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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Jon Freeman 19 Jan 19 - 12:01 PM
Jos 18 Jan 19 - 03:47 AM
Donuel 17 Jan 19 - 10:15 PM
leeneia 17 Jan 19 - 09:06 PM
Donuel 17 Jan 19 - 08:03 PM
Tattie Bogle 17 Jan 19 - 06:30 PM
leeneia 15 Jan 19 - 05:02 PM
Jos 15 Jan 19 - 09:38 AM
Charmion 15 Jan 19 - 09:33 AM
Tattie Bogle 14 Jan 19 - 09:08 PM
Jon Freeman 14 Jan 19 - 05:32 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jan 19 - 10:29 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jan 19 - 09:32 PM
leeneia 13 Jan 19 - 09:00 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jan 19 - 07:52 PM
Janie 13 Jan 19 - 05:26 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Jan 19 - 03:54 PM
Donuel 13 Jan 19 - 02:59 PM
Stanron 13 Jan 19 - 02:32 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Jan 19 - 07:55 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Jan 19 - 07:21 PM
Donuel 12 Jan 19 - 06:52 PM
Donuel 12 Jan 19 - 04:02 PM
Jos 12 Jan 19 - 03:42 PM
Thompson 12 Jan 19 - 05:29 AM
Donuel 11 Jan 19 - 10:38 PM
Charmion 11 Jan 19 - 09:41 PM
Stanron 11 Jan 19 - 08:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Jan 19 - 07:59 PM
leeneia 11 Jan 19 - 06:33 PM
Steve Shaw 11 Jan 19 - 06:28 PM
Donuel 11 Jan 19 - 05:28 PM
Jos 11 Jan 19 - 04:31 PM
leeneia 11 Jan 19 - 11:32 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Jan 19 - 07:22 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jan 19 - 06:29 PM
Jos 10 Jan 19 - 04:49 AM
Steve Shaw 09 Jan 19 - 08:55 PM
Jos 09 Jan 19 - 03:33 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Jan 19 - 01:46 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Jan 19 - 10:49 AM
Thompson 09 Jan 19 - 09:29 AM
Charmion 09 Jan 19 - 07:21 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jan 19 - 07:52 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Jan 19 - 07:29 PM
Thompson 08 Jan 19 - 04:00 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jan 19 - 09:11 PM
Charmion 07 Jan 19 - 06:00 PM
Mrrzy 07 Jan 19 - 07:35 AM
leeneia 06 Jan 19 - 09:39 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 19 Jan 19 - 12:01 PM

Potato and leek gratin from the bbc good food site today. It’s a recipe I’ve used before and we enjoy. I find I need a bit more cooking time (say 45 minutes both with and without the foil) than the recipe suggests and some comment on par boiling the potatoes to reduce cooking time. I just slice the potatoes, I don’t peel them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 18 Jan 19 - 03:47 AM

"shandy would be sweeter than beer"

Well, yes, but compared with the gammon being "simmered in full-sugar Coca-cola and various veg for over 2 hours, then baked in a dressing of maple syrup ..."?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Jan 19 - 10:15 PM

Opps I forgot the can of Tomato sauce. You can double the cans of beans and Tomato sauce to stretch it out.


Leenia, On Monday the DC beltway will be hit by an Arctic blast into the single digits. Upstate NY rarely goes below zero but while in Rochester I experienced a windchill of -63. I ran for cover in less than 5 minutes. Buffalo can drift 6 ft of snow in a single hour!
I've never had visible body hair, its transparent, but I think I have caveman genes. In the cold I am motivated but in the heat I wilt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 17 Jan 19 - 09:06 PM

4 F - that's cold! All this time I thought you live somewhere warm.

Not last night, but the night before we had something we haven't had in 40 years. Wieners, whole-wheat buns, home-made cole slaw. It wasn't our idea; the wieners were a gift.

