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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)

Sandra in Sydney 26 Sep 22 - 09:50 AM
Sandra in Sydney 23 Sep 22 - 11:12 PM
Donuel 23 Sep 22 - 07:40 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Sep 22 - 01:37 PM
Donuel 21 Sep 22 - 08:23 AM
Sandra in Sydney 20 Sep 22 - 05:36 PM
Steve Shaw 19 Sep 22 - 05:50 PM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Sep 22 - 05:28 PM
Donuel 19 Sep 22 - 04:45 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Sep 22 - 01:12 PM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Sep 22 - 09:42 AM
Raggytash 19 Sep 22 - 09:04 AM
Donuel 30 Aug 22 - 06:49 AM
Sandra in Sydney 29 Aug 22 - 06:28 PM
Donuel 27 Aug 22 - 11:23 AM
Sandra in Sydney 27 Aug 22 - 01:20 AM
Donuel 24 Aug 22 - 05:56 PM
Donuel 23 Aug 22 - 11:32 AM
Sandra in Sydney 23 Aug 22 - 09:22 AM
Donuel 19 Aug 22 - 10:31 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Aug 22 - 09:58 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Aug 22 - 06:29 PM
Steve Shaw 18 Aug 22 - 06:09 PM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Aug 22 - 06:00 PM
Donuel 17 Aug 22 - 06:57 PM
Sandra in Sydney 13 Aug 22 - 06:35 PM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Aug 22 - 05:57 AM
Donuel 11 Aug 22 - 08:58 AM
Bill D 10 Aug 22 - 10:51 AM
Sandra in Sydney 07 Aug 22 - 06:33 AM
Donuel 06 Aug 22 - 07:31 PM
Sandra in Sydney 06 Aug 22 - 06:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Jul 22 - 09:48 AM
Sandra in Sydney 31 Jul 22 - 06:47 AM
Sandra in Sydney 22 Jul 22 - 02:44 AM
Rain Dog 14 Jul 22 - 09:30 AM
Helen 12 Jul 22 - 06:30 PM
Helen 12 Jul 22 - 12:06 PM
Sandra in Sydney 12 Jul 22 - 10:55 AM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jun 22 - 10:39 PM
Raggytash 28 Jun 22 - 07:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Jun 22 - 06:54 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jun 22 - 06:39 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Jun 22 - 06:11 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Jun 22 - 04:46 PM
Donuel 28 Jun 22 - 04:05 PM
Raggytash 28 Jun 22 - 02:12 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Jun 22 - 10:22 AM
Raggytash 28 Jun 22 - 06:29 AM
Donuel 27 Jun 22 - 08:39 PM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 26 Sep 22 - 09:50 AM

Tutankhamun’s burial chamber may contain door to Nefertiti’s tomb Hidden hieroglyphics could suggest the king is buried within a much larger structure housing the Egyptian queen.
The discovery of hidden hieroglyphics within Tutankhamun’s tomb lends weight to a theory that the fabled Egyptian queen Nefertiti lies in a hidden chamber adjacent to her stepson’s burial chamber, a world-renowned British Egyptologist has said.

Nicholas Reeves, a former curator in the British Museum’s Department of Egyptian Antiquities, said that while the theory remained unproven after inconclusive radar scans, it has been given fresh impetus following the new clue.

Reeves realised that cartouches depicting Tutankhamun being buried by his pharaonic successor, Ay, had been painted over cartouches of Tutankhamun burying Nefertiti, the legendary beauty, queen of Egypt and wife of King Akhenaten ... (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Sep 22 - 11:12 PM

2 great articles & an interesting new bookmark, thanks Donuel & Stilly


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Sep 22 - 07:40 PM

The conical shape of the reservoirs naturally creates higher pressure/faster flow at the bottom and minimizes evaporation per volume of water at the surface. pretty schmart


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Sep 22 - 01:37 PM

These Amazing Aqueducts Built By the Nazca Culture in the Peruvian Desert 1,500 Years Ago Are Still in Use Today

They are pretty amazing. "Built by the Nazca people during the pre-Columbian period of Peruvian history, the Cantalloc Aqueducts continue to serve their original purpose, with local farmers still relying on this them to bring water to the arid region."


