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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Jon Freeman 19 Aug 19 - 11:51 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Aug 19 - 10:50 PM
Charmion 19 Aug 19 - 09:27 AM
Jon Freeman 18 Aug 19 - 06:58 AM
Mrrzy 16 Aug 19 - 01:12 PM
Stilly River Sage 16 Aug 19 - 09:55 AM
Charmion 16 Aug 19 - 09:23 AM
Mrrzy 15 Aug 19 - 10:33 AM
David Carter (UK) 15 Aug 19 - 03:28 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Aug 19 - 05:44 PM
Thompson 14 Aug 19 - 02:14 PM
Thompson 14 Aug 19 - 02:09 PM
Thompson 14 Aug 19 - 02:08 PM
Mrrzy 14 Aug 19 - 11:05 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Aug 19 - 11:27 AM
Mrrzy 13 Aug 19 - 11:00 AM
leeneia 13 Aug 19 - 01:37 AM
Stilly River Sage 12 Aug 19 - 10:09 PM
Mrrzy 12 Aug 19 - 10:51 AM
Charmion 12 Aug 19 - 10:45 AM
Stilly River Sage 11 Aug 19 - 11:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Aug 19 - 04:59 PM
Mrrzy 09 Aug 19 - 03:21 PM
leeneia 09 Aug 19 - 03:16 PM
Megan L 08 Aug 19 - 12:23 PM
Mrrzy 08 Aug 19 - 11:58 AM
SPB-Cooperator 07 Aug 19 - 07:12 AM
Stilly River Sage 06 Aug 19 - 09:53 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Aug 19 - 09:51 AM
leeneia 05 Aug 19 - 12:45 AM
leeneia 05 Aug 19 - 12:34 AM
Mrrzy 04 Aug 19 - 07:11 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Aug 19 - 12:59 PM
Jon Freeman 04 Aug 19 - 11:19 AM
Mrrzy 04 Aug 19 - 11:02 AM
Jon Freeman 04 Aug 19 - 10:46 AM
Stilly River Sage 04 Aug 19 - 10:23 AM
Jon Freeman 04 Aug 19 - 10:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 02 Aug 19 - 12:11 PM
leeneia 02 Aug 19 - 10:55 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Aug 19 - 10:03 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Aug 19 - 07:07 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Aug 19 - 09:41 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Aug 19 - 09:30 AM
Charmion 01 Aug 19 - 08:55 AM
Thompson 01 Aug 19 - 06:17 AM
leeneia 01 Aug 19 - 12:41 AM
Charmion 31 Jul 19 - 12:54 PM
Mrrzy 31 Jul 19 - 10:57 AM
Thompson 31 Jul 19 - 04:57 AM

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 19 Aug 19 - 11:51 PM

back to the corn... I think the only sweet corn we have at home these days comes from a Birds Eye frozen packet where it is mixed with peas – to me it’s not a bad standby to have in the freezer.. Years ago, I remember cans of a “Jolly Green Giant” brand.

As for it on the cob, it never was common here but we did have a few seasons of growing about 6 plants. From that, I do believe it’s a veg best cooked very soon after harvest (something that wouldn’t be achievable with supermarket produce) so it was worthwhile for a few treats. A problem now though is none of us have the teeth that would enable munching into the cob as I’d like to.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Aug 19 - 10:50 PM

I made cranapple juice last week after steam-juicing cranberries from my freezer. I wanted to use the pulp so I found a cranberry bar online that uses a boxed yellow cake mix for the flour portion of the recipe. Lots of sugar and butter in it - these are rich so cut them small, but they sure are good! I tried making something one time before and it was way too complicated. This was easy, and the house smelled marvelous by the time they came out of the oven. Allrecipes cranberry bars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 19 Aug 19 - 09:27 AM

We had a feed of corn (on the cob, maize to you Brits) last night, a variety new to me called Trinity Bicolor. Sweet as all corn seems to be these days, and only a bare whisper of true corn taste. The strongly flavoured yellow corn varieties of my youth seem to have vanished, probably because they ripened later and produced fewer cobs per stalk. Sigh.

Unwilling to set loose a storm of husks and cornsilk in the kitchen, I tried baking the cobs in their husks in the oven. It worked, and now I doubt that I will ever boil corn again.

