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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Charmion 30 Jul 20 - 08:23 PM
Mrrzy 31 Jul 20 - 08:39 AM
Raggytash 31 Jul 20 - 12:24 PM
Charmion 31 Jul 20 - 12:51 PM
Mrrzy 01 Aug 20 - 07:20 AM
Jos 01 Aug 20 - 07:30 AM
Charmion 01 Aug 20 - 08:41 AM
Jos 01 Aug 20 - 08:56 AM
Dave Hanson 01 Aug 20 - 09:57 AM
Mrrzy 01 Aug 20 - 11:08 AM
Charmion 01 Aug 20 - 12:14 PM
Dorothy Parshall 01 Aug 20 - 12:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Aug 20 - 01:42 PM
Raggytash 01 Aug 20 - 01:44 PM
Raggytash 02 Aug 20 - 08:00 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Aug 20 - 08:32 AM
Jon Freeman 02 Aug 20 - 09:23 AM
Stilly River Sage 02 Aug 20 - 11:42 AM
Dave Hanson 02 Aug 20 - 03:15 PM
Jos 02 Aug 20 - 03:41 PM
Charmion 02 Aug 20 - 08:09 PM
JennieG 02 Aug 20 - 10:10 PM
Charmion 03 Aug 20 - 10:38 AM
Mrrzy 03 Aug 20 - 10:42 PM
Jos 04 Aug 20 - 03:27 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Aug 20 - 03:57 AM
JennieG 04 Aug 20 - 06:51 AM
Raggytash 04 Aug 20 - 07:30 AM
Jon Freeman 04 Aug 20 - 07:48 AM
Mrrzy 04 Aug 20 - 07:49 AM
Charmion 04 Aug 20 - 03:37 PM
Jos 04 Aug 20 - 04:01 PM
Dave Hanson 04 Aug 20 - 04:06 PM
Raggytash 04 Aug 20 - 06:14 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Aug 20 - 06:15 PM
Jos 05 Aug 20 - 04:14 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Aug 20 - 05:39 AM
Mrrzy 05 Aug 20 - 08:59 AM
Raggytash 05 Aug 20 - 09:08 AM
Charmion 05 Aug 20 - 09:33 AM
Charmion 05 Aug 20 - 09:35 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Aug 20 - 04:12 PM
leeneia 07 Aug 20 - 12:45 AM
Jos 07 Aug 20 - 01:33 AM
Raggytash 07 Aug 20 - 06:48 AM
Jos 07 Aug 20 - 07:10 AM
Mrrzy 07 Aug 20 - 07:27 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Aug 20 - 08:30 AM
Charmion 07 Aug 20 - 11:31 AM
Jos 07 Aug 20 - 12:07 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 30 Jul 20 - 08:23 PM

Raggy, you are a Good Spouse. Isn’t that an Eton Mess?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 31 Jul 20 - 08:39 AM

Felt a little iffy so had a large mug of chicken Better Than Bouillon with a dash each of lemon and hot sauce. Mmmm.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 31 Jul 20 - 12:24 PM

Charmion, an Eton Mess is when it's all smashed up together.

I much prefer something that looks aesthetically pleasing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 31 Jul 20 - 12:51 PM

Then, Raggy, I think you may have committed Pavlova.

I have read about these elegant confections but never attempted to construct one myself. I stand in awe of those who do -- especially since they always insist that "it's so EASY!"

Sez they. I remain impressed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 07:20 AM

This is why the mise en place is so important: I had most of the ingedients for my sauerkraut soup already sizzling when I realized I could *not* open the jar of sauerkraut!

Still, it was a yummy sausage-and-veg concoction...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 07:30 AM

When I can't open a jar with a metal lid, usually when it has been sitting in the cupboard for some time (years), I usually find that hitting the lid with a sharp object to pierce it will do the trick.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 08:41 AM

Back in the mid-70s, I worked in the Navy hospital in Halifax. Sterile distilled water came in cylindrical 80-oz brown glass bottles with short, narrow necks and small screw-on lids that were always stuck fast after their trip through the autoclave. To open such a bottle, we would upend it and gently rap the edge of the lid on the hard terrazzo floor. This technique never failed, and I use it to this day when I have to open a large jar. It’s less effective with small jars and bottles; dunno why.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 08:56 AM