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 21 Sep 22 - 08:23 AM

1.8 million year old human tooth found near Tiblisi Georgia. Some of the first folks who ventured out of Africa.
More underwatwer finds : https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/dec/22/israeli-archaeologists-find-treasure-trove-among-mediterranean-shipwrecks


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Sep 22 - 05:36 PM

Israeli archaeologists find traces of opium in 3,500-year-old pottery Archaeologists say find supports theory that drug was used in burial rituals, possibly to ‘enter ecstatic state’

Earliest-known surgical limb amputation found in 31,000-year-old skeleton from Borneo cave


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 05:50 PM

In 2004 we visited the ancient site of Kourion in Cyprus. There's lots of amazing stuff there from the Roman and Byzantine periods, and at that time we were able to wander at will over the whole huge site. We saw several examples of rather fine mosaic floors - mostly completely exposed to the elements and with no-one stopping you from walking all over them. Arrgh!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 05:28 PM

late last century my colleague living a few miles from Sydney's original English settlement found nails & other small interesting stuff - his c.1861 house had been an inn - as well as a small plastic doll! We examined all his finds.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 04:45 PM

All I found in my backyard was an early abandoned plow blade.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 01:12 PM

Yes - that Gaza find is fascinating, but only a half-mile from the trumped-up Israeli border - lets hope this find is treated well and stays with Gaza.
Several discoveries have been made in recent years. Due to a lack of funds and expertise, Gaza has usually invited international groups to help with the process of excavation and preservation.


And one the Egyptian burial cave, I see that
The cave has been resealed and is under guard while archaeologists develop a plan to excavate it, the IAA said.

It said "a few items" had been looted between its discovery and when it was closed.

That cave probably needs a large security detail at this point, and watch for people tunneling in from the side. Someone needs to guard the guards.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 09:42 AM

thanks for the link, raggytash, it's an amazing find - ... Salman al-Nabahin unearthed the mosaic pavement, thought to date from the fifth to the seventh century AD, six months ago while working in his olive orchard in Bureij refugee camp, about half a mile from the border with Isra ...   Gaza is rich in antiquities, having been an important trading spot for civilisations dating as far back as the ancient Egyptians and the Philistines depicted in the Bible, to the Roman empire and the Crusades from the 11th to the 13th centuries ...

another find from today news, on the other side of the border - 'Extremely rare' Rameses II-era burial cave found in Israel


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Raggytash
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 09:04 AM

In a report in todays Guardian a Palestinian farmer has unearthed a Byzantine mosaic floor thought to date from the 5th-7th century.


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/sep/19/ornate-byzantine-floor-mosaic-discovered-by-palestinian-farmer


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 30 Aug 22 - 06:49 AM

https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/klinefelter-syndrome.html


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Aug 22 - 06:28 PM

DNA from medieval skeleton reveals XXY chromosome condition, Klinefelter syndrome Key points:
    Researchers analysed the DNA and bones of a 1,000-year-old skeleton excavated from modern-day Portugal
    They found the individual had a genetic condition which meant they were born with an extra X chromosome
    The diagnosis explains some of the skeleton's features, such as its unusual height and wide pelvis


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Aug 22 - 11:23 AM

Underwater research is incredibly expensive, but it’s becoming increasingly clear that the future of archaeology lies at least partly under the waves.
boat migration 15,000 years ago
Underwater LIDAR should help this process.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Aug 22 - 01:20 AM

Portugal man accidentally uncovers a 25-metre-long dinosaur skeleton in his own backyard ... they have unearthed the vertebrae and ribs of a possible brachiosaurid sauropod that would have stood approximately 12 metres tall and 25 metres long ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 24 Aug 22 - 05:56 PM

