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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Donuel 06 Jul 20 - 06:44 PM
Steve Shaw 06 Jul 20 - 07:18 PM
Charmion 06 Jul 20 - 08:00 PM
JennieG 07 Jul 20 - 01:38 AM
Charmion 07 Jul 20 - 08:58 AM
Mrrzy 07 Jul 20 - 12:23 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jul 20 - 02:26 PM
Mrrzy 07 Jul 20 - 03:50 PM
JennieG 07 Jul 20 - 08:35 PM
Jos 08 Jul 20 - 02:17 AM
JennieG 08 Jul 20 - 03:00 AM
Mrrzy 08 Jul 20 - 08:48 AM
Charmion 08 Jul 20 - 12:57 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jul 20 - 06:45 AM
Mrrzy 09 Jul 20 - 08:05 AM
Charmion 09 Jul 20 - 09:55 AM
Raggytash 09 Jul 20 - 01:07 PM
leeneia 09 Jul 20 - 01:38 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jul 20 - 06:31 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jul 20 - 08:42 PM
Charmion 09 Jul 20 - 09:07 PM
JennieG 09 Jul 20 - 10:07 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 20 - 12:50 AM
leeneia 10 Jul 20 - 12:55 AM
Dave Hanson 10 Jul 20 - 02:28 AM
Donuel 10 Jul 20 - 10:34 AM
Mrrzy 10 Jul 20 - 11:33 AM
Charmion 10 Jul 20 - 02:22 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Jul 20 - 04:07 PM
Jos 12 Jul 20 - 04:13 PM
Charmion 12 Jul 20 - 09:22 PM
Mrrzy 13 Jul 20 - 09:15 AM
Charmion 13 Jul 20 - 09:32 AM
Donuel 13 Jul 20 - 09:48 AM
Mrrzy 13 Jul 20 - 02:34 PM
Charmion 13 Jul 20 - 04:13 PM
Jos 13 Jul 20 - 04:47 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jul 20 - 07:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jul 20 - 08:37 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jul 20 - 08:53 PM
Charmion 14 Jul 20 - 10:16 AM
Stilly River Sage 15 Jul 20 - 10:27 AM
leeneia 15 Jul 20 - 01:13 PM
Mrrzy 16 Jul 20 - 05:11 PM
Mrrzy 18 Jul 20 - 12:35 PM
Charmion 20 Jul 20 - 09:56 AM
Mrrzy 20 Jul 20 - 10:39 AM
Stilly River Sage 20 Jul 20 - 11:58 AM
Steve Shaw 20 Jul 20 - 03:44 PM
Charmion 20 Jul 20 - 09:14 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 06:44 PM

Are spicy hot foods really good for you in hot weather?
I like slushys made in my Red Sox mini fridge from flavored water.
Its probably bad for me in hot weather.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 07:18 PM

I will eat or drink anything at any time of the day or night. What I eat or drink is no predictor of the kind of sleep I'll have. In this regard I do consider myself to be truly blessed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 06 Jul 20 - 08:00 PM

Oh, Steve, you are indeed blessed.

I just split a bottle of Pinot noir and a rib steak with Himself. If I were so misguided as to follow that up with cheese and port, my nocturnal misery would be unconfined.

It’s a sad fact that, when my olfactory senses finally developed to the point where I could truly appreciate such things, my digestion got other ideas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 01:38 AM

Charmion - 'pumpkin' in Ozziespeak is pretty much any vegetable (or are they actually fruit?) in the squash family with an orange flesh. Butternuts, to us, are pumpkin. So are Queensland Blue pumkins, green and yellow striped Japanese (Jap) pumpkins, you name it.

I made some yummy roasted pumpkin soup last week using a Queensland Blue, but tinned will do to try the scone recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 08:58 AM

I think I knew that, JennieG. I was being sarcastic.

