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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

leeneia 02 Jan 19 - 03:01 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Jan 19 - 02:10 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jan 19 - 02:09 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Jan 19 - 01:59 PM
Charmion 02 Jan 19 - 08:19 AM
Dave Hanson 02 Jan 19 - 07:58 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Jan 19 - 05:21 AM
Dave Hanson 02 Jan 19 - 03:04 AM
EBarnacle 01 Jan 19 - 12:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Jan 19 - 12:45 PM
Charmion 01 Jan 19 - 11:44 AM
leeneia 29 Dec 18 - 06:01 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Dec 18 - 08:39 PM
Jon Freeman 28 Dec 18 - 06:33 PM
robomatic 28 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM
Senoufou 28 Dec 18 - 04:21 PM
leeneia 27 Dec 18 - 10:01 PM
Charmion 27 Dec 18 - 11:29 AM
Jon Freeman 27 Dec 18 - 07:51 AM
BobL 27 Dec 18 - 02:44 AM
leeneia 26 Dec 18 - 04:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Dec 18 - 11:31 AM
Charmion 26 Dec 18 - 09:42 AM
BobL 26 Dec 18 - 03:53 AM
Charmion 25 Dec 18 - 11:00 AM
wysiwyg 24 Dec 18 - 05:21 PM
Thompson 20 Dec 18 - 10:37 AM
Stilly River Sage 20 Dec 18 - 10:00 AM
Steve Shaw 20 Dec 18 - 09:54 AM
Thompson 20 Dec 18 - 08:46 AM
Ed T 20 Dec 18 - 08:24 AM
BobL 20 Dec 18 - 03:00 AM
Donuel 19 Dec 18 - 10:16 PM
Steve Shaw 19 Dec 18 - 06:15 PM
Jos 19 Dec 18 - 05:53 PM
Donuel 19 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Dec 18 - 11:52 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Dec 18 - 02:06 PM
leeneia 18 Dec 18 - 01:41 PM
SamStone 17 Dec 18 - 03:32 PM
Thompson 17 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 18 - 10:14 AM
Steve Shaw 17 Dec 18 - 04:37 AM
Jos 17 Dec 18 - 01:37 AM
leeneia 16 Dec 18 - 11:44 PM
Big Al Whittle 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM
Thompson 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM
Jos 16 Dec 18 - 05:20 AM
Tattie Bogle 15 Dec 18 - 07:34 PM
leeneia 15 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 03:01 PM

With canned tomatoes, I now buy the no-salt version. They taste better, fruitier. And my husband wants low-salt food.

With garden tomatoes, I don't bother to peel them. I slice them thinly with a serrated knife, and the peels come out as thin strands that people hardly notice. And maybe tomatoes are like some other fruits, where the flavor and vitamins are in a thin layer right under the peel.

SRS, I know what you mean. We are having pea soup too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 02:10 PM

When it comes to fresh vs canned tomatoes, even the Italians frequently use canned. They are often riper, richer and sweeter than the fresh you can buy in shops. Different if you grow your own to ripe perfection before picking them. I much prefer to buy whole plum tomatoes in cans. Cirio and Napolina are good brands, but there are often annoying bits of skin and tough bits of blossom-end rot/greenback in both which I cut out. And I never leave out that pinch of sugar. It sounds wrong but it miraculously improves the flavour - even the Italians do it. Rachel Roddy always does it! I hate skinning tomatoes. When I make salmorejo in summer, my very favourite tapa, I blitz the toms with skin on. It works for me!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 02:09 PM

I'll be drawing down leftovers for a while here, but freezing rain is coating everything today so it's time for something hearty like split pea or lentil soup.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 01:59 PM

That's where I got it from. It's the Italian bible, isn't it, Charmion!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 08:19 AM

That tomato sauce is the bomb. It’s even better (if possible) when made with fresh tomatoes, but then you have to skin them which rather spoils the “easy” part of that recipe.

Himself and I are eating our way through Marcella’s “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking”. Last night it was frittata made with the mushrooms that were sitting rather too long in the veg bin. Gone in three minutes flat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 07:58 AM

I'll try that maybe tommorrow Steve.

Cheers, Dave


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 05:21 AM

Indeed, Dave. Equally simple is Marcella Hazan's onion and butter tomato sauce for spaghetti. Into a saucepan you put a can of plum tomatoes, a knob of butter and a whole peeled onion. Simmer for 45 minutes, discard the onion, check the seasoning and viola! Serve with proper Parmesan.