The need to look 300 meters below the sea
when we looked under 2 miles of ice


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Aug 22 - 11:32 AM

Amusing lecture regarding 3,500 year old writing.
cuniform


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Aug 22 - 09:22 AM

‘Missing Detail’ From the Cerne Abbas Giant Story Revealed The Cerne Abbas Giant, a crude, naked, male-giant figure, drawn on an English hillside with chalk, measuring a whopping 180 feet (55 meters) tall has obviously been an eternal source of fascination. Over the years, many tiny details have emerged, helping reveal more and more about this artistic perversion, a seemingly comical figure brandishing a disproportionately large club, along with a 36-foot (11-meter) long phallic erection on full display, near the village of Cerne Abbas in Dorset.

Last year a key detail in unravelling the enigma of the Cerne Abbas Giant emerged. The figure was scientifically dated through the existence of snail shell remains in the soil. This dating conclusion put the Cerne Abbas Giant’s date of creation in the time frame of the Cerne Abbey at the base of the hill. Now this has led to previously unconsidered speculation about the relationship between the two constructions. So, what might the connection between the naked giant and the ancient abbey be? (read on!!)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Aug 22 - 10:31 AM

The stones at Carnac have faired better than those in Spain unless Carnac has received extensive restoration. Stonehenge is 2,000 years younger.

All the Mammoth bones found level with the Great Lakes latitudes are not well preserved but is not easy finding elephant graveyards. In Alaska some of the remains still smell of necrotic decomposition.

baby elephant dna is valuable. I wonder if stem cells are a factor.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Aug 22 - 09:58 AM

Experience: I unearthed a mammoth from the ice age Not me, unfortunately, I live in the wrong hemisphere, but it was in the Yukon where a lucky bloke (guy, blokes live in the Land of Oz in this hemisphere) made this discovery


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Aug 22 - 06:29 PM

Seriously though, I've just been reading about it. It's a truly amazing find and it's good to see that there are plans to restore the site.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Aug 22 - 06:09 PM

Stones? Y'mean that people had already been eating avocados there?

I'll get me coat... :-(


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Aug 22 - 06:00 PM

Huge megalithic complex of more than 500 standing stones discovered in Spain Archaeologists says prehistoric site in Huelva province could be one of largest of its kind in Europe.
A huge megalithic complex of more than 500 standing stones has been discovered in southern Spain that could be one of the largest in Europe, archaeologists have said.

The stones were discovered on a plot of land in Huelva, a province flanking the southernmost part of Spain’s border with Portugal, near the Guadiana River.

Spanning about 600 hectares (1,500 acres), the land had been earmarked for an avocado plantation. Before granting the permit the regional authorities requested a survey in light of the site’s possible archaeological significance. The survey revealed the presence of the stones ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Aug 22 - 06:57 PM

I have a 15 volume Art encyclopedia that is almost 50 years old that has photos of UR and other ancient sites that look much nicer than they do today. They also have many Iraq artifacts that are now looted and lost. I expect to find more surprises. Some of the assumptions made 50 years ago are absurd today but the plates are great.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 13 Aug 22 - 06:35 PM

In the Greek islands, the Antikythera shipwreck yields statues, human teeth and the missing head of Hercules In 1900, sponge divers working near the Greek island of Antikythera accidentally discovered a 2,000-year-old mystery.

Dressed in a canvas suit with a helmet made of copper, Elias Stadiatis plunged through the cool ocean depths, in search of the soft sponges he had spent his career gathering.

But as he reached the rocky bottom at a depth of about 50 metres, he uncovered a long-forgotten tragedy.

Hidden between layers of debris on the ocean floor were what appeared to be rotting corpses and horses.

Stadiatis immediately began signalling to the crew above and was soon dragged back to the surface, apparently shaking with fear and mumbling about "seeing a heap of dead people".