North Americans are weird about the fruit of genus Cucurbita. Acre upon acre of pumpkins (the big, round orange kind) are grown here, but I'll bet money that a substantial proportion of them end up in landfill and compost bins after a couple of weeks on doorsteps as Hallowe'en decorations. Pies and sweet breads are about the only ways most of us eat the flesh, if we bother at all, and most people use canned pumpkin because, you know, convenience. We're a bit more flexible with squash, but not much, and the long-keeping winter squashes are often served sweetened.

Most of the recipes I know for squash or pumpkin that are not sweet are from Asian and African cuisines. I have never seen canned pumpkin or squash soup in a grocery store.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 12:23 PM

Spicy food cools by making you sweat [haha typoed Swear] a lot.

I made iced tea finally by making 4 cups of double-strength tea in a bowl, waiting for it to cool, then putting it into an 8-cup pitcher and adding 4 cups of cold water. Sweetened in individual cups by a tsp of maple or simple syrup. Had I wanted to sweeten the whole pitcher, I'd have double-sweetened the hot before diluting.

I need ideas for baked burgers, no buns, roast veg to go with so it can all be done in one oven... Got anything for me?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 02:26 PM

You're not asking for a suggestion to combine them (like shepherd's pie). You want to make hamburger patties and roast vegetables? It's an easy matter to find recipes for roast root vegetables, etc. I suppose you could use a lidded container and steam/bake the meat (and add smoke flavor, etc.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 03:50 PM

Thanks... Looking mostly for baked burger ideas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 07 Jul 20 - 08:35 PM

I'm with you on convenience, Charmion. It isn't difficult to prepare from scratch, but sometimes having some of the work done for you is good.

Apart from pumpkin scones Ozzies haven't really gotten into the sweet pumpkin thing - although I do remember my Nanna Davis making gramma pie. As a child, I could never quite decide if I liked it or not.

Our autumn trips to Ontario have coincided with Tim Horton's pumpkin spice muffin season. One bite of those goodies and we were goners, now I make my own; canned pumpkin is unknown here, so I bake cut-up pumpkin (leaving the skin on, no seasoning) in the oven until cooked, peel, and puree the flesh. It keeps in the freezer in one cup bags, many recipes seem to use one cup.

Haven't made any for a while, I can hear them calling......


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 02:17 AM

Until I looked at the link I just assumed that Gramma Pie was a recipe commonly made by Grandmas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 03:00 AM

That's what I thought when I was a kid too, Jos!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 08:48 AM

Uck on pumpkin anything. Or pumpkin-spice anything.

I may just make a stir fry with my ground meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Jul 20 - 12:57 PM

That gramma pumpkin your Nana made into pie, JennieG, is called a crookneck squash in these parts. It's a winter squash like the Hubbard and butternut varieties, but less often seen in supermarkets. People who grow their own like them.

I have mixed feelings about so-called pumpkin spice, which is ubiquitous in September and October, thanks to Tim Horton's and every other pastry purveyor in these parts. A good pumpkin pie has ginger, clove and nutmeg in it as well as cinnamon, but I can't detect anything but cinnamon in the Tim's version. And it doesn't belong in coffee, except as a light dusting on the foam of a cappucino.

This morning, Himself whipped up a batch of bannock at zero dark thirty, so I emerged from the pit to the smell of frybread wafting through the house. Worse things happen at sea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 06:45 AM

I adapted a recipe by Gino D'Acampo a couple of nights ago and it was a triumph. For two people you need:

250g dried linguine (or spaghetti or tagliatelle)
A sprinkling of dried chilli flakes, to taste (it needs to be quite spicy)
About 125g diced pancetta or unsmoked bacon
A big garlic clove
About 30g FRESH basil (or forget it)
A big double handful of the best cherry tomatoes, cut in half
100ml of the finest extra virgin olive oil, plus an extra glug to fry the bacon
Salt
Parmesan or pecorino, freshly grated.

Start the pasta pan going with loads of boiling salted water. It should taste like the Mediterranean.

