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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Thompson 07 Nov 18 - 11:00 PM
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Subject: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 07 Nov 18 - 11:00 PM

What are we eating today? I made a Yotam Ottolenghi chickpea dish and it was yum. Two tins of chickpeas with the liquid poured off. Caramelise a couple of onions and garlic to taste; add the chickpeas and then about a tablespoon each of chopped rosemary, thyme and sage, and a tablespoon of anchovies. And slivers of lemon zest - the yellow part of the skin of a (washed) lemon. Let it all simmer and combine; add a couple of cups of chicken stock and simmer a bit more. Mash some of the chickpeas a bit. Just before serving, add a tablespoon each of chopped parsley and chopped mint, the juice of the lemon and a tablespoon of za'atar, and stir them in. Very moreish indeed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Nov 18 - 11:04 PM

Alas, it's the "liquid diet" portion of prep day leading to tomorrow's colonoscopy. Ask me again tomorrow after I get back home! (Sorry to do an immediate side-track on your topic - in my refrigerator I have a wonderful batch of chicken pot pie I made on Tuesday that I reheat and serve with whole grain crackers on top instead of making a crust.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 07 Nov 18 - 11:42 PM

Oh, goodness, good luck with the colonoscopy. (Here, I think they're moving more and more to colonography instead, which can be done without anaesthetic, and is supposed to be more accurate… whether it's so or not…) Waiting for that chicken pot pie recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 06:57 AM

I did a sort of spicy cauliflower/broccoli. I think it ran fry some onion, add 1 tsp each of ground cumin and corriander and 2 tsp of mild chili powder. Bit of garlic paste, 1 jar Patak Korma sauce, and a Knorr stock pot (or two?) Add some water and cook the brassica in the mix. Cooked the evening before for consumption the next tea time.

Served with basmatti rice. A typical bodge job of mine but it turned out quite well liked.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 08:33 AM

Mmmm, sounds good! I was watching one of the English chef programmes the other day and they were making "cauliflower steak" - basically frying a big slab of cauliflower as if it's a steak. Must try it! Again, my man Yotam has a recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 08:46 AM

That link isn't working for me, try this one

The fish wouldn't go down here but perhaps I could try something on those lines one day IF feeling really keen.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 09:35 AM

Chickpea and squash stew with couscous, from a recipe by Mark Birman. It’s a less-meatarian dish that somehow manages to get winter squash into Himself. Durn it, I’ll have to hit the supermarket for ginger root, courgettes and a red sweet pepper.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 11:07 AM

Hmm, must check the ginger stocks; haven't been shopping for a couple of weeks - flu.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 04:41 PM

I just made a large pot of my friend E.V.'s Hot & Sour Chicken Soup -- most of it for the freezer as, well, winter's coming! This soup is truly both tasty and beneficial if I come down with one of winter's maladies.

E.V., like me, doesn't so much use a recipe as use an ingredient list and guide.

Thinly slice (today I varied it and used bigger chunks of everything except the carrots) onion, red bell pepper, carrot or zucchini, garlic, ginger and saute in coconut oil until tender.

Add chicken broth and pulled chicken meat. (I cheated and used a supermarket rotisserie chicken -- and put the carcass along with some veg scraps in the freezer to make stock one of these days, also for the freezer.)

Then add Asian fish sauce (nuc mam, nam pla, etc.), chili-garlic paste (or Sambal Olek or other hot pepper sauce), and rice wine vinegar -- all to taste. Adjust the three sauces for your preferred taste or amount of heat. Oh, salt and black pepper.

Believe me, if you're in the throes of a head cold this works a treat. And I find it also settles the stomach and will coax me to eat if nothing sounds good.

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 06:25 PM

This takes ten minutes max. We've had a busy day today and this is what I chucked together. With thanks to Nigel Slater, who provided the idea.

Put a pan of your favourite short pasta on to boil in salted water. 250g for two people.

Drain a jar of tuna in olive oil, preferably yellowfin (albacore). If you have tuna in spring water, throw it away unopened.

Put tuna in a bowl and add the following: a tablespoon of nonpareil capers (never use any capers bigger than those). Two cloves of garlic, finely sliced (throw your garlic crusher away - worst bloody invention ever). A helping of chopped fresh parsley (don't arse about: tear the leaves off the parsley, put them into a mug and snip away like mad for one minute with a pair of scissors). Freshly-ground black pepper. A little bit of salt, only if your tuna is unsalted. Five tablespoons of full-fat creme fraiche. Nigel uses double cream, but trust me on this. Mix up everything roughly. You want a few visible tuna flakes.

Drain the pasta and retain a mug of pasta water (you'll need some to loosen the sauce).
Mix the pasta and the tuna mix together. Use pasta water to loosen. I've never managed without it. Serve in warm bowls. Heresy coming up: serve with Parmesan. True Italians would kill me for that, but it works.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 08 Nov 18 - 11:44 PM

Oooh, those sound good! Last night I made one of our standard soups: saute onions, shallot and garlic in coconut oil, add a rake of grated carrot and keep going on low-ish heat, add chicken stock (well, I use chicken usually, or sometimes vegetable stock from cubes), then chopped-up broccoli and some flakes of dried hot chilli pepper, and finally a couple of fillets of hake. Simmer till any non-grated bits of carrot are soft and the hake has broken up and disappeared into the soup. Very nice with brown soda bread on the side.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 07:31 AM

I'm doing a risotto this evening, based on scraps of sausage, chicken and stuffing rescued from our last roast chicken dinner that I'd kept in the freezer. There'll be bacon in a t and I'm using by home-made real chicken stock. I'll let you know how it goes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 07:33 AM

Vegetable cobbler last night. Carrots, parsnips and swede for the veg inside. Used Jos-Roll frozen pastry for the cut out rounds on top and Parmesan cheese on the pastry.

I think I’ll do a Quorn mince “cottage pie” for tea today and have with some spinach. Sat, probably pizza and (deep fried) chips. Sun may be be Quorn fillets cooked in a sauce made with a sauce that’s basically a jar of the Korma stuff mixed with a tin of chopped tomato, again with rice. Mon, perhaps macaroni cheese, etc.

As you see, rarely anything needing recipes from me… Still, it does serve a purpose with me haven taken on the bulk of the cooking, we do get fresh veg and it beats the Wiltshire Farms type meals.

Trying to get back to a recipe (mostly followed and omitting the ham), one I must repeat soon is potato and leek gratin it worked out really well last time and we have plenty of leeks , although I found the potato needed a while longer to soften in the oven.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 09:11 AM

Guess who accidentally fired off his last post before editing the damn thing...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 03:17 PM

Steve Shaw -- throw in a few more things (chop up a tin of anchovies, add a can of diced tomatoes) and you've got a good puttanesca.

Love it! Will try your version as a very acceptable variant.

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 04:32 PM

This is a good recent food thread: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=165070&messages=20

And I made the "Mexican" version last night:

Instead of cornmeal, I mash up a can of butter beans or white beans or chickpeas and sometimes add a small amount of flour.

The two main variations I have made are:

"Mexican" with corn kernels, red capsicum and chilli through it and grated cheese mixed in and on top.

Zucchini with grated zucchini - and other available veg - with grated cheese in and on it.

A good standby for a quick meal and very good as leftovers.

The mashed beans/chickpeas makes it high in fibre but in fact the mash looks and acts like mashed potato. A sneaky way to add fibre without ruining a dish. I use them for making fish cakes instead of mashed potato, too. Yum!


Also, has anyone tried using the liquid from the canned white beans, butter beans or chick peas as a substitute for egg white. The liquid is called aquafaba. I tried it for making maccaroon thingies. It worked well. No beanie taste. I liked them.

20 recipes for aquafaba

Hubby & I are not on a meat-free life, but have cut meat back considerably and added lots more beanie-type things. One of my fave foods is sausage rolls but now I make a version based on mashed white beans with lots of yummy vege flavours mixed in.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 04:45 PM

My version of puttanesca (whore's pasta, or prostitute's spaghetti) is as follows:

For two people.

Four anchovy fillets in oil

100g pitted black olives, roughly chopped

A tablespoon of nonpareil capers

Chopped fresh parsley

A handful of chopped cherry tomatoes, or a tin of tomatoes

Two cloves of garlic, sliced (NOT crushed: never do that abominable thing)

A goodly sprinkling of dried chilli flakes, to taste

Extra virgin olive oil

Freshly-ground black pepper (no salt)

250g spaghetti


Get your spaghetti on the boil in salted water.

In your biggest and best shallow pan (mine are Le Creuset: snob), gently fry the garlic and chill flakes in a couple of tablespoons of olive oil for a few minutes. If the garlic goes brown, you've got it wrong. Just a gentle sizzle.

Add the anchovy and break up the fillets with a wooden spoon until they've melted. Add the capers, tomatoes, parsley, pepper and olives. Simmer until the pasta is done.

Drain the pasta when it's al dente, reserving some pasta water. You may or may not need some. Throw the pasta into the pan with the sauce. Mix well and serve. No Parmesan, but a drizzle of your very finest olive goes well. The whole spirit of the thing is that you use things only out of tins, jars or packets. That's what the ladies of the night would do to fortify themselves for the night's work to come. Gawd knows what their clients thought about the ensuing garlic breath...

In Napoli they would get the Camorra on to you for using anchovies. In other regions the chilli is omitted. That's a shame. You can hold the parsley back and sprinkle it on at the end. You can add dried oregano if you like. Not the worst idea in the world.





Put your


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 06:03 PM

Put thinly sliced carrots in a big skillet. (good use for a salad shooter)
Ditto celery
add place pieces of pre-cooked kielbasa
splash in 1/3 cup white wine

cover and simmer till carrots are cooked and kielbasa is warmed through

serve with good bread, radishes for something crisp.

We had our kielbasa shipped in by Usinger's in Milwaukee. I cooked it and froze it as soon as it arrived. This may not be practical for those across the pond.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Nov 18 - 07:24 PM

My chicken pot pie/stew doesn't have a recipe with measurements, but I can tell you what goes in it.

I use cooked chicken, in this case, chicken breast from a package that was frozen hard from the store and I didn't bother to try to soften it enough to use some and put the rest back in the freezer. It all thawed and I had about six large chicken breasts to bake at once; this recipe used 3 or 4 of them, and my chicken dice was about 1" sized pieces.

Chopped onions, sauteed, then add diced carrots and let them soften a bit. Dice red-skinned (red lasoda) potatoes and add them last because they soften up more quickly (though these are the waxy potatoes so they hold their shape better than Russets). I had a cup or more of the liquid from when I baked the chicken and I poured that in along with some water. Salt and ground pepper, and a little dried oregano were the seasonings. Water to bring up enough liquid and let it simmer a little, then add the chicken when the veg is ready and let it simmer again. I mix flour with water to use for thickening and mix it into the liquid. Serve with pie crust if you have it (when my children were small I would make pie crust and cut it out with cookie cutters. The plate of baked shapes was on the table to add to the top of their bowls of stew). I have been using some gluten free crackers with lots of different grains and seeds an it's very good broken into large pieces on top.

The way this turned out, it has probably more chicken than vegetables.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 03:58 PM

I mentioned aquafaba - an amazing little magic ingredient. It's the water you drain out of a can of white beans, butter beans or chickpeas. The bit you usually throw away.

Raspberry Rose Vegan Macarons (Using Aquafaba)

The first part of the rather long recipe at that webpage:

Ingredients

    Macaron Shells:
    250 grams Aquafaba

    1/8 teaspoon Cream of Tartar
    Pinch of Salt
    150 grams Ground Almonds
    130 gram Pure Icing Sugar*
    110 grams Superfine/Caster Sugar
    A drop of Vegan Red Food Coloring
    A few drops of Organic Rose Extract

    Raspberry Rose Buttercream:
    125 grams Vegan Butter Substitute
    55 grams Icing Sugar
    A few drops of Organic Rose Extract
    A few drops of Vegan Red Food Coloring
    25 Raspberries

    Extras:
    Piping Bags with a Round Tip attached
    Silpat Mats or Silicone Baking Paper
    Baking Trays
    Spray Bottle filled with Water

Instructions

    The night before you want to make your Macarons, prepare your Aquafaba. In a small saucepan, bring 250 grams of Aquafaba to a simmer. Let this simmer away until it has reduced to 110 grams of Aquafaba. (I pour it out and weigh it on a kitchen scale a few times in-between to check). Once it has reached 110 grams, pour it into a bowl to cool and then refrigerate overnight.
    Macaron Shells: Process Ground Almonds and Icing Sugar in a food processor and then sieve into a bowl, making sure there are no lumps in your mixture. Set aside.