We hauled out all the extras - ketchup, mustard, pickle relish, chopped onions.
=============
Steve Shaw, I made your pork roast today. It was delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Jan 19 - 08:03 PM

Now that its getting down to 4 degrees F outside were making good basic chili.
Kneed 2 tsp ground pepper into 2 lbs lean hamburger and cook with onion and peppers. Put 1 can kidney beans in croc pot with a small can of Mexican corn and combine with meat & veggies. Add a pinch of cumin and a cup of salsa. Add desired amount of picante sauce or for the bold ground ghost pepper. Slow Cook on low for 4 hours and keep warm.
Serve with French bread & butter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 17 Jan 19 - 06:30 PM

In answer to Charmion, I saved the (somewhat overcooked!) veg (onion, garlic, carrot and leek) from simmering the gammon and was going to put them into our next pot of soup, but husband found them first and threw them into a meatball casserole! Something of a mix of flavours in the latter but not bad at all!
ANd Jos, yes, why not? Though I would tend to use cider with pork or gammon and beer with beef (when not using Coke, that is!) But then shandy would be sweeter than beer. Let us know how it turns out!
Leeneia's cassoulet sounds good too!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Jan 19 - 05:02 PM

Simple cassoulet

Put a liner in a large slow cooker (easier cleanup)
Set 3-4 chicken thighs in it, flesh side down
Drain but don't rinse 1 or 2 cans great northern beans. Add.
Chop one half of an onion, add it
pour on one can tomatoes. I prefer them without salt
slip in some bay leaf
cut up carrots into 2-inch pieces. add them
cut Polish sausage into 2-inch pieces. put on top

Slow cook on low till the chicken is tender and the carrots are how you like them. Remove chicken from bones.

Just before dining, add 1 or 1.5 teaspoons dried leaf thyme.

This is a good dish for when you forgot you were having company until the morning of the day of the dinner.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 15 Jan 19 - 09:38 AM

That's given me an idea. I have a gammon joint in the fridge. I also have a can of shandy that I bought by mistake in Lidl (or possibly Aldi) without reading the teeny-tiny print. The main label is in German and I had bought two cans thinking it was cheap beer, and intending to use it in slug traps, but even the slugs turned their noses up at it.
However, I may try cooking the gammon in it. Fingers crossed, it might taste quite good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 15 Jan 19 - 09:33 AM

Heavens, Tattie, that's quite a recipe. What does the Coke do to the veg? Are they edible when the joint is cooked?

After a bit more than a year of consistent use, I think I've about broken the code on the convection oven in our new stove (cooker). It has certainly taken me long enough.

Baking is easy, since I stick to bread, but roasting has been a bit more of a challenge -- especially chicken, which seems to dry out when the oven is hot enough to produce the crackly skin I like. I had a blinding flash of the obvious the other day and put the battered old pan I use in the barbecue on the bottom rack of the oven and filled it with water, then heated the oven to 375 Fahrenheit with the fan on.

I split a four-pound chicken down the back and flattened it (spatchcocked it), laid it out on a rack in a flat roasting tin, and seasoned it with salt, pepper, thyme and dehydrated garlic. I gave it an hour at 375F, then cranked up the heat to 400F for another ten or fifteen minutes.

Result: perfect chicken, thoroughly cooked in all its parts, even the joints, and with moist, flavourful breast meat. Spatchcocking makes it easy to quarter, so I'm not wrestling with the carving knife and slopping dish gravy all over the table.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 14 Jan 19 - 09:08 PM

Fab gammon joint yesterday, cooked for my husband's birthday. Used a recipe from BBC Good Food: not for those on a January detox (as my daughter and son-in-law professed to be!)
2kg gammon grain simmered in full-sugar Coca-cola and various veg for over 2 hours, then baked in a dressing of maple syrup, whole grain mustard, red wine and cloves. Yummeeee!
(the recipe actually said red wine vinegar, but none in 2 supermarkets I tried, so just red wine had to do!) Served with roast potatoes, cauliflower cheese and fresh mini-sprouts.
Followed by birthday cake and lemon tart and ice-cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 14 Jan 19 - 05:32 PM

Dad had an unusual meal yesterday. I’d just done the Quorn Fillet meal with a jar of Korma sauce/can of chopped tomatoes for the sauce. When I sat down to eat mine, he said “you haven’t had any chutney” and offered to pass me the jar I’d put out.