They feared Stadiatis was delirious, suffering from nitrate poisoning or seasickness ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Aug 22 - 05:57 AM

one of my sources is the Smithsonian Magazine

Why Did 16th-Century Andean Villagers String Together the Bones of Their Ancestors? Researchers suggest the practice was a response to Spanish conquistadors’ desecration of the remains ...
... The dates the researchers obtained from the vertebrae fall in a range between 1520 and 1550 C.E. The reeds, meanwhile, date from about 1550 to 1590, which coincides with the time period the Spanish arrived in Chincha. To Bongers and his colleagues, this timeline points to a tentative explanation: The vertebrae were collected from previously buried, disjointed human remains and put on reeds as a deliberate mortuary practice, developed perhaps in response to European destruction of the tombs ...

Archaeologists Uncover Remains of 13 Hessian Soldiers at Revolutionary War Battlefield The discovery came as a surprise to the team at New Jersey’s Red Bank Battlefield Park ...

Evidence of Fur and Leather Clothing, Among World’s Oldest, Found in Moroccan Cave Humans likely sported clothes made of jackal, fox and wildcat skins some 120,000 years ago ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Aug 22 - 08:58 AM

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/no-there-wasnt-an-advanced-civilization-12-000-years-ago/

We would have to go back hundreds of millions of years when there were no homosapiens and a different species built a civilization in which any trace is now ground to dust.
We’re used to imagining extinct civilizations in terms of sunken statues and subterranean ruins. These kinds of artifacts of previous societies are fine if you’re only interested in timescales of a few thousands of years. But once you roll the clock back to tens of millions or hundreds of millions of years, things get more complicated.

I don’t believe the Earth once hosted a 50-million-year-old Paleocene civilization. But by asking if we could “see” truly ancient advanced civilizations, what is left is life itself in DNA or other unknown things to look for. Some things will always be unseen but as they say anything is possible, just not likely.

Did someone mutter exo aliens? Sorry Bill the only evidence is for actual flying objects, everything else are just stories.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Bill D
Date: 10 Aug 22 - 10:51 AM

A link about this was posted on Facebook today. There are other pages devoted to it. This one seems to have the most detail.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9177867/Rare-5-000-year-old-crystal-dagger-uncovered-Prehistoric-Iberian-megalithic-tomb-Spain.html


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 07 Aug 22 - 06:33 AM

I read interesting sources & & like sharing what I find


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Aug 22 - 07:31 PM

Sandra you make this thread exciting,


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 06 Aug 22 - 06:55 PM

Discoveries in Pompeii reveal lives of lower and middle classes Archaeologists are enriching our knowledge about those who were ‘vulnerable class during political crises and food shortages’
A trunk with its lid left open, a wooden dishware closet and a three-legged accent table topped by decorative bowls. These are among the latest discoveries by archaeologists that are enriching knowledge about middle-class lives in Pompeii before Mount Vesuvius’s furious eruption buried the ancient Roman city in volcanic debris.

Pompeii’s archaeological park, one of Italy’s top tourist attractions, announced the recent finds on Saturday.

Its director, Gabriel Zuchtriegel, said the excavation of rooms in a domus, or home, first unearthed in 2018 had revealed precious details about the domestic environment of ordinary citizens of the city, which was destroyed in 79AD. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jul 22 - 09:48 AM

The Bahamian gold is destined for the Bahamas Maritime Museum.
The expedition is also collecting data on the reef health, seafloor geology and plastic pollution to understand how the archaeology and marine environment interact.

“The sea bottom is barren,” said Allen. “The colourful coral that divers remembered from the 70s is gone, poisoned by ocean acidification and choked by metres of shifting sand. It’s painfully sad. Still lying on those dead grey reefs, though, are sparkling finds.”