[**This is the magic bit. Aquafaba acts like egg white.**]   

With a stand mixer fitted with a clean bowl and with clean beaters, whisk Aquafaba, cream of tartar and salt on high till it turns foamy and resembles frothed up egg whites. Make sure there is no more liquid left at the bottom of the bowl before moving on to the next step.


    Gradually add caster sugar in, bit by bit, whilst your mixer is turned on. Add your food coloring and Rose Extract in and then continue whisking on high for another minute. You should end up with a thick, glossy meringue. etc etc

She has other recipes e.g.
Vegan Chocolate Mousse made with Aquafaba (Chickpea Brine)

And there are heaps of recipes on the 'net if you search for "aquafaba recipes". You can use it wherever you would use egg white, as far as I know, so sweet or savoury.


I confess, I didn't precook the aquafaba the night before, blah blah. I just made a simple little crunchy meringue. They were yummy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 05:02 PM

Celebrate all the recipes but sometimes whatever you make is less important compared to the way you cook it.
I use ancient-like clay pots that I soak in water before cooking.
I use separate pots for fish(small) fowl(big) or meat(medium). There will always be some sterilized residue for the next recipe. I buy them from Germany.

If there is too much water at the end , simmer it separately for sauces.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 07:16 PM

I read another aquafaba web page and the reason you boil the chickpea water the night before is only if you have been really diligent and cooked your own chickpeas. Like that's gonna happen!

I'm too disorganised for that so I just open a can of chickpeas or other beans. The liquid in the cans is just the right consistency to start making all the different yummy recipes.

I think I'll try the chocolate mousse recipes next.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 07:24 PM

Donuel, I have owned one of those clay roasting pots for about 40 years. Haven't used it much over the last few years but maybe I should get it out of the cupboard and give it another go. It used to make a lovely roast leg of lamb.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 07:33 PM

I have a Romertopf pot that was at my Dad's house as part of his estate. A friend had given it to him and when she was helping me at his house she spotted it and told me I should keep it. That night she roasted a chicken in her Romertopf and it was amazing—tender, moist, meat falling off of the bones. I've found several others in thrift stores and sold them on eBay; I found one large enough to bake a turkey that I sold earlier this year (I don't think I'll ever do a turkey in one, so that's why I sold it. I brine my turkeys and roast them uncovered.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 07:49 PM

cool, and the skin is still crisp too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Nov 18 - 09:30 PM

I take the top off the clay baker before baking is finished to make the skin crisp up.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 06:07 PM

Today, as an experiment, I bought some beets. I expect I will microwave a beet, and simmer the greens with butter & garlic, like Sicilian spinach. As another experiment, I bought sausage, which I will broil. (Sausage is one of those things I have never eaten except in restaurants.) I will have hot tea. For dessert, sugar wafers.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 06:10 PM

Beets are pretty forgiving, however you plan to cook them. I usually steam or simmer them in shallow water. I used to peel them before I cooked them, but it seems if you cook them then the outer skin slips off easily.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 06:40 PM

Beets are easy to grow. Even I could do it. You do need to thin them, because each beet seed is actually a packet with several seeds in it, and if you don't thin them, the beets are too crowded. You can transplant the tiny seedlings so they don't go to waste.

I used to grow beets then make myself a lunch of boiled beets with butter and black pepper. Whole wheat bread on the side.

But then sex reared its ugly head. It seems that many men have a real hate for beets. My husband hates beets so bad that even the smell of my beets, leftover from cooking lunch, was really awful for him. So I gave up as a beet farmer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 07:24 PM

Well I love beetroot, and regard the corned beef and beetroot butty as a thing of great joy. However, I pee fake blood after eating it. It must run in the family. I think there's a gene. Nearly forty years ago my two-year-old daughter filled the potty with "blood." I rushed her to the doc in blind panic. Said the doc nonchalantly, "have you been feeding her beetroot?"

I had...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 08:54 PM

I suspect that is fairly common, Steve.

The weather turned very cold and blustery here today so lentil soup was on the menu. The simple Egyptian version in my Middle Eastern cookbook - water, grated onion, lentils, seasoned with salt, ground pepper, a tiny amount of cumin, and lemon juice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 09:26 PM

It's a bit hand-to-mouth this end. It's been a whirlwind four weeks since my dad died unexpectedly on 15 October (even though he was 94: he'd been a picture of health)... We've cleared the house, cremated and scattered me dad on Pendle and moved me mum from Manchester to the Westcountry into what's turned out, fortuitously, to be a lovely residential home, just five miles from our house, no mean task. Food has been a bit on the back burner, and fish and chips has been resorted to, but I did a decent chilli last night and we've had the occasional salmon arrabbiata (ask me) as well as fried salmon with lemon sauce, chips and romanesco. I've also done ox cheek casserole, which takes hours to cook but which is not only a dish of great beauty with mash and greens but which also yields plenty of lovely beefy sauce to stir into pappardelle and sprinkle with parmigiano reggiano. I also did an Elizabeth David beef daube, so simple yet so beautiful. As I've had to travel up north three times in four weeks, I've had ample opportunity to buy stuff at Gloucester Services to stock up my freezer. I have three pieces of rolled brisket, several pounds of ox cheek, two gorgeous pieces of pork shoulder with a lovely covering for crackling, and at least six man-sized pork chops which I shall cook the Delia way, with double cream, mushrooms and lemon juice. At times like this, one's gotta eat properly...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Nov 18 - 11:34 PM

Next time I get to a store with unadulterated pork sirloin (too many producers add a salty mix to their pork, supposedly because people overcook it so it keeps it moister but it's way too salty.) I have a casserole with tomatoes, pork, onion, and eggplant that is served with mashed potatoes. Mmmmm!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 13 Nov 18 - 10:01 PM

mmm. It's a funny old life, sometimes having reservations over eating meat, being finicky with what meat I eat, normally sticking with meals suitable for me and veggie parents and rarely missing meat, etc.

But a pork casserole along those lines does sound quite tempting at the moment...

But I'l probably leave things till Christmas now. If they still do them, I'll probably go for an Iceland frozen stuffed turkey joint wrapped with bacon again, I found last years surprisingly nice. No indoor cats to share it with this year but I'm sure PussPuss, if still around, would like a slice or two to help me out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 12:32 AM

I'll post the recipe later. I usually use a sirloin or tenderloin, whichever is available and relatively inexpensive. The eggplant has a fabulous "umami" effect on the rest of the ingredients. I know it isn't something that is like MSG, but it doesn't so much have it's own flavor as it makes everything else taste better.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 10:20 AM

On the theme of meat, Himself and I went shopping in Kitchener yesterday and came home with a pot roast, among other things. Now, pot roast was never a favourite dish in my family, but Himself is a fan so I made up my mind to get good at it.

Step one, get a decent piece of beef, preferably a well-marbled blade roast. Then haul out the Dutch oven; having been blessed with a generous kin group, we possess a Le Creuset braising pot that does the job in style.

Brown the roast on every side in about a tablespoonful of canola oil (high smoke point). Salt and pepper it well on all sides while you're at it. Set the roast aside and wipe out the pot. Next, sauté a chopped onion, some minced garlic, and a couple of ribs' worth of finely chopped celery in olive oil, to which then add dried thyme and about three quarters of a cup of red plonk with a bit of salt and a good grind of pepper, followed by about half a cup of beef stock and a glug of brandy. (It need not be *good* brandy.) Let it all boil for a few minutes, then put the roast back in the pot. Put on the lid and turn the gas down as low as it will go, or put the pot in the oven at 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Leave it alone for at least two hours.

When the roast is done (tender to an ordinary fork), fish it out of the pot and put it aside. Put the pot on the hob and turn up the gas. Reduce the pot liquor, stirring constantly, adding thickener if you like (I use beurre manié). Carve the roast, laying the slices (or collops, if you carve as clumsily as I do) on a warm platter. Ladle the gravy over all.

Serve with spuds, carrots, etc. I like to roast them in the oven with onion, garlic and slabs of fennel.

And that's what we had for dinner last night.

Tonight, something much less meat-arian, almost certainly involving chickpeas.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 11:51 AM

Thanks SRS. I had to do a bit of looking up on flavours there. I do like aubergine/eggplant and grow 4 plants (Hansel, a small variety that are good from finger size fruit up and usually crop well) in a container in a greenhouse each year.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 03:09 PM

Joe, how did you manage to live in Wisconsin for any length of time with never having bratwurst made on the grill in the summer?

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 06:31 PM

Microwaving a large beet was not a success. It was undercooked (tough). My second attempt, last night, was far more successful: I peeled it, cut it up, and boiled it. Likewise, beet greens take far more time than spinach.

I never knew there was anybody who did *not* piss red after eating beets. It lasts about a day.

A couple of times, I have made a real borsht (with beef cubes, turnips, carrots, etc., etc. -- not the mere shredded beet with sour cream that you get in a US deli). It is a substantial project, but worth it if you have guests.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 07:42 PM

If you like cold soup, but gazpacho turns you off a bit, you should make salmorejo, the Andalucian dish that resembles a thick gazpacho but which is made very thick by the addition of bread. It's traditionally served in small bowls as a tapas, with a topping of crumbled hard-boiled egg and finely-chopped Serrano ham, with some local breadsticks to accompany. To me, it's the absolute taste of summer and it must be eaten outdoors, and Mrs Steve won't let me make it in winter. Contrary to popular belief, it can be made with top-quality canned tomatoes instead of fresh. In any dish that relies on tomatoes of any kind, there's a magic ingredient that transforms the grub beyond all your dreams. It's a half-teaspoon of sugar. Trust me on that one. Italian cooks use it even if they have the finest sun-ripened San Marzano tomatoes, though they wouldn't admit to it.

I have my own salmorejo recipe but I couldn't possibly post it in November in the northern hemisphere. Ask me again in May.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 07:48 PM

And never skin tomatoes. That's as bad as doing garlic in a garlic crusher, the worst invention ever. If you pulverise the tomatoes with your hand-blender, you won't notice the bits. And anyway, I like the bits!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Nov 18 - 09:11 PM

This is what my garlic press looks like, and it's what Julia Child's garlic press looked like. She wasn't snooty about how the garlic got broken up or pulverized for her cooking so I follow her lead.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 03:46 AM

I haven't used a garlic press for ages - a lot of garlic gets left behind and is a so-and-so to remove (no hole-clearing gadget such as comes with the Shopify product). It's easier to smash the garlic under the side of a large knife. And then peel it, with no bother.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:04 AM

Joe, beetroot is superb if you scrub and chop it and add it to the other vegetables roasted under a chicken lengthways-halved carrots, long slices of parsnip, peeled halved onions, whole garlic bulbs, chopped celery, fat slices of bell pepper... The beets add a sweet, earthy flavour. I like to slosh dry vermouth over the vegetables, then the chicken juice basted them further.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:14 AM

Beetroot has been variable here but I've had success with "boltardy" some years. Just a simple boil, peel and slice with young samples is all you need with a salad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:24 AM

1. Take two crumpets out of the packet.
2. Place in toaster.
3. Toast until well-browned.
4. Spread with a great deal of butter.
5. Eat.
6. Give buttery plate to cats to lick.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:37 AM

In fast-cooked pasta sauces I just slice the garlic finely with a small knife. It's better than chopping, which can leave a few unpleasant little nibs. For slow-cooked things such as stews or ragus I just thump the unpeeled cloves with my fist, take off the skin and throw in the broken cloves. You can fish them out at the end but I never do. If I'm baking something such as skin-on chicken pieces (with cubed unpeeled potatoes, thick wedges of onion, strips of pancetta and extra virgin olive oil) in the oven, I separate out the unpeeled cloves and throw them into the baking tray about 20 minutes before the end (they burn otherwise). You can then suck the beautiful, sweet creamy middles out. Another good thing to do with garlic is to wrap the unpeeled, separated cloves of a whole head of garlic in foil with some extra virgin olive oil and bake them in the oven for about half an hour. Squeeze out the lovely middles and blend them with cooked peas, Parmesan cheese and a knob of butter. Makes a fabulous emerald-green crostini topping (thanks for that one, Nigella, you genius). Crushing garlic releases the bitter, acrid elements of the cloves far too rapidly into the dish. Gentle cooking of the cloves sweetens them and adds flavour subtly. I rarely want a pronounced garlicky taste to be the point of the thing. If you're making a pasta sauce, slice the garlic thinly into your pan of cold extra virgin olive oil and leave it to infuse for as long as you like (if the dish calls for chilli flakes, put them in there as well).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:39 AM

As an alternative, one can melt St Agur into crumpets, Sen.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:39 AM

I forgot to say that I always remove the green stalks from inside garlic cloves. Don't want them in the dish.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:44 AM

Oh Jon, I'd absolutely love to do that, but unfortunately blue/runny cheese gives me serious vertigo which can last for days. :(


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:49 AM

I like crumpets with the tangy Rose's English Breakfast Marmalade and thin slices of a mild cheese on top. I've been buying Maasdam cheese, which is like a mild swiss cheese, not unlike Jarlsberg.