The problem was that the “chutney” was a (clearly labelled) jar of home made plum jam that I’d put out to go with the Ambrosia rice pudding mum and I (dad doesn’t like this and was having a yoghurt) were having for afters. To make matters worse, he’d been quite liberal with the “chutney” on his plate.

While I do think a spoonful of jam can go quite nicely with rice pudding, I gather it wasn’t the best to go with his meal...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 10:29 PM

I live in a part of town with lots of Mexican and Central American groceries, and one store in particular has a large tortilla factory in place. I stopped by tonight on my way home and picked up two packages of fresh tortillas, still warm. They're in my freezer now and will be used for lunch with friends in a couple of weeks if I don't get a chance that morning to swing by and get more fresh.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 09:32 PM

We had a piece of pork this evening, boned and rolled shoulder with a goodly cover of rind, weighing in at about 3lb-plus. I have a trivet which I put the pork into, then placed that in a big roasting tin. Into the bottom I put a pint of water, two sticks of celery, two carrots, two chopped shallots and some herbs. I rubbed salt into the rind (no oil) and then put the meat into the hottest possible oven for 20 minutes. I then turned the oven down to about 130C and went out for the afternoon (I did top up the liquid before we left). After about four hours I ended up with the most gorgeous roasted meat, tender as the driven snow, topped with crackling to die for. And the liquid beneath, once I'd sieved it and skimmed some fat off (I used it to roast my spuds and parsnips), was totally divine.

I have uses for pork fillet (tenderloin), which can be cooked fast, but I won't buy leg of pork. Tasteless waste of money. Shoulder, belly and hocks for me. I bought my pork at Gloucester Services. The breed was Gloucester Old Spot. Damned fine butcher. They sell good brisket too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 09:00 PM

I'm going to print out and try some of these recipes. Thanks.

It snowed here. Snow is about 6 inches deep on lawns and sidewalks, and it has piled up on tree branches to make lovely white fans. We celebrated by having homemade gingerbread cake with lemon frosting.

We now have two little girls on our block, and there are two snowmen in the neighborhood.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 07:52 PM

Now here's a beef stew that is delicious and trouble-free. Thanks to the sainted Elizabeth David.

For four people. You need two pounds of top rump cut into half-inch thick slices about as big as your palm, 100 g streaky bacon or pancetta, two tomatoes sliced, two carrots cut into rounds, two onions roughly chopped, a few garlic cloves smashed with your fist (NOT crushed), extra virgin olive oil, a glass of red wine and seasoning. If you have some pork rinds, the kind of thing you might trim from pork chops, that's great, otherwise have a couple of rashers of really fatty bacon to hand. Finally, you need a goodly bunch of fresh herbs tied with string. Thyme, parsley, sage, bayleaf sort of thang.

Once you've assembled that lot, the method is ridiculously easy. Everything just goes in cold.

Put a good glug of olive oil into your heaviest casserole. Chop the bacon and throw it in. Put the carrots, onion and tomatoes on top of that. Put in the bunch of herbs and the smashed garlic. Layer the pieces of beef carefully on top. Season well then put the pan on to medium heat for about fifteen minutes. While you're waiting, do the fun bit. Put the red wine into a small pan, bring to the boil and set fire to the alcohol vapour. Watch your eyebrows. As soon as the flame goes out, pour the wine all over the meat.

Cover tightly (foil under a lid), put into the oven at 160C for two and a half hours and forget it. Beautiful with mash and greens. Boeuf en daube as in rustic France. The recipe also includes thin slivers of orange zest, but I don't like that so I always leave it out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Janie
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 05:26 PM

Fixing a beef stew to take to Amos tomorrow for some respite from hospital food.

Sauted onions and garlic until translucent and removed from dutch oven. Cubed a 2lb. sirloin tip roast and browned it in batches in the dutch oven, deglazed the pan with a cheap red wine, added the meat, onions and garlic back to the pot, added more wine, beef broth, bay leaf, thyme, salt and pepper. Has been simmering about 90 minutes. Will add carrots and potatoes when the meat is nearly as tender as I desire. At the very end, will taste to see if more salt or pepper are needed and thicken slightly with a flour paste.

