Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


'Hell Broke Loose in Georgia'

Lighter 31 Mar 18 - 12:22 PM
GUEST,Mick Pearce (MCP) 31 Mar 18 - 01:30 PM
Lighter 31 Mar 18 - 04:19 PM
GUEST,Mick Pearce (MCP) 01 Apr 18 - 01:25 PM
Lighter 01 Apr 18 - 04:30 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: 'Hell Broke Loose in Georgia'
From: Lighter
Date: 31 Mar 18 - 12:22 PM

Kuntz & Pelliccioni's Traditional Tune Archive dates the common fiddle tune to the 1925 recording by Gid Tanner & the Skillet Lickers.

A recent performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1r_bnyr0HaM

No old printed version of the tune seems to exist.

There is, however, at least one other tune with the same title. This was recorded in 1925-26 by native Georgian Fiddlin' John Carson.

A recent performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf1AjBOpP5o

(Carson's track is barely audible, but the above sounds to me like what he's playing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TXcam0HGQQ )

The earliest mention of a tune by this name appears to have been in a diary entry of Feb. 17, 1870, noted in Decatur, Ga., by Civil War veteran George W. Bailey. There are two much later but presumably reliable claims that "Hell Broke Loose in Georgia" was known during the Civil War.

I've always felt that the Skillet Lickers' tune sounds too modern to have been played in the 1860s. It has suggestions of the turn-of-century "Chicken Reel," plus a notable ragtime shuffle.

Carson's tune has the advantage of being, I think, a better fit for the words "Hell's broke loose in Georgia!"

So it may be more likely to be close to the "original" melody.

The Traditional Tune Archive gives a lot more information about both tunes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Hell Broke Loose in Georgia'
From: GUEST,Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 31 Mar 18 - 01:30 PM

Frank C Brown's Collection of North Carolina Folklore has a version of "Hell Broke Loose In Georgia" (1v with tune) from Bascom Lamar Lunsford (vol5 pp 496-497 - you can see it at archive.org). It looks as if it might have been recorded in 1935 (LOC).

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Hell Broke Loose in Georgia'
From: Lighter
Date: 31 Mar 18 - 04:19 PM

Thanks, Mick. It rather resembles Carson's tune.

If Lunsford is right that his great-uncle sang it "more than 60 years ago," that would put it right around 1870.

Trad Tune Archive sugg. that the title orig. referred to the Georgia gold rush that began ca1830.

It has always seemed likely to me (and, I imagine, others) that it referred to Sherman's March (1864).

The phrase "Hell's broke loose in Georgia!" was often used to mean "All hell's broke loose!" It seems not to have appeared in print before 1869.

Which proves little, if anything.

"Ride Ol' Buck to Water" is similar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0uI-TpDCqQ

The video's also worth watching for the utter lack of interest expressed by the shoppers.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Hell Broke Loose in Georgia'
From: GUEST,Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 01 Apr 18 - 01:25 PM

I think the video's encouraging - it's nice to see somewhere where strolling players are so commonplace that people aren't surprised by them!

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Hell Broke Loose in Georgia'
From: Lighter
Date: 01 Apr 18 - 04:30 PM

Heh, heh.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 19 April 8:17 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.