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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Charmion 10 Jul 20 - 02:22 PM
Mrrzy 10 Jul 20 - 11:33 AM
Donuel 10 Jul 20 - 10:34 AM
Dave Hanson 10 Jul 20 - 02:28 AM
leeneia 10 Jul 20 - 12:55 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 20 - 12:50 AM
JennieG 09 Jul 20 - 10:07 PM
Charmion 09 Jul 20 - 09:07 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jul 20 - 08:42 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jul 20 - 06:31 PM
leeneia 09 Jul 20 - 01:38 PM
Raggytash 09 Jul 20 - 01:07 PM
Charmion 09 Jul 20 - 09:55 AM
Mrrzy 09 Jul 20 - 08:05 AM
Steve Shaw 09 Jul 20 - 06:45 AM
Charmion 08 Jul 20 - 12:57 PM
Mrrzy 08 Jul 20 - 08:48 AM
JennieG 08 Jul 20 - 03:00 AM
Jos 08 Jul 20 - 02:17 AM
JennieG 07 Jul 20 - 08:35 PM
Mrrzy 07 Jul 20 - 03:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jul 20 - 02:26 PM
Mrrzy 07 Jul 20 - 12:23 PM
Charmion 07 Jul 20 - 08:58 AM
JennieG 07 Jul 20 - 01:38 AM
Charmion 06 Jul 20 - 08:00 PM
Steve Shaw 06 Jul 20 - 07:18 PM
Donuel 06 Jul 20 - 06:44 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Jul 20 - 11:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 06 Jul 20 - 10:35 AM
Charmion 06 Jul 20 - 10:04 AM
Charmion 06 Jul 20 - 09:59 AM
Jos 06 Jul 20 - 02:15 AM
JennieG 06 Jul 20 - 01:56 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jul 20 - 11:48 PM
Charmion 05 Jul 20 - 08:23 PM
Mrrzy 05 Jul 20 - 09:14 AM
JennieG 05 Jul 20 - 04:12 AM
Jos 05 Jul 20 - 03:34 AM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jul 20 - 09:26 PM
Charmion 04 Jul 20 - 09:05 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Jul 20 - 07:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jul 20 - 07:44 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Jul 20 - 06:08 PM
Thompson 04 Jul 20 - 12:52 PM
Charmion 04 Jul 20 - 12:33 PM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jul 20 - 10:55 AM
Mrrzy 04 Jul 20 - 10:02 AM
Dave Hanson 04 Jul 20 - 05:23 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Jul 20 - 04:04 AM

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 02:22 PM

See what I mean, Steve?

I don't get it, myself, but I'm not American either. In fact, the festive desserts of my far distant youth were trifle, mince pies, and Christmas pudding with "hard sauce" (aka brandy butter), and if that ain't a cultural throwback to the Empire I don't quite know what is!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 11:33 AM

Thansgiving > $mas


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 10:34 AM

We fry fish coated in a crispy panko egg coating. It tastes fancier than it is. Flounder is quick and other fish take longer at lower heat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 02:28 AM

' Fish planks ' that's a new concept for us here in the UK

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 12:55 AM

You bring back the memories, Stilly. My mother used to cook fish that way, and I always liked it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 12:50 AM

I love pumpkin pie, and in my book, Thanksgiving is a better holiday than xmas. I loved the gathering of family and friends as I was growing up, and it still is the holiday I am most interested in celebrating as fully as possible. Not to do with pilgrims, everything to do with my loved-ones getting together. Even if it isn't exactly on the date of the official US holiday.

That said, my ex is from Puerto Rico, and squash/pumpkin gets used in savory dishes, like as an addition to bean dishes. No spice seasonings, it vanishes into the dish, simply providing nutrition and thickening.

This evening I had a 6oz piece of Haddock that I've had in the freezer. I bought a couple of packages of frozen fish planks at my favorite discount/gourmet grocery, and gave one to a friend. I heard from him that they're really good, so I dug it out and thawed some. And the simple butter in the skillet, flour, salt and pepper on the fish was just perfect. Lemon squeezed over it, with an extra grind of pepper, and it's a rich white fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 10:07 PM

I don't mind the pumpkin spice taste. Although there are squillions (well, nearly) of recipes to make your own, I thought I would try a ready-made one so brought a little box back from Canada with me. Brand is Club House, ingredients are listed as cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, cloves, and it smells good.

I usually drink my coffee black with three drops of milk, but have tried pumpkin spice latte. Not bad, but I couldn't drink it every day all year round.