Hubby used to think I was crazy, but he has been converted to the taste. We don't go much for sweet stuff but the EB Marmalade is more tangy than sweet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:53 AM

Fry some eggs in butter, set aside on a hot plate, whack up the heat and fry your crumpets (or bread) in the buttery pan. A three-minute delight. You can hasten the procedure by toasting the crumpet/bread to about half way before frying.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 04:57 AM

Helen, I think marmalade (typically made from Ma Made here) is a topping Pip might choose for a crumpet. Not one for me but we are all different...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Helen
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 02:28 PM

Fried eggs. One of my fave recipes is from Claudia Roden's Middle Eastern Cookbook. I've owned a copy of this book since maybe the 1980's and had to upgrade to a new edition about 15 years ago because the old one was falling apart.

Here is someone else's recipe:
Beid bi Tom

Fried eggs with garlic and lemon
Ingredients
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 cloves garlic, crushed
    juice of ½ lemon or 1 teaspoon sumac
    6 eggs
    crushed dried mint to garnish

Directions

(Roden says, crush the garlic and put it in the lemon juice. Cook the garlic and lemon a bit to soften the garlic and then slide in the eggs.)

    Melt the butter in a large skillet, or use 2 smaller ones.
    Add the garlic and lemon or sumac.
    Slide in the eggs, previously broken into a bowl, and continue to fry gently.
    Rub some of the dried mint in the palm of your hand, letting it sprinkle over the eggs.
    When the whites are set, remove the pan from the heat, sprinkle lightly with salt, and serve.

Yum!

Jon, the thing about seville orange marmalade is that it is not overly sweet and the distinctive tang of the oranges and orange rind is music to my taste buds. I also like Cointreau, for the same reason.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 06:33 PM

I grow my own garlic and it is very easy to peel. It's the "elephant" variety that is probably actually a large leek, but great garlic flavor. The garlic press is simple to operate - crush the portion (I have to cut up my cloves, they're very large) - then use the knife to rearrange the bit left in the press and press it again, or scoop it out into the food being prepared. I don't waste any.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 07:28 PM

I see you're holding out on the garlic-crushing, Maggie. All I can say is, give my method a whirl. I assure you that my garlic crusher (which actually looks uncannily like yours) still lives in my kitchen gizmo drawer, where it resides but never sees the light of day. It harks back to the era in which I totally misunderstood what garlic can REALLY do for dishes, but it still does have sentimental value. Chop, bash or slice your garlic, and use a lot more cloves than you otherwise would. Garlic needs to be add subtle. It does not need to add garlic...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 07:51 PM

I have a garlic roasting thing but I've never gotten around to using it; I think my Dad sent it one xmas and he loved using his. Smashing garlic under a knife is messy and you have to clean the board or counter. There are times when I slice garlic, depending on how it's being used. Like I said, I grow the very large garlic so the skin is robust and it comes off easily. And when I grow garlic here and harvest every spring I have enough to last me all year. It keeps well in a dark area stored in a paper bag.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 07:56 PM

Exemplary. But flippin' 'eck, Maggie, a bit of squidged garlic on your worktop isn't any more trouble to clear up than trying to get all those bits out of your crusher...?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Nov 18 - 09:46 PM

It snowed and was cold. So we made a chicken pot pie, with real pie crust on the top and a pretty scalloped design around the edge.
Pie crust, leftover roast chicken, peas, onions, cream sauce, and herbs.

It's work, but it's worth it. I use Jiffy pie crust mix. One box makes two small crusts. The second half of the mix freezes well in the box you buy it in. Just close up the inner bag.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 16 Nov 18 - 01:06 AM

Made lamb meatballs in a spicy soup with freekah, Verra nice, apart from a flaming row with the puppy, who snatched the first few from the table when I turned my back, smashing the plate they were on. Teenagers...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 17 Nov 18 - 12:19 PM

Gyoza for dinner tonight thanks to the new Asian grocery just a nice dog walking distance away.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Nov 18 - 02:29 PM

Steve do you like small hot garlic cloves or big and mild elephant garlic?
I like a little raw hot on uncooked dishes or large quantities of mild in cooked recipes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Nov 18 - 07:09 PM

Mild garlic is about as useful as decaf coffee. No use at all in other words. When garlic is gently cooked, any harshness disappears and all will be sweet, soft and lovely. We've had Yottam's roasted cauliflower tonight, a one-tray dish with chopped Nocellara olives, a horseshoe of sliced piccante chorizo (skinned, natch), two red onions hacked into big wedges, a hefty sprinkling of sweet smoked paprika, a very large cauliflower hacked into florets, a handful of pumpkin seeds and a large glug of extra virgin olive oil. Not least, several cloves of garlic, smashed with the fist then lightly chopped into big pieces. Seasoning of course. You mix that lot in a big bowl then spread it all out on a baking tray on which you've put a big sheet of greaseproof paper. Roast in a hot oven (200C, or 400F for you antediluvian yanks) for half an hour, turning it all over once half way through. When you take it out, mix in a goodly amount of chopped fresh parsley. It's an amazingly beautiful dish. Me and Mrs Steve are very fond of hot spiciness, but if you're not quite as keen you could always use a milder chorizo.

If I need to use garlic in the raw, I just slice it very thinly with a sharp paring knife. I use that in my tuna pasta dish in which the only cooked ingredient is the pasta. The other ingredients are tuna in olive oil, creme fraiche, capers, garlic, parsley and seasoning. Don't be scared of raw garlic, or any garlic, but just cut it up very thinly. Garlic should rarely be the point of the thing, unless you're making garlic mayo in which to dip your chips. English chips, not crisps.

When I buy garlic I'm not concerned with how "hot" it might be. It has to look fresh and feel very firm and not smell manky. Beware of garlic that's on sale well out of season. It can be very harsh and acrid. I've had to give up growing my own because my garden soil is plagued with white rot, which screws up my onions, leeks and garlic and which has spores that live in the soil for twenty years.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Nov 18 - 07:38 PM

I grow garlic from some that I originally dug up in the woods across the street from my house. It's the hard-neck elephant garlic that is probably actually a leek. It can be strong, but since I grow it and keep it for a long time, I think it loses some strength over time. Use more to get the flavor you want.

Our weather warmed this week so I've worked in the yard. Dinner tonight was light—a sharp blond cheddar cheese on whole grain crackers, topped with slices of kielbasa and washed down with a merlot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Nov 18 - 07:55 PM

I actually cut all my grass today (half an acre). It was surprisingly long considering that we had two quite vicious frosts two weeks ago. My garden's been a bit neglected for a few weeks after my dad died, but my sprouting broccoli bed looks great and my parsnips and leeks are looking good, and my freezer is full of a bumper crop of Autumn Bliss raspberries, best year ever.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Nov 18 - 08:16 PM

I envy you those raspberries! If you look at agriculture maps of the US, you'll see that the state producing the most raspberries commercially is Washington state, where I grew up. We spent summers grazing on various wild patches of raspberries planted and forgotten by neighbors. Pick the berry, blow off any dust or bugs, eat. That was the routine for 9-year-old kids.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 06:24 AM

Many moons ago I tried growing summer raspberries, but they soon got decimated by reversion disease. But the Autumn Bliss ones have been growing merrily away for twenty years and are as vigorous as ever. They are primocane raspberries (they fruit on new season's wood) which means I can hack the whole lot to the ground in winter and I don't bother training them (a bit of thinning maybe). I'm at the mercy of blackbirds occasionally but I don't mind if they have a few, and in indifferent late summers the good old grey mould gets lots of them just as they're getting ready to be picked. It's generally late August before meaningful quantities can be picked. But it's very nice to have them in the freezer for indulgent winter puds. My soil pH is a bit high for raspberries so I put on loads of grass clippings and leaf mould in spring in addition to a layer of compost. Once a year I have to bust my organic principles and give them a dose of chelated iron to stop the leaves going too yellow.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 06:39 AM

I had Autumn Bliss and they were fab, but the red fellows, the grey squirrels of raspberries, outbred them.. must replant them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 06:42 AM

My Autumn Bliss ARE red!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 06:52 AM

Oh? Mine were a lovely glowing amber!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 10:07 AM

If mold is a problem put some regular store-strength hydrogen peroxide in a spray bottle and spritz them all in a preventative move or if you start to see the mold. And sprinkling ground cornmeal on the ground under them is good for fertilizing and slows or eliminates the mold growth.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 02:07 PM

I have a feeling that grey mould gets in at the flowering stage. I'll check whether hydrogen peroxide fits in with my organic sentiments. I suppose it's only water with an extra dollop of oxygen...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 02:18 PM

I am only organic in my gardening, Steve - that's where this peroxide recommendation comes from! Same with the cornmeal. See Dirt Doctor for lots of organic tips. Near the top on the left side you'll see "Library Topics" and you can search on hydrogen peroxide as a treatment or you can search on mold and see what is recommended.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 04:46 PM

Here is an image of my pork and eggplant recipe:

Flickr Mudcat album.

I serve it with the mashed potatoes, it's a perfect combination. I don't sprinkle parsley because I don't like parsley.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 06:51 PM

We had the Puglian dish orecchiette con cime di rape tonight. You can use any short pasta but orecchiette is the traditional thing and without it the dish would be delicious but not authentic. As a matter of fact, the fact that I use tomatoes is not authentic either, but I think they add a lot. In Puglia they use stringy turnip tops, very nice too, but I've used purple sprouting broccoli or tenderstem to good advantage and tonight I used that new-fangled veg, kalettes, aka flower sprouts. Delicious. If you use tenderstem, you need to cut the stems into small pieces (leave the tops whole), otherwise you end up with a bit too much crunch.

For two people:

Put 250g orecchiette pasta in a very large pan of boiling salted water, having noted the required cooking time on the pack.

In your best shallow casserole pan, put two cloves of finely-sliced garlic into three tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil. Add dried chilli flakes (or fresh chillies) to your taste. The dish should be quite spicy but not fiery. Sauté gently for a couple of minutes.

Add a handful of good cherry tomatoes, cut in half. At the same time add a goodly amount of chopped fresh parsley. Simmer that lot gently for a few minutes to soften the tomatoes a bit. Season gently.

Two minutes before the pasta is due to be al dente, throw 200g broccoli/kalettes into the pasta pan. It will slow the pasta down by a minute, which is what you want.

Three minutes later, having checked for doneness, drain the pasta/greens pan quickly and throw the mix into the sauce. You need a bit of the pasta water to go in there. Mix thoroughly and serve up, topped with a grating of pecorino (or parmesan) and a drizzling of your finest olive oil.

You'll find fussier versions of this that require you to pre-cook the greens, etc., but forget all that. This works a treat. It's one of our favourite dishes, and Mrs Steve is very hard to please, I assure you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 07:03 PM

"I don't sprinkle parsley because I don't like parsley."

How can this be? What's not to like if the parsley is fresh? The only parsley I ever use is fresh out of my garden, always flat-leaf. I wouldn't allow dried parsley into the house. In fact, I find all dried herbs, with the honourable exception of dried oregano, to be utterly disgusting. Dried basil is just about the worst.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 10:42 PM

I'm drying basil on my kitchen counter even as you type. Most of the time I put it fresh into ziplock bags, force the air out, and freeze them. It stays green that way, but for some things, dried works.