I think I was in a bit of a rush and did not brown the beef as well/dark as would have made for the very best flavor. Still, likely to be better than hospital fare.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 03:54 PM

Not interested, Donuel. Now where's that bloody corkscrew...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 02:59 PM

A few people Steve does not understand

The misunderstanding about British cuisine being dreadful is defied in this thread. Most dishes here sound very desirable.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron
Date: 13 Jan 19 - 02:32 PM

Back in the halcyon days when my waistline was less than 30 inches, I had that generosity of spirit that accepted anything anyone ever offered me. There were lots of oversized, funny smelling hand rolled cigarettes, all sorts of pills, and, fortunately, no developed opiates. I remember preferring stuff that kept me awake to stuff that sent me to sleep though more recently non alcoholic sleep assists would have been welcome.

I suspect that if cannabis becomes legal I would buy some occasionally, and in all honesty it's not the illegality that stops me right now as much as not knowing how to get it and not being sufficiently bothered to find out. This is going to sound weird I know but I can, and do, get 'high' doing Killer Sudoku puzzles and drinking Green Tea, not necessarily at the same time.

What I get from these three threads is to tell the doctors as little as possible. This stratagem has, so far, enabled me to avoid things being stuck into either end. and has not yet led to my untimely end. I did have a spell, many years ago now, of frequent and unpleasant indigestion, and recognised the term hiatus hernia from that. I can't remember what, if anything, I did about it but it no longer happens. No doctors were involved and it went away. I'm not actually recommending this as a way to go for others but I do remember someone once said, "when they get you, they don't let go".


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Jan 19 - 07:55 PM

Tonight I did a dish that was inspired by, but somewhat distant from, the very last one in Nigella's book Nigellissima. It's a one-pot job that leaves very little washing up, which is highly nutritious and which you can eat out of a bowl on your knee in front of the telly.

For two people with seconds. Get your heaviest pot and put 100g chopped-up pancetta in it. Brown the bacon, then add two chopped carrots, two chopped celery sticks and a chopped onion. You will need to add a good glug of olive oil. Your best. Sautée that lot gently for a good half-hour. You are making what is known as a soffritto. I added a small pinch of dried chilli flakes to mine. Free country.

Weight out 200g of green or brown lentils. Not the red ones. I used puy lentils. Rinse them then throw them into the pot. Add a can of plum tomatoes and a splash of water and 750ml of chicken or veg stock. I used turkey stock. Throw in a handful of chopped fresh parsley and a bay leaf. Smash four garlic cloves with your fist, peel, and throw them in. No chopping and definitely no crushing. Simmer for half an hour with the lid on.

Check and adjust seasoning and make sure the lentils have softened. Then the coup de grace: throw in about 125g of small pasta. It should be something like ditalini or ditaloni, or mini-macaroni. Not the tiniest soup pastas. They wouldn't be right. I don't like tbat cheap little shell pasta much. I mused about whether to use orzo but thought better of it. If you have only bigger pasta, put some in a plastic bag and smash it up slightly with your meat mallet or rolling pin. Anyway, turn up the heat a bit, leave the lid off and get it to a jolly bubble until the pasta is al dente. It takes a bit longer than boiling it in plain water.

Ladle into bowls, drizzle with your finest olive oil, turn the telly on and devour, preferably with a bottle of Italian red.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Jan 19 - 07:21 PM

I'm a bit bloody annoyed. I did a great big long post about mushrooms this morning but some git pulled the website just as I hit send, and even my "select all-copy" didn't take. Grr.

Anyway.

In a nutshell, I was rabbiting on about the abuse of mushrooms in cookery. Nasty rubbery things in the "Full English Breakfast." Nasty little tasteless buttons in casseroles and stews, I love sautéed mushrooms on toast but they must be thinly sliced and fried in butter with salt and black pepper. Add a fried egg or two, done in the mushroom butter, and you have a breakfast to keep you going until mid-afternoon. If I want to be antisocial for 24 hours, I add parsley and fist-smashed garlic cloves to the sautée. Delia's pork chops recipe, done with cream and chopped mushrooms with thyme and lemon, is a thing of beauty too. But, for a casserole or stew, I use only dried porcini. I soak the fungi in boiling water for half an hour and use the beautiful liquid in the stew, and I chop the ceps finely and add them too.