The link to the information on gramma, aka crookneck squash, was interesting. Nanna's sisters lived in the Hunter Valley a couple of hours north of Sydney, which is where gramma pie seems to have been very popular - and it may have been unknown in other parts of Oz. When Nanna left her first husband she went to the town where her sisters lived, so perhaps picked up the idea from there. She earned her living as a cook and her pies were good.

Except that I was never quite sure if I liked gramma pie.......


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 09:07 PM

The thing about pumpkin, Steve, is pie, and that’s associated with the American Thanksgiving holiday, which is massively more emotive and/or evocative than English harvest festivals or the Canadian version of Thanksgiving. Almost as powerful as Christmas. I am quite satisfied to eat pumpkin pie about once per year, myself. Himself, on the other hand, would eat it every week if I would make it that often.

Now squash is another matter. (Yes, I know it’s botanically almost indistinguishable from pumpkin.) I cannot get squash past Himself’s teeth unless it’s in a certain Moroccan stew I make occasionally and serve with couscous. I like it baked, stewed, steamed, roasted before a quick fire — you name it, but I have to eat it alone. I haven’t tried mixing it with custard and serving it in a pastry case, however. Not that desperate yet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 08:42 PM

I have never understood the US obsession with pumpkin. It's bland and mushy and utterly uninteresting. I can make a very good soup out of butternut squash, and can roast chunks of it in the oven to go with my roast. As soon as I read that your pumpkin spice is full of cinnamon, well that's me out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 06:31 PM

Don't be tempted to over-elaborate. Just really good olive oil, garlic and FRESH basil. It's a sort of stripped-down pesto, no pine nuts, no cheese. Keep it that way. I love the simplicity of Italian cooking. All it takes is the finest ingredients you can lay your hands on. I got that from St Marcella and I'm sticking to it! And no dried basil, not ever. Ruinous stuff.

On pesto, I don't know what it's like your end, but I won't buy ready-made pesto. It's unfailingly horrible. Pesto needs your finest olive oil, freshly-peeled garlic and basil that you've just gathered yourself, as well as freshly-grated Parmesan from that big chunk in your fridge and pine nuts that are so good you can hardly resist just tipping the pack into your mouth. No sunflower oil, no dried this or reconstituted that.

I make a special pesto for bruschetta topping that also includes sun-dried tomatoes, but I may have mentioned it before...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 01:38 PM

Back to pumpkin pie spice. I've decided that when you put the Big 3 spices (cinnamon, cloves, ginger), all you wind up with is a rather sharp, scratchy taste which I dislike. So now I just pick one of the three and use it.

When I was a kid, spice cake was a popular dessert, and I never liked it. Now I know that that was because of that scratchy effect I mentioned. A couple years ago I made spice cake using only ginger, and I liked it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 01:07 PM

Because I have time on my hands I've gone back to making bread. Todays offering is a white loaf, glazed with egg. It's just come out of the oven and looks great. Just let it cool and little and then lather a slice with fresh Irish Butter. Uuummmmmmmmmmmmmmm !!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 09:55 AM

Imma gonna try that, Steve. Himself likes a pasta dish on the side or as a first course, and this one would be perfect.

The sauce looks like a pesto with sun-dried tomatoes that's sold here in jars, but much better because it's made with fresh everything.

The whizzing of garlic, olive oil and basil would go well in a food processor, if one is to hand. I have found that the food processor is heavy and awkward and takes up a lot of space both in storage and on the work surface, but it really rocks in a messy, labour-intensive job like pesto.

We are now heading into the shank of tomato season in Ontario, when we eat tomatoes with every meal including breakfast and the midnight snack. I'm always looking for new ways to use tomatoes, especially the small ones that are perfectly fine until abruptly they're not, and the whole punnet goes over when I turn my back on it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 08:05 AM

Stir fry with ground bison, zucch and asparagus. Not bad at all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 06:45 AM

I adapted a recipe by Gino D'Acampo a couple of nights ago and it was a triumph. For two people you need:

250g dried linguine (or spaghetti or tagliatelle)
A sprinkling of dried chilli flakes, to taste (it needs to be quite spicy)
About 125g diced pancetta or unsmoked bacon
A big garlic clove
About 30g FRESH basil (or forget it)
A big double handful of the best cherry tomatoes, cut in half
100ml of the finest extra virgin olive oil, plus an extra glug to fry the bacon
Salt
Parmesan or pecorino, freshly grated.

Start the pasta pan going with loads of boiling salted water. It should taste like the Mediterranean.

