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BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs

The Sandman 06 Nov 18 - 03:31 PM
Senoufou 06 Nov 18 - 03:27 PM
Jon Freeman 06 Nov 18 - 03:16 PM
Senoufou 06 Nov 18 - 02:53 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Nov 18 - 02:46 PM
Senoufou 06 Nov 18 - 02:42 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Nov 18 - 02:35 PM
Jon Freeman 06 Nov 18 - 02:27 PM
Senoufou 06 Nov 18 - 02:18 PM
Jon Freeman 06 Nov 18 - 02:08 PM
JHW 06 Nov 18 - 01:57 PM
Jos 06 Nov 18 - 09:12 AM
Senoufou 06 Nov 18 - 08:34 AM
Gallus Moll 06 Nov 18 - 06:22 AM
Mo the caller 06 Nov 18 - 05:52 AM
Senoufou 04 Nov 18 - 04:16 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Nov 18 - 03:22 PM
Senoufou 04 Nov 18 - 02:16 PM
Big Al Whittle 04 Nov 18 - 01:46 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Nov 18 - 01:37 PM
Jon Freeman 04 Nov 18 - 08:30 AM
Mo the caller 04 Nov 18 - 07:38 AM
Steve Shaw 03 Nov 18 - 03:06 PM
Tattie Bogle 03 Nov 18 - 01:43 PM
Senoufou 03 Nov 18 - 12:31 PM
leeneia 03 Nov 18 - 11:51 AM
Jos 02 Nov 18 - 06:08 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Nov 18 - 05:21 PM
Gallus Moll 02 Nov 18 - 04:34 PM
Senoufou 02 Nov 18 - 03:04 PM
MikeL2 02 Nov 18 - 02:43 PM
JHW 01 Nov 18 - 11:47 AM
Senoufou 01 Nov 18 - 11:37 AM
Tattie Bogle 01 Nov 18 - 11:25 AM
SPB-Cooperator 30 Oct 18 - 08:41 AM
Jon Freeman 30 Oct 18 - 08:33 AM
Senoufou 30 Oct 18 - 08:22 AM
Senoufou 30 Oct 18 - 08:18 AM
Steve Shaw 30 Oct 18 - 05:48 AM
Big Al Whittle 30 Oct 18 - 05:29 AM
Senoufou 30 Oct 18 - 03:42 AM
BobL 30 Oct 18 - 03:03 AM
Jos 29 Oct 18 - 03:57 PM
Senoufou 29 Oct 18 - 02:23 PM
keberoxu 29 Oct 18 - 01:19 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Oct 18 - 01:13 PM
Senoufou 29 Oct 18 - 01:10 PM
Steve Shaw 29 Oct 18 - 12:44 PM
Jon Freeman 29 Oct 18 - 12:35 PM
Jos 29 Oct 18 - 12:29 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: The Sandman
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 03:31 PM

Demise of the jacket potato, micro wavecooking plus not using best varieties


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 03:27 PM

As our garden was very big, we had a three-stage compost heap down at the bottom. The compost seemed to fertilise the soil quite well, so we didn't use fertiliser.

And I used to 'rotate' the crops on the vegetable plot, to minimise pests getting a hold. The main problem was watering, as the rainfall never seemed to be enough. I had three large plastic rainwater butts and a much-used watering can.

When I think of the energy I had in those days, I'm a bit sad to think I couldn't do all that now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 03:16 PM

Sounds a bit scary, SRS. I can't answer your question about growing Russets but I'm not sure it's a UK home growers usual variety? Maybe one of the keener gardeners here will advise from that perspective. Blight, early and late are probably the biggest worries with potato growing here.

We do use Phostrogen on the veg plot here so can't claim to be organic. I'm not sure we'd be that organic without. There's about 2-3 yds between the veg plot wire fence and where the farm plant stuff (sugar beet this year) and I'm not sure we are 100% clear from whatever stuff they might use.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:53 PM

Goodness Stilly, that's rather a lot of processing and additives just for some chips!
That's why I miss our home-grown spuds. They were completely organic and tasted gorgeous. :(


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:46 PM

Here is a response to the Pollan video that describes the ingredients and offers a different reading on the chemicals used in the field.