I don't understand people who use mind-altering substances such as psilocybe or cannabis, still less people who brag about using them. It isn't big and it isn't clever. I use booze with caution and that's more than enough for me, thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 12 Jan 19 - 06:52 PM

https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/lobster-or-crab-bisque-229275

double the lump crab meat to 1 lb
salt and mushroom to taste


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 12 Jan 19 - 04:02 PM

Find some reliable food banks. Did you know a practicing Mormon is required to have a year of food stored?

There is a big difference between artificial/chemistry and billions of years of evolutionary organics. As temporary psychotic episodes go I would not place the sacred mushroom experience into that category of experience. It is a surprise I would not spoil by an attempt to define.
I would only recommend having a theme question or questions and be sure to ask.

As a bucket list experience it is in the top 10. Now they use it for geriatrics having a hard time transitioning.

Its been over 30 years since I even tried a joint but there are several gourmet cooking shows that feature pot as an ingredient.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 12 Jan 19 - 03:42 PM

Apologies - in my post on 11 January I meant 'herring roes', not 'herring rows' (I woke up in the night worrying about it, imagining herrings lined up in a row, or even herrings having a row and fighting noisily).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 12 Jan 19 - 05:29 AM

A dogshit shake isn't an appetising description, to be honest.

I'd personally be nervous of any of these hallucinogenics - even cannabis, now that it's been genetically engineered to be much more stoney than it was in my youth. Not that I was any great toker then either…

But with how little we know about the brain and its workings, it seems foolish to me to be seeking what are essentially artificially-induced psychotic experiences.

Incidentally, talking of mushrooms, does anyone else occasionally buy stuff in the wholesale fruit and vegetable markets? It's always super-fresh, you get things that you won't get in most shops, and the prices are extraordinary. You're buying in bulk, but not that much bulk - I sometimes go halvers with a friend or two for a box of something.

And is anyone doing any pre-Brexit stocking-up-just-in-case, and if so what are you stocking up on?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 10:38 PM

I have never added a sacred or magical mushroom to any recipe except for tea with full disclosure. Some things are better in their fresh and anticipated original organic form like in a salad with your favorite dressing. Although convenient, dried shrooms are tough on the tummy.

Ayahuasca is not one of those things. They say it is like all bitter alkaloids with MAO inhibitors and that it tastes like a dog shit shake with alfalfa flavor and will cause vomiting. I do not believe vomiting is a required gateway to an epicurean psychoactive journey. Besides the idea of saliva as an ingredient turns me off. but that's just me. There are better ways to share spit.

Most of us would prefer a nice crab bisque.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 09:41 PM

When I was not ill in any way, I was 23 and in the armed forces. Being afraid of arrest and imprisonment in those days, I used no drugs at all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stanron
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 08:14 PM

Is it just me or does anyone else link this thread with the Barrett's oesophagus thread. In the interest of expanding threeness how about a thread about the drugs we all took when we were not ill in any way at all?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 07:59 PM

I shop at an unusual one-of-a-kind grocery store in town; they buy from chain stores' warehouses with products nearing the sell-by date, and from independent grocery suppliers who were overstocked; when there is meat, poultry or fish it is frozen. The groceries are discounted, often quite deeply, and they have what they have and when it's gone it's gone. I buy a lot of my dairy products there (excellent cheeses, high-end yogurt quarts, bulk packages of eggs, yogurt cups, etc.) and veggies. Fresh veggies are anything you can think of, along with fresh flowers, flowers in vases, flowers in pots, etc.

I had some salmon today for lunch that I picked up there; I only bought one salmon package because I didn't know anything about it the supplier and it's just as well. It was quite oily (which is good) but not particularly tasty. I have resolved not to buy any more salmon there unless it's labeled as wild-caught sockeye or better; this experiment confirmed my mostly-formed suspicion. The unsold the dog salmon comes from wherever.