Trim the hanging bits of corn husk off each cob, and the top of the silk tassel. Fill the sink or a bucket with water and soak the corn for about 15 minutes. Heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, and lay the cobs on the rack in the middle of the oven. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Using tongs, lift out the cobs and lay them on a heat-proof surface to cool for a few minutes. When you can handle the corn without pain, peel off the husk (it will come off easily, taking the silk with it) and get busy eating.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 18 Aug 19 - 06:58 AM

Wasn’t feeling hungry the other day so I just had a few of the cooked potatoes on a plate with some butter. I don’t know what they were except not Charlotte, planted late here and as our one sample for the year and in a spot we later had doubts about… They were wonderful – firm flesh and great sweet and nutty flavour. Not a great crop (not that we try for much) but say 2/3 a carrier bag left and I look forward to eating more of these “new potatoes”.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Aug 19 - 01:12 PM

When you said Use the book as an icebreaker I thought of As an icepick. The visual did not work.

I am still on a mussel hunt. But I am afraid to cook them myself. So I might go back to the place that tried to sneak in Pernod. Ugh. But I think if they skip just the Pernod it might be quite good...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Aug 19 - 09:55 AM

Though my recipe calls for a less lean meet, I have an eggplant, tomato, and pork casserole that is a favorite cold weather dish and I use tenderloin because it's relatively inexpensive and very easy to cut up for the dish. I start making it in the fall when the eggplants are still producing and the weather has cooled. I serve it with mashed potatoes. This is a recipe I scanned for someone ages ago and I have it in my Flickr account. I landed on this recipe when I was trying to find a way to use as many things from my garden as possible and I had lots of tomatoes and eggplants. It comes from Tess Mallos' The Complete Middle East Cookbook, a book I have given to all of my family members. My mother liked it and years ago gave copies to her sisters (one who is married to a Turkish immigrant who loved these recipes).

The funny thing about this book is that the newer editions are expensive paperback, but I go to Bookfinder.com and I search for the book using "The" in the title (my librarian friends scratch their heads on this one - it should drop out and not affect the search, but that isn't how this works) and I choose "used or out of print" then look for the hardcover editions. I can usually get them for under $10; I just ordered another one for under $5. I keep extra copies to use as gifts. I had a copy at the library where I worked and we had lots of international student employees. Sometimes that book was used as the ice breaker, other times it was used to compare recipes, because Mallos has it broken down by country so the same general recipe appears in different forms several times in the book. I gave that office copy to a co-worker when I retired because though it sometimes was a distraction, the bonding that people do over food is one of the fastest methods I can think of.

BTW: When I have extra eggplants I peel and cut them up and cook and then freeze them, so I always plan for a few for that casserole by cutting them in quarters length-wise, browning all sides, and freezing. Then they're ready for the casserole even out of eggplant season.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 16 Aug 19 - 09:23 AM

Grilled pork tenderloin.

Here in Hog Heaven (Stratford in the headquarters of the Ontario Pork Council for a reason), pork tenderloin is often on special at the supermarket. It doesn't taste like much if simply roasted, so it's a good idea to marinate it in something fairly acid, such as fifty-fifty lemon juice and olive oil, and to add lots of garlic and thyme.

I dislike the fiddly task of stripping the fascia (the silvery skin of connective tissue) off the tenderloin, so I cut it into medallions before putting it into the marinade. After about half an hour of immersion at room temperature (longer in the fridge), take out the meat, shake off the excess marinade, and lay the medallions on a cutting board. Cover them with a sheet of waxed paper and flatten them like schnitzel. I prefer the rolling pin method.

Then grill the medallions (now more like ovals) either on the barbecue or under the broiler. They cook fast, so don't leave them unattended for a minute. Very good with rosé and a heap of grilled or stir-fried veg.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Aug 19 - 10:33 AM

Fried green tomatoes are too big, I think, to be tomatillos. Here in Virginia, at least. Tomatilloes?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: David Carter (UK)
Date: 15 Aug 19 - 03:28 AM

Green tomatoes are used in some south east asian recipes. They go well with chicken.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Aug 19 - 05:44 PM

There are recipes for green tomatoes that use just that - green (unripe) tomatoes. I make relish when I have enough green tomatoes in the fall (picked before the first frost). Tomatillos are similar, but they have that husk (calyx) and aren't in the same genus, though they're all Solanaceae family. They're apparently more tart, though when they're quite ripe they're sweeter and similar to the tomato and can be substituted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 14 Aug 19 - 02:14 PM

And mussels: for me it's white wine and butter and lots of garlic and finely-chopped parsley, let them release their liquor and cook for a very few minutes till sweet, then remove the mussels (or pour out the liquor) and reduce the liquor/wine/garlic/parsley and add a slosh of cream. Serve with crusty French bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 14 Aug 19 - 02:09 PM

Ooh, avocado soup sounds good!

