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Lyr Add: Old Napper

harpgirl 26 Dec 99 - 09:42 PM
Bruce O. 27 Dec 99 - 02:06 PM
harpgirl 27 Dec 99 - 04:50 PM
Bruce O. 27 Dec 99 - 05:32 PM
Richie 17 Aug 09 - 11:45 AM
Richie 17 Aug 09 - 12:02 PM
GUEST,Tom Bliss 17 Aug 09 - 12:07 PM
Richie 17 Aug 09 - 12:26 PM
Richie 17 Aug 09 - 04:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Aug 09 - 06:00 PM
Richie 17 Aug 09 - 06:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Aug 09 - 07:47 PM
Richie 17 Aug 09 - 08:38 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Aug 09 - 08:54 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Aug 09 - 09:42 PM
GUEST,Tyson 10 Aug 16 - 08:21 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD NAPPER
From: harpgirl
Date: 26 Dec 99 - 09:42 PM

...Hudson says..."Text secured by Mr. G.E. Bynum, Saltillo (Mississippi)from Miss Ila Long, Saltillo

OLD NAPPER

Old Napper was a good coon-dog
Old Trailer was the same
Old Napper beat old Trailer so bad
It made old Trailer ashame

Foddy a ling a ding
Run about Napper, Ho!
Foddy a ling a ding
Run about Napper, ho!

The raccoon's tail is ringed all around
The possum's tail is bare
The rabbit, has no tail at all
But a little bunch of hair

Old Tom cat was so fat
He could not catch the mice
He lost the fine-tooth comb
And his head ran away with lice


...this is a charming song....harpgirl


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Subject: Tune Add: OLD NAPPER
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Dec 99 - 02:06 PM

Miss Mary Ila Long noted the tune from Mrs Theodosia Long. Chorus should start "O foddy ling a ding ling

X:1
T:Old Napper
S:Folk Tunes from Mississippi, A. P Hudson, 1937,1971
N:collected from Mrs. Theodosia Long
Q:1/4=120
L:1/8
M:4/8
K:F
C|A A (A A)|G F F (F/ F/)|G G G A|c3A|A A A A|\
(G/ G/) F F (F/ F/)|G2 (G/ G/) ((D/ D/) E|\
F3||"Chorus"C|F E D C|E G E G|(F/ F/) E D E|F3C|\
F E D C|E G E G|c/ c/ B A G|F3|]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: harpgirl
Date: 27 Dec 99 - 04:50 PM

...Bruce O., perhaps the 1936 University of North Carolina Press,Chapel Hill edition is different than the 1937, 1971 editions you quote...thanks for the ABC...harpgirl


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Dec 99 - 05:32 PM

The titles are slightly different, and I don't have the one you quote. The 1937 issue was for the National Service Bureau, (WPA), and called the 2nd edition. Reprinted by Da Capo Press in 1977. {Original price, 25 cents) 45 songs with tunes.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 11:45 AM

Hi,

I'd like to find out about the origin of this song.

Anyone?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 12:02 PM

Here's what I have on one page of notes:

Poor Old Napper- Version 1 Brown Collection

Poor Old Napper/Old Napper/Rise Old Napper

Old-Time Fiddle breakdown and song USA; England

ARTIST: from Brown Collection

CATEGORY: Fiddle and Instrumental Tunes

DATE: 1846 (Old Napper Rise);

RECORDING INFO:

OTHER NAMES: Old Napper; Rise Old Napper; Old Napper Rise;

SOURCES: Brown; Scaborough; Hudson; Thede; Kuntz; Folk Index;

NOTES: Kuntz give a brief description: Old‑Time, Breakdown. USA, Oklahoma. G Major. Standard tuning. AABB. See also Harvey Sampson's "Napper." Source for notated version: W.S. Collins (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) [Thede]. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 102.

A similar version found in Brown B was published in Folk-songs of Virginia: by Arthur Kyle Davis 1965 ("Old Napper came to my house") Collected by Miss Juliet Fauntleroy, of Altavista, Va. Contributed by Mr. HW Adams, of Altavista, Va. Campbell County

The song is known as a minstrel song:

Old Napper Rise-1846

I went down to New Orleans
Didn't go to stay
Laid my head in yellow gals lap
Yellow gal fainted away

Scaborough (1922) groups it with Jawbone songs:

I went to old Napper's house,
Old Napper wasn't at home.
I took my seat by the pretty yaller gal
And I picked upon the old jawbone.

In many US versions the old-time song is about a dog, Old Napper. "In Specimens of Mississippi Folklore"ý by Arthur Palmer Hudson, Mississippi Folk-lore Society 1928 we have the lyrics (see version 4) to OLD NAPPER:

1. Old Napper was a good coon-dog,
Old Trailer was the same;
Old Napper beat old Trailer so bad
It made old Trailer ashame

The song appears in Brown under the title "Taffy was a Welshman."

"Taffy was a Welshman," Roud #19237, is a traditional nusery rhyme with anti-Welsh lyrics that was published c. 1780 in England. Here's some info.