I cook enough of some dishes to use them for several days - this week it has been split pea soup and rice with chicken for dinner with various other small side dishes. I'm doing a "no-spend" month so these are all things that came from my shelves or out of the freezer. Given the challenge of not buying new ingredients, it's interesting to see what I can come up with.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 06:33 PM

Don't worry, Donuel. That was an usual experience. Most people are happy to share recipes. It is a compliment that a diner likes a food so much that they ask for it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 06:28 PM

Recipes are like Irish tunes in a single line of notation. Not even bare bones, but possessing a whiff of an idea. Something to build on, rebel against and stray badly from. I just get meself up into the kitchen, vaguely recall something I once read in a book, then do my own thing. I have one golden rule, which is that no one ingredient, except for the main meaty or fishy one, should EVER be the point of the thing. I do not want every mouthful of any dish to taste mostly of basil/mint/garlic/chilli/apple/onion/thyme. I want integration of flavours, team work from the ingredients. I have few rules, but just a couple are that dried basil has no place in any kitchen, that garlic should NEVER be crushed, and that, if your dish tastes herby, you've got it wrong. Another thing or two I've learned are that the microwave rarely yields decent food and that steaming most vegetables is going to give you inferior results. I'd make an exception for chopped cabbage, but nothing else. Boil your veg in water half way up the veg, always with a pinch of salt, don't overcooked them, and you'll never look back. Sod the vitamins. You'll get plenty of those anyway if you live in the West like me. Food is enjoyment, not medicinal.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 05:28 PM

My experience years ago made me uneasy asking about recipes. Perhaps its just me but I have wondered if anyone has ha a similar experience.

I was offered a small portion of ribs and non chalantly popped it in my mouth. Suddenly the meat liquified and fell off the bone, all my senses turned into a river of flowing bacon and weak kneed I craved a second bite. I impetously asked "what is the recipe for this" at which point the lady stiffened and acted as if I had asked for her wallet and social security number. She said with tight lips and glaring eyes "This is a secret family recipe!".
It was if I had tried to steal from her ancestors and future grand children's fortunes and destroy the dreams of franchises for centuries to come.
Clearly my question was inappropriate and tantamount to felony.
I assumed that one should never ask except as a compliment not meant to be answered.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 04:31 PM

I found Waitrose selling frozen herring row (very cheap and nutritious). I thawed them, dipped them in flour with a little salt and chili powder, and fried them in butter, then stir-fried onion, celery, courgette, chestnut mushrooms and a few slices of leek, and served the lot with pasta and a slug of cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 11 Jan 19 - 11:32 AM

I wanted something different, so I made Thai chicken.
==========
linguine, boiled as usual

peas, nuked in the wave and drained (supposed to be sugar snap, but I only had ordinary)

chicken fried in a skillet (supposed to be breast, but I used thighs)

sauteed garlic

sauce - 1/4 cup water, 1 T soy sauce, 1 T lime juice. 2 T peanut butter, tiny amt cayenne pepper (I prefer black pepper). Don't thicken; just put the food in a serving bowl and slosh the sauce on top.

The first batch was dry, so the second day I made another batch of sauce, reducing the water and increasing the lime juice.

The peanut butter didn't want to mix with the water, and i wonder if adding a tiny bit of mayonnaise would help with that.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 19 - 07:22 PM

Or eat a huge helping but take longer over it. :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jan 19 - 06:29 PM

Moderation in everything - so add all of the good stuff, but don't eat a huge helping, watch your portions. Mischief managed!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 10 Jan 19 - 04:49 AM

It's up to people to keep their own resolutions. If they are led astray by your tasty suggestions that's their problem. You are not to blame.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jan 19 - 08:55 PM

Quite, but I didn't want to wreck anyone's New Year slimming resolutions.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 09 Jan 19 - 03:33 PM

On potatoes: "add a generous amount of grated cheese instead of butter"
In my case, change "instead of" to "as well as".


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Jan 19 - 01:46 PM

I would far sooner use warm milk to loosen mash than cooking water. I only ever use a plastic hand masher. Making mash produces more than enough washing-up as it is.

When I cook the following I always cook far too much, accidentally on purpose:

Mashed potatoes
Boiled rice
Sausages
Jacket potatoes

A pile of cold mash can be fried with a knob of butter. Keep it moving to break it up and grate a healthy dose of cheddar into it. Once melted and smooth, put into large bowl, sit in front of telly and devour. Or you can make Irish-style potato farls.