The magic ingredient to add to any tomato sauce is half a level teaspoon of sugar.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 02 Jan 19 - 03:04 AM

Had this on Boxing day, the simplest most delicious pasta dish you can imagine ' spaghettini aglio e olio ' spaghetti, olive oil, garlic and optional chopped parsley, salt and pepper.

the recipe is is in any decent Italian cookbook.


Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: EBarnacle
Date: 01 Jan 19 - 12:52 PM

Mea culpa. I forgot to post my favorite egg nog recipe before the holidays. A fellow grad student friend gave it to me many years ago and, other than a few tweaks I continue the tradition.

Coquito, aka Puerto Rican egg nog

2 cans cream of coconut
2 cans condensed or evaporated milk, your preference
4 egg yolks
1 tablespoon good quality vanilla
1 bottle good quality dark rum [I prefer Goslings or Don Q.]
Cinnamon, to taste
Nutmeg
Lemon zest

Combine all of the wet ingredients, mixing thoroughly.
Just before serving it up, put the dry ingredients on the mixture in the bowl.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Jan 19 - 12:45 PM

I have to finish up some cooking that was started on Sunday. The filling for meat pies keeps fine for a couple of days and now I'll finish them - the gift for my ex each year is a dish his mother used to make Puerto Rican chicken empanadillas will go into the freezer to be eaten over the next few weeks. A batch of beans because I'm out of the 12 ounce jars that I keep in the freezer for personal sized portions for easy meals. I used to take the frozen jar in my lunchbox to work, and everything else stayed cold enough in the bag. Time to find another job so I can take my lunch again!

The beans are a riff on a PR recipe, but I add a little heat and I use kidney beans instead of the smaller red beans.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Jan 19 - 11:44 AM

After a week of rich festive meals, normal eating resumes today. Thank goodness; I don't think I could face one more chocolate truffle (oh, maybe just one more ...)!

This afternoon, the last of the orange-flavoured duck gravy is scheduled to become the basis of a batch of carrot-and-ginger soup. Supper will be a mushroom omelette with green onions and a bit of grated Parmesan. We picked the bones of the duck, and now we have lots and lots of lovely duck broth.

The supermarket reopens tomorrow, so I shall sally forth to purchase a bunch of kale in order to make minestrone. Lovely stuff for winter in Ontario.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 29 Dec 18 - 06:01 PM

Steve, you certainly have a lot of good ideas for what to do with turkey.

Robomatic, I ate at the Texas Roadhouse once and liked it. I still remember their house-made salad dressing. Delicious!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Dec 18 - 08:39 PM

Well we love all the post-Christmas cold meat and we always cook a second, smaller turkey a couple of days after Christmas. I also boil up a large piece of unsmoked free-range ham on Boxing Day in a large pan of water with some carrots, onions, celery sticks, herbs and peppercorns. That gives us a lovely lump of meat and a pan of stock ideal for making pea and ham soup next week. The challenge is to vary the accompaniments. We did have a good old salad on Boxing Day with some ruby gem spuds baked in their skins, very nice but a bit too summery. Next day we had Nigella's quick version of dauphinoise (the one in Nigella Bites, with crême fraiche instead of double cream) with some greens. Delicious. Today I reheated some turkey slices in tightly-wrapped foil, along with some stuffing. Meanwhile I sautéed some sliced banana shallots in plenty of salty butter until they were beginning to caramelise. All that went in layers on warm ciabatta rolls (mayo and tommy-k optional, never for me) to be scoffed messily and greedily keeping over the plates. Nirvana. Tomorrow I'll concoct a turkey curry karahi-style with green peppers. For Sunday I'll make a hearty turkey broth with a soffritto, the smaller turkey scraps and the lovely pan of turkey stock I made on Boxing Day. I'll chuck in some tiny soup pasta ten minutes before the end to make it into more of a meal and we'll have some crusty bread with it. I have another bag of small pieces in the freezer, with which I'll make a turkey and pancetta risotto for Mrs Steve and me some time early in the New Year.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 28 Dec 18 - 06:33 PM

Take away here too today. There was some debate over what to get and from where and I’m not sure my own contribution to that (dad, at that point, was fixed on having ½ pizza and chips and I suggested I could share the one in the freezer with him and fry some chips, just leaving 3 for a takeaway) achieved anything other than muddying the waters further…

