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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Sandra in Sydney 27 Nov 21 - 01:57 AM
Bill D 26 Nov 21 - 07:44 PM
Sandra in Sydney 25 Nov 21 - 03:15 PM
Sandra in Sydney 25 Nov 21 - 06:34 AM
Sandra in Sydney 23 Nov 21 - 02:21 AM
Donuel 21 Nov 21 - 07:57 PM
Donuel 21 Nov 21 - 07:43 PM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Nov 21 - 07:20 PM
Sandra in Sydney 21 Nov 21 - 07:06 PM
Rain Dog 18 Nov 21 - 10:22 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Nov 21 - 08:59 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Nov 21 - 08:32 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Nov 21 - 12:14 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Nov 21 - 02:35 AM
Sandra in Sydney 09 Nov 21 - 08:41 PM
Sandra in Sydney 02 Nov 21 - 10:43 AM
Sandra in Sydney 31 Oct 21 - 08:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Oct 21 - 06:07 PM
Steve Shaw 29 Oct 21 - 06:16 AM
Donuel 28 Oct 21 - 06:45 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Oct 21 - 06:23 PM
Sandra in Sydney 24 Oct 21 - 05:54 AM
Donuel 23 Oct 21 - 07:31 AM
Steve Shaw 23 Oct 21 - 07:20 AM
Sandra in Sydney 23 Oct 21 - 02:31 AM
Sandra in Sydney 20 Oct 21 - 07:05 PM
Donuel 19 Oct 21 - 04:45 PM
Donuel 19 Oct 21 - 04:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Oct 21 - 10:26 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 21 - 07:00 AM
Steve Shaw 19 Oct 21 - 06:45 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 21 - 05:02 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Oct 21 - 10:07 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Oct 21 - 08:08 PM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 15 Oct 21 - 11:26 AM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Oct 21 - 08:18 AM
Donuel 12 Oct 21 - 11:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Oct 21 - 11:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM
Donuel 12 Oct 21 - 11:17 AM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Oct 21 - 10:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 11 Oct 21 - 12:04 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Sep 21 - 04:52 AM
Sandra in Sydney 26 Sep 21 - 06:36 AM
Stilly River Sage 24 Sep 21 - 07:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Sep 21 - 10:08 AM
Sandra in Sydney 24 Sep 21 - 06:07 AM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Sep 21 - 11:19 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Sep 21 - 10:56 AM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Nov 21 - 01:57 AM

it does indeed -

p.s. there's a really good typo in the report - The mosaic is believed to date back to the late Roman Empire, roughly 250-450 BCE, and is part of a massive villa complex buried beneath a farmer's field.

Looks like your newspapers/news organisations were not the only ones to dispense with that un-necessary occupation - the proofreader!

According to Professor Google (who of course knows everything) the late Roman Empire was AD (using the old Christian dating) or CE (using the newer, all-embracing category!)

Pedants like me had fun after our local papers cut out those unneeded staff members ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 26 Nov 21 - 07:44 PM

Just keeps coming..
https://www.npr.org/2021/11/26/1059341809/leicester-england-archaeologists-ancient-roman-mosaic


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 25 Nov 21 - 03:15 PM

Decorated ivory 'pendant' carved from mammoth tusk is oldest example of ornate j jewellery in Eurasia, archaeologists say

but it could also be a boomerang!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 25 Nov 21 - 06:34 AM

another mosaic discovery - ‘Oh wow’: remarkable Roman mosaic found in Rutland field


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Nov 21 - 02:21 AM

I also found an article about the mosaic table ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 21 Nov 21 - 07:57 PM

I'm watching 60 minutes and they showed a Caligula palace mosaic in the form of a coffee table found in a NYC apartment.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 21 Nov 21 - 07:43 PM

i know its just pattern recognition wiring of the brain but I see gargoyle faces in the bog book of psalms


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Nov 21 - 07:20 PM

Every morning after reading the ABC site I go to The Guardian & just found this!