If you want them exactly ripe, cheat and buy them frozen; Aldi does them, as does Iceland.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 14 Aug 19 - 02:08 PM

My understanding is that "green tomatoes" in American recipes usually refers to tomatillo(e)s, a thing I've heard of and even tried to grow, but never tasted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Aug 19 - 11:05 AM

Steve Shaw: shame, shame.

I am still craving mussels.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Aug 19 - 11:27 AM

I took my Chopin Liszt to the supermarket and left Mrs Steve a note saying I'd be Bach in a fugue minuets...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Aug 19 - 11:00 AM

Saw the avocado thing on a friend's fridge, who also had a magnet pad labeled Chopin Liszt. How musical and food-related!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Aug 19 - 01:37 AM

Mrrzy - loved your avocado joke. How true.

My tomatoes have not been ripening. A website says it's because the weather here is too hot. (Never heard of that one!) But I collected several as a test and have put them on the wide windowsill along with an apple to supply ethelyne gas. They said to put them in a brown paper bag, but if I did that, I would forget to check them.

Wish me luck. My own theory is that we are going on a trip in two weeks, so they are waiting for us to go out of town, and then they will turn a beautiful ripe red and be devoured by squirrels.

Maybe tomorrow would be a good day for fried green tomatoes.

Slice green tomatoes about 1/2 inch thick.
Melt butter in a skillet.
Dip tomatoes in corn starch.
Fry tomatoes in hot butter till outside is crisp and inside is soft.
Grate a little pepper on top.

If you have never had them, green tomatoes are tart. They make a nice contrast to mild foods like chicken.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Aug 19 - 10:09 PM

I picked up a jar of garlic Alfredo sauce (Aldi's brand) and will use that with the tandoori bread to make some small personal pizzas. Chicken, basil, Parmesan, fresh sliced tomatoes, etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Aug 19 - 10:51 AM

Avocado: not ripe not ripe not ripe not ripe aha you went to the bathroom so I rotted. But when they are good they are very very good.
Made a great chicken soup (no noodles) with mirepoix and thighs and a lot of Berbere spice. Leftovers made a lovely noodle dish (no broth).


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Aug 19 - 10:45 AM

What am I eating? Not much today; we just returned from a week of restaurant meals on holiday.

It's high summer in southwestern Ontario, so my shopping objective is corn (maize). In its husk, to be eaten off its cob after steaming on the barbecue.

Oh, and tomatoes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Aug 19 - 11:51 AM

Last week I bought a solitary mango from a local large chain grocery store (employee owned, and good prices, but not always the most knowledgeable about how to handle some produce). It is still on the counter waiting to ripen or rot; I suspect it was refrigerated in such a way to mess up the ripening process.

A few days later I was in a Middle Eastern grocery store (many of the employees barely speak English) that knows exactly how to handle all of it's produce, and I bought a case of mangoes of the typical size, large but not gigantic, and they're ripening beautifully and are sweet and juicy. These were a good price - the case of 9 was $6 and I shared them with a friend (who is Puerto Rican, grew up with his own mango trees, and knows exactly when they're perfectly ripe).

The same thing happens when I by large avocadoes at the Mexican grocery up the road from my house; again, it's an ethnic store where they barely speak English but they know how to handle the food they carry and you can be sure the aguacate are beautifully ripe and ready to use when they say so (there is a box stacked with the fruit on the counter next to each cash register). Those guacs are expensive, $5 each, but they are large and perfect. The same Puerto Rican friend also had avocado trees, so is a perfectionist about buying them.

Produce as a category isn't one-size-fits-all like many of the big-box grocery stores treat it. More and more I try to buy from the stores that know what they're doing with their fruit and veggies—and you can often learn from other customers. I was looking at plantains one day in the Fiesta grocery store near me (a chain that serves Mexican/Central American shoppers) and a tall black woman, from Jamaica, and I were talking about them. She reached out and took the green banana from my hand and set it aside, and handed me a different one. "This -look at the skin, those spots on the other one aren't a good sign." When they're green they're cooked like a potato (tostones), when they're ripe, they're baked and have a wonderful sweet banana flavor (a dessert, with butter and a little cinnamon sugar if you like), but if you get a bad one they just dry out and aren't much good for either use.

This isn't to say that no one who grew up with the typical US grocery-store environment knows how to handle produce, but there's a learning process that many of them seem to have missed, or the system of fruit and vegetable delivery and storage doesn't make possible.