Turn on your oven very low (100C) both to warm your bowls and to soften the tomatoes on a small tray (they need to keep their shape, not fall to bits).

Use a hand blender or whatever you use to whizz the 100ml olive oil and garlic for a minute. Add the basil, stalks and all, and whizz again for another minute. It needs to be quite smooth.

Meanwhile, fry the bacon with the chilli flakes and a glug of olive oil in a small frying pan until rendered and not quite crispy - it took me about eight minutes, so next time I'll do this while the pasta is cooking.

When the pasta is cooked al dente, drain it but keep a bit of pasta water just in case. Tip the pasta back into its pan and just add everything else to it, stirring carefully off the heat to thoroughly coat the pasta. Decide whether it needs a splash of pasta water to loosen the sauce (mine didn't but it was a marginal decision).

Transfer the grub into warm bowls and sprinkle the cheese on top. There you go. It's simple and quick and it's a star performer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 12:57 PM

That gramma pumpkin your Nana made into pie, JennieG, is called a crookneck squash in these parts. It's a winter squash like the Hubbard and butternut varieties, but less often seen in supermarkets. People who grow their own like them.

I have mixed feelings about so-called pumpkin spice, which is ubiquitous in September and October, thanks to Tim Horton's and every other pastry purveyor in these parts. A good pumpkin pie has ginger, clove and nutmeg in it as well as cinnamon, but I can't detect anything but cinnamon in the Tim's version. And it doesn't belong in coffee, except as a light dusting on the foam of a cappucino.

This morning, Himself whipped up a batch of bannock at zero dark thirty, so I emerged from the pit to the smell of frybread wafting through the house. Worse things happen at sea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 08:48 AM

Uck on pumpkin anything. Or pumpkin-spice anything.

I may just make a stir fry with my ground meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 03:00 AM

That's what I thought when I was a kid too, Jos!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 02:17 AM

Until I looked at the link I just assumed that Gramma Pie was a recipe commonly made by Grandmas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 08:35 PM

I'm with you on convenience, Charmion. It isn't difficult to prepare from scratch, but sometimes having some of the work done for you is good.

Apart from pumpkin scones Ozzies haven't really gotten into the sweet pumpkin thing - although I do remember my Nanna Davis making gramma pie. As a child, I could never quite decide if I liked it or not.

Our autumn trips to Ontario have coincided with Tim Horton's pumpkin spice muffin season. One bite of those goodies and we were goners, now I make my own; canned pumpkin is unknown here, so I bake cut-up pumpkin (leaving the skin on, no seasoning) in the oven until cooked, peel, and puree the flesh. It keeps in the freezer in one cup bags, many recipes seem to use one cup.

Haven't made any for a while, I can hear them calling......


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 03:50 PM

Thanks... Looking mostly for baked burger ideas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 02:26 PM

You're not asking for a suggestion to combine them (like shepherd's pie). You want to make hamburger patties and roast vegetables? It's an easy matter to find recipes for roast root vegetables, etc. I suppose you could use a lidded container and steam/bake the meat (and add smoke flavor, etc.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 12:23 PM

Spicy food cools by making you sweat [haha typoed Swear] a lot.

I made iced tea finally by making 4 cups of double-strength tea in a bowl, waiting for it to cool, then putting it into an 8-cup pitcher and adding 4 cups of cold water. Sweetened in individual cups by a tsp of maple or simple syrup. Had I wanted to sweeten the whole pitcher, I'd have double-sweetened the hot before diluting.

I need ideas for baked burgers, no buns, roast veg to go with so it can all be done in one oven... Got anything for me?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 08:58 AM

I think I knew that, JennieG. I was being sarcastic.

North Americans are weird about the fruit of genus Cucurbita. Acre upon acre of pumpkins (the big, round orange kind) are grown here, but I'll bet money that a substantial proportion of them end up in landfill and compost bins after a couple of weeks on doorsteps as Hallowe'en decorations. Pies and sweet breads are about the only ways most of us eat the flesh, if we bother at all, and most people use canned pumpkin because, you know, convenience. We're a bit more flexible with squash, but not much, and the long-keeping winter squashes are often served sweetened.

Most of the recipes I know for squash or pumpkin that are not sweet are from Asian and African cuisines. I have never seen canned pumpkin or squash soup in a grocery store.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 01:38 AM

Charmion - 'pumpkin' in Ozziespeak is pretty much any vegetable (or are they actually fruit?) in the squash family with an orange flesh. Butternuts, to us, are pumpkin. So are Queensland Blue pumkins, green and yellow striped Japanese (Jap) pumpkins, you name it.