‘It was terrifying’: ancient book’s journey from Irish bog to museum treasure

wikipedia - Faddan More Psalter


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 21 Nov 21 - 07:06 PM

thanks for the story & link, Rain Dog

Batavia shipwreck revealing new information about historic Dutch shipwrights - 1629 shipwreck - mutiny & massacre, see also 3 Related stories at the end of the article, links to 3 graves found in 2015


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Rain Dog
Date: 18 Nov 21 - 10:22 AM

Something slightly different.

Some friends of mine were having an extension built on there late 19th century property. During the work a skeleton was found underneath part of the property.

The local archaeological tean were called in. That was about 2 years. They recently updated my friends as follows:

According to our bone specialist:

     ‘The available evidence combines to suggest that the bones recovered relate to a single individual.  The skeleton represented is of a relatively tall, adult male, aged 25–35, although the attrition of the molars could indicate slightly younger age.‘

There was nothing to indicate why he died but I think we may presume ‘natural causes’....This seems to be how long many people in the prehistoric past actually lived.

Having got the bones looked at, we selected a good, solid leg bone and sent it off to Queens University, Belfast for radio carbon dating. This individual died some where between 2467 and 2204 BC (mostly like date, 2351BC) – so well over 4000 years ago. This places our man in the Early Bronze Age, during what archaeologists call the Beaker Period – towards a 1000 years before Dover’s famous Bronze Age boat.

We have also been working on the pieces of broken pottery found with the bones and have had some success in identifying it as the remains of a Beaker - the typical pot of the period (perhaps a beer tankard). Interestingly, another one of these Beaker pots came up near Connaught Park during the 19th century, but that got lost in the War.

 
Here is a link to

Dover Bronze Age Boat

Which was mentioned above.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Nov 21 - 08:59 PM

Anatolian Neolithic Weavers At Çatalhöyük Used Trees to Make The Oldest Cloth ... To obtain a definitive answer for the material used to make the cloth at Çatalhöyük, a team of archaeologists with expertise in this area collaborated on a study of pieces of clothing fabric recovered during 1993—2017 excavations led by Stanford University archaeologist Ian Hodder. These fabrics were made between 8,700 and 8,500 years ago and were still quite well preserved despite the immense passage of time. ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Nov 21 - 08:32 PM

when I was looking for more info I found stories about many other older & younger canoe finds around the world.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Nov 21 - 12:14 PM

That is impressive. At first the archeologist dismissed it as an old Boy Scout project. Good thing she looked again.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Nov 21 - 02:35 AM

Intact 1,200-Year-Old Canoe Recovered From Wisconsin Lake


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 09 Nov 21 - 08:41 PM

Tudor wall paintings uncovered in Yorkshire ‘discovery of a lifetime’


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 02 Nov 21 - 10:43 AM

Famous "Cloth of Gold" ship decaying due to bacteria poop - Mary Rose


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Oct 21 - 08:25 PM

wow!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Oct 21 - 06:07 PM

Two new species of large predatory dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight, UK

A bit larger time jump than we usually encounter in these stories, but interesting!

The discovery of spinosaurid dinosaurs on the Isle of Wight was a long time coming. “We’ve known for a couple of decades now that Baryonyx-like dinosaurs awaited discovered on the Isle of Wight, but finding the remains of two such animals in close succession was a huge surprise” remarked co-author Darren Naish, expert in British theropod dinosaurs. . . . Although the skeletons are incomplete, the researchers estimate that both Ceratosuchops and Riparovenator measured around nine metres in length, snapping up prey with their metre-long skulls. The study also suggested how spinosaurids might have first evolved in Europe, before dispersing into Asia, Africa and South America.

Dr Neil J. Gostling of the University of Southampton, who supervised the project, said: “This work has brought together universities, Dinosaur Isle museum and the public to reveal these amazing dinosaurs and the incredibly diverse ecology of the south coast of England 125 million years ago.”