When I make friend okra and it's just me at home it usually never makes it to the table, I eat them off of the paper towel where they drain and cool on while the rest of them cook.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:42 PM

Oh well done Jon, that's exactly what it was!! Weird-looking things aren't they?

I don't know how he eats these fiery foods. He actually laughed like a drain when I told him that vindaloo is considered almost too hot for many Brits. He thought it was tasty but rather feeble, however Scotch bonnets seem to make his food sufficiently fiery to his taste. He must have an asbestos mouth.

The cats and I evacuate the kitchen when it's all cooking. Bright orange steam comes out and it catches in one's throat. One tiny spot on the tongue would mean an ambulance for me I reckon!

I suppose I ought to give okra a try Stilly. It's nice to have something different now and then.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:35 PM

Okra grows well here in North Texas, so I learned how to eat it. In particular, fried okra (sliced in about 1/2 inch pieces, rolled in seasoned cornmeal and sauteed in shallow corn oil). I've stir-fryed it with success, but never want it boiled (slimy). If you soak it in vinegar that will remove the slimy consistency, and I made a case and a half of pickled okra this year as gifts for friends who love it. There is a lot in the freezer and I have a recipe for broiled okra that is supposed to be very good.

I have grown potatoes and sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes are in the ground right now, the red lasoda (the waxy ones with red skin) will be planted probably in December or January and harvested next spring.

Michael Pollan about how Russet potatoes are grown for McDonald's restaurants. My question, are all Russets subjected to this treatment, or just the ones destined to the fast food boxes?


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:27 PM

This is butternut squash, Sen.

I'd run a mile from your husband's cooking. I love spicy but don't have much tolerance for heat. Vindaloo would be far too much for me without adding extra heat!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:18 PM

I don't know its name Jon. It's a strange shape, fat at the bottom and thin at the top, a bit like a pear, but larger. Pale yellow with faint stripes. It was very nice, especially with the potato chunks.

I don't really know what he does with the okra or ladies' fingers!! :)
because they go in with his own vegetables, not our joint vegetables if you see what I mean.

He makes me smile sometimes, as he's getting more and more 'Europeanised'. He bought a microwaveable vindaloo from Morrisons at the weekend, and said it was delicious, so he went back and bought THREE more to have in the freezer for 'snacks'! He'll probably add Scotch bonnets to them, as they won't be nearly hot enough for him.

I'm a bit scared of pressure cookers to be honest, as when I was young, a neighbour's one exploded and caused a lot of damage to her kitchen.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 02:08 PM

I love Okra (also known as ladies fingers), especially in the form of bhindi bhaji from an Indian restaurant/take away but I don't think my couple of attempts at cooking the fresh okra worked out too well.

Which squash, Sen? Butternut is the most likely one for us to use.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: JHW
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 01:57 PM

"Its odd how some people don't eat the jackets. I think they're the best bit."
Agree, alas my oven only goes up to 190. Dries and wrinkles big spuds but doesn't bake them.
Routinely I cut very small spuds in half. Toss in tiny amount of oil in prep bowl and bake? laid on their round backs, skin and all on baking tin in the oven. 25 mins. Time to get other vegs boiled while their doing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jos
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 09:12 AM

I used to use a pressure cooker in the 1970s to feed a large family. I haven't bothered with it for years now.

I tried okra but it was so slimy it made me feel quite ill. Somebody on a cookery programme a while back said the secret was to soak them in salt and vinegar to get rid of the slime, but I haven't tried it. There are so many other lovely things to eat that I am happy to forgo okra for the foreseeable future (who needs gumbo anyway).


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 08:34 AM

Since we got this fancy rice boiler, which has a steaming grid above the rice section, we've cooked our vegetables by steaming them, and the flavour is much better. It also conserves the vitamins and food value, instead of leaching them out into the water when boiling.

Spuds done this way (as Mo says, cut into fairly small pieces) are quite delicious. Also those strange 'squash' things, slices of aubergine and something called okra (green thingummies, don't ask!) which my husband goes in for.