I don't like parsley, I'm not particularly fond of kale, I dislike lima beans. There, I outed myself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 18 Nov 18 - 11:18 PM

Tried the cauliflower tray bake but it didn’t really work for me. Half an hour: still raw. An hour: drying out. I added olive oil. Then I fell asleep. Woke and it had been put in fridge, rejected as too greasy. Tasted ok to me... maybe my oven’s too slow. Maybe I should have put foil over it...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 04:27 AM

I wouldn't ever use dried parsley either, but dried thyme is fine by me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 07:55 AM

Was your oven hot enough, Thompson? I've never had a failure! 35 mins max otherwise the cauliflower gets overcooked. Only use the best extra virgin olive oil too, enough to coat everything. A bit more fat comes out of the chorizo.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 08:41 AM

Maybe not - it’s a Neff, so should be good, but it can lie.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 09:30 AM

Last night it was Murghi Saag that I had made the day before, for some reason this type of food is always better the day after it was made.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 12:13 AM

A lot of food is better as leftovers - partly because you’re anxious when cooking for others, partly because the tastes blend and intensify overnight. Here’s another good tray bake - very handy for guests because it’s so easy - the blessed Nigella Lawson’s chicken thighs with frozen peas and leeks:

Empty two packs of frozen peas into a chicken-sized roasting pan and give them a smash down. Add the whites of four or five leeks, washed and chopped in 2cm slices. Chopped cloves of garlic to taste. A bunch of dill, torn up. Eight chicken thighs on top. A good slosh of dry vermouth, or white wine if you don’t have it. A scatter of flaky salt, a glug of olive oil, or rapeseed oil.

Cook for three quarters of an hour in a 200c/400f oven, take out and give a mix (but leave the leeks up top so they get caramelised and sweet). Back in for another half hour. Chop a bit more dill over the top and serve.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: sciencegeek
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 03:45 AM

found beautiful escarole at the store so picked up three heads and had a ball... first off was escarole soup

chicken broth well seasoned to taste
sweet Italian sausage formed into tiny meatballs
1 head of escarole chopped
bring to boil and then simmer 1/2 hour
add 1/4 cup of acini de pepe - a tiny pasta just larger than couscous
cook until pasta is done, serve with crusty bread

greens & beans

1# Italian bulk sausage crumbled and cooked in olive oil with plenty of minced garlic
add 4 cans of cannelloni beans
simmer for 20 minutes add water if needed
add 1 head of escarole torn into large pieces
simmer until greens are tender
serve with grated cheese and crusty bread

escarole with angel hair pasta

start pot of water for pasta

add minced garlic to olive oil & heat
add diced tomatoes - canned is fine
add 1 tbsp of capers
season with basil & oregano to taste
add 1 head of escarole chopped into bite sized pieces
cover pan and simmer until greens are tender

by the time escarole is done, pasta should be done, drained and returned to pot

stir the escarole into the pasta and serve with grated cheese

I cook by eye and taste, so adjust to your taste

all three dishes hold well and reheat just fine


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 03:51 AM

I might try the chicken, leek and peas recipe, but I shall add some green pepper, just to spite the "blessed" Nigella (who threatened to excommunicate anyone who used green peppers - on the grounds that red peppers are SWEETER). That recipe would be ruined by red peppers, but green ones would be rather nice, I think.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 05:17 AM

"...the blessed Nigella Lawson’s chicken thighs..."

Oh, I don't know. I've always thought she has very nice legs...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 07:26 AM

100 million Americans will eat Campbells green bean casserole recipe this week.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 02:49 PM

I'm going to steam some green beans, but no Campbells soup will go near them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 06:57 PM

I must say, over the past couple of years I've turned away from steaming. I'll still steam chopped sweetheart cabbage in order to ensure that I don't get overly soggy cabbage, but I've taken to boiling all other veg. I've found that hard veg such as carrot batons and tight Cornish cauliflower florets cook much more evenly when boiled, and, when I have awkward veg such as tenderstem, with tops that cook quickly but stalks that take much longer, I'm better off boiling with the shoots covered but with the stalks under water and the heads sticking out above in the steam. A very good idea is to split the lower parts of tenderstem stalks up the bottom inch or two with a sharp knife. When I steam, I find that the water in the pan underneath still ends up with water that looks like I might have lost nutrients. As I understand it, boiling, as opposed to steaming, doesn't really lose much at all. It's texture for me every time. Steamed carrots just don't do it for me at all. A very nice winter veg combo with your roast chicken is steamed organic cabbage mixed with boiled carrot batons. Naturally, you will also need roast parsnips, it goes without saying. And I will not use the cooking water from any brassica to make gravy. It just ain't right.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Iains
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 05:16 AM

Scary vegetable cooking water. The longer you boil it, the more concentrated the pesticide residues.

A school of thought below.
https://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/should-vegetable-cooking-water-be-saved/

and a recent report:

[PDF]The 2016 European Union report on pesticide

https://www.actu-environnement.com/media/.../news-31777-efsa-pesticides-aliments.pdf
(I do not have much luck linking to a pdf so the link needs copying and pasting)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 06:29 AM

Well just wash all veg thoroughly before cooking or eating raw. That will get rid of almost all residues. My point was that brassica water makes for not nice gravy, and I can't think of a good use anyway for water that spuds have been boiled in, except for when you make those lovely thick winter stews that you boil up for two hours with shin of beef, potatoes, carrots, swedes and onions. I'm making a vast crock of that this weekend, to go with Atora suet dumplings, what else. Just the thing for eating off your knee out of a big bowl in front of Strictly on Saturday and the results show on Sunday. I think she doth worry too much. Eating lots of veg will far outweigh in benefits the risks of ingesting what are probably tiny amounts of toxins.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 06:40 AM

We always steam spuds. Makes them sweeter.

Risotto, though,I make in the pressure cooker (otherwise mainly used for stock). It’s not a classic risotto but a big hearty rice based mixup.

Fry chopped onion till transparent, add some risotto rice (I like carnaroli best), then when it’s glossy, courgette and aubergine and dried mushrooms, then a good dose of stock. A sloshy mix around and the pressure cooker is closed and brought up to pressure.

While it’s coming to pressure and humming away for I think around 10 or 15 minutes, I simmer a handful of frozen shellfish mix with butter and lemon and dill.

Then I take the pressure cooker off the heat and let the pressure off with a long-handled wooden spoon. Add in the liquor from the shellfish and a glass or more of white wine. Stir well and bring back up to pressure. Five minutes and it’s done.

It’s nice with lemon wedges to squeeze over, and/or (sorry, Italians) Parmesan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 07:25 AM

For a decent cheat's risotto (does away with all that adding and stirring), proceed as usual at first, sauteeing your onions gently (in butter, not oil). If you're also using chopped pancetta, add that now and cut down on the butter. Then turn up the heat and add the rice, just to toast it a little bit, stirring to coat with fat. Add a small glass of white wine and let that bubble for a minute or two. Then add any herbs you're using (chopped thyme is always good) and seasoning. Add your boiling stock (I find that you need slightly over twice the volume of stock as the volume of rice). Bring to a healthy simmer, give it a good stir, turn the heat down, put the lid on and forget it for 14 minutes (open the prosecco).

After that, you need to give it a really good bashing about for a minute of two to bring out the creaminess. Adjust the liquid. Only then do I add any other ingredients, such as cooked peas, broad beans or French beans, or sautéed mushrooms or scraps of leftover chicken or sausage. The world's your oyster. Turn off the heat and add a big knob of butter and a generous handful of freshly-grated Parmesan. Keep checking the liquid level (it keeps on thickening for a bit) and seasoning. For me, the coup de grace (but not for Maggie) is to stir in a handful of chopped flat-leaf parsley. You'll live forever.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 07:45 AM

By this time of the year my solid fuel stove is going full time all day and banked up at night.

It has a large flat top that can be used for slow cooking and heating water. It is very good for 'foil steaming'. Yesterday's offering had a piece of pork belly, one whole, peeled onion, one large peeled carrot (not chopped up) and one large slab of peeled swede.

All of these are placed on one half of a long strip of strong foil. When I remember a few cloves of garlic are put in as well.

The foil is folded back on itself and the three seams are double folded. All four corners get an extra fold. This gets placed on the top of the stove for a couple of hours.

Water comes off the meat and the onions also give off water. Over time this turns to steam. The package blows up like a balloon. Everything is cooked after the ballooning has gone on for about thirty minutes.

The vegetables are a revelation. Super succulent and sweet. I do the occasional vegetable only steam. Parsnips end up a bit dry but an extra small onion mashed up with the parsnip sorts that out.

I think I'll do a vegetable only job tonight, just replacing the meat with a leek. Yummy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 08:59 AM

Husband's Fiery Horror dinner:-

Brown a large chopped onion in a little vegetable oil.
Add two tablespoons of oil and one of peanut butter, and one tablespoon of salt, plus half a pint of water.

Add three chopped tomatoes and half a jar of tomato paste, a Maggi chicken stock cube and a tablespoon of hot Madras curry powder.
Chuck in four Scotch bonnets and a pile of cubed meat.

Simmer for thirty minutes until both cats and the wife are partly asphyxiated and requiring oxygen.

Meanwhile, using the rice steamer, put a selection of any vegetables in the steaming compartment above and cook with the Basmati rice until ready (about ten minutes)

The Horror left over can be decanted into containers and put in the fridge. It will do for a further two meals.
.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 09:16 AM

I agree that the steamer is for puddings.

I don't "boil" my vegetables, I simmer them, and whenever possible I get organic ones, so using the water shouldn't be a problem.

I am astonished at Thompson's 10 or 15 minutes in a pressure cooker to cook rice. When I used to use a pressure cooker, that sort of timing would have been for a hearty stew of the kind that would have taken several hours in a slow oven.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: MMario
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 12:43 PM

Tonight will be tortellini en brodo (sausage stuffed tortellini, turkey broth) with asiago shredded on top, and a mixed greens salad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 02:14 PM

When I say boil, Jos, I don't mean a rolling boil in deep water. I mean a simmer in as little water as possible, say half way up the veg, with a tight-fitting lid, usually with a pinch of salt. I have pans with glass lids with a small vent (a hole) which means I can see what's going on in there but have the lid tight on. I got fed up with pans with lids that I had to have tottering precariously over the edge of the pan to let the steam out.

We're having my home-made chunky guacamole dip tonight with crudités, followed by cheese and biscuits (I have some Vallage triple creme cheese and a bit of leftover Gorgonzola piccante). I don't go for those abject little tubs of supermarket guacamole. I get two ripe avocados which I mush up roughly in a bowl with a fork. It can be as rough or smooth as you like, but I like a bit of texture meself. Into that goes half a green chilli, finely chopped, six diced cherry tomatoes, the juice of a small lime, a goodly seasoning of salt and some finely chopped parsley. It should be coriander/cilantro really, but Mrs Steve can't abide the stuff (she says it tastes like washing-up liquid) so I use the parsley instead. Maggie could stick with the coriander. ;-) I find it tastes better made at least several hours in advance.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Nov 18 - 08:51 PM

I wonder what they're serving over in the Mudcat Tavern?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 04:19 AM

Ooooh SRS, I can't wait for the Mudcat Tavern to open its doors!
And I hope they'll be serving hot buttered crumpets!

I've been trying for years to persuade my husband to reduce the quantities of salt and fat in his Fiery Horror. A heaped tablespoon of salt is far too much. Imagine his blood pressure! And all that blooming oil. It makes a greasy mess in the dishwasher filter.

I wonder if I hid all the tablespoons? But no, he merely use his cupped hand to hull more and more into the brew, like his mother and sisters do.
He's now discovered Vindaloo microwaveable meals at Morrisons. They have a really HOT one with that logo of five chillies on the packet and a warning printed in red. He often has one as a midday snack before heading off for his work. However can he stand it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 10:49 AM

It's Thanksgiving day, a holiday in the US on the fourth Thursday of November, so people take the whole week off if they can, or at least take off Friday if it isn't already a part of their holiday. Wednesday is usually a good day to start preparing part of the meal, but this year I was racing to finish putting up a new corner of the fence to keep the dogs in and anything else out. I'm working carefully around the house today because I pulled a muscle yesterday.

The 16 pound (small by most standards) turkey is in the brine as of early this morning. I find it doesn't need to be in the salt and sugar mix for more than 4-6 hours to be very nicely seasoned and salted. I steam-juiced some frozen cranberries this year so instead of our usual sparking apple juice (Martinelli's is the best brand) I'm mixing frozen apple juice half strength, adding a cup or so of my full-strength cranberry juice, then when people want a drink I'll mix it with seltzer to give it a sparkle at the correct dilution.

The rolls will be started soon, the root vegetables that will be roasted will be peeled and cut up. I'm using an extra roasting oven (counter top) for either the rolls or the veg, but since the turkey is really best when it's had an hour to rest, that's plenty of time for other things to go in the oven. (I also have some green peppers that I'll put in with the root vegetables, just because I like roasted peppers.) They'll all get a coating of olive oil, salt, pepper, and anything else that strikes my fancy the roast till as much as possible is caramelized. There will probably be two, possibly three vegetarians here today, so we're going heavy on the side dishes.