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Oct 21 - 06:16 AM

Well-preserved statues of a Roman man, woman and child were dug up from under the ruins of a Norman church in Stoke Mandeville. The church had been demolished a few decades ago, and the rubble was being cleared to make way for Boris Johnson's vanity waste-of-money project, the HS2 railway, when the remains were found. There was also a hexagonal Roman glass jug.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Oct 21 - 06:45 PM

DNA only lasts awhile and Carbon 14 has its drawbacks but a way to determine gender has been found for fossilized remains millions of years old. Cochlear size differentiation is the key. Women have bigger cochleas to hear higher frequencies.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Oct 21 - 06:23 PM

Huge restored mosaic unveiled in Jericho desert castle

a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hisham%27s_Palace">Hisham's Palace - 8th Century Islamic desert castle near Jericho

Hisham’s Palace - 2016 article


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Oct 21 - 05:54 AM

another treasure! A new National Geographic documentary series - National Geographic TV

Egyptians used advanced embalming methods 1,000 years earlier than thought ... It is among major discoveries to be revealed in National Geographic’s documentary series, Lost Treasures of Egypt, starting on 7 November. It is produced by Windfall Films, and the cameras follow international archaeologists during the excavation season in Egypt. The mummification discovery will feature in episode four – entitled Rise of the Mummies – on 28 November.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Oct 21 - 07:31 AM

Sandra posts are a treasure trove of antiquities in themselves.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Oct 21 - 07:20 AM

I have a feeling that we all had a connection problem yesterday!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Oct 21 - 02:31 AM

Have Sumatran fishing crews found the fabled Island of Gold? It was a fabled kingdom known in ancient times as the Island of Gold, a civilisation with untold wealth that explorers tried in vain to find long after its unexplained disappearance from history around the 14th century. The site of Srivijaya may finally have been found – by local fishing crews carrying out night-time dives on the Musi River near Palembang on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.
Their extraordinary catches are treasures ranging from a lifesize eighth-century Buddhist statue studded with precious gems – worth millions of pounds – to jewels worthy of kings ...

Treasures now retrieved by the fishers are simply being sold before archaeologists can properly study them, ending up with antiquities dealers, while the fishers using dangerous diving equipment and buckets receive a pittance of the true value.
“They are lost to the world,” Kingsley warned. “Vast swathes, including a stunning lifesize Buddhist statue adorned with precious gems, have been lost to the international antiquities market. Newly discovered, the story of the rise and fall of Srivijaya is dying anew without being told.”


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Oct 21 - 07:05 PM

Solar storm confirms Vikings settled in North America exactly 1,000 years ago

I tried to post these 3 references yesterday but had a connection problem
Unfreezing the ice age: the truth about humanity’s deep past
For more than a century, this sacred treasure was hidden in a New Zealand swamp from the podcast series Stuff the British stole


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 04:45 PM

Someday there may be a Google LIDAR Earth for Armchair Archaeologists.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 04:41 PM

My tow truck driver used google earth to find my car today.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 10:26 AM

My daughter returned from Italy about 10 days before the new immunization mandates went into effect - I imagine those who haven't gone to work now because of no vaccination have slowed things throughout the workforce. Good timing for the tourist to have finished the trip before now.

Right now I'm working a puzzle to do with Times Square in NYC. Jigsaw puzzle travel, a subset of armchair travel. :)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 07:00 AM

I hope you get back to travelling to interesting places sometime soon.

I do my archaeological travel via magazines & websites, I have too many sore bits to do "real" travelling (poor me!) I give my old magazines to a charity shop where they are first read by a volunteer who used to volunteer on excavations in his earlier years.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 06:45 AM

I've been to Herculaneum twice. It's a lot more compact than Pompei and you can see the best of it in just a few hours. It's stunning. Unlike at Pompei, a lot of the buildings' roofs didn't collapse in the eruption, so many of the interiors are really well-preserved. The most poignant sight is the skeletons stranded in open-fronted buildings that were once on the sea shore (sea levels have changed significantly, so what was the shoreline is now well back on dry land). There's still plenty of excavating to do there.