I made some yummy roasted pumpkin soup last week using a Queensland Blue, but tinned will do to try the scone recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 08:00 PM

Oh, Steve, you are indeed blessed.

I just split a bottle of Pinot noir and a rib steak with Himself. If I were so misguided as to follow that up with cheese and port, my nocturnal misery would be unconfined.

It’s a sad fact that, when my olfactory senses finally developed to the point where I could truly appreciate such things, my digestion got other ideas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 07:18 PM

I will eat or drink anything at any time of the day or night. What I eat or drink is no predictor of the kind of sleep I'll have. In this regard I do consider myself to be truly blessed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 06:44 PM

Are spicy hot foods really good for you in hot weather?
I like slushys made in my Red Sox mini fridge from flavored water.
Its probably bad for me in hot weather.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 11:09 AM

Did I describe my "house" iced tea mix? I never drank iced tea until I moved to Texas, and now I can't imagine life without it. To cut back on the caffeine, I use green tea. In a 2-litre glass jar I suspend 3 green tea bags and use a generous sprig (several inches long with several leafy stems) of lemon balm that grows unrestrained outside my back door (it escaped from a pot). After brewing I sweeten it with three level tiny scoops of Stevia. Once it's cold I put ice and a little water into a glass and fill it with the tea. The point of iced tea is not to be the same strength as a cup of hot tea, hence the extra water. If you use the hot tea to try to make a cup of iced tea the cubes melt too fast and it's too dilute. There is a sweet spot, when the tea is only a little warm, when you can start making a glass that will come out perfect. I make enough to drink for a couple of days, hence the added water once the tea is chilled.

I can drink this into the early evening and still get to sleep at night (I have to stop drinking black tea by early afternoon).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 10:35 AM

That's the classic behavior in the Pacific NW as well. And zucchini can grow so very large very fast if you're not watching them.

This morning's breakfast will be a whole ripe mango that needs to be eaten. If I feel need for any more I'll reheat a little of the oatmeal I made on Sunday. Yes, it's a lump in the container, but scoop a few spoons-ful into the bowl, shape it a bit, nuke it, add brown sugar and milk and you are scouring your arteries and meeting about half of your calcium needs for the day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 10:04 AM

In Ontario, we are approaching peak tomato/zucchini season. In a week or two, green-thumbed neighbours will start sneaking about with baskets to deposit on doorsteps in the dark of night.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 09:59 AM

Pumpkin soup? Condensed, in tins? Yikes. You Ozzies will eat anything.

Of course, Squash soup is a completely different class of article. Totally.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 02:15 AM

Maybe the pumpkin scones could be made with a tin of other pureed fruit, such as apple. Or how about other kinds of soup - mushroom scones, anyone? Tomato scones?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 01:56 AM

Honestly, SRS......when I realised that my yarn had gone it seemed such a small thing considering the amount of flood damage to the house, furnings and other Stuff, but in the end it was those small things that tipped me over the edge.

Back to recipes!

Pumpkin scones are an Aussie favourite, and a recipe idea currently sweeping the internet in Oz is two-ingredient pumpkin scones. One needs a tin of condensed pumpkin soup, and self-raising flour. You empty the soup into a bowl and add enough flour to make it stiff, roll out on a floured board, and cut into squares or rounds. Bake. Spread with butter. Enjoy. While shopping earlier I bought the tin of soup (always make my own soup, very seldom use tinned) so, when the mood strikes later in the week, I plan to have a go.

Two ingredient pumpkin scones


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jul 20 - 11:48 PM

It looks like someone could start an interesting thread just to do with the fate of freezers, chest or upright. :) Too bad about the yarn. You might have wanted to slam the lid closed if you'd gone in looking for it, though, so you saved yourself from one of those awful views that can't be unseen. Or smelled.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Jul 20 - 08:23 PM

Ice cream can be refrozen if you churn it — y’know, do what was done to make it the first time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 05 Jul 20 - 09:14 AM

Jos... It's a chest freezer, not a whole-body freezer, eh?

Ice cream can be refrozen?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 05 Jul 20 - 04:12 AM

We had to lose our chest freezer in following The Second Great Flood of 2017 (plumbing problems) - because we were away on the weekend it happened we had a partial blackout, due to electrical cords and a power board sitting in water. The fridge wasn't affected but the chest freezer was, meat had started to drip out the bottom (talk about a body in the freezer) so it was taken away unopened and disposed of.