Sad.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Jul 22 - 06:47 AM

After 350 years, sea gives up lost jewels of Spanish shipwreck Marine archaeologists stunned by priceless cache long hidden beneath the Bahamas’ shark-infested waters.
It was a Spanish galleon laden with treasures so sumptuous that its sinking in the Bahamas in 1656 sparked repeated salvage attempts over the next 350 years. So when another expedition was launched recently, few thought that there could be anything left – but exquisite, jewel-encrusted pendants and gold chains are among spectacular finds that have now been recovered, having lain untouched on the seabed for hundreds of years ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 22 Jul 22 - 02:44 AM

‘Weird, wonderful’: rare dig at Arthur’s Stone writes new story of neolithic site Visitors flock to Herefordshire burial plot that inspired CS Lewis amid excitement at what is being found.
High above one of western Britain’s loveliest valleys, the silence is broken by the sound of gentle digging, scraping and brushing, along with bursts of excited chatter as another ancient feature is revealed or a curious visitor stops by to find out what is going on.

This summer archaeologists have been granted rare permission to excavate part of the Arthur’s Stone site, a neolithic burial plot with soaring views across the Golden Valley in Herefordshire and the Black Mountains of south-east Wales.

Using their version of keyhole surgery, the archaeologists unearthed features, including what appear to be stone steps leading up to the 5,000-year-old tomb, and tools used by the first people to farm this landscape. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Rain Dog
Date: 14 Jul 22 - 09:30 AM

Ancient Cave Art in Alabama May Be The Largest Ever Found in North America

"New details of our past are coming to light, hiding in the nooks and crannies of the world, as we refine our techniques to go looking for them. Most lauded is the reconstruction of the evolution of humanity since our African origins around 300,000 years ago, by analyzing our living and fossil DNA.

Replete with the ghosts of African and Eurasian populations of the deep past, these have been resurrected only through the ability of science to reach into the world of the minuscule by studying biomolecules.

Now, digital analysis of rock surfaces reveals how other ghosts of the deep past – this time from almost 2,000 years ago in North America – have been coaxed into the light.

Writing in the journal Antiquity, professor Jan Simek of the University of Tennessee and colleagues have published images of giant glyphs carved into the mud surface of the low ceiling of a cave in Alabama.

The motifs, which depict human forms and animals, are some of the largest known cave images found in North America and may represent spirits of the underworld."


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 12 Jul 22 - 06:30 PM

And another nifty slider article, this time around the valley where I grew up:

Aerial images show how roads and a highway to
major regional NSW towns were submerged in July flood

The first two images with sliders show something else, too. If you look at the grass in the before images, they must have been taken before the drought broke because there is not much green to be seen, but in the after images with the floods there is green grass and trees, so at least the recent rainy periods have had some positive effect. But more rain isn't better. Just enough would have been good.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Helen
Date: 12 Jul 22 - 12:06 PM

This article has a few images with a nifty left-right slider so that you can see what a place looked like before and just after the recent floods in NSW:

Aerial images show south-west Sydney suburbs before and after July flood disaster


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 12 Jul 22 - 10:55 AM

Rare ‘time capsule’ cobalt mine abandoned over 200 years ago is discovered in Cheshire   Interactive tour of the mine Take a look underground at Alderley Edge in this state of the art immersive fly-through. See the newly-discovered mine up close, thanks to cutting edge 3D scanning technology.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 10:39 PM

2 posts - a zillion inteseting links! I could add more ...








sometime later!

thanks, stilly for your links, I'd never heard off the area. I've only scanned your first 2 links - so far - lots of interesting reading there.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Raggytash
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 07:56 PM

Looks like I have a full day tomorrow looking at all these links !!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 06:54 PM

I decided to create a new post because I don't find a current article on the topic I was looking for. Back when I was in high school my oceanography class (yes, not archeology) took a field trip to the Olympic Peninsula, where among other things, we were going to visit the western-most point of the contiguous US, at Cape Alava. It's in a rain forest area where it rains so much that the trail exists but has a long line of planks to walk on for much of the length of it. I don't remember if we ever got to where we were going, or if it was raining so hard that when we got there we just turned around and headed back.