A technique with bottles with narrow necks and small screw tops is to grip the bottle top between a door and the door frame at the hinge side of the door. This holds the bottle very tightly while you put all your strength into turning it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 09:57 AM

Rubber gloves will help to hold then tightly.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 11:08 AM

Oh, I whacked it, hot-watered it, and I even have the thingie that usually works, that improves grip and increases moment arm [who says you never use high school physics?] but noooo. Tonight Imma sic my son on it. Then next time I'll be ready.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 12:14 PM

Raggytash, I suddenly find myself in possession of three egg whites at the height of soft fruit season. So I shall make a Pavlova or blow up the kitchen trying!

You have inspired me. It’s your fault.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dorothy Parshall
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 12:56 PM

When a jar is difficult, I turn it upside down in a bowl or pan of HOT water and leave it until it opens. Usually works.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 01:42 PM

Something about the contents of a jar that is so reluctant to open - just so it wasn't swollen and shut!

I have one of those rubber-lined multi-size lid grip things that I bought while I was in the throes of PMR - weak hands were a feature of it; I use a pliers on small bottle screw tops if it won't open. I suppose the "pierce the lid" tip would work - just such a hazard to work around that now sharp metal. Rubber gloves work. I have a flat thin rubber disk that I think was meant as a sink stopper but that also works on some jars. That doorway method sounds effective but I'd be afraid of leaving a mark on the wood.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 01 Aug 20 - 01:44 PM

Go for it Charmion, it really is very easy ..............honest!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 08:00 AM

Well Charmion, how did you get on with making Meringues?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 08:32 AM

Scotsman went into the bakers shop. Pointing to a confection in the window, he asked the baker, "Is that cake or a meringue?"

"No, you're right, it's a cake..."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 09:23 AM

We've had something like this for opening the odd stuck jam jar or bottle lid for over 20 years and while not used often, it's been very useful to have around.

We also have an electric jar opener somewhere but I took it out of circulation. It's beyond me why but both parents were capable of thinking it was the tin opener and getting it quite stuck - I had some struggles freeing it.

Oh and I don't know if others do it but a family thing anyway. When you do pass the item with the top to someone else and they open it with ease, you say "I must have loosened it".


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 11:42 AM

It's so hot right now in Texas I could put meringues on parchment and slide it onto the afternoon hot pavement to cook.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 03:15 PM

It was so hot yesterday I saw a dog chasing a cat and they were both walking.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 03:41 PM

Yesterday I started with the recipe for Jansson's Temptation from Donuel's link back in June, then added garlic, leek, courgette, a bit of left-over cauliflower and some fresh herbs.
Not that I'm wedded to the 'five-a-day' mantra, but I like to add a few extras.
I made a lot, so guess what I'm having tonight.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 08:09 PM

Raggytash, I made the Pavlova and it was boffo. It was also easy, as advertised.

I started with a recipe by Nigella Lawson, but that did not take me far — for one thing, I had only three egg whites and she wanted four, but a little arithmetic fixed that. Also, we had no whipping cream, and I had neither the time nor the inclination to make a fruit sauce, so I dressed it with vanilla ice cream and sweetened thawed strawberries.

I can definitely see myself doing that again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 02 Aug 20 - 10:10 PM

Charmion, a little finely-grated chocolate atop your pav is not bad either. Of course it needs to be good quality, preferably dark if you like it......not cheap crappy stuff.

(Places tips of fingers together in front of mouth and blows kiss to pav)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 03 Aug 20 - 10:38 AM

Jennie, I always try to avoid crappy stuff, which is sometimes surprisingly expensive.

The chocolate idea will appeal to Himself, who would eat a bushel basket if it came with chocolate on it. Do you add that when the meringue is still warm?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Aug 20 - 10:42 PM

Son failed. I whacked it harder and heard it pop, then it was bare-hand openable.

Something came up on another thread ... Were any of you taught to use scissors rather than a knife, with basil?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 03:27 AM

I use scissors for most herbs. Nobody taught me, I worked it out for myself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 03:57 AM

Snipping herbs with scissors in a cup or jug saves washing up. The exception is basil. Keep the baby leaves to sprinkle on the finished dish but tear the bigger leaves with your fingers and add them just before the end. And always include the leaf stalks of most herbs. Just cut them up small, that's all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 06:51 AM

No, I would add the grated chocolate once all has cooled down. If you serve with whipped cream, just sprinkle on top of the cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 07:30 AM

Good on you Charmion, told you it wasn't difficult!!