See Pompei and Herculaneum before you die if you can. The best way to arrive at both is on the ultra-cheap Circumvesuviana railway that runs from Sorrento to Naples. When you get off at Ercolano Scavi station you do have to walk up the hill through the rather rough little town but it looks scarier than it is (you are in the vicinity of Naples, don't forget!). Pompei is easier. Vesuvius looms menacingly over both towns, though it lost a lot of its height in the eruption.

Give me a week to go wherever I like on the planet and there's nowhere I'd rather be...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 21 - 05:02 AM

more about the crusader sword


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Oct 21 - 10:07 PM

Sharp-eyed diver finds crusader’s ancient sword on Israeli seabed Metre-long relic, encrusted with marine organisms, is believed to be about 900 years old


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Oct 21 - 08:08 PM

oops, I opened this thread to post this -
Skeleton buried in Vesuvius eruption found at Herculaneum Archaeologists find remains of fugitive during first dig at site near Pompeii in almost three decades


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM

a jigsaw room! with a view!

My 4 windows are full of plants, the north facing bedroom window has a sheer curtain & thin bright yellow curtains so looks lovely when the sun hits for a few hours in the morning. My other 3 windows just look across the courtyard to the neighbours, but the plants & blue wren decals give me a pretty view from my living room thru the sheet curtain, which is bordered with heavier curtains of green & brown ferns.

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Oct 21 - 11:26 AM

I have a box ready to ship to Mudcatters Jen and Art in New Mexico, it's one in a series they have collected. Good! I donated two others back to the shop. I have a space that I created during the 2020 COVID-19 shutdown when I rearranged two rooms in the house. Now the one that people first walk into is light and airy, my triple window full of plants looks lush and inviting, and my table is set up for puzzles, even rather large puzzles. (Fully extended I think this table can seat 12).

It does seem to offer a form of armchair travel (though I usually stand, not sit, for a few minutes at a time to work on this, then go back to whatever took me past the room to begin with.) The one I've shipped represents Paris during the time of an Exposition. Now I'm working on one from NY City, and the one I set aside for a time I am told by a couple of friends is the famous Split Rock Lighthouse on Lake Superior in Minnesota. (Identified by actual traveller Joe Offer.)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Oct 21 - 08:18 AM

Stilly, I had a large (3 or 4 shelves) collection of old jigsaws, puzzles I'd bought in the 70s + used jigsaws I'd bought in recent years, all gone except for 2 (1942 Gen Macarthur Battle of Midway & 1952 Qoronation) I bought & 2 that belonged to my grandmother, cos I only have one table & online jigsaws are sooo much easier.

Tell yourself you have a house & have no need for on-line jigsaws, besides buying from the thrift shop is for a good cause. Mine all want to charity shops, amany came from charity shops.

sandra (supporting the circular economy)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 11:13 PM

healthy addictions in a word are 'fun'.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 11:04 PM

I'm headed to the local thrift store that carries used jigsaw puzzles. I'm finding them a fascinating way to take a close look at various interesting sites and objects. Woe to me if I get hooked on online puzzles.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 08:06 PM

I enjoy reading it, it's a gi-normous rabbit hole ...

If I believed in New Years' Day resolutions (as we all know every day is new year's day) I'd make one to delete bookmarks for my rabbit hole sites - I have soooo much I need to do!

delete bookmarks??? shudder, my tummy feels sick at the thought ...

sandra (off to Jigsaw Explorer which is not a time waster as it only gives me 2 new jigsaws each day, well, it does have archives aka More Puzzles)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 11:17 AM

Thank you Sandra, Origins.com in its entirety has become one of my virtual time machine guilty pleasures.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Oct 21 - 10:05 AM

Medieval Remains of ‘Noble Girl’ Discovered Under Real Alcázar in Spain Archaeologists have unearthed the skeleton of a 5-year-old, blonde-haired girl, buried in the late 13th or early 14th century beneath a chapel floor in the Real Alcázar in the Virgen de la Antigua in Seville, Spain. On analysis of this Alcázar burial , they believe her coffin was moved to an even more sacred spot beside the main altar in the 1930s. This discovery hints at the possible existence of a hidden crypt full of treasure-laden royal burials. (read on)