Turn on your oven very low (100C) both to warm your bowls and to soften the tomatoes on a small tray (they need to keep their shape, not fall to bits).

Use a hand blender or whatever you use to whizz the 100ml olive oil and garlic for a minute. Add the basil, stalks and all, and whizz again for another minute. It needs to be quite smooth.

Meanwhile, fry the bacon with the chilli flakes and a glug of olive oil in a small frying pan until rendered and not quite crispy - it took me about eight minutes, so next time I'll do this while the pasta is cooking.

When the pasta is cooked al dente, drain it but keep a bit of pasta water just in case. Tip the pasta back into its pan and just add everything else to it, stirring carefully off the heat to thoroughly coat the pasta. Decide whether it needs a splash of pasta water to loosen the sauce (mine didn't but it was a marginal decision).

Transfer the grub into warm bowls and sprinkle the cheese on top. There you go. It's simple and quick and it's a star performer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 08:05 AM

Stir fry with ground bison, zucch and asparagus. Not bad at all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 09:55 AM

Imma gonna try that, Steve. Himself likes a pasta dish on the side or as a first course, and this one would be perfect.

The sauce looks like a pesto with sun-dried tomatoes that's sold here in jars, but much better because it's made with fresh everything.

The whizzing of garlic, olive oil and basil would go well in a food processor, if one is to hand. I have found that the food processor is heavy and awkward and takes up a lot of space both in storage and on the work surface, but it really rocks in a messy, labour-intensive job like pesto.

We are now heading into the shank of tomato season in Ontario, when we eat tomatoes with every meal including breakfast and the midnight snack. I'm always looking for new ways to use tomatoes, especially the small ones that are perfectly fine until abruptly they're not, and the whole punnet goes over when I turn my back on it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 01:07 PM

Because I have time on my hands I've gone back to making bread. Todays offering is a white loaf, glazed with egg. It's just come out of the oven and looks great. Just let it cool and little and then lather a slice with fresh Irish Butter. Uuummmmmmmmmmmmmmm !!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 01:38 PM

Back to pumpkin pie spice. I've decided that when you put the Big 3 spices (cinnamon, cloves, ginger), all you wind up with is a rather sharp, scratchy taste which I dislike. So now I just pick one of the three and use it.

When I was a kid, spice cake was a popular dessert, and I never liked it. Now I know that that was because of that scratchy effect I mentioned. A couple years ago I made spice cake using only ginger, and I liked it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 06:31 PM

Don't be tempted to over-elaborate. Just really good olive oil, garlic and FRESH basil. It's a sort of stripped-down pesto, no pine nuts, no cheese. Keep it that way. I love the simplicity of Italian cooking. All it takes is the finest ingredients you can lay your hands on. I got that from St Marcella and I'm sticking to it! And no dried basil, not ever. Ruinous stuff.

On pesto, I don't know what it's like your end, but I won't buy ready-made pesto. It's unfailingly horrible. Pesto needs your finest olive oil, freshly-peeled garlic and basil that you've just gathered yourself, as well as freshly-grated Parmesan from that big chunk in your fridge and pine nuts that are so good you can hardly resist just tipping the pack into your mouth. No sunflower oil, no dried this or reconstituted that.

I make a special pesto for bruschetta topping that also includes sun-dried tomatoes, but I may have mentioned it before...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 08:42 PM

I have never understood the US obsession with pumpkin. It's bland and mushy and utterly uninteresting. I can make a very good soup out of butternut squash, and can roast chunks of it in the oven to go with my roast. As soon as I read that your pumpkin spice is full of cinnamon, well that's me out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 09:07 PM

The thing about pumpkin, Steve, is pie, and that’s associated with the American Thanksgiving holiday, which is massively more emotive and/or evocative than English harvest festivals or the Canadian version of Thanksgiving. Almost as powerful as Christmas. I am quite satisfied to eat pumpkin pie about once per year, myself. Himself, on the other hand, would eat it every week if I would make it that often.