As for rice, melt butter in a frying pan. Add the rice, break it up then break in an egg or two. Throw in some frozen peas (maybe boil them first). Stir around until piping hot. Add more butter if too dry. Fit for a king. Beware of keeping cold rice too long or too warm. Bacterial nasties love cooked rice. It has to be next day only for me.

Cold bangers can just be devoured, but if you slice them carefully lengthways into long, thin strips they make a beautiful butty, preferably with mayo. Or chop them up and add to a risotto, preferably with some cooked chicken scraps and bacon.

Jacket potatoes gone cold will develop a soft skin, but no matter. For breakfast, microwave a couple of them for two minutes or so. Put them in a bowl, cut them up to bite size with scissors, add butter and devour. Or add a generous amount of grated cheese instead of butter, microwave for another minute or grill (just get that cheese melted). Delicious. Microwaving them does make a strong potatoey smell. I can scoff cold jacket potatoes just as they are.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Jan 19 - 10:49 AM

New York Times has a good mashed potato recipe. It addresses an array of desired results. I had listened to Sam Sifton, one of the Times' recipe gurus on a radio program earlier in the week describe making potatoes, so I did it that way and they were perfect. In the past I haven't always drained the potatoes enough and they weren't as fluffy or creamy as I was trying to achieve. My Mom used to talk about keeping some of the cooking water, but that must have been a recipe from decades ago. Milk and butter, and I don't melt them first in an pan, I put a few potatoes into the stand mixer bowl then plop in the butter then add the rest of the potatoes. They're so hot the butter doesn't stand a chance and isn't going to cool anything. I usually use a hand masher first to break them up in the bowl, then use the paddle or whisk to make the finished potatoes. The milk is added at that point so I can watch the consistency. I use Russets for mashed potatoes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 09 Jan 19 - 09:29 AM

We always steam spuds, and they don't collapse. To mash them, we add an egg, a dose of butter, the top of the milk; we mash them using the hand masher, not a ricer (which makes mash gluey). Then serve with a knob of butter melting on top.

Le CrEUset is easy to spell, except for Brexiteers.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jan 19 - 07:21 AM

I’m not fond of mashed anything, so I like my spuds baked. Even an ancient microwave is a great help in this department, as a nuked whole potato becomes a field-expedient baked potato very quickly when plonked on the oven rack beside whatever is in there already.

Here in Ontario, spuds are not marketed by cultivar (e.g., King Edward), but by colour and flesh type — except for the excellent Yukon Gold, a yellow-fleshed waxy potato that makes the best hash browns ever.

I did not expect to fall in like with the Instant Pot, but was won over by its capabilities with respect to beans and whole grains, especially brown rice. The Christmas pudding took half an hour, plus time to come up to pressure and to release the pressure naturally.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 19 - 07:52 PM

I get very fed up when my mash doesn't turn out the way I want it, usually too sloppy and runny, too gluey or too grainy. I don't like anything in my mash except salt and butter (and plenty of the latter). What I've learned is to always hedge my bets by using at least two, preferably three, varieties of spud. I don't like spuds that collapse in the boiling water so I avoid King Edwards. Also, only a small amount of waxy sorts go in, things such as Charlotte or Nicola. Too much of those risks glueyness. Santé are very good if you can get them. I regard Lady Balfour to be horrid watery things so they don't get in. Most cookery books suggest insufficient boiling time. I reckon thirty minutes is the minimum. If I've put plenty of butter in but the mash is still a bit too stiff, under protest I'll add a drop of milk. I have a potato ricer but using it for mash risks the spuds cooling down too much. I've used it successfully to make gnocchi, for which I boil the spuds in their skins which I can slip off later. That stops the spuds from going too soggy, not great for gnocchi.