This is on the Makah Reservation, and the village near there was Ozette. Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village.
Ruth Kirk’s Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village presents a detailed account of a world-famous archaeological site on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. Full-scale excavations from 1966 to 1981 revealed houses and their contents—including ordinarily perishable wood and basketry objects that had been buried in a mudflow well before the arrival of Europeans in the region.

Aside from the archeological site, there are several small villages on Cape Flattery, and basket making is an activity there, for tribal use and for sale to tourists. They have a unique way of making baskets that includes a crosshatch base made of thinly split cedar, and I collected a few over the years.

Probably 20 years ago now there were some stories in the news about canoe whaling, that Makah tribal members proved that it is possible to kill a whale from canoes, that the stories about it weren't just tribal tall tales. A Native Tribe Wants to Resume Whaling. Whale Defenders Are Divided
The Makah are the only Native Americans with an explicit treaty right to hunt whales, but they have not been allowed to do so for 20 years. A recent proposal could change that.

The whole larger area is called Cape Flattery, and the nearest town is Neah Bay.

So here are some of the tidbits about Ozette.

Ozette Indian Village Archeological Site

From the Washington Post archives,
Civilization Lost...And Found


The University of Washington Special Collections has a short video online: The Tribe and the Professor Petroglyphs and Artifacts, approximately 1975

The National Park Service has a PDF of a booklet about the site: The Ozette Archeological Expedition

And finally, the Makah Museum has a website https://makahmuseum.com/about/ozette-archaeological-site/

Map coordinates: 48°09'54.22" N 124°38'00.22" W"


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 06:39 PM

a few sites I found recently

Spanish Stonehenge discovered

Blood Stained Glass Panels At Canterbury Cathedral Saw Becket Die

English Heritage brings Roman town’s lost Edwardian navvies to life

UC discovers princely tombs near 'Griffin Warrior' Startling find adds to amazing story of powerful Greek figure


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 06:11 PM

I don't think dinosaur fossils fall into the realms of archaeology either. However, I'm not bothered and I enjoy the ride.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 04:46 PM

We had a professor at my university who was well-known for her detective work in identifying works of art that turned up with no provenance. She got to dig around in monasteries and museums in Europe to do her work. I heard her lecture a couple of times, and the knowledge of materials and brush strokes, of art formats (paint, drawing, lithograph, etc. makes it as interesting a discovery as some of the archaeological finds either out in the landscape or things found and stored away in museum vaults without any knowledge of what they were till later.

Oddball things creep into the thread because of the nature of the research into such old objects. Best to ignore the few that aren't exactly dinosaur fossils or cave paintings and just enjoy the ride.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 04:05 PM

https://www.independent.co.uk/topic/archaeology
No offense RT but you can be as strict as Frau Blucher.
A Blucher is a hide glue maker that holds instruments together.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Raggytash
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 02:12 PM

"mostly to do with archeology, but sometimes geology or other hard sciences"

And fascinating it has been too SRS, I don't see how renaissance art fits into your criteria though.

Much as it is interesting I consider a separate thread would be the order of the day, that too could then be expanded on with futher contribution of a similar nature.

I have often clicked onto what sounds like an interesting discussion only to find that thread creep has lead the original topic into something far removed from the title.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 10:22 AM

Raggy, I started this thread years ago as a place to store interesting stories, mostly to do with archeology, but sometimes geology or other hard sciences, so new threads wouldn't be needed.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Raggytash
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 06:29 AM

Donuel. I was making what I consider to be a valid point. I am not going to get involved with you about it.

We have an expressionn this side of the pond "you can't educate pork.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Jun 22 - 08:39 PM

What is your Raggytash professional advice regarding DNA evidence?
8 years ago I held a Rembrandt drawing in Michigan, with security guard assistance.
Do you know the one about the $34 1st century marble Roman head?


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