/rant off/


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Aug 19 - 04:59 PM

I pulled a package of a half-dozen large organic chicken thighs from the freezer and they're marinating now in sherry, soy sauce, a little sugar, and some grated ginger. Cook it up later in peanut oil and I'll put some basmati rice in the rice cooker and steam some cauliflower or broccoli in the top compartment. This time of year always make more than you'll eat at one meal so you don't have to heat up the house as often.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Aug 19 - 03:21 PM

Thanks MeganL...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 09 Aug 19 - 03:16 PM

Chuck roast was on sale, so I bought a big piece and cooked two dishes in slow cookers - Mexican pot roast and chuck roast stewed in beer. We froze most of it, but tonight we will be having Mexican pot roast, corn on the cob and guacamole.

What is Lincoln sausage? I see it has its own festival.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Megan L
Date: 08 Aug 19 - 12:23 PM

Mrrzy I do them a few ways cider (or apple juice for my tt friends) with a finely chopped shallot and a little cream at the end. There is also a nice thai inspired one with lemongrass coconut milk OI found at food republic, Im not great with chillies and couldn't get kafir lime leaves or galangal so I used some grated ginger and lime zest


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Aug 19 - 11:58 AM

Is there a better sauce for mussels than white wine amd butter, with or without onions or even mirepoix, with or without cream? I am a seeker. No beer, no Pernod (gaaah)... Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 07 Aug 19 - 07:12 AM

Last night - Lincoln Sausage and chestnut mushroom risotto.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Aug 19 - 09:53 AM

I didn't think to make more oatmeal overnight (I use a small crockpot and it comes out so creamy after barely simmering all night) and I don't feel like cooking anything so I had a slice of apple pie for breakfast. There's one slice left and it might make it to tomorrow, but there is no guarantee.

I love pie for breakfast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Aug 19 - 09:51 AM

My mother used to make soft boiled eggs for us and serve them in the little egg cup with the top chipped off by tapping with a spoon. That egg-filled top was left sitting beside the cup for the contents to be scraped out as the first bite.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 05 Aug 19 - 12:45 AM

What we are eating at my house:

My brother and SIL sent four packages of Wisconsin cheese, and we are going to have Welsh rabbit made with beer. (I believe the recipe is in the Joy of Cooking.) I will make a round loaf of crusty bread for dipping.

A friend of mine just sent me the link to this video. He makes good no-knead bread using this recipe:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0t8ZAhb8lQ


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 05 Aug 19 - 12:34 AM

I have a friend who grew up in England and eats strange things like a soft-boiled egg standing upright in a little stand. One morning I saw her dip a piece of toast in the egg, and the oily, glistening, slimy yellow yoke blooped out of the top and gooshed down the eggshell. (At way too early in the morning yet!) At the site, my stomach heaved in its moorings, and I spent the rest of breakfast staring at my own knees.

So I'm with you if you say you don't like eggs.

If thoroughly disguised, say in a Quiche Lorraine, I like them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 07:11 PM

Jon Freeman, look up conditioned taste aversion. One-trial learning, no extinction. In my case it's Bailey's Irish Cream. But also I prefer my eggs hidden.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 12:59 PM

I can consume eggs with relish in any shape or form. When I was a student I drank them straight out of the shell for breakfast. Delicious, and no washing up. I hadn't heard of Salmonella at the time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 11:19 AM

Mrzzy, I'm just odd with eggs. I don't remember the event but I believe it stems from me being violently sick after eating a (soft) boiled egg (free range and supplied by my grandmother) when I was very young.

I'm fine with egg in cooking but the more it resembles an egg, the more I struggle and I can heave at the smell of a hard boiled one.

As part of a family who has in the past kept chickens, ducks and geese for eggs, maybe that is a shame. But that's how it is.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 11:02 AM

I can do hardboiled eggs if I can eat just the yolks. Like the devil part out of deviled eggs (Mimosa eggs, in French). I need a partner who only likes the whites...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 10:46 AM

Nice when your own grown stuff can make some contribution, SRS.

Mum’s (who deal's with these things) previous main herb area (both sides of the uncovered part of a pigsty and needing access for logs stored in the sheltered part) collapsed last winter so it’s been a rebuild. We got 8ft of metal staging for one side and were able to reuse an old aquarium stand with 2x2 timber on top for the other. All container grown, say up to 10” pots with some space on the ground for 6 larger tubs.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 10:23 AM

This week I made several small single-serving pizzas using portions of a large tandoori (Iraqi) bread, and each evening I was able to use herbs and sweet banana peppers from the garden.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 04 Aug 19 - 10:05 AM

I enjoyed the salad visiting (oz again) brother made last evening.