Anyway, an Indian takeaway won but I, by then feeling the effects of a sleepless night and having to attend an appointment this morning took what was intended to be a short nap. The tea time meal was over and visiting family had returned to their B&B before I woke up. My veg curry is in the fridge. I might microwave it later but haven’t felt that hungry yet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: robomatic
Date: 28 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM

I got introduced to Texas Roadhouse early in December. So far I've been back twice for the American farm-raised catfish. I bring it up here because I seriously like the place and I'm hoping some of you will tear it down for me before I give it a five star yelp review.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Senoufou
Date: 28 Dec 18 - 04:21 PM

Last night we whizzed off to a very large and quite new chippie called 'Deep Blue' (I think it's a chain of chippies) on the outskirts of Norwich. They seem to fry on demand, and it was all beautifully crisp and fresh (cod and chips)
Sat in the car munching away. It was served in individual cardboard trays with little wooden forks (no plastic, very environmentally friendly)
Quite a treat for us, and most enjoyable.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 27 Dec 18 - 10:01 PM

Tonight we had a nice, wintry dish

turkey with root vegetables

Put a liner in a slow cooker. (If you have a scullery maid, you can skip the liner.) Place a turkey thigh in it, pressing the flesh against the crock.

Wash and peel some root vegetables and cut them into bite-size pieces. I used parsnips and carrots. You can add turnips and rutabaga, but I don't because I don't like them. Avoid beets. The world is not ready for purple turkey.

Cut an onion into wedges. Toss the wedges and the root vegetables into the pot.

cover and cook all day on low, until the meat is tender.

As dinnertime approaches, add 1/3 cup white wine or the juice of a lemon. Allow enough time for the alcohol in the wine to evaporate.

At dinnertime, remove the meat and vegetables to a serving dish. Add 1 teaspoon marjoram or rosemary to the juice, stir well and pour the juice over the top.

Salt and pepper are added at the table, as desired.   

==========
We had this with buttered cornbread and steamed cauliflower.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 27 Dec 18 - 11:29 AM

BobL, your Dad's fruit in vodka sounds like the cordial I make most summers, which is always delicious but often results in fruit fit only for the compost heap once the liquor is tapped off. I have never made it with peaches (why not? good question); so far, I have used only raspberries or sour cherries. The osmotic process that pulls the juice into the booze reduces raspberries to tasteless pulp, but sour cherries are high enough in cellulose to retain some structure even after six months of maceration, so they are good with yoghourt or ice cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 27 Dec 18 - 07:51 AM

The nut roast I mentioned earlier was a success. It froze and reheated (just thawed it and slices in the microwave) well. Rather than splitting duties with Pip as suggested before, I cooked it. It took a me lot longer than the recipe suggested (double the prep time but I’m slow even with a decent knife, a lot longer for the mix with the lentils added to absorb nearly all the liquid and at least 10 minutes more baking time) but parents enjoyed it and I would use this recipe again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 27 Dec 18 - 02:44 AM

Tinned peaches Charmion, it's not a good season for fresh ones. However they do the job excellently. Might try bottled ones sometime, but my dad's recipes for fruit in vodka usually yielded uneatable fruit and wonderful liquor.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 26 Dec 18 - 04:52 PM

For Christmas dinner we had Mexican food. It wasn't a deliberate choice; the avocados were ready to eat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Dec 18 - 11:31 AM

A while back I posted a link to a good comparison of the North American wild grapes, so of course I can't find it now. Mustang grapes are featured at the bottom of this page. I make grape jelly just like in the SureJel package instructions.

Today I'll make a batch of bread pudding because I love it for breakfast or snacks. It reheats very nicely. The rest of my eating is leftovers from the last couple of days.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 26 Dec 18 - 09:42 AM

Peaches stuffed with mincemeat — how delightful! Fresh or tinned peaches?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 26 Dec 18 - 03:53 AM

Xmas dinner was a venison joint, boned & rolled by local butcher. 2lb 8oz was just right for a party of 4, with enough left over to make one small sandwich.
Followed by mincemeat-stuffed peach halves, doused in sherry and warmed in the oven during the main course.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 25 Dec 18 - 11:00 AM

Today being Christmas, I are roasting a duck and making bigarade sauce. There will be steamed pud with custard to follow. I may not be capable of movement for some time after.

Himself, on the other hand, will be looking around for cheese and nuts.

I don’t know where he puts it all.