Now squash is another matter. (Yes, I know it’s botanically almost indistinguishable from pumpkin.) I cannot get squash past Himself’s teeth unless it’s in a certain Moroccan stew I make occasionally and serve with couscous. I like it baked, stewed, steamed, roasted before a quick fire — you name it, but I have to eat it alone. I haven’t tried mixing it with custard and serving it in a pastry case, however. Not that desperate yet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 09 Jul 20 - 10:07 PM

I don't mind the pumpkin spice taste. Although there are squillions (well, nearly) of recipes to make your own, I thought I would try a ready-made one so brought a little box back from Canada with me. Brand is Club House, ingredients are listed as cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, cloves, and it smells good.

I usually drink my coffee black with three drops of milk, but have tried pumpkin spice latte. Not bad, but I couldn't drink it every day all year round.

The link to the information on gramma, aka crookneck squash, was interesting. Nanna's sisters lived in the Hunter Valley a couple of hours north of Sydney, which is where gramma pie seems to have been very popular - and it may have been unknown in other parts of Oz. When Nanna left her first husband she went to the town where her sisters lived, so perhaps picked up the idea from there. She earned her living as a cook and her pies were good.

Except that I was never quite sure if I liked gramma pie.......


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 12:50 AM

I love pumpkin pie, and in my book, Thanksgiving is a better holiday than xmas. I loved the gathering of family and friends as I was growing up, and it still is the holiday I am most interested in celebrating as fully as possible. Not to do with pilgrims, everything to do with my loved-ones getting together. Even if it isn't exactly on the date of the official US holiday.

That said, my ex is from Puerto Rico, and squash/pumpkin gets used in savory dishes, like as an addition to bean dishes. No spice seasonings, it vanishes into the dish, simply providing nutrition and thickening.

This evening I had a 6oz piece of Haddock that I've had in the freezer. I bought a couple of packages of frozen fish planks at my favorite discount/gourmet grocery, and gave one to a friend. I heard from him that they're really good, so I dug it out and thawed some. And the simple butter in the skillet, flour, salt and pepper on the fish was just perfect. Lemon squeezed over it, with an extra grind of pepper, and it's a rich white fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 12:55 AM

You bring back the memories, Stilly. My mother used to cook fish that way, and I always liked it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 02:28 AM

' Fish planks ' that's a new concept for us here in the UK

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 10:34 AM

We fry fish coated in a crispy panko egg coating. It tastes fancier than it is. Flounder is quick and other fish take longer at lower heat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 11:33 AM

Thansgiving > $mas


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 10 Jul 20 - 02:22 PM

See what I mean, Steve?

I don't get it, myself, but I'm not American either. In fact, the festive desserts of my far distant youth were trifle, mince pies, and Christmas pudding with "hard sauce" (aka brandy butter), and if that ain't a cultural throwback to the Empire I don't quite know what is!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Jul 20 - 04:07 PM

"Fish planks" is simply referring to the frozen fillets that have a board-like consistency.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 12 Jul 20 - 04:13 PM

As soon as I read 'fish planks' I knew exactly what it meant, even though I had never come across it before - it's such a good description.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Jul 20 - 09:22 PM

Flash-frozen fish fillets = fish planks. Typically sold in heavy plastic bags in quantities up to a kilo, depending on where you shop. Pollock, basa, tilapia, perch, sometimes haddock, rarely cod nowadays.

The fish plank was preceded by the fish brick, a pound or so of fish fillets packed into a rectangular waxed-cardboard box and frozen. My mother, who could ruin rations for NATO, would set the oven at 350F, put a frozen fish brick in a baking tin lined with tin-foil, smear the top of the brick with corn-oil margarine, and bung it in the oven “until done”.