1 bowl of basmati rice with chopped/cubed tomato, sweet pepper, onion, cucumber, pine nuts, mint, chives and parsley mixed in.

1 bowl divided into sliced beetroot, sliced tomato and nice small lettuce leaves (from the garden. I’m behind and no tomatoes starting to ripen yet… but could at least supply that, and mum, the herbs).

Also available, olives, sliced buttered baguette and, for those who can stand them, hard boiled eggs.

Simple again but I seemed to get lots of different and interesting “mouthfuls”.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Aug 19 - 12:11 PM

Thank you - and I agree, that is a good-looking grill. Back in the 1970s I worked for the Forest Service at a station that had a crew house but didn't want to deal with the problems of a kitchen. They put a couple of the standard-issue USFS fire grills in the ground outside the building, expecting we would go to the trouble to build a fire each time we wanted to eat. We got resourceful with hot plates and electric saucepans instead.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 02 Aug 19 - 10:55 AM

Hi, SRS. The grill came from the RJ Thomas Mfg Co., which also uses the brand name Pilot Rock.

https://www.pilotrock.com/userdocs/Pilot%20Rock%20Catalog_250.pdf

Ours is an infinitely adjustable one with a single shelf. Two shelves might be better.

You have to dig a big hole and bury the base. It takes a robust person to do that. (Parks don't want people going off with their grills.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 10:03 PM

I'm doing a frugal "No Spend" month this August, so am making meals as much as possible from the cupboards and fridge and freezer. Tonight was a thawed tandoori bread and I used 1/3 of it to make what amounted to three thin-crust pizza slices. I still allow myself to pick up fresh fruit and vegetables, gas for the car, dog food, etc., but am being more resourceful with the materials already here. I'll make a crock pot of oatmeal with chopped dates that will be my breakfast for the next few mornings.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 07:07 PM

It was a perfect barbie night tonight. Normally we have a burger followed by a.n. other but I rang the changes tonight. We had mackerel fillets with skewered veg and a weird but very nice Waitrose "Mexican-inspired bean burger" wot I'd got cheap, froze and forgot about. It was just right. I didn't marinade the mackerel but I just made a baste of olive oil, fresh lemon juice, thyme and seasoning.

Everything was delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 09:41 AM

Leeneia, what is the brand of grill your husband likes?

It looks like the John Dory is everywhere EXCEPT North and South America.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 09:30 AM

I have a feeling that they don't inhabit your waters.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 08:55 AM

Thanks for the link, Thompson. That is definitely not a critter I have ever seen laid out on ice in this country.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 06:17 AM

John Dory, reputedly from jaune dorée, or yellowy goldy, is this. Verra tasty. The BBC has a rake of recipes here. Of course, eating shellfish now that we've poisoned the sea with plastic is probably not a good idea, so some might be avoided…


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Aug 19 - 12:41 AM

Yesterday I didn't give a thought to dinner until the last minute. Fortunately we had the wherewithal for that summer favorite, the BLT. (bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich). Homegrown tomatoes made them especially good.

My dear husband, the DH, loves to cook over a wood fire. Years ago we came across a grill in a county park in Iowa that he really liked. Fortunately, it still had the manufacturer's name on it, and we ordered one for ourselves. (The company acted surprised. They were used to selling to parks.) He makes excellent steaks, hamburgers and pork chops on it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 31 Jul 19 - 12:54 PM

Steve Shaw, we eat chicken often, and in summer I always cook it on the barbecue. To prevent that chicken-leather effect, you put a beat-up old roasting tin on the tiles of the gas barbecue -- i.e., under the grids, but over the burner -- and fill it with water. Put the grids back, and light the barbecue. When it's hot enough to do the business, the water in the pan will be simmering. Thus, the chicken is bathed in steam while it cooks -- obviously with the lid down -- and the meat comes out wonderfully moist. The steam does not result in soggy skin; it emerges crisp and delicious.

Twice recently you've mentioned John Dory. That's a species I have never seen in a shop; is it a strictly European fish, or is it perhaps called something else on this side of the Herring Pond?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 31 Jul 19 - 10:57 AM

Not a lack of flavor, Steve Shaw, but a quite different flavor. I love gas-grilled anything, but I *LOVE* anything charcoal-grilled.

The mussels were great. Crab tonight.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 31 Jul 19 - 04:57 AM

I always steam potatoes rather than boiling them, then put a clean teacloth over them to absorb the steam after taking the steamer off the salty boiling water.

New potatoes are delicious with salty butter and chopped dill.


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Mudcat time: 20 October 1:11 PM EDT

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