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Subject: Hinton Xmas Recipes
From: wysiwyg
Date: 24 Dec 18 - 05:21 PM

Thanksgiving-style Xmas Menu


Scalloped Potatoes With Spinach And Cheese

2 pounds peeled Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 1/8-inch slices
1 1/4 cups 1% low-fat milk
1 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
Dash of nutmeg
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
2 cups sliced Vidalia or other sweet onion
1 cup (4 ounces) reduced-fat shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry
3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 450°.
Place potato slices in a large saucepan, and cover with water. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, 6 minutes or until tender. Drain well; set aside.

Combine milk and next 5 ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk until blended.

Melt butter in a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté 7 minutes or until golden. Reduce heat to medium. Gradually add milk mixture, stirring with a whisk until blended. Cook 5 minutes or until thick and bubbly; stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Add cheese, stirring until cheese melts. Remove from heat.

Arrange half of potato slices in an 11 x 7- inch baking dish coated with cooking spray. Top with half of spinach and half of cheese sauce. Repeat with remaining potato, spinach, and sauce. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake at 450° for 15 to 18 minutes or until golden and bubbly.



Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Honey and Cinnamon
4 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling potatoes after cooked
1/4 cup honey
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Lay the sweet potatoes out in a single layer on a roasting tray. Drizzle the oil, honey, cinnamon, salt and pepper over the potatoes. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes in oven or until tender. Take sweet potatoes out of the oven and transfer them to a serving platter. Drizzle with more extra-virgin olive oil.

stove top stuffing for Greg and cheesy arepas for me; cheesy corn and crunch casserole;


GLUTEN-FREE GREEN BEAN CASSEROLE WITH CARAMELIZED MUSHROOMS & ONIONS

1 tablespoon gluten-free cornstarch
2 teaspoons McCormick® Basil Leaves
1 teaspoon McCormick® Onion Salt
2 tablespoons butter
1 cup thinly sliced onions
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1 1/2 cups milk2 teaspoon gluten-free soy sauce
4 ounces (1/2 package) cream cheese, cubed
1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces and cooked

Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix cornstarch, basil and onion salt in small bowl. Set aside.
Melt butter in large skillet on medium-high heat. Add onions; cook and stir 6 to 7 minutes or until golden brown. Add mushrooms; cook and stir 2 minutes or until mushrooms are tender. Stir in cornstarch mixture. Add milk and soy sauce; stir constantly, cook until sauce is thickened and bubbly. Add cream cheese; cook and stir until cream cheese is melted. Add cooked green beans; toss gently to coat.
Spoon into 2-quart baking dish. Sprinkle top evenly with almonds.
Bake 25 minutes or until heated through and top is lightly browned.


CHEESY CRUNCHY CREAMED CORN CASSEROLE


My thinking is that since we were apart for Txgiving, our last Christmas in the house should be a big deal with items that can be made in advance w double ovens, to prevent packing burnout. Most recipes are oven rather than stove top, and I have some GF adaptations and simplification tricks up my sleeve as well.

I'm thinking quantities to carry over for our Dec. 27 anniversary and the following days before our Jan 1 move to our retirement house.

Greg has already done his signature turkey job, and may also do the scalloped potatoes.

The idea is: not much cooking in that last week before our fast departure, and cooked but frozen leftovers to take, if any.

Since romaine is now considered contaminated, veggies are casserole style. We can always add cherry tomatoes.

I plan on doing the bulk of the cleanup; I'll need that standing time. I also plan on doing the shopping.

My thought is that rather than see this as his "orders" (his default setting), he might look forward to this plan for a boatload of comfort food from his loving wife, as we are apart Thanksgivings day. (I sent him each recipe for pix and mouth watering.)

He's also made a GF cake and cheesecake.

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 10:37 AM

What jelly do you make, Stilly? I made a dose of apple and rosehip jelly a few weeks back; just about to de-mould and re-boil the last jar and lash into it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 10:00 AM

Usually on xmas morning we have pancakes, bacon, etc. but I'm thinking this year I might make baking powder biscuits and serve them with homemade jelly. They fall on both of these like they're starving. I sometimes do a side of Jimmy Dean sage sausage, though I didn't grow up in the south so there is none of that sausage and biscuit and gravy nonsense.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 09:54 AM

Fried eggs on top of a couple of fried Rankin's potato farls make a damn fine breakfast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 08:46 AM

Now that's what I call a breakfast.