Appetizers will be out for when people arrive - this crew always goes for the olives so there will be a can of those out (I didn't get by the fancy grocery store with all of the various olives that are available by the pound), some deviled eggs, cashews, just whatever is around they'll eat. Getting ready for the big meal an hour later, so they don't need to fill up, just graze.

The yeast rolls are homemade, the apple pie is brought by my ex and I have never been able to persuade him to make his own crust so it will be the tough grocery store crust with a pretty good homemade filling.

I'm going to mix up some cranberry sauce here soon and chill it. Make from scratch with cranberries, orange juice, and sugar. Cook it till the pectin is released and it naturally gels.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 11:18 AM

Golly, my pressure cooker wouldn't do a stew in 15 minutes!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 12:43 PM

I love coriander, but there is apparently a gene involved with whether people like that or not. I grow it (comes back voluntarily every fall and winter) and freeze it to use in guacamole, bean dishes, etc. Guacamole is best eaten as fresh as possible. If it has to be stored, I freeze it as soon as possible in ice cube trays to defrost as many as I need later (defrost slowly, microwaves must be used carefully if that is your preferred defrost method. 10-20 seconds at a time.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 02:15 PM

My chunky guacamole is definitely better for a few hours in the fridge. The lime juice prevents any browning of the avocado. I suppose it could be different if you're making that smooth purée of the type supermarkets sell. I too love coriander, but it's denied to me. I suppose I could always sprinkle a bit in last minute, but it wouldn't be the same somehow.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 05:36 PM

For our Thanksgiving turkey dish, I sliced a raw turkey breast into thin "steaks" and sautéed them in toasted sesame oil. Dee-licious!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 06:34 PM

I understand that a wild turkey has been terrorising the town of Johnston, Rhode Island, for months. Good for him!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Nov 18 - 11:28 PM

My guacamole is made by squeezing a lemon into a bowl then scooping the avocado out of the skin with a tablespoon and using a couple of forks to mash it up, but it isn't smooth like the grocery store stuff. I grate onion into it because years ago my son wouldn't eat onion if he saw it in things but he liked the flavor if he didn't know it was there. I dice up jalapeno or poblano peppers really small and use the garlic press for the garlic. Chop up the cilantro and stir in. Salt and pepper.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:29 AM

I saw onion in some recipes and not others and decided against. I'm not a massive fan of raw onion. No garlic in mine either. I don't recall seeing that during my recipe-sweep. My recipe has a small handful of cherry tomatoes, the best I can get, per two avocados, finely diced, which nicely loosens the mix. I found that I need to use a tad more salt than I might have thought I needed. I'm not a salt fanatic.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:40 AM

Pressure cooker: Beef stew 15-20 mins. Topside pot roast about 30 mins depending on size. Chicken casserole 5 mins. Plus the preliminary browning and bringing up to pressure. But I wouldn't bother to use it for rice, which only takes 10 mins (15 from cold) anyway.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 05:17 AM

I don't have a pressure cooker, or a slow cooker for that matter, but I can't see how a piece of beef suited to long, slow cooking can properly develop a melting texture and depth of flavour in 30 minutes. Naturally, I stand to be corrected, but I won't be investing in such gizmos any time soon. About thirty years ago I did flirt with a slow cooker. I found that it produced a diagreeably dry texture in meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 08:28 AM

And we have just ordered a pressure/multi cooker. I'm not quite sure where it's going to go yet or whether or not it will get much use but vegetable soups are one thing we have mind for it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 09:24 AM

Carmalize, do not carnalize, a chopped white onion per loaded Yam with chopped jalapenos. spice to your own delight and POOF the Yam is no longer sweet but a crinchy savory treat. Pile on top cooked bacon, cheese and some baked yam then bake again until melted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 10:14 AM

I have an Instant Pot electronic pressure cooker (otherwise known as a multi-cooker), and I give it house room because it cooks whole grains (especially brown rice) perfectly and works boffo as a stock pot. Now, I know you're all going to tell me just to put the stock pot on the back burner of the stove and go to bed, and I did just that for most of my increasingly long life, but I never slept soundly knowing that a gas hob was burning in the kitchen. The Instant Pot can be left unattended, and does not occupy a quarter of the high-value real estate of the stove top.

It also steams the Christmas pudding -- again, without supervision -- and does it in a quarter of the time required to do it the old-fashioned way, in the canner.

If your household eats in the vegetarian/vegan style, an electronic multi-cooker could be a game-changer. Here, the devices are marketed as time-savers, which is rather misleading. What they do is safely handle tasks that otherwise require personal attendance, allowing you to do other things. Where they do save time directly is in pre-cooking beans, which takes only about half an hour.

I tried cooking a pot roast in it and was disappointed in the texture of the meat: stringy. The Le Creuset enamelled iron pot remains unsurpassed for that job.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 10:52 AM

The Instant Pot Duo V2 7 in 1 is on an Amazon (UK) "Deal of the day" today, apparently £80 compared to an RRP of £170.

It was one of the ones we considered and may be a good buy but we opted for a Tefal that was £30 cheaper.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 11:23 AM

I couldn't agree more, Charmion. I have two Le Creuset deep casseroles, a large one (pot roast, bulk ragu production and big stews, etc) and a slightly smaller one (casseroles and stews for two and brilliant for risottos) and a large Le Crueset shallow casserole (best thing for making pasta sauces that need gentle sauteeing of chilli and garlic, etc, as it's big enough to chuck the cooked pasta into and stir in). I've had them for many years and I honestly don't understand all this talk of pressure cookers and electrical gizmos. I feel sorry for whoever has to wash 'em up, and, well, do they REALLY produce good grub...?

I've inherited, at no cost to myself, two glass-lidded pans with vented lids which are perfect for boiling potatoes or veg, and (the coup de grace) a magnificent huge lidded stainless steel frying pan which is brilliant for cooking rare steaks, for starting off pork chops and pot roasts before they go in the oven and for browning minced steak for chilli or ragus.

All these pans need, at most, fifteen or twenty minutes' soaking in hot water with a drop or two of Fairy Liquid to get them clean. I only ever use silicone utensils in them, never metal ones. One thing I've never done is put my Le Cruesets in the dishwasher.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 12:02 PM

In our house rice takes around an hour. Perhaps it’s a slow house.

My mother made the best stews I’ve tasted. She started them in the pressure cooker then moved them to a grungy old casserole in the oven for a couple of hours. Beef or mutton, carrots, celery, bay leaf, thyme, water, and a good slosh of red wine, then a squirt of Lea & Perrin’s Worcester sauce (correctly pronounced Wooster, of course) and a dash of Angostura bitters. Sometimes she’d go wild and add a little orange zest. Oh, and spuds went in too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 12:57 PM

It's WorcesterSHIRE sauce!

Orange zest is a constituent of Elizabeth David's boeuf en daube, though she leaves the rind in strips. If you throw red wine into a stew or casserole, it's best to add it early, before the other liquid goes in, and get it to a merry bubble to give the alcohol time to evaporate with the lid off. Or just boil the wine in a small pan separately, set fire to it then pour it in. Burning the booze is good fun and it avoids a degree of harshness getting into the stew. If you have good stock you shouldn't need the Worcestershire sauce, though adding it does no harm, or the bitters. As for herbs, I might make a little bunch of thyme sprigs, parsley stems and a bay leaf, maybe a little sprig of sage, all tied together with string, that I can remove towards the end. I find I can overdo the bay and I'm always careful with rosemary, which can be a bit of a hooligan if too much is added. I've been known to add bacon pieces to a casserole, though I never put in mushrooms, which I think add nothing. However, the inclusion of soaking water from dried porcini is a great addition. Another Elizabeth David trick is to add a few bits of pork rind. She cuts hers into tiny pieces but I wouldn't want to encounter tiny pieces of soft pigskin in my food, so I leave mine in big pieces that I can fish out before serving up. I get the rind by trimming it off pork chops, which I won't buy if they have been trimmed up. They can freeze until you need them. They add a nice degree of richness. If I'm slow cooking, I leave the carrots, celery and onions in much bigger chunks that I otherwise would. That way they add nice texture.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 01:38 PM

The instant pot duo is also a great way to sterilize your surgical tools, prepare growth medium for mushroom production, sterilize almost anything except for prions (mad cow protein).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 02:03 PM

I remembered some of this discussion last night when most of my small family and a couple of friends were at my house for Thanksgiving dinner. "No one, absolutely NO ONE is to give me one of those multi-cooker things." They asked if this was a xmas list tip. "Yes. You won't find one of those things on my list." It was more of a threat than a non-wish.

The pots and pans and few devices I own each have their own characteristics, and I am not interested in discarding the bulk of these so one thing can take over and do a half-assed job on an assortment of dishes.

I had always thought a rice cooker was overkill, then I started reading what the movie critic and cancer survivor Roger Ebert said about them. He had to get his food through a tube for the last several years of his life, but he was always really focussed on real food. https://priceonomics.com/rice-cookers/. This is just one article about his attitudes, so a few years ago I spent about $50 for a Cuisinart rice cooker that is just what he says, cook and warm, and it has a bonus stainless steel basket that fits over the top for steaming while the rice cooks. I like this because the rice doesn't burn to the bottom of the pan (though in some cultures, "pegau" or singed rice, is a delicacy. My Puerto Rican ex taught us all that you NEVER put the pot in the sink to soak when there is rice stuck burned to the bottom. You scrape out that delicacy and put it on the top of the platter of food.)

The iron skillets are precious for sauteed foods, I have a couple of non-stick pans for other specific things that would be hard on the seasoned finish of the skillets. The stainless deep pot "Dutch oven" has as set of uses (pot roasts, boiling potatoes, soups, etc.) and the deep "chicken fryer" cast iron skillet with the well-fitting lid has others. The deep Cuisinart enameled dutch oven is great for stove-top or oven dishes like pot roasts, stew, etc. The graniteware roaster and the Romertopf clay baker are primarily for roasting chickens, etc. The pressure cooker doesn't get used often, it generally speeds of several of those other tasks already mentioned. I am not convinced that one device can replace all of those and certainly the volume it holds doesn't match all of the other devices.

The rice cooker is perfect for rice and other grains; I add things to it and (for example) have a pot of chicken and rice (isn't that the original comfort food for cultures around the world?) and broccoli or cauliflower steamed to go alongside. I'm not finished exploring the rice cooker, I'm not willing to add another universal device to the kitchen.

/rant off

https://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-journal/the-pot-and-how-to-use-it

No, I am not putting you on the Rice Diet. Eat what you like. I am thinking of you, student in your dorm room. You, solitary writer, artist, musician, potter, plumber, builder, hermit. You, parents with kids. You, night watchman. You, obsessed computer programmer or weary web-worker. You, lovers who like to cook together but don't want to put anything in the oven. You, in the witness protection program. You, nutritional wingnut. You, in a wheelchair.

And you, serving in Iraq or Afghanistan. You, person on a small budget who wants healthy food. You, shut-in. You, recovering campaign worker. You, movie critic at Sundance. You, sex worker waiting for the phone to ring. You, factory worker sick of frozen meals. You, people in Werner Herzog's documentary about life at the South Pole. You, early riser skipping breakfast. You, teenager home alone. You, rabbi, pastor, priest,, nun, waitress, community organizer, monk, nurse, starving actor, taxi driver, long-haul driver. Yes, you, reader of the second-best best-written blog on the internet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM

I don't even know what a rice cooker is. You guys must have very capacious kitchens in which you have room to store all these things.

I cook rice in a non-stick pan with a vented lid. Basmati is the only rice of choice for me unless I'm doing a paella or risotto. The rice goes in the pan and gets two or three rinses with cold water. Drain (I do it roughly, against the edge of the sink). Turn on the ring and boil lots of water in the kettle. Salt the rice (check again later). Put the pan on the high heat and pour in an excess of boiling water. Stir for a minute, get it back to the boil, turn the heat down to a simmer with the lid on and set the timer for exactly twelve minutes from adding the water. Drain well in a sieve or colander - give it a minute. Fluff the rice up with a fork and serve. I really can't be arsed with all this water-measuring and rice-measuring. When I used to do that, decades ago, I got variable, unreliable results. This works every time, though just half a minute of overcooking and the rice won't forgive you. If you really hit the spot with your careful measuring, yours might turn out better than mine, but only very slightly.