Closer to home - a very famous mystery The Tamam Shud Enigma: Australian Cold Case with Ancient Persian Connection Re-opens. On December 1, 1948, authorities were called to Somerton beach in Adelaide, South Australia. A dead body had been found. Little did police realize they were about to encounter what is now considered one of Australia’s most profound mysteries, with connections to the ancient world.
They found his cold body on the sand, slumped at the base of a seawall. He was a middle-aged man in top physical condition, smartly dressed in a suit and tie, his sophisticated black shoes polished. Despite the hot weather, he wore a knit pullover and suit-jacket. His corpse revealed no obvious cause of death. Nobody knew who he was, or where he had come from. After collecting the body, police examined his possessions and clothes for a hint of who he was, but the tags and labels had been carefully removed, leaving no trail. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Oct 21 - 12:04 PM

Marble of ancient Greek statue traced to its likely origin

One of the great statues of antiquity has been connected to its likely birthplace by analysis of its marble.

The Colossus of the Naxians on the Greek island of Delos once stood about 9 metres tall, but is now in pieces. One is at the British Museum in London, while the rest are in Greece. The statue’s name refers to the island of Naxos, which has been a major source of marble since the Greek archaic era from 800 BC to 480 BC – but it isn’t from either of two known quarries of that period.

Instead, the marble has the chemical signature of a deposit in another part of the island, found by Scott Pike at Willamette University in Oregon. He will present his results at a meeting of the Geological Society of America on 11 October.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Sep 21 - 04:52 AM

Gibraltar cave chamber discovery could shed light on Neanderthals’ culture Researchers find space in Gorham’s Cave complex that has been closed off for at least 40,000 years.
Researchers excavating a cave network on the Rock of Gibraltar have discovered a new chamber, sealed off from the world for at least 40,000 years, that could shed light on the culture and customs of the Neanderthals who occupied the area for a thousand centuries. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Sep 21 - 06:36 AM

Ancient footprints could be oldest traces of humans in the Americas White Sands National Park, in southern New Mexico, is known for chalk-coloured dunes that stretch for hundreds of square kilometres. But at the height of the last Ice Age, the region was wetter and grassier. Mammoths, giant sloths and other animals walked the muddy shores of shallow lakes that grew and shrank with the seasons. And they had company.

In a landmark study published on 23 September in Science1, researchers suggest that human footprints from an ancient lakeshore in the park date to between 21,000 and 23,000 years old. If the dating is accurate — which specialists say is likely — the prints represent the earliest unequivocal evidence of human occupation anywhere in the Americas. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 07:41 PM

Here's a worm you won't want to meet in your travels. (One reason why armchair travel is a safer option.)

"The man was plagued by an unknown species related to the Guinea worm, one that may have recently jumped from reptiles to humans."


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 10:08 AM

I found a link to this wonderful story (sorry, it's music in the BS section) down at the bottom of the page with Sandra's story: ‘We’re like Mork and Mindy!’ Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, music’s odd couple. :) This makes me happy!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Sep 21 - 06:07 AM

and now for something a little bit different - Dinosaur fossil with ‘totally weird’ spikes in skeleton stuns experts


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Sep 21 - 11:19 AM

lots of good info around, including in my stash of archaeology magazines. Since lockdowns started last year I've been grabbing magazines when I see them as supplies of any overseas magazines are erratic, when is why I had a stash of 6 unopened magazines! I only have 4 now. Some folk might spend their money on alcohol or shoes, I spend mine on magazines!

When lockdown ends & "unessential" businesses re-open I'll take all my read magazines (at least a dozen) to a charity shop where a retired volunteer used to go on digs (BC, of course, everything is BC in the world now) & eagerly devours them before putting them out for sale.

I also have friend who used to go on digs & is sorely missing them. She was due to go back to Greece last year ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Sep 21 - 10:56 AM

Good articles, Sandra!


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