I'm partial to a fried egg and potatoes, with some of that Kalle fish roe paste they sell in Ikea on the side, and of course salt and vinegar.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Ed T
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 08:24 AM

This morning for (later than normal) breakfast,creamed lobster meat on toast with a side of seared scallops.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 20 Dec 18 - 03:00 AM

Peanuts, groundnuts, monkey nuts, goober peas or (according to Wiki) pindars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 10:16 PM

ground nuts? What on Earth do you call carrots?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 06:15 PM

Groundnuts are peanuts. Groundnut oil is an excellent neutral oil that has a high smoke point.

Our bog-standard lasagne uses a typical bolognese ragu, made with a mix of minced pork and beef, browned then added to a soffritto which includes pancetta as well as onions, carrots and celery. Add all that together with canned plum tomatoes and a good splash of chicken stock. Season well and simmer for as long as you like. I might add a glass of white wine that I've boiled and burned the alcohol from. Some recipes demand chicken liver and milk, but not for me. Mrs Steve insists on garlic, but I'm averse to crushed cloves so I might peel and bash with my fist about eight cloves which go into the mix. As for herbs, either leave them out or just add a sprinkle of dried oregano near the end. Dried basil has no place in any decent kitchen. I'll let you off if you chuck in some fresh basil leaves near the end.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 05:53 PM

Groundnuts/peanuts are seeds, from which oil is extracted, or they can be eaten raw, roasted or made into peanut butter.
If you plant a raw one in a pot you can watch the plant grow, and produce a pea-like flower, from which what looks like a stem will grow and extend downwards until it reaches the soil, where it deposits the seed - in effect, the seed plants itself in the ground, hence the name 'groundnut'.
(I've never heard of potato oil.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 05:22 PM

I assume a ground nut is the same as a pomme d'terre.
Out here in the wilderness it is called a potatow.

Simple eggs can be made delicious by a clever hand.
Eggs do not deserve to be assulted by ketchup or hot sauce.
A sprinkling of tarragon and smidge of ground fennel do wonders


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Dec 18 - 11:52 AM

I'm almost finished with a lasagna I made a few days ago of various things that needed using. Tomatoes from the garden, ripening in the house slowly after the first frost in October and now simmered long enough to use for sauce (wearing vinyl gloves I squirt them out of the skins that go into the compost bowl). Some ricotta and mozzarella from the freezer from the last time I made lasagna, and the very wet tomato mix was added to a couple of containers of marinara sauce that had been in the fridge long enough they needed to be finished off soon.

I didn't have any lasagna noodles in the house so I took a box of spaghetti and used it (dry) to make a layer after the eggplant and cheese and sauce layers. More cheese and sauce and then bake it till everything is done. The spaghetti is just fine in there, though it doesn't have the consistency of the large flat pasta, but it tastes good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 02:06 PM

42nd anniversary so we're having steak, home-made oven chips (par-boiled in salty water then baked very hot in groundnut oil), broad beans from the freezer, home-grown, and some roasted cherry toms. I must have ribeye but Mrs Steve gets a piece of sirloin because she doesn't like trimming away the sinew (I just scoff the lot). There will be blood. And Rioja.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 18 Dec 18 - 01:41 PM

Back to our roots - bratwurst and sauerkraut. We indulged in fresh bratwurst shipped by Usinger's in Milwaukee and cooked it right away. Then we put it in the deep freeze.

To precook: poke sausage in several places with a sharp fork. Put in a skillet with water halfway up the sides. Bring water to a boil, then turn down to simmer. Turn sausage over after 15 mins. Simmer for maybe 30 mins. Freeze.

To prepare: Place brats in heavy saucepan. Rinse sauerkraut and spread over brats. Sprinkle with caraway seeds. Add 1/4 water or white wine. Simmer till heated through.

You can eat it on a bun or not, as you prefer. Have chopped onion and good mustard on hand.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SamStone
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 03:32 PM

being diabetic because of Agent Orange (and i don't mean trump) lots of salmon and steamed veggies


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 01:54 PM

Thanks, Leenia. I use rubber gloves for icky and sticky things, like taking the skins off roast peppers, but I'm afraid I just use the same ones I use for washing up the pots and things that don't go in the dishwasher. I had a pair of 'dirty jobs' rubber gloves for anything germy and non-food, but the demon puppy Oscar seems to have found and destroyed them; must get a new pair.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 10:14 AM