Just after the War, everyone had a pressure cooker and also a three-tiered steamer. And an open fire (no central heating) on which to roast spuds and all sorts of other things. People actually 'cooked' in those days - no microwaves, electric toasters, fan-assisted ovens or ready-made meals.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 06:22 AM

I prefer waxy to fluffy potatoes- - tho for bakes potatoes it is not such an issue!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Mo the caller
Date: 06 Nov 18 - 05:52 AM

I never boil spuds now, because the tasty varieties (King Edwards, Sharp's Express) do tend to turn into soup. Cut them small and they steam quite quickly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 04:16 PM

When I had shingles a few years ago, followed by agonising post-herpetic neuralgia, the doc suggested rubbing my back with chilli paste as the capsicum would kill the pain. Husband fell about laughing. I had Amitriptyline instead, which did the trick in a couple of weeks.

His dad died of heart failure, and had eaten fiery, spicy food all his long life. But then, diagnosis is poor in W Africa, so he may well have had some other illness, not heart trouble at all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 03:22 PM

Eat enough Scotch Bonnets and they'll STAVE OFF heart attacks!

Roasted diced squash, carefully-handled, which means neither overdone nor underdone, baked in good olive oil, gently seasoned, no burnt bits but nicely caramelised, is a thing of beauty. It can be eaten as a side veg or made into a beautiful soup with gently sautéed onions and home-made stock.

Desiree is a modern variety, much-m!igned as a fast-grown bulk commercial spud. Grow it yourself and it's a thing transformed. I have found that you tend to get a few very huge spuds and a lot of tiddlers per plant, but they yield very well overall.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 02:16 PM

Yes, I have to admit the different varieties do have differing qualities for cooking.
We grew Maris Piper too, but found Desirée to be the best all-rounder for our type of soil (very light and well-drained) and rainfall (usually sparse!)

Husband has just cooked a delicious-smelling snack for us both to eat in front of the TV. He's used his rice cooker, and above the rice has steamed potato wedges and lumps of some weirdly-shaped thing called a squash (!), drained them and added butter (of course) and salt-and-pepper.

I've just been served with a bowl of this, a fork and a paper napkin.
His portion is of course swamped in Fiery Horror sauce.
The cats are already theatrically coughing and sneezing.

He's growing two gigantic Scotch Bonnets plants in our utility room. They're about six feet tall and there's a sinister number of fruits on them already. Scotch bonnet chillies are so fiery they could provoke a heart attack. Hmmm...he knows I have Life Insurance.... :(


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 01:46 PM

Its odd how some people don't eat the jackets. I think they're the best bit.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 01:37 PM

Spuds that do that make bad jackets too. Sloppy watery things. Kind Edwards are usual culprits. A big Charlotte bakes very nicely. Some spuds sold in shops are incredibly watery these days, a reflection on how they're grown. You're paying good money for water. Caveat emptor!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 08:30 AM

Sen, possibly Tesco's are also selecting varieties that they think are good bakers under that label?

I'm not at all up on this (and I'm guessing it disagrees with Steve Shaw's personal favourite) but people may prefer a potoato with a floury texture. Off the top of my head, I'll suggest Maris Piper for a baker.

Where I certainly do agree though is that potatoes differ and some are better for some uses than others. Charlotte is the only one we usually grow a small sample of each year. To me that's a great boiler, excellent with a salad or a hot meal.

One of the worst seems to me to be when you get a bag of spuds with the intention of making mash and find what you've got just boils into the water.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Mo the caller
Date: 04 Nov 18 - 07:38 AM

With grated cheese and sweetcorn


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Nov 18 - 03:06 PM

No oil!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 03 Nov 18 - 01:43 PM

In the oven right now: guess what's for supper tonight?


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 03 Nov 18 - 12:31 PM

I think the name 'Jacket Potatoes' above the spuds in Tesco refers only to their size. Jos is right in that they're just 'potatoes' until one does something with them.

They do seem to be all the same size and shape.

Bags of 'any old spuds' have little ones, wonky ones and damaged ones.
They're very cheap, but we don't bother with those.