Accidentally on purpose, I always cook too much rice. Next day for lunch I melt a knob of butter in a frying pan. Throw in the cooked rice and break it up a bit. Add two or three beaten eggs and a generous amount of cooked peas (anything else you fancy, bacon, mushrooms, ham...). Let the eggs set lightly, stirring gently all the while. Season lightly, put in a bowl and consume while you're watching the one o'clock news. A bit more butter or a squidge of soy sauce is good. It's so comforting that even the latest brexit gloom on the telly won't seem too bad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:08 PM

I see I spelled "Creuset" two different ways. I'm working on several other imaginative variants.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:17 PM

You STIR your rice during the cooking? That is forbidden in rice cooking circles around here. Not until it is completely cooked is it fluffed before serving. ;-)

Fried rice is a wonderful use of lots of leftovers. I add scrambled eggs at the very end so they don't get too broken up. https://youtu.be/2WJSUVMjNVc The thing they don't mention is that it also comes with an instruction manual, a long list of grains, rice, oats, and more that can be cooked and gives you the proportions. If you're curious, this links the a manuals online source for their rice cooker manuals.

My rice cooker sits on a lower shelf in a small bookcase in the kitchen. That bookcase has two complete shelves of cookbooks and the bottom shelf has the rice cooker, a food processor, and my blender with the glass jar.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 03:34 PM

And I cook basmati rice in a stainless steel saucepan with a glass lid. The lids got a strainer which I find useful.

I think we've tried a few methods of cooking rice but I just use a simple method found on a packet of Tilda Basmati rice. Add about 70-80g rice per person to pan of boiling water. Boil for 12 minutes, drain the water off, put lid on pan and stand for three minutes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 04:07 PM

No, Maggie, just at the very start to make sure the rice and water get nicely mixed and there's nothing stuck to the bottom. Then it's lid on and leave severely alone!

Well said, Jon, tho' three minutes is uncomfortably long: the rice will cook a bit more and might go a bit cleggy. Can we agree on a minute and a half...?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 04:14 PM

And Tilda is a good, reliable brand.

I wouldn't bother scrambling your eggs first, Maggie. Just beat them in a cup and stir into the rice once it's hot in the pan. That way they coat the rice nicely before they set. Mind you, I haven't tried it your way. But you're dirtying another pan, and the worst pans to clean are the ones that eggs have been scrambled in!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 05:21 PM

I don't want the eggs to set in fried rice, I want them to be another loose bit like the pork or chicken and diced vegetables and green onion (scallions) and whatever else happens to appeal to me.

I shop at a Middle Eastern market, where they have massive offerings of rice. I usually buy very long grain Basmati rice and it's nice if I can't read most of the label. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 05:31 PM

Well Steve, 3 minutes (after which I fluff the rice up with a fork) works for me but one should feel free to adapt/adjust as one sees fit...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 06:00 PM

Thank goodness the Bertucci's franchise of Italian family restaurants
has got an entree salad built out of baby arugula greens;
my tummy is now full of fresh crunchy tasty ones.
That way I could get my nutrition and avoid romaine lettuce at the same time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 06:50 PM

Isn't arugula what we call rocket? I like to include a bit of that in any salad. In fact, it grows wild in my garden. Adds a nice bit of spice.

I tend to use home-grown rocket and lettuce in my salads, even at this time of year. I've still got some nice mixed lettuce growing in big pots in a sheltered spot. I'll buy a nice red pepper and some decent cherry tomatoes (mine are finished), cut them up, put them in the bottom of my salad bowl and put in a good tablespoon of my finest Tuscan extra virgin olive oil. I then add a slightly smaller amount of the most expensive, thick, syrupy balsamic vinegar (a bottle lasts me all year). I will not countenance that thin, watery abomination that sells for a couple of quid and totally discredits the name. I then mix that thoroughly with the tomatoes and pepper, and only then put the lettuce and rocket on top. I'll then cover the lot with cling film. I don't mix the lettuce with the dressing until the very last minute as I don't much care for soggy lettuce. There's only one way to toss the salad, and that's to get your two hands in there and enjoy yourself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 07:02 PM

The Etymology of the Words "Arugula" and "Rocket",
or, why it's called one thing in Northern Europe
and another thing in the Americas


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Nov 18 - 07:25 PM

I know the far south of Italy and I've come across "arugula" there. "Eruca" is the botanical Latin name of the genus that includes the plants we call rocket. Unless you're in a posh restaurant that's pretending to appeal to the cognescenti only, it's "rocket" this end. Unfortunately, unless you grow your own (incredibly easy), the rocket we get here in supermarket bags is insipid and just about useless.

I have a couple of lovely recipes that use rocket in a non-salad context. We'll see how it goes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 12:43 AM

Worcestershire indeed, but still correctly pronounced Wooster (the sauce, that is, not the place).
We use a Japanese fuzzy-logic rice cooker that always cooks rice perfectly, whether it’s brown or white, basmati or jasmine, then keeps it hot till you use it.
I’m not that gone on non-stick otherwise. Watch the Storyville episode called Poisoning America, about the largest ever class action to know why.
Made the Guinness stew, it was hearty and was wolfed down. I wouldn’t use housekeeper’s cut for it again, though, didn’t much like the texture.
The next meal when it’s my turn will involve harissa - ‘rose harissa’, the recipe says. I have yet to find an affordable source.
By the way, a couple of years ago I asked the checkout person in a local Polish or Moldovan shop (and you can feck off, Hillary Clinton, telling Europe to “control immigration”) what the great big bunches of dill sold there in winter were used for. The answer was borscht, with pork ribs, beetroot, onions and dill.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM

Well the "controversial" device came today. With the jiggling around I need to do to find it a permanent home, it's likely to be a few days before I get to trying anything on it though.

Coming back to points raised. Its ability with meat (which seems to be the most questioned) isn't an issue here. On the other hand (as well as veg soup) if I could find a few recipes on the nut/chickpea/lentil stew/casserole lines (all missing from the bits I do here now but sometimes feel I ought...) that suit it, I think from my side of things at home, it will justify its existence. Pip may also have her own ideas...

For really fancy btw, has anyone enountered a thermomix. I believe very expensive (£1000+) things that are supposed to do everything from the measuring to the cooking?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 08:50 AM

"supposed to do everything from the measuring to the cooking?"

Wouldn't that take all the pleasure out of cooking?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 09:17 AM

I guess that depends on the cook and time available to fit cooking in life, Jos.

For my personal part, I'm not one who particularly enjoys cooking and does't mind short cuts. I do of course aim, with a very basic repertoire, to produce things that are enjoyed by the family (and, even with my ways, did seem to pass that with visiting family from oz; and brother there can be quite a serious cook when he wants to be)...

Even got praise for my cauliflower cheese from a niece and I do nothing special. Just use a strong cheddar, cut the cauli into larger chunks than say Pip would, leaving more stalk and keep a careful watch on when the veg is cooked (I think it can turn quite quickly from nice and still a bit crisp to soggy, but maybe that's just me...).

So I suppose that all makes me lazy but tries in some ways...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM

Years ago I found a set of recipes in Martha Stewart Living magazine that I started using regularly. I always baked salmon, but her simple salmon steak sauteed in butter won me over, as did the new potatoes that were simmered in water until tender, slightly cooled, then "smashed" enough to split the skins and lower their profile. Those patties of softened potato are then placed in a skillet with butter and turned once and served with salt and fresh ground pepper. All of those little crispy edges of skin (I like this with red or Yukon potatoes, the ones that are a little more waxy). Sometimes I sprinkle chives over the top. I don't remember what Martha called those potatoes, but my son and his girlfriend make "smashed potatoes" all of the time, and when I asked what it was he told me it was the ones I'd been making and he added the standardized name.

Today on Pati's Mexican Kitchen (a PBS cooking program) she made a very elaborate version and she calls them smashed potatoes - using different colors of new potatoes for the variety, and then she puts them on an olive oiled pan, smashes them slightly with a spoon and spoons olive oil and various seasonings and peppers over the top and bakes it all. My sauteed in butter version is quicker and easier, but the point of describing this is that as a comfort food goes, those little potatoes are a family favorite.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 10:42 AM

Thinking smash, anyone heard of "stwnsh"? It's a Welsh word and can be qualified but from my childhood, I'd eg. be thinking of potatoes and swede mashed together here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Nov 18 - 07:19 PM

I encountered a thermomix which was on display at a food fair about a year ago. Very sophisticated and very expensive. I'll tell you what. I love cooking, though I'm not that good at it. I like to get my hands in there, to do my own chopping, grinding, mixing and timing. I don't need a machine to sort out my cooking. I need a hob, an oven, some good pans and the finest ingredients I can lay my hands on.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 03:06 AM

And to clarify, just in case. I think there is room for more than one approach to cooking and do respect the efforts of those, including a brother, who may take a more dedicated approach.

I suppose “wrong” to me is more about total dependency on microwave meals and takeways. I can see that infirmities can make cooking difficult or impossible (and to some degree, even see that with Pip), can see that there can be the odd day where you simply fancy say fish and chips from the local takeaway, but I become more baffled by the not knowing how to do anything angles. (But Peter/dad was a bit like that. His upbringing was such that a kitchen was purely a woman’s place… We on the other hand were expected to help mum out a little which at least left us with some basics to use if needed).

I must admit though that even I am a bit undecided over the Thermomix – can there be a taking automation too far? - I don’t know. That and perhaps even I will find the pressure/multi cooker a bit strange to start with. I’m more of the “take a few veg from what’s around, taste, try a bit of this, etc.” variety than one for precise weights and measures in advance…

...At least mostly. Another gadget we have is a (Panasonic now and the best we’ve had by far) breadmaker and, while you might try, eg. an extra ½ tsp of salt, a few more ml of water, etc. to get to your ideal, I think you do need to be quite accurate with your measurements there.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 04:09 AM

Even more OT but for those who might use a breadmaker, the things I like about this Panasonic are:

1. "Repeatability". I don't understand all the wherefores but this one produces the most consistent "same loaf each time" of the ones we've had.

2. Others have needed water first and you sort of "balance" other ingredients, starting with the flour, on top. With this one, the water goes in last and it mixes things up before adding the yeast (which goes in it's own slot) after the other bits have had a stir. Perhaps this helps towards getting more consistent results?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:09 AM

The salt in bread making isn't just for flavour. Too much, and the dough won't rise properly and the bread will be very dense. Too little, and the dough will rise too much, be very light and fluffy, and seem to be trying to climb out of the top of the tin.
PS. I have never used a breadmaker so I don't know what the effect would be in one of those.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:26 AM

I think the principle is the same there, Jos. As far as I understand it, as well as taste, sugar can increase rising and salt restrict rising.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:45 AM

Well, Jon, I'll admit to also possessing a Panasonic bread maker. We've had it for around twelve years now and I echo your remarks about repeatability. Actually, all we ever use it for is to make ciabatta loaves (the ones with 500g of strong white flour and extra virgin olive oil) and a 2/3-to-1/3 wholemeal 500g loaf. After many years I discovered that you don't need to add Vitamin C at all. I like the fact that you have control over the quality of the flour (always organic this end) and the amount of salt (I cut it down by about a third). The bread is much better than any shop bread, though I'm the first to admit that using the thing might be regarded as cheating!

I have found that I get a more homogeneous consistency in the finished article if I put the yeast in the pan but mix all the other dry ingredients thoroughly in a bowl first. That goes in on top of the yeast, then in go the oil/butter and finally the water.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 06:15 AM

Years ago, probably in the 1970s, I was invited to one of those sales parties where there was a demonstration of a breadmaker and they tried to sign people up for a regular supply of their flour and their 'special secret ingredient' that speeded up the process. The secret ingredient was vitamin C, but they didn't tell you that (or you would have known you didn't need to buy into their regular supply).
I didn't buy it anyway - a long rising improves the flavour of the bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 06:28 AM

Flour, I'm not sure it's all organic but I do like the stuff from the localish Leatheringsett watermill (and their outlets).

Jos, I can't know how the machine compares to traditionally home baked loaves (have tried a couple but not say your regular white or whatever loaf) but do believe that it can be easy to better a shop bought (and I'm not just thinking Mothers Pride or whatever cheap sliced loaf) loaf with one.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 07:51 AM

Nowt wrong with Mother's Pride for a chip butty...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 07:54 AM

I agree there...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 09:54 AM

I was given a bread machine years ago and thought it was a silly specialized piece of equipment, but I set out to master it and I use mine regularly still. It's a large-capacity one manufactured by Welbilt, in this case sold by another company that branded it. But it's a round 3-pound loaf and when you bake the loaf in the machine you end up with round or half-circle shaped sandwiches and such and that shape seems to dry out fast.