I have a low-power 1-quart crockpot I like to set up overnight to cook my oatmeal for the day or enough for a few days (it reheats well). I forgot the crockpot so I'll slow-cook it in a saucepan on the stove, into which I chop up figs or dates or throw in a handful of raisins, trying to not burn cereal onto the bottom of the pan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 04:37 AM

I browned a cheap hunk of brisket in my Le Creuset, set it aside, put some strips of pancetta into the pan to render, added chunks of carrot, celery and onion, fried for ten minutes, added a mug full of porcini water along with the chopped fungus, added a glass of red wine which I'd boiled and burned the alcohol from, a bit of seasoning and a bunch of fresh herbs, put the brisket back in and left it in a slow oven for thee hours. I had to hurry up so as not to miss the Liverpool kickoff. Delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 17 Dec 18 - 01:37 AM

If you never wash up you are saving on detergent and using less fuel to heat water, so you can set them against the plastic waste (just make sure those bags and gloves don't end up in the sea).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 11:44 PM

Hi, Thompson. A slow-cooker liner is a tough bag of some clear, synthetic material that withstands high heat. that you put in the slow cooker to keep food from getting cooked on to the ceramic. It saves a lot of scrubbing.

It is made by Reynolds, the company which makes aluminum foil and Reynolds Oven Bags.
==========
when my mother-in-law turned 70, she announced that she was not going to cook anymore. She had cooked for 50 years and was sick of it. I didn't want to follow her example, so I asked myself how I could make cooking more fun.

I decided that I like cooking but dislike cleaning up, so I decided to buy four things:

Reynolds Oven Bags
Reynolds Slow Cooker bags
parchment paper to put under roasting meats
disposable gloves for handling icky things.

I don't often use the gloves, but occasionally they are truly worth it. For example when yanking the purple gobbets out of a raw chicken.

If anybody comments that I am using up natural resources, I can tell them that I drive an 11-year-old car, I have no television, no cable, no boat...on balance I figure I can spoil myself a little.

Another thing I did is buy two cartons of Rubbermaid storage boxes. They stack nicely and are tough.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM

None of this foreign muck.

We've booked into the Balti House for Christmas,


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 06:00 AM

What's a slow cooker liner?

Horror story in the Guardian: unsold human food, still in its plastic packaging, is routinely thrown into the mix while making animal food, meaning that meat eaters may be harmed by the plastic the animals ingest and digest.

"More than 650,000 tonnes of unused food, from loaves of bread to Mars bars, are saved from landfill each year in the UK by being turned into animal feed. The system that strips off the plastic wrappings can’t capture it all, and so in the UK a limit of 0.15% of plastic is allowed by the Food Standards Agency. The official EU level for plastic permitted in animal feed is zero although in reality many other countries operate within the same 0.15% limit."

Meanwhile, I made borscht last night: chopped onions and beetroots, belly of pork (I'd thought those strips in the freezer were spare ribs…), celery and a big bunch of dill, and a chopped-up cabbage at the end; stock. It was tasty, but I think I'd put in the cabbage earlier and chop it finer in future, and maybe grate the beetroots before cooking them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 16 Dec 18 - 05:20 AM

Leeneia, if you ever cook for me, could I ask you just to leave the fat on my share, PLEASE


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 15 Dec 18 - 07:34 PM

Scots wha hae leftovers tae use up: Random Scran
Piece of previously cooked cod loin, sprouts, leeks, cauliflower (all also previously cooked!) Baked beans, requested by grandchildren for THEIR tea but hardly ate a random few.
Throw randomly on plate, grate strong cheddar cheese over the whole lot equally randomly.
Randomly select 2 minutes on random poweer setting (full) on microwave and zap!
Haute cuisine!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM

We just had a Sunday dinner on a Friday. I like this idea - a fine meal, good company, and no driving at night.

Here's the main dish: Trim the obvious fat from a beef chuck roast, then place it in a slow cooker. Place whole cranberries all over the top surface of the beef. Cook 8 to 10 hours on low, till tender. Let cool some, then put in fridge overnight.

Next day, remove fat. Slice meat, warm in oven. Just before dining, add 1 tsp molasses to the sauce. Optional: add 1/4 tsp cinnamon to the sauce. Serve with noodles.
===========
Notes: I like to use a slow-cooker liner for easier cleanup.
Use the rest of the molasses to make gingerbread, ginger cookies and BBQ sauce. Some people put butter and molasses on pancakes, too.

After dinner, we played music in the living room.


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