We used to grow all our own spuds in the last house (huge garden, we were younger and had more energy!) I did Earlies, Middles and Lates.
There's something very satisfying in forking up a potato plot and unearthing quantities of lovely home-grown spuds. Sigh.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: leeneia
Date: 03 Nov 18 - 11:51 AM

Scrub. Oil. Bake at 400 for one hour, till tender in the middle when poked.
Let cool till safe to handle.
Slit open
Butter
Commercial sour cream
fresh-cracked pepper

Yum!

(The butter and sour cream supply salt.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jos
Date: 02 Nov 18 - 06:08 PM

I thought they were only jacket potatoes once they were cooked. Before that, they are just big potatoes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Nov 18 - 05:21 PM

Ah, the well-buttered jacket spud can be a thing of beauty. Choose your spud carefully. An organic Nicola is my go-to (I grow 'em). It goes beautifully with some home-grown salad and some cold meat left over from the Sunday roast. Some shop spuds go horribly watery. Know your spud.

For two people. Take four/five/six spuds (depending on size). Scrub well and smother with salt (NO BLOODY OIL!). Bake in oven, 200C/400F, for one hour. In the meantime, grate 200g of the strongest cheddar and fry 150g of chopped-up pancetta or streaky bacon until almost crisp. Smoked or not, it's up to you.

When the spuds have cooled enough to pick up, cut a sliver off the top of each one (the long side). Scoop out the flesh into a bowl, being careful not to break the skin. Mix the warm flesh with the bacon and cheese. Maybe some salt (easy, tiger) and definitely some freshly-ground black pepper. Stuff the mix back into the skins. Place on a tray and heat in a hot oven for 20 minutes.

By far the finest accompaniment to these stuffed spuds is tinned baked beans. I'm not kidding.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 02 Nov 18 - 04:34 PM

For me it has to be garlic butter (made by me) plus ground black pepper!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Nov 18 - 03:04 PM

Many happy returns for your birthday Mike!

Steve would indeed have loved that! He'd have ordered one of each I expect.

I have to say, I'm never interested in 'fillings' for jacket potatoes.
The only thing I'll ever put on one is an enormous knob of butter!

When we visit 'SpudULike' in the Chapelfield shopping mall in Norwich, I always ask for four butter pats. I mash the potato up with all this butter and it's gorgeous.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: MikeL2
Date: 02 Nov 18 - 02:43 PM

Hi Sen.

We got some potatoes labled " Jacket Potatoes"

Just had a couple with our dinner and cooked in the oven they were very good.

Back to the thread last week was my 83rd birthday and one of my grandsons invited us out for lunch.   He took us to a local pub that has just been Re-opened after some refurbishment.
On the menu was a list of jacket potatoes. The new owners are from Liverpool and the potatoes were all named after Liverpool footballers eg Steven Gerard etc etc. All had different fillings. But you could ask for fillings that you prefer if you wanted.

Steve Shaw would have loved it.

Cheers

Mike


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: JHW
Date: 01 Nov 18 - 11:47 AM

Well agreeing with some I don't mind if 'jacket' potatoes disappear. Jacket was ever an admission that your spud wasn't baked and yes a real baked spud has an almost inedible shell but so tasty it is well worth the hard work. A cafe in Richmond (N.Yorks) used to do a cheese and leek version like eating a pair of slippers full of cheese, leek and mashed buttery spud. Crispy, crunchy, fiercely tough and so tasty.
(Can't do them at home, fan oven isn't hot enough.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 01 Nov 18 - 11:37 AM

Just this morning we were in Tesco, and bought some spuds.

I was surprised and pleased to see the words 'Jacket Potatoes' actually printed on the sign above the loose spuds. Usually it says 'Baking Potatoes'.

This might be because of Halloween and Guy Fawkes, as 'Jacket' is more traditional.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 01 Nov 18 - 11:25 AM

Agreed that potatoes baked solely in the microwave are soggy lumps of nothingness, and don't have a nice crisp skin, but the 5 minute starter in the m'wave does cut down the overall cooking time, and you still get a scrumptious skin by finishing in a conventional oven.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 08:41 AM

I remember my first backed potato in its jacket - as it was called then - my mother took me to the Ideal Home Exhibition when I was 11. They were being sold on the Potato Marketing Board stall - nothing fancy - just with a knob of butter. The pleasure of stopping during a long car journey for a jacket potato with cheese - nothing fancy, just a nourishing bit of nosh and a half-hour or so break, accompanied my a half-pint of foaming ale or a refreshing glass of shandy is harder to find, and often seems to be priced the same as more substantial meals (in pubs).