Another golden rule is to buy only the best spuds. Even the most expensive spuds are cheap.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Jan 19 - 07:29 PM

I don't have slow cookers or pressure cookers and I use our ancient microwave only for softening butter in winter when I need a crumpet or teacake. I have a Foreman grill that's been redundant, a white elephant, for ten years. I cooked a two-pound piece of brisket in a Le Creuset casserole on Sunday. I browned it all round in a glug of oil in the hot pan for a couple of minutes, then set it aside so that I could fry some chopped carrot, celery and shallots in the fat (I had to add a bit of butter and I take no notice of the burnt stuff on the bottom of the pan) then I added a pint of beef stock from a cube, a glass of red wine which I'd boiled and burned off the alcohol from, the soaking liquid from 25g dried porcini, then the chopped porcini. I put the meat back on top and brought it all slowly to the boil. While I was waiting I went into the garden and picked a bunch of parsley, some sprigs of thyme, a bay leaf and a small bunch of sage. I tied all these together with string and added them to the pot with some seasoning. That went in a low oven, 140C, for three hours, lid on. The meat was tender and moist, the juices made lovely gravy and we had it, three of us, with mashed potato and sprouting broccoli from my garden. There were juices left over and some goodly scraps of beef, which I made into a lovely ragu to stir spaghetti into the next day, nothing else needed except a topping of freshly-grated Parmesan,


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 08 Jan 19 - 04:00 PM

How long did you pressure cook your pudding? I did mine for an hour and it was distinctly overdone.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jan 19 - 09:11 PM

My son was here for the holidays and heading back to the Pacific NW this evening so we went through what may seem a rather bizarre ritual - stopped by "Chicken Express," a small chain of fast food restaurants that we used to get as takeout when the kids were little. The $16 family pack would feed four of us in a one-salary home. Not sure what the oil is they use for frying. As he grew he continued to buy it for himself, and if you eat it hot and fresh it isn't *too* bad, but he likes it reheated. Gag. And he bought a large order to repack and stash in his luggage to eat and share with his girlfriend when he gets back home. He seems unconcerned about the amount of time it isn't refrigerated, though we always suggest he should freeze it first or take cold packs.

Since he was going to take this order home with him I made one of his favorite home-made dishes for an early dinner before he left - you guessed it - chicken strips. I dip them in flour then egg then into seasoned bread crumbs. Saute in shallow oil in which you've melted 3-4 tablespoons butter.

Kids!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Jan 19 - 06:00 PM

Mrrzy -- HA HA HA HA!

We ate the last of the Christmas pud last night (Little Christmas), and it was absolutely terrific with vanilla ice-cream. I may never make hard sauce again.

It is time to sing the praises of our electronic pressure-cooker, the Instant Pot. It is large and lumpy and takes up way too much space in the kitchen, but it earns its keep by reliably cooking brown rice, wild rice, beans, stock, and -- of all things -- Christmas pudding and other suet-assisted desserts that otherwise have to steam for hours and hours. I can set it up, turn it on and WALK AWAY, even go to bed or leave the house, and when I return to the kitchen nothing has exploded and the contents are perfectly cooked.

My most recent achievement is a pilaff of brown and wild rice that I made last night to go with roast pheasant (from a game farm; we don't know anybody who shoots them). When we had picked the bones of the pheasant -- at just under two pounds, it was a satisfying meal for two and no more -- the wreckage went into the Pot with a couple of carrots and a couple of onions, and in the morning we had a Pot full of pheasant stock. The rest of the brown-and-wild-rice pilaff made an excellent snack.

Wild rice is a thing around here, harvested and sold by the Anishnabe First Nation. It's amazing when combined with brown rice, but a bit astringent all by itself.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Jan 19 - 07:35 AM

I love the idea of instant mulling.

Super Bowl, I like to cook the teams. If it is Rams v. Saints, how about mutton etouffee?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 06 Jan 19 - 09:39 PM

Beef with snow peas, Chinese style. other ingredients: white onion, garlic, ginger root, soy sauce, cornstarch, mushrooms, green pepper

If the snow peas are floppy, soak them in tepid water for a couple hours to take up water and become crisp again. This also works for the green pepper you forgot about. (Slice it up first.)


I don't cook the steak in the wok. I cook it separately, slice and add at the last minute. Snow peas are also tossed in at the last minute.

To save hassle, we now cook a big batch of brown rice and put the extra in a ziploc bag, flattened. Freeze. Next time we want rice, we break off a chunk, thaw and eat.

If I didn't say so earlier, we do that with pasta, too.


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