No wonder I started cooking at the age of 12 — in self-defence!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 09:15 AM

I love my frozen swordfish fillets... In a toaster-oven with butter and spiced, in half an hour you have meltingly delish swordfish and a tasty sauce. Yum yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 09:32 AM

On the rare occasions when I have seen swordfish for sale in Canada, it was fresh (or at least not frozen), cut into steaks, and paralytically expensive. About the only wild-caught fish we can afford nowadays is local pickerel and smelt, in season, or haddock trucked from the coast. The last time I bought cod, it came from Iceland and cost the earth.

Sigh.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 09:48 AM

Love swordfish but in the last 20 years they have gone from huge adult steaks to tiny baby steaks and I don't have the heart to buy it anymore.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 02:34 PM

Ran across an article on the diff between stock (made with bones) and broth (made with meat), so there is no such thing as "bone broth" - true?

Discounting veg stock/broth for this question.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 04:13 PM

I’ve been cooking a long, long time, and I first heard the phrase “bone broth” about 2015. As far as I can tell, it’s what I’ve always called stock, or meat stock, if I’m talking to vegetarians.

Now, stock and broth are different things. Stock is what you get when you put bones and vegetables in water, boil them for an extended period, and strain out the solids. It becomes broth when you add it to fresh ingredients and cook ‘em up into soup. Concentrate and clarify it, and you get bouillon. Concentrate it to a gluey consistency and the result is demi-glace.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 04:47 PM

Just what I was thinking - stock is an ingredient.
If I wanted a light supper and was offered a bowl of broth and some crusty bread - well that's what I have just eaten. If I was offered a bowl of stock I might be less enthusiastic, even with crusty bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 07:21 PM

If I have a chicken carcass I boil it up for a couple of hours with whatever scrappy bits of onion, celery and carrot I have to hand. A bay leaf will go in there, along with some fresh thyme and some black pepper. Not salt. Parsley if I have it. Strain that lot and you have lovely stock. It should go without saying that the chicken should be free-range. If I have the giblets they can go in, but not the liver.

I won't use that awful Marigold vegetable bouillon. Used in the recommended amounts, it's way too salty. For veg stock I boil up some scrappy old outer celery stalks, some carrots with their peelings, an onion or two, a bay leaf and whatever herbs I have. Super!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 08:37 PM

If you have bones you want to make broth with then it is much improved if you bake them before you put them in a pot with liquid. Especially beef bones.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jul 20 - 08:53 PM

Agreed, though oddly I don't have much call for beef stock in my cooking. I don't think that you really need to roast bones for a chicken stock. I don't suppose you can beat a damn good beef stock for French onion soup...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 14 Jul 20 - 10:16 AM

Professional cooks make "white" and "brown" meat stocks, the difference being whether the bones have been roasted before going into the pot.

White stock is for all those dishes in which the meat flavour is subordinate to vegetables, such as most veggie soups (leek & potato, carrot & ginger), or the meat is mildly flavoured -- pork, most poultry, rabbit -- and the primary flavouring is mildly acidic (especially white wine, lemon, lime and apple) or aromatic (e.g., tarragon, oregano, marjoram or thyme). Brown stock is for dishes with caramelized ingredients, especially onions and seared red meats, and bitter flavourings, including the tannins in red wine. Of course, lots of exceptions apply, especially for non-European cuisines.

French onion soup is traditionally made with the beef shin that on other days would go into the pot au feu, and the onions must be carefully browned (caramelized) before the stock goes into the kettle. It's a "poor folks" dish that reached its present form in 19th-century Paris, where people crowded into industrial neighbourhoods would eat in cheap brasseries because their inadequate homes did not provide much in the way of cooking facilities. I think its popularity in North America is almost entirely due to Julia Child and Simone Beck; I imagine that Elizabeth David and her cohort probably did the same in Britain.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Jul 20 - 10:27 AM

It's really hot here now but I finally got some good cheese so I'm thinking a batch of macaroni and cheese, with crumbled Italian sausage in it, would be a quick dish. It reheats fairly well (add a little milk, microwave at a medium high and stir several times).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Jul 20 - 01:13 PM

Mac & cheese with Italian sausage in it. I like that idea, Stilly.