Also, with reference to breaks - is it my imagination or is it increasingly difficult to find somewhere to stop for a loo break unless I drive on motorways?


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 08:33 AM

We had a combi oven. It seemed a good idea at the time but we found that we only used the microwave part and replaced it with a (cheaper) microwave when it broke down. I do like the idea of the "all in one, microwave/baked" potato but we never got that far with ours.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 08:22 AM

It's the same café where my husband asks for "Yorkshire tea bread please, ee by gum!" This joke is wearing very thin now, but he won't stop. Fortunately the lady always laughs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 08:18 AM

Ha, there's a café in Morrisons in Norwich which has a lady 'barista' (?). Their coffee walnut cake is to die for. But sometimes they haven't got any. I politely point out that it's for sale on their shelves.

The lady is very nice and knows us now. The last time this happened, she said, "Just go and buy one, and I'll cut a slice off and put it on a plate for you. You can take the rest home."

The poor lass was trying to serve customers, clear tables and wash up some cups in a bowl all at the same time. I was tempted to offer to help her by wielding a tea towel, but no doubt that's not allowed!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 05:48 AM

I can beat that. A few years ago we went to M&S caff in Bolton for a cup of tea. No chance. They'd run out of milk. But, I protested uselessly, the food dept. is next to the caff...


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 05:29 AM

What really pisses me off is when you're shopping as Sainsbury's, you decide to use the cafe.

They say, 'Sorry we've ron out of baking potatoes'

You say, 'you've got a shop full of them'

THey say, 'We can't use THEM.....'

WEird!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 03:42 AM

That sounds like a good all-round solution Bob.

In our last house we had an open log fire. We 'did' jacket potatoes, chestnuts, marshmallows, toast and...CRUMPETS!!! :)

I bought a lovely set of brass fire irons in a jumble sale, and the toasting fork was used almost every evening, as was a flat copper dish with a hinged lid (a bit like a miniature warming pan) in which went the chestnuts.

The spuds were wrapped in tinfoil, and put in the ashes below the grate, then exposed for the last fifteen minutes or so to crisp up the jackets.

One had to manoeuvre around five rather cross cats who were always stretched out on the rug before the fire. I'll swear they actually tutted when they saw me coming.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: BobL
Date: 30 Oct 18 - 03:03 AM

I have the advantage of a combi oven - fan oven, grill and microwave, with various combined modes of operation. Maximum temperature, 250deg C, for 10-15 minutes to do the skin, plus microwave power setting to cook the inside over the same time, should be about right. Will experiment and report back.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jos
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 03:57 PM

We just called them 'baked potatoes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 02:23 PM

Ah keberoxu, I've actually swum in Lake Erie. And in every one of the Great Lakes. (about fifty years ago though)


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: keberoxu
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 01:19 PM

Where I was raised, near Lake Erie,
we didn't say "jackets".

We said "skins" or "coats."

Thoroughly content with baking potatoes in the oven,
greasing the skins well on the outside
so that they would be nice and soft to chew on
with more than enough butter and salt
after the potato innards had been hollowed out.

I know how Joe Offer felt, in the earlier post.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 01:13 PM

It's an old term denoting prostitution in the U.S.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Senoufou
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 01:10 PM

Oh yes Jos, sorry, 25p is correct.
And Steve you really are a one! :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 12:44 PM

Fish and chip shop!

"But I did try to ride the aforesaid horses bareback."

Gosh, hope your back didn't get sunburned!


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 12:35 PM

In this context, a Fish and Chip shop, srs. Only other meaning I can think of off hand is a carpenter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Demise of the jacket potato in pubs
From: Jos
Date: 29 Oct 18 - 12:29 PM

Five shillings became 25 pence - 60 pence would have been 12 shillings.


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