We didn't lose much food, and it was covered by insurance anyway. I did, however, lose some alpaca knitting yarn that was stored in a plastic bag to kill a couple of flying bugs and that, in the fuss of having to throw out much of our furniture, I just forgot about. It was discontinued years ago so could not be replaced. Sigh.

Now we have an upright freezer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 05 Jul 20 - 03:34 AM

There is never ever enough room in my chest freezer to hide a body.
However, it is still going, having been given to me by someone moving to a smaller house back sometime in the last century.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 09:26 PM

We had a chest freezer at my mom's house growing up, and it was a black hole. So much stuff got buried and forgotten down in the bottom. Upright are so much easier to organize (though I still manage to lose track of stuff; with my old freezer it was defrosted twice a year and reorganized. I'll have to work out a routine like that for the new one.)

Chest freezers are always the go-to freezer for murderers trying to confuse investigators about the time of death. That's the other reason why I don't want to have one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 09:05 PM

Steve Shaw, your story is why I do not and never will own an upright freezer.

We have a small chest freezer Himself purchased in 1991 when he was posted back to Canada from Germany, having won the Cold War. The technician who replaced its thermostat some ten years ago told us to keep it going as long as possible because they don’t make ‘em like that any more.

In summer, I go out to the garage to exhort it to extra effort and promise it wine and roses if only it survives another year. So far, it’s working.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 07:52 PM

Even in our Cornish greenhouses we can't pick tomatoes for at least another three weeks. I always grow a cherry variety called Sungold: they are delicious and they resist soil-borne tomato diseases....


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 07:44 PM

I've had that happen with the freezer door - and after such an event make sure to test the door every time.

I picked another bowl of tomatoes and am now looking at several quarts of tomatoes when I can. I blanch and peel then dice, though these tomatoes are smaller and I may blanch and can them whole in pint jars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 06:08 PM

Bit of a freezer disaster last week. The door of our smaller upright freezer had been slightly ajar for around two days without our noticing. Everything except big blocky things had completely thawed, though still very cold. I had to ditch a few items such as two packs of bacon, some raw prawns and some tuna skewers, not to speak (lamentably) of a huge tub of very nice vanilla ice cream. I've done two trial cookings of things that got thawed then which got a panicky refreezing, and they all passed the test, namely some home-made meatballs (they were delicious), some classy uncooked artisan sausage rolls (I have three more packs, so thank God for that) and some Marks and Spencer ultimate mash, of which I had five packs. I'd bought them at the start of the lockdown, to my shame, as I never rely on ready-made mash. I cooked just the one as a trial, and it was fine. I have a truckload of the finest local butcher's sausages in there in the hope of many a summer barbecue, and I'm assuming they'll be fine. I also have a considerable number of free-range pork chops that are vacuum-packed, and I'm pretty certain they'll also be fine. One or two other items we'll be devouring in the next day or two. Some things you'd eat yourself but wouldn't risk disappointing your guest with!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 12:52 PM

Pinto beans look like what the Indians call Rose Coco and the Italians call Borlotti, but this wiki makes them seem different…


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 12:33 PM

I didn't know that about chili, Stilly; thanks. And here I am, sixty-five years old, and I finally learn that "frijoles" is beans.

I guess, then, that "chili", as a culinary term, is somewhat analogous to "curry" in that it indicates a cooking style with a certain range of ingredients and flavourings, rather than a particular dish.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 10:55 AM

Chili con frijoles is made in Texas with pinto beans. There are lots of other US regional bean dishes that are meant to be bean dishes (it can be argued that the original chili is just a sauce, hence the names recognizing the additional ingredients, con frijoles or con carne. Beans or meat.)

I prefer to cook with kidney beans, they have better flavor and are nutritionally a notch above pintos. The little red beans are used in a lot of Puerto Rican bean dishes, but when I was learning recipes from my late mother in law, I didn't have little red beans available. So I used red kidney beans.

"Ranch style" beans is a pinto bean dish you often find in Texas barbecue places, and they usually have a couple of choices, sweet or savory.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 10:02 AM

Quick Quaker Oats are still around.

I used to only like peanuts out of what are loosely called nuts. Now I only dislike cashews, but like all other nuts (again, loosely speaking).

I didn't used to like hot spice, now I prefer it.

Still hate cilantro.

Texture is still a thing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 05:23 AM

Pinto beans are the only ones I've ever come accross a shortage of [ a few years ago mind ]

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Jul 20 - 04:04 AM

I think my choice reflects what I can easily lay my hands on in this remote fastness. I shall be looking out for pinto beans...


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