We still don't have a stove (renovation) so I can't roast or bake. But recently I bought a flat piece of rump roast and loaded it with lemon pepper. Put it in the slow cooker and strewed sauteed garlic thereupon. Cooked it on low about 7 hours. Probably could have been six.

Took it out. Refrigerator overnight. Sliced thinly across the grain, removed fat, made sandwiches. Excellent. Tomorrow we will use the rest with noodles and the liquor from the cooking.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Jul 20 - 05:11 PM

I would like to thank whoever taught me that picking over crabmeat for shells is best done in a *metal* bowl, so you can *hear* the shell pieces your eyes and fingers missed.
So had crab set aside in lime juice, chopped a shallot, crushed some garlic, cut up a half-zucchini and a defrosted cod fillet into pieces that ranged from small dice to large chunks. Melted a rather lot of butter, turned on kettle, cooked shallots in the butter with some smoked paprika and a smidge of cayenne, after a bit added garlic, after a bit added zucch, tossed till small zucch pieces almost done, then added rather a lot of white wine, cooked down till big zucch chunks almost cooked, added fish, tossed till big fish pieces almost done, then added some boiling water and chicken [better than] bouillon, and when it came back to the boil added the crab and lime juice, stirred, turned off, did something else for about 5 mn, then ate. Yum, yum, yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Jul 20 - 12:35 PM

Tomates provençales:

Slice tomato[es] in half, set skin-side down/cut side up on baking dish. Salt, pepper, some parsley, some basil, more garlic, glug of olive oil on cut sides. Bake in hot-ish oven, 15-20 mn. Then don't try to eat them, they are little pools of lava. Wait. Have patience. THEN eat.

Most recipes have bread crumbs but mom's never did.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 09:56 AM

Himself affects to dislike grilled tomatoes, Mrrzy, but I bet he'll like your Mum's recipe.

We had ferocious thunderstorms with tornado warnings yesterday, so no barbecue. Instead, I roasted the Sunday dinner chicken Marcella Hazan's way, with a lemon inside.

Heat the oven to 375F.

Take a chicken of medium size -- 1.5 to 2 kg (three to four pounds), pat it dry, and pull out the pad of fat from the vent. Take one large or two small lemons and stab them through and through with a skewer, making at least 20 holes in each. Put the lemon(s) in the cavity of the chicken and close the vent with a skewer. Truss the chicken just tightly enough to keep the legs and wings from sprawling, and set the chicken breast down on a rack in a smallish roasting pot. Salt and pepper all the surfaces you can reach, and put the blob of fat on the chicken's back.

Roast for half an hour, then turn the chicken over. Salt and pepper again, and baste if you feel like it. Roast for another hour or so, cranking up the heat to 400F for the last 20 minutes to brown the breast. Total roasting time should be 25 to 30 minutes per pound, or a hair over an hour per kilo. Carve and serve immediately.

If you're a bit of an overachiever, you could ream the lemon and use the juice in soup, especially avgolemono.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 10:39 AM

I am a big fan of poking holes in things and sticking them into poultry cavities. Cherry tomatoes in game hens, lemons in chickens, larger tomatoes in ducks...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 11:58 AM

Cooking is piecemeal right now; a fillet of haddock for dinner last night, an omelette for lunch, the morning oatmeal in a crockpot. There haven't been any large cooking operations beyond the steam-producing canning of a case and 1/3 of homegrown tomatoes (16 pints). The irony of canning is that it happens when the house is already too hot.

I made hummus last week that has been a nice late afternoon snack before a light dinner.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 03:44 PM

I don't agree with carve and serve immediately. A rest of up to half an hour is extremely beneficial in m'humble.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Jul 20 - 09:14 PM

Steve, I normally agree with you on resting a roast chicken, but this Marcella recipe is an exception. If the stars are in alignment, the skin puffs up most marvellously, and it’s nice to get it to the table like that — it deflates within a few minutes.


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Mudcat time: 20 October 2:14 PM EDT

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