I started using it on the manual setting all of the time now and when it finishes mixing and kneading I remove the dough, shape it and bake it in a regular loaf pan. I make rolls, pizza dough, and more, letting the machine do the initial mixing and I use it after the first rise.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 10:36 AM

That does sound a big loaf, SRS. The most ours will take flour wise (and what I usually use - it will do smaller ones) is 600g/ around 1.3lbs and that seems to me a fairly large loaf.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 01:02 PM

They take about four cups of flour, sometimes a little more.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 04:25 PM

I've found the 500g loaf ideal for most things. The 600g job rises triumphantly above the top of the pan, and the slices are too tall for me toaster!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 05:55 PM

I'm preparing to make my famous banana nut bread that was baked in regular bread loaf pans when I had the kids here devouring it. Now I make loaves in smaller artisanal-style pans that are given to friends who live alone or have just a partner at home now. They don't need all of those calories. It's a quick bread with baking soda and I use a lot of extra bananas so it's more cake-like. I bake the pecans so they give off that warm maple-like flavor and I use butter instead of shortening or oil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 06:47 PM

Mrs Steve does amazing banana bread out of bananas that are going a bit past it. We can't do nuts as she's seriously allergic to walnuts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Nov 18 - 09:11 PM

On Thursday evening (Thanksgiving) I put the entire roasted turkey back into the fridge and pulled it out to get slices for meals; tonight I cut it apart and have the stock simmering. It's just too much to prepare for the meal and do all of the cutting up and soup on the same night. The pot is cooling a little before I pull out the bones and skin, strain the broth, and use that for making soup tomorrow.

For the banana bread, the bananas I'll be using were at the over-ripe state and then I froze them one or two at a time and they're finishing defrosting in the fridge now. I'll make a double batch of batter that will add up to probably six small loaves.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 05:47 AM

I cut the 600g loaf from this one lengthways these days before slicing. I know that leaves you with bread with only 3 sides of crust that might not appeal to many but for our purposes at home it does give 2 loaves of a size everyone is happy with out of one run of the machine.

Our toaster btw, seems quite shallow to me. It's wide and will do crumpets nicely but in terms of shop bought loaves, is more suited to a smaller Hovis brown than much larger.
---
Pip was another who did a banana bread, using fruit past their best. Parent's loved it but I'm not sure it was one of my favourites.
--
Shame about the walnuts. Pip used to do a very nice date and walnut loaf. Seems a long while since it was last made though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 10:35 AM

I make almost all the bread we eat at home. I've been running a sourdough experiment for several months now, but I recently decided that it's not worth the trouble with just two of us, and only Himself eating more than a slice per day. Also, I have so far failed to produce a wholemeal loaf that I like using the sourdough method. So I'm (reluctantly) going back to active dry yeast.

Disposing of the sourdough culture (its name is Fred) feels like shooting the family dog. I hate the idea, but it must be done.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 10:50 AM

Maybe you could give the sourdough culture to a friend or neighbour, like finding the dog a new home.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 11:37 AM

Agreed - I bet you can find a taker for the next stage of your experiment. :)

My broth is ready to use - with as much turkey as is here I'm going to make a dense turkey pot pie stew with some of it and freeze the extra broth.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 02:39 PM

White sourdough is the best white bread I've ever tasted, my starter is over 10 years old now, it never fails.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 26 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM

Incidently I've tried sourdough wholemeal and sourdough rye and I'm distinctly very dissapointed with both.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 07:08 AM

Thompson I do believe I would enjoy beet root prepared your way.
I have had such an aversion to beets as a result of having to eat Borsch as a kid.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 07:13 AM

I love beetroot and devour it with relish but I have to make a pact with myself not to look down the toilet for the next 24 hours.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 01:19 PM

I love white sourdough bread, but my digestion does not. If I'm going to eat bread more than occasionally, it really has to be whole-grain. A batch of brown is under construction as I type.

Beetroot is great stuff. I like to include it in a batch of roasted veg, with Jerusalem artichokes, carrots, celery root and parsnips, flavoured with shallots, garlic and thyme. The carrots and beets usually have to be parboiled, but it's a small nuisance. Around here, we can get beets in every hue produced by beta-carotene, from pale yellow to darkest crimson. Golden beets are just as delicious as the red kind, but don't result in pink pee.

Just sayin'.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 01:34 PM

I have shifted over the years to giving as many consumable gifts as possible, made at home. This year I've canned both pickled okra and mustang grape jelly and last night I made seven small loaves of banana nut bread that are now wrapped and in the freezer.

I recently send my son and my sister pickled okra, but neither is sure they'll like it, so my advice has been to wait until they have guests over to open the jar. Try it themselves and see if they like it. If not, chances are someone at the gathering will know what it is and like it and they can send the rest home with them. It keeps in the fridge for a long time so they can try that trick at parties all through the holiday season until it's eaten or given away.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 03:42 PM

Aaah, back to the beets. I used to strongly dislike beet foods until I got together with Lady Hillary. She has made a convert of me. She cuts the beets up fine, then boils them and adds a few spices, finishing up with an immersion blender. We make the batch large enough to store in a couple of quart size Chinese Tupperware containers. We generally serve it cold with home made yogurt instead of sour cream [shades of my grandmother].

A couple of weeks before Thanksgiving I made up a batch of leek and potato soup. The problem I had with it was that it resisted taste. No matter what spices I added to it [again, the batch size gave us three quarts for the fridge] it was determinedly bland. Hot sauce, curry, chili sauce no effect.

For Thanksgiving Lady Hillary made up a butternut squash soup that, for its final heating got some ginger and garlic [both fresh]. Delightful.

This weekend we had sweet potato fries at a barbecue restaurant. It came with a dusting of brown sugar that was very good. There was something in the taste which suggested that a bit of finely chopped ginger would go well with it. That will get a try in the next few days.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 27 Nov 18 - 04:12 PM

Sometimes when food is just too bland, what it needs as well as other flavours is a little salt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 29 Nov 18 - 09:19 PM

Unless I want edema, I avoid salt.
This morning, we had home made latkes [potato pancakes] with peach compote[also homemade].


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 29 Nov 18 - 11:14 PM

Unfortunately we have no Mustang Grapes in these parts.
As for wild Tarts, I don't know.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:23 AM

Chocolate digestive bisuits topped with slices of mature chedar cheese...

and a mug of strong black tea [leave the teabag in]...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:30 AM

If food is too bland it could be that you're either leaving out something vital or you're using lesser-quality ingredients. The latter is why shop ready-meals are so high in salt. I always think that there's a "right" amount of salt for any recipe. To cure blandness, my first resort is fresh herbs and/or a tiny splash of Tabasco, maybe a bit more black pepper, depending. The Italians do it right when they start a ragu or a soup with a soffritto made with chopped onions, carrots and celery sautéed in extra-virgin olive oil. For a meat sauce, I add a bit of chopped-up pancetta to that for richness and savour. My chili meat sauce and bolognese always start like that. I find that slow-cooked meat dishes such as ragus and pot roasts are the very devil to judge for salt while you're actually cooking them, and they always taste different once they've stood for a few hours. Start low with your salt. You can always up it later on.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:31 AM

I'm just wondering how you can dunk a choccie biscuit with a slab of cheese on top...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 07:16 AM

not that I'll be eating them, Fun and festival treats or even making them, but they look good & someone might like to add them to their recipe library

sandra (not a sweet tooth)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 07:37 AM

Steve - I'm not a dunker..

but guess a solution could be a tightly held sandwich of TWO chocolate digestives
with twice as much cheese in the middle...

chocolate facing inwards...???

I'm not a coffee drinker.. but that might dunk quite nicely in white coffe with a mountain of sugar stirred in...???


[remembering a once a week grammer school dinner from the early 70s..
pudding was coffee, loads of sugar, cheddar chunks, and an apple..]


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 08:17 AM

I do like a can-do bloke, pfr...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 10:38 PM

Thai chili sauce disappeared with nary a twinge of the taste buds. We generally limit our salt intake because of my sensitivity to it. If there is some salt in a spice I will chance it but go easy.
If we can taste salt as saltiness it is definitely too much.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 04:54 AM

Are mustang grapes the same as scuppernong, which I’ve read about but never seen?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 11:54 AM

No, and they aren't the same as muscadine, either, though I've heard of them in the region.

http://palatepress.com/2010/06/wine/wine-indigenous-american-grape-varieties-a-primer/

Of the six native species that had been growing in North America long before European settlers arrived, some may sound more familiar than others: rotundifolia (muscadine), aestivalis (summer grape), riparia (frost grape), labrusca (fox grape), mustangensis (Mustang grape), and rupestris (sand grape). Over the last hundred years some interest has been given to this rowdy and uncouth bunch of American species. While these grapes are not as widely cultivated or commercialized as vinifera varieties, they do show potential for making enjoyable wines and deserve to be recognized.


The author of the article later dismisses our little Texas grape:
Vitis mustangensis has little to no redeeming commercial qualities. Limited in habitat to Texas, Oklahoma, and parts of Louisiana the mustang grape is highly acidic and bitter in taste. Simply handling the grapes can irritate the skin.

The bit about irritating the skin is true. The first time I picked them it was with bare hands and my hands really smarted after a while. I wear vinyl gloves when I work with them now. The remarkable thing about these grapes with their big seeds and thick tough skins is that they still manage to produce a wonderful rich dark pink/red juice and it's perfect for a sweet/tart jelly. If you've ever tasted tamarind or tamarindo, they are sweet and tart in the same way.

I like the jelly on toast, on baking powder biscuits, and I often will heat some in a small custard cup in the microwave and use it as syrup over pancakes. I think you could use it in place of cranberry sauce in a pinch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 12:06 PM

At last, a second good reason to visit Texas. I'd love to try your mustang grape jelly.

Himself and I are going out for dinner tonight, to the Stratford Chef School, where the students are staging "Escoffier at the Ritz". It's an eight-course (!) extravaganza in the Belle Époque style, definitely not the sort of thing we could get at home.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 12:28 PM

You are more than welcome to come for a visit - the guest room is (remarkably!) clear. The rest of the house, not so much. But when one has grown children who might stop by and you want them to stay for a little while if they can, the guest room is ready.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:14 AM

Ox-cheek ragú last night, a la Jamie Oliver-ish (I'm no slave to recipes). Very cheap, tough, sinewy meat in great big hunks, braised for four hours in red wine, passata and porcini water with onions, carrots, celery, garlic (bashed, never abused by a garlic crusher) a few strips of smoked pancetta and a big bunch of fresh herbs (and a pinch or two of spices). It makes enough sauce both to use as gravy with mashed potato and veg and the chunks of ludicrously-tender meat (that's tonight) and for a goodly portion to stir into fettuccine with some of the diced beef, topped with freshly grated Parmesan and a dash of the best extra virgin olive oil (that was last night). Cucina povera!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:20 AM

I know I'm late doing this but this morning has seen the Christmas cake being mixed and it's now in the oven for over 4 hours.

It weights in excess of 5lb so we will have a fair bit to go at over the festive season!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 08:33 AM

I got the accent on "ragù" the wrong way round. I knew something wasn't right. The actual ragù is very fine, however.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 10:28 AM

So you really don't need someone to fix it because it gives you a chance to admire the sauce. :)

This "christmas cake" creature - is this what we Yanks call "fruit cake?" A very large cake that lasts as long as it seems to need to last, when a "normal" cake would be stale after a week, must be a different kind of baked good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 10:35 AM

Mustang jelly
You better slow that mustang down

Christmas cake has fruit, nuts, eggs, flour, sugar, spices and lots of alcohol. When my father made it the whole house reeked of whiskey from October to January.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 10:51 AM

A nice flying haggis last night: aka chicken Balmoral. Basically a chicken breast casserole but topped with slices of haggis and some whisky or Drambuie in the sauce. You can try wrapping the chicken breasts around the haggis,but it always worms its way out!
And save your best single malt for drinking: any old blend will do in the sauce - well almost!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 03:03 PM

Tattie Bogle, the simple use of two cocktail stick through the chicken and black pudding may help to keep everything in place.








.............. or you could fall back on the Glasgow trick and dip it in batter and deep fry ..............





I'll get me coat


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:14 AM

a "normal" cake would be stale after a week

A sponge cake might be stale after a week, but a fruit cake improves with a bit of keeping. Especially if fed with small doses of liquor at weekly intervals.

