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Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )

GUEST,Fyldeplayer 19 Nov 18 - 06:14 AM
GUEST,Myrtle's cook 19 Nov 18 - 08:57 AM
Steve Gardham 19 Nov 18 - 09:25 AM
treewind 19 Nov 18 - 11:15 AM
treewind 19 Nov 18 - 11:20 AM
GUEST,matt milton 19 Nov 18 - 01:14 PM
Long Firm Freddie 20 Nov 18 - 05:08 PM
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Subject: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: GUEST,Fyldeplayer
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 06:14 AM

We are recording with a young engineer who has not much 'acoustic' experience. He has done a good job on vocals and strings but we feel the duet concertina is a bit harsh. What method have people used in the studio for a good mellow sound? - this is a wooden ended duet. Two mikes? Type? Like to get a good captured sound ( not everything can be fixed in the mix ). Thanks


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Subject: RE: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: GUEST,Myrtle's cook
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 08:57 AM

There are several threads over on Concertina.net that discuss this topic and provide some recommendations - worth checking out


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Subject: RE: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 09:25 AM

Fit baffles. Experiment with different thickness of card paper cloth until you get the sound you require. To fit baffles simply take off the endplates, cut card/paper to shape of endplates, place under endplates, refit endplates.


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Subject: RE: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: treewind
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 11:15 AM

Don't put mics too close, and don't point them direct at the ends of the instrument. This will work well if you are recording the concertina track separately from other instrumentals and vocals, maybe not so well if there are other sounds going on in the room.

For example a stereo XY pair in front of the player usually works for me. You could even use a single mic in that position if you don't want a full stereo image of the instrument and are confident of getting the balance right between ends of the instrument (but that's perhaps risky with a duet...)

I assume you've discussed this with the recording engineer. He might try a different type of mic. I'd use a good condenser mic, and certainly avoid anything that is designed for close vocals like an SM58 as these have a presence peak that are likely to exaggerate any harshness.

Any of the above might turn out to be wrong, of course. There are no fixed rules about recording: it's all trial-and-error guided by experience.


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Subject: RE: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: treewind
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 11:20 AM

"don't point them direct at the ends of the instrument"
For clarity, I meant not directly facing the ends of the instrument. In front of the bellows but pointing at the ends is more like what I meant.


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Subject: RE: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: GUEST,matt milton
Date: 19 Nov 18 - 01:14 PM

"What method have people used in the studio for a good mellow sound? - this is a wooden ended duet. Two mikes? Type? Like to get a good captured sound ( not everything can be fixed in the mix )"

Several things here. One is that that judging things on what they sound like on their own in an ensemble is not necessarily the way to assess them – you might find that rather than needing 'fixing' in the mix, that very perceived harshness is what makes the concertina sit well in the mix without requiring any EQ. I would wait until you hear it in the mix with everything else before you decide it sounds harsh. Maybe you already have?

That said, a smooth large-diaphragm condenser mic such as an AKGC414B or 214 will sound good. Or, if using a small-diaphragm condenser (pencil mic), back it off the concertina (assuming you've got enough separation to avoid bleed from other instruments).

Someone suggested not using an SM57 (or was it 58?). I wouldn't necessarily agree: I think positioned in the right place an SM57 or 58 ought to work.

If he has an electro voice RE20, a Shure SM7B or any ribbon microphones, that'd give a warmer sound.

Using more than one microphone might result in a better sound or it might not - depends which microphones you use! I wouldn't personally use two mics on it unless it was being heard solo: if you are an ensemble with vocals and strings (more than one?) as well personally I would want to leave as much space as poss in the mix for the vocals.

If the vocals sound good, then that's 90% of your mixing work done; everything else is subservient to that if the songs are worth hearing. What does the vibe of the concertina recordings sound like? If the playing is good and the energy and vibe is right on the concertina takes, I wouldn't re-record, I would EQ out the harshness. It's easy enough to do: that's what EQ is for! However, if your squeezebox player is unhappy with their performance, you may as well use a more laid back mic when you re-record.

Got any sound files to share? Very difficult to give advice like this without being able to hear what you're talking about. Are you 100% sure that the monitoring system you're listening to yr raw recordings on is accurate?


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Subject: RE: Recording Duet Concertina ( studio )
From: Long Firm Freddie
Date: 20 Nov 18 - 05:08 PM

Just a thought; Geoff Lakeman, renowned Duet player and singer, released his CD After All These Years last year. One of his sons, Sam Lakeman, was the recording engineer. He co-owns Charcoal Records. He may be able to help.

LFF


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