Anyone ever had Greek Basil, it has much smaller leaves than normal but with an intense flavour. I much prefer it when on the rare occasions I can get hold of it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 07:48 AM

Yep Raggy. I've neither made this in a while nor had close to the same success with the plant (and have no basil of any sort planted this year) but the best pesto we ever made used the Greek Basil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 07:49 AM

Hmmm... Basil in excess has a licoricey flavor I don't like, but I am always curious to try new things.

Mom used a knife to chiffonade other herbs. Just basil has to have scissors.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 03:37 PM

I roasted a chicken yesterday, so today I must make chicken salad.

I've been told that "most people" prefer the breast meat, so I guess that's yet more proof (as if I needed it) that we're weird chez nous -- we like the legs and the wings best, and eat the breast last. So it often becomes chicken salad, especially in summer.

Cold roast chicken breast, sans skin, cut up in half-inch cubes
chopped celery
chopped apple (don't peel it)
finely sliced onion
thyme (dried or fresh, your choice)
garlic salt
freshly ground black pepper
mayonnaise thinned with vinaigrette

The amount (by volume) of apple & veg should be equal to or a bit greater than the amount of meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 04:01 PM

Neither the chicken breast nor the legs are the best part. The best part is the thighs. And always keep the skin on, it's the other best part.
And it's good for you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 04:06 PM

I fully agree with Jos, the thighs are the tastiest part of a chicken.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 06:14 PM

I've been thinking Charmion ...........an unusual event for me I might add! .......... if you made Meringues what did you do with the egg yolks?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Aug 20 - 06:15 PM

The thighs, wings and underneath meat are the best. On every roast chicken there are two little oysters of underneath meat that we wrestle each other for in our house. But Mrs Steve has yet to discover the sheer joy of the parson's nose, which is by far the tastiest bit of a chicken, but which no-one in our house has ever discovered, apart from me. Long may that remain so.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 04:14 AM

Is Mrs Steve not a mudcatter then? Otherwise you've given the game away now.

(My mother always had the parson's nose, but didn't say why.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 05:39 AM

No she isn't, though one can never rule out the occasional rummaging in my history. I neither know nor care! I've always felt that investigating your partner's online interactions would be a certain path to misery.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 08:59 AM

We called it the pope's nose.

I read in a Chinese cookery book that the best meat on the chicken is in the middle joint of the wing. I still like thighs and those nuggets the Shaws wrassle over. Those go to the person who gets the chicken out of the oven.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 09:08 AM

Decades ago when I was still working as a chef we used to roast up to a 100 chickens at a time.

The chefs would descend upon them like a plague of locusts when they came out of the oven to pick out the oysters.

The clientele NEVER saw them!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 09:33 AM

The oyster bone was a particular treat for a small child in my family, and the chicken's tail was the parson's nose, or the Pope's nose, or (when we were feeling extra ecumenical) the Moderator's nose.

Now that I carve the chicken, the oysters and the Moderator's nose are MINE. Himself gets the legs.

Answering Steve's question about the egg yolks: They went into the rich French pastry I made for Saturday's sour-cream cherry tart. It's a fairly ridiculous recipe with a quarter pound of butter and three yolks, and a damnable nuisance to roll out, but I've never found anything better for a fruit-and-custard pie.

The cherries were the light red Montmorency type known around here as "pie cherries", and I made the custard with crème fraîche (now available in Perth County!) instead of American-style sour cream, and it was boffo.

I probably won't make another pie until Thanksgiving, when I will use the frozen remainder of the pumpkin pulp yielded by last year's Hallowe'en shrunken heads. For that, English-style plain pastry is best.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 09:35 AM

Sorry, that wasn't Steve's question but Raggy's. But the answer stands.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 Aug 20 - 04:12 PM

It's the pope's nose on a turkey at Christmas. I know, because Terry Wogan said so. Once your chicken/turkey has rested for a few minutes, you, the chef, go into the kitchen on your own to remove and devour said appendage. There is a certain way of pulling off the "nose" so as to also remove an immoral amount of the skin just behind it. You are perfectly justified in doing this, and the beauty is that no-one will know that you've done it. It makes your aperitif glass of white wine taste twice as good. Lines the stomach too, so to speak. Shhh...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 12:45 AM

We still don't have an oven, so I invented Pork Calypso, which is sort of Caribbean. It doesn't have the red pepper of Caribbean seasoning, and it's not grilled or roasted, so I gave it a new name.