And yes, a "Christmas cake" is essentially a rich fruit cake, decorated appropriately.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:28 AM

In my day a Christmas cake was iced with about a centimetre thick layer of marzipan, covered by hard white sugar icing, decorated like a Roman temple. Not so much nowadays when we’re all influenced by German and Polish customs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 04:55 AM

Christmas cake is traditionally made on the last Sunday in November to give it several weeks to mature. Every member of the household has a turn stirring the mixture and making a wish.
I used to ice the cake with a vaguely flat covering of white icing, a small model fir tree, and footsteps in the 'snow' made with a silver charm of a boot. (Must do it again sometime.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 08:31 AM

Tried the beets under the chicken with vegetables recipe. The carrots and all were good but beets are still to 'earthy' for me.

The leftover red sauce may be a good violin stain with varnish but may not be color fast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 09:03 AM

Yes, fruitcake. I'm a week late starting ours, but I'll get going this afternoon. It's a two-day process in which the fruit macerates overnight in brandy (or other hooch) and the juice of two lemons and two oranges.

I don't ice it: that's not the Canadian style. (Fruitcake is the only thing that's naked at Christmas in Ontario.) Also, the fondant-marzipan icing is very fiddly to make and apply, not to mention expensive (the price of almond paste these days!), and it doesn't travel well, especially in the mail.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 06:55 PM

Grand Marine' or Drambuie is my choice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 05 Dec 18 - 02:43 AM

Sailor Jerry rum in my cookbook.

While we're on the subject, a good addition to fruit salad is a 50:50 mix of Archer's peach schnapps and Southern Comfort. Just enough to moisten, not marinade!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 05 Dec 18 - 10:31 AM

By the time it's in a fruitcake, any old rum'll do, BobL.

A nice but misguided person once gave me a bottle of Red Label Johnny Walker. The stuff is undrinkable, but it was boffo in fruitcake.

I agree with you on the subject of Southern Comfort in a fruit salad, but we don't eat fruit salad often enough to justify the purchase of an entire bottle of Southern Comfort. I have no experience of Archer's peach schnapps, which may not be available in Ontario.

Tonight's supper will be my sister-in-law's vegetarian lasagne. Himself came home with rather a lot of striploin steak the other day (bin-end sale at the butcher, I gather), so a veg-heavy dish feels like a good idea. It's remarkably like a normal lasagne, but with no meat in the sauce; you could feed it to your lacto-ovo vegetarian teenager without incident. It has three kinds of cheese, though, so the calorie count is not inconsiderable.

And it makes six servings, so that's dinner tonight and two days' worth of lunch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 06 Dec 18 - 09:47 AM

A nice alcoholic dessert is made by soaking porridge oats in whiskey and honey then whipping in cream just before serving it. Don't give the driver any.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 02:31 AM

Charmion, any old rum will do for any old fruitcake.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 09:40 AM

Okay, BobL, point taken. You can't expect good results if you don't use good ingredients.

That said, I still insist that fruitcake (any old fruitcake) is a suitable destination for Red Label Johnny Walker.

Thompson, I believe the dessert you describe is Atholl Brose. I have an elderly cookbook called "The Scots Kitchen"; its version of the recipe calls for the finely ground oatmeal that I know as "pinhead" oats. Is that what you mean by porridge oats?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 10:46 AM

Richard Wade
known to his friends as Dick Wad has been named Ass. Deputy to Facebook public relations to change minds instead of changing Facebook.


Some recipes will always taste bad no matter what you think about them.
Like Sticky Bitter Bottom Buns, changing the name won't help until you change the recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 05:57 PM

There used to be a retail shop north of Harvard Square,
in Cambridge, Massachusetts,
called "Atholl Brose."
It stocked everything Scottish
and provided access to a tailor
who could custom-fit you for a kilt.

They had a shelf of books, some written in Scots,
like "The Shriek of the Maws."

I don't recall that they sold food, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 06:21 PM

"I don't recall that they sold food, though"

What, not even haggis?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 07:47 PM

We've had salmon arrabbiata tonight. I basically follow Gino d'Acampo's recipe but not slavishly.

For two people you need some fresh keta or sockeye salmon, not tinned, about 300g. Take off the skin (easiest when the salmon is half-thawed). Cut the fish into 1cm dice.

Put your pasta on to boil in salted water. I use pennone rigate for this. I'm not too keen on those little penne tubes but suit yourself.

In the meantime sautée gently two sliced cloves of garlic (do NOT crush) and your own personal predilection of dried chilli flakes in a pan of extra virgin olive oil. The dish is supposed to be pretty spicy so don't hang back too much. After a few minutes add at least one can of plum tomatoes. Only the best will do. I usually add a few more plus a goodly dollop of sun dried tomato paste. At the same time add a good handful of chopped fresh parsley and some seasoning. Let that lot simmer uncovered for a few minutes (or you can make the sauce in advance, which is what I did tonight).

Two minutes before the pasta is ready, turn the heat up a tad under the sauce and throw in the salmon, heat it through for a minute or two then turn off the heat. Have faith, the fish is perfectly cooked. Drain the pasta (keeping a cupful of the water) and toss into the sauce. Mix well, adding a bit of pasta water if needed, and serve. No Parmesan on fish (a mortal sin in Italy). A goodly drizzle of your finest extra virgin olive oil on top is paramount, as it is on most pasta dishes and pizzas. This dish is so quick and easy, and it couldn't be healthier. And it's utterly delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Dec 18 - 07:53 PM

Dammit, I should have said that you need around four tablespoons of olive oil. Also, you can use diced chicken breast instead of salmon, though you do need to stir-fry it for a minute or two before adding to the sauce. Not hard, though, is it!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 10:24 AM

I think I’ll be helping to make a nut roast early next week. My parents had decided on stuffed butternut squash halves from Tesco for the main part of their Christmas dinner. There were a lot of problems with the Tesco Christmas order which also included a bit of turkey for me. It started with the butternut squash item being “unavailable” on the first day Tesco opened their Christmas area and after the order finally got placed, it got wiped by a regular grocery order and all the Christmas delivery booking slots had gone for another attempt at ordering.

Anyway, after some debate, we decided to go for something home made instead and have opted to try this nut loaf which I think looks good. The deal is that I will get all the ingredients prepared and laid out. Pip will then take over. The plan is to freeze until Christmas eve/day.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 10:34 AM

"Keta" is also called "dog salmon" up in the Northwest and Alaska. Go with the sockeye, or go home. It doesn't have nearly as much flavor or color. It's okay if you don't have anything else, but if you have a choice, go with sockeye.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM

I've tried 2 meals in the multi cooker so far, both slow cook.

The first, a sort of red lentil, chick pea and carrot stew came out well. The recipe I based it on called for pasta at a later stage but, not having any, I tipped some arborio rice in and gave the mix about a 15 minute quick cook on "stew" instead. It was popular enough to be asked to do it again.

I started an attempt at a spicy/curry veg meal in the early hours of this morning (couldn't sleep). I've got this one quite wrong. The veg (potato, carrots, parsnip and sprouts) have cooked OK but I've wound up with way too much, rather insipid liquid. I knew there would be no evaporation but the veg themselves seem to have added somewhat to the liquid. I think I'm going to have to try to rescue this one using a pan on the cooker and aim to be wiser next time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 12:13 PM

I agree about the salmon, and keta is lower in those omega-3 oils as well. I didn't have enough sockeye. But actually keta is fine in the arrabbiata, I promise you, and it's much cheaper this end. When I have sockeye I want it nicely seasoned and fried in butter, skin side down to start with, with home-made oven chips (parboiled unpeeled wedges, roughed up, coated in groundnut oil and roasted for 20 minutes in a fierce oven), tenderstem broccoli and some oven-roasted cherry tomatoes with basil.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM

I have dried ghost pepper. Anyone ever use it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Joe_F
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 06:05 PM

Tonight it will be lamburger, Sicilian spinach, rutabaga, tea, & icecream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Dec 18 - 08:50 PM

I've been on my own today and have got pissed off with one thing and another, so I did meself a trough of comfort food tonight which I scoffed out of a huge bowl in front of a repeat of Chas & Dave's Christmas special on the telly.

You need a fairly small roasting tin or Pyrex dish if it's just for one. Oil it well.

Boil about 350g waxy potatoes, unpeeled, for about twenty minutes.

Meanwhile, take about 75g pancetta or streaky bacon (unsmoked for me, but hey) and cut the rashers into inch-long pieces. Grate about 50g Parmesan. Take about 150g of a melting cheese. Gruyere, fontina, mozzarella or taleggio will all fit the bill, though, as I didn't have any of those, I used provolone dolce. Cut the cheese into small slices.

Drain the spuds, let them cool slightly then slice them up. Put the spuds into the bottom of your oiled roasting dish. Insert the pieces of cheese and bacon roughly into the spud layer. Sprinkle with the grated parmesan, making sure that there's a bit left to go on top. Finally, sprinkle a hood dollop of olive oil on top.

Bake for about 30 minutes at about 180C.

I ate mine with some peas as I needed the vitamins. Lovely it was.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 09 Dec 18 - 09:14 AM

I’ve just been looking at an earlier comment about keeping metal utensils away from cookware.

I admit to damaging one stainless steel pan with a potato masher but I guess I accepted I was going to do that and I don’t use that one for things that stick. I’ve tried with the others but, eg. with last set of visiting family, I did a sort of “self service” from the pans. I put a couple of plastic ones out but they were swapped for metal ones, etc. and Pip is the type who can grab the nearest object to hand even if that means a metal knife vs a non stick frying pan (which now is the only thing I have that is non stick coated).

Anyway, she’s asked me to replace some wooden tools for her Christmas present from me (likely to be more used by me but if that’s what she wants I don’t argue) so I’ve bought a set of wooden handled ones with silicon tools and a couple of silicon desert spoons. I’m not sure whether that will help lead to more care but time will tell.

Favourite pan (if a less dedicated type is allowed to have such things) btw is a 16cm Vogue Tri wall (aluminium sandwiched between stainless steel) one which I use for gravy and sauces. It seems to heat more evenly that the Judge ones and less likely to stick (not that I’ve had major problems cleaning the others). I didn’t get a lid (metal and sold separately) for this one but retained a glass lid from an older discarded saucepan that is a good fit if needed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 10 Dec 18 - 06:14 AM

Charmion, I tried that whiskey-honey-cream-oatmeal thing with pinhead oatmeal one time but found it vaguely gritty. I just use the ordinary oatmeal you make porridge with.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Dec 18 - 10:53 AM

Thompson, from its other recipes, I gather that The Scots Kitchen considers vague grittiness to be a feature, not a bug. Its recipe for haggis is fit to fright the French, containing as it does items that are not legal for sale in Ontario.

I have come down with bronchitis and, if it goes the way it usually does, I will lose all olfactory function within the next 24 to 48 hours. During the taste-free days, I will live on tea and toast.

Now that we live in beautiful, leafy Stratford, Ontario, we are within shouting distance of a genuine grist mill that still produces whole-meal flour. Our bread game, always of a high standard, has consequently gone up yet another notch. I make a 100%-whole-wheat sandwich loaf that is, if not to die for, certainly something to live on. Made with flour from the Arva mill, it has a nutty flavour and a firm (but not stodgy) texture that is delicious when fresh and just magnificent as toast. I got great results with standard commercial flour (Robin Hood "Best For Bread"), but the stone-ground flour is notably better.

If I bake today, while still compos mentis, I might survive to next week ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 12 Dec 18 - 11:01 AM

Tonight, something quick and simple - fried turkey meatballs and new potatoes with a good dollop of butter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Dec 18 - 11:57 AM

The best kind of meal possible - whatever is served - an invitation from the neighbor next door to join her for (in this instance) pot roast after helping her with some yard work.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: JennieG
Date: 13 Dec 18 - 12:12 AM

A favourite Ozzie Christmas treat is made from a commercially-made dark fruit cake. Break up the cake in a bowl and stir in enough sherry (or orange juice if serving it to kids) to make it pliable enough to roll into balls somewhere between a walnut and a golf ball in size. Drizzle melted white chocolate or white icing on top, and decorate with bits of red and green lollies/candy/sweets, depending where in the world you live. Serve in paper cases - they look like mini Chrissie puds.

A plate of these makes a nice gift, if you are into edible givings.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 13 Dec 18 - 04:46 AM

Scots? Wha? Hey!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Dec 18 - 11:42 AM

Salmon was brined overnight and is now in the smoker out on the front porch. This is for a friend, who brought the fish over here because I have the smoker.


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Mudcat time: 14 December 12:51 PM EST

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