Pork Calypso

Pork butt or shoulder (same thing) . Select the flattest cut.
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
many grinds of black pepper

Line a reasonably-sized slow cooker with a Reynolds slow-cooker liner. Put the meat in the microwave and nuke it at medium power about 5 minutes to kill the germs and make it lukewarm. Set it in the slow cooker and rub the spices and black pepper onto top. Place it in the cooker so as much of the surface is pressed against the pot as possible. Add 2-4 tablespoons water.

Cover and cook on Low till very tender, maybe six hours. Remove carefully* from pot and let cool about 40 minutes. (set a timer) Refrigerate on a trivet till next day and discard fat.   Slice and serve with pasta, using the cooking liquid to make a sauce. Or make sandwiches. Delicious!

I wonder whether one should remove the cooking liquid with a basting bulb halfway through cooking. Hmmm...

Sweet potatoes and pineapple go well with this, but not in the same dish.

The beauty of the slow cooker is that its gentle heat does not destroy the spices.
===================
Removing the meat can be dangerous, because the bag can break and dump hot food on a person. But I don't want to put that hot, heavy pot in my fridge. So I set the cooker in the sink. Then I gather the top of the bag together and slip a steel bowl the same diameter as the slow cooker under the bag as I lift it out. I think this is safe. I leave the food in the bag and in the steel bowl to cool in the fridge.

Over the years, I have used many slow-cooker bags, and only one ever broke. One was enough to convince me to be careful.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 01:33 AM

"Pork butt or shoulder (same thing)"

I thought "butt" was what Americans call the rump - or does it also refer to the shoulder? I'm confused.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 06:48 AM

"Put the meat in the microwave and nuke it at medium power about 5 minutes to kill the germs and make it lukewarm."


Leeneia, I think you will find that germs absolutely delight in being lukewarm!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 07:10 AM

Six hours in the slow cooker should kill off most of the germs, though - I wouldn't bother with the microwave.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 07:27 AM

I noticed the butt=shoulder too. I thunk they meant Any really big piece of pig.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 08:30 AM

The cut of pork matters a lot. Leg and fillet are more or less tasteless. The fattier the cut, the better the flavour. I always use shoulder for a good roast to feed the masses, preferably on the bone but even boned and rolled is fine. Always slow-roasted for hours, with a boost at the end to crackle the crackling. As a gourmet for two, you can't beat belly on the bone. Good pork sausages are made from shoulder. One of my favourites is the herby, cured Italian pork jowl (guanciale), for a peerless carbonara. It's extremely fatty but begod it tastes wonderful. Free-range pork, preferably not the boring Landrace breed, always tastes much better than Belsen-house pork, and has a much nicer texture. A thick-cut pork chop, baked with mushrooms, lemon, fresh thyme and cream, done the Delia way, is a thing of beauty too. I cut the rinds off and freeze them to go into my boeuf en daube when the weather turns cold.

Discussions about how to get good crackling can get very heated. For me it's good, deep scoring with a Stanley knife, just seasoning without oil and a 15-minute hot boost at the end of roasting. Shoot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 11:31 AM

The American "pork shoulder butt" is the upper, or butt, end of the pig's foreleg, including only the muscle and bone of the shoulder joint and upper back.

The pig's actual butt, or bum, is the ham.

(I also translate from French.)

I'm with Steve Shaw on the issue of pork lusciousness -- the shoulder wins by miles. Loin and leg roasts benefit hugely from smoking and curing, which is why ham is so much easier to find than a fresh leg roast of pork. It also explains all the variant forms of bacon, of which my favourite is Canadian-style peameal ...

Hmmmm. Let's talk about bacon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Aug 20 - 12:07 PM

Can I just put in a word for the shoulder of lamb, which, like the shoulder of pork, is far tastier than the leg.


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