Versions of this rhyme vary, among commmon versions is:

Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief;
Taffy came to my house and stole a piece of beef;
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy wasn't in;
I jumped upon his Sunday hat and poked it with a pin.
Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a shame;
Taffy came to my house and stole a piece of lamb;
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was away,
I stuffed his socks with sawdust and filled his shoes with clay.
Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a cheat,
Taffy came to my house, and stole a piece of meat;
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy not there,
I hung his coat and trousers to roast before a fire.

Origins and history
The term "Taffy" may be a merging of the common Welsh name "Dafydd" and the Welsh river "Taff" on which Cardiff is built, and seems to have been in use by the mid-eighteenth century. The rhyme may be related to one published in Tommy Thumb's Pretty Song Book, printed in London around 1744, which had the lyrics:

Taffy was born
On a Moon Shiny Night,
His head in the Pipkin,
His Heels upright.

The earliest record we have of the better known rhyme is from Nancy Cock's Pretty Song Book, printed in London about 1780, which had one verse:

Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief;
Taffy came to my house and stole a piece of beef;
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy wasn't home;
Taffy came to my house and stole a marrow-bone.

Similar versions were printed in collections in the late eighteenth century, however, in Songs for the Nursery printed in 1805, the first signs of violence were evident, ending with:

I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bed,
I took the marrow bone and beat about his head.

In the 1840s James Orchard Halliwell collected a two verse version that followed this with:

I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not in;
Taffy came to my house and stole a silver pin.
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bed;
I took up a poker and threw it at his head.

This version seems to have been particularly popular in the English counties that bordered Wales, where it was sung on Saint David's Day (1 March) complete with leek wearing efigies of Welshmen. The image of thieving Welshmen seems to have begun to die down by the mid-twentieth century, although the insulting rhyme was, still sometimes used along with the name "Taffy" for any Welshman.


A "NAPPER" is also a cheat or thief.

"Poor old Napper" from Brown

Brown Collection: 123 "Taffy Was a Welshman"

The three songs entered here are clearly derived from the familiar Mother Goose rhyme about the thieving Welshman. What appears to he a Negro version of the first of the three has been reported from Mississippi (JAM. xxvui 141), and of the second from Vir-
ginia ( I'", SV 167, TNFS 103); and the first stanza of our B corresponds to stanza 3 of another Virginia song (TNFS 166).

A. 'I Went Down to Suckie's House.' Communicated by Professor M. G. Fulton of Davidson College, in 1915 or thereabouts.

1 I went down lo Suckie's house to get a cup of tea.
What do you s'pose old Stickie had for me?
Chicken feet, sparrowgrass, hominy, and tea.

2 I went down to Suckie's house and fell upon my knees
And I like to laugh myself lo death to hear the turkey sneeze.

B. 'Napper' Contributed in 1914 by C. R. Bagley of Moyock. Currituck county, as a fragment of what are "known among the Negroes as breakdowns."

1. Napper come to my house,
I thought he come to see me.
When I come to find him out
He 'suade my wife to leave me.

Chorus: Break down, Napper, hoo, hoo,
Break down, Napper, hoo.

2 I went to Napper's house;
Ole Napper sick in hed.
I rubbed my hand across his head
And killed ole Napper dead.

3. Goose chewed tobacker.
Duck drinked de wine.
Hog played de *cwards (chords),
In de punkin vine.

C. 'Old Napper.' Contributed by Phil Brandon of Durham. Not dated.

I Napper went a-huntin';
He thought he'd catch a coon.
And when his old dog treed
He treed a mushy-room.

Chorus: Poor old Napper, hoodie dinkey, hoodie dinkey.
Poor old Napper, hoodie dinkey, ha!

2. Napper come to my house.
I thought he come to see me.
When I come to find out
He was persuadin' my wife to leave me.

*So in the manuscript. One supposes it should be "cyards." with the familiar Southern breaking of the vowel after palatals. It will be seen that this final stanza is a form of the jingle dealt with under the title 'Get Along, John, the Day's Work's Done' in the section on Bird and Beast Jingles.

---------------

I don't get the connection to "Taffy Was a Welshman." Any other info, versions?

The original minstrel lyrics?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: GUEST,Tom Bliss
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 12:07 PM

It's all about this banjo player...

The 'rabbit with no tail at all' refers to his little known nickname (given to him by Muppitz of This Parish) "(Duracell) Bunny" (think late-night sessions.. who is still playing at Guinness Speed when all others have faded away?)

'Old Trailer' is, of course, the little-known nickname of a certain singer songwriter with a camper van aka 'trailer'. (The rest of that verse is sub judice at the moment).

And in the last verse it should be written as it's usually pronounced: 'fine tooth-comb.' The thing is, it wasn't even his to loose. It was mine - and now I can't comb my teeth any more.

See you all at Whitby

maybe.


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Subject: Lyr Add: POOR OLD NAPPER (from Michael Ismero)
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 12:26 PM

Here's a link to Michael Ismero's version. Listen:
http://www.michaelismerio.com/living_histDocs.html


Here are the lyrics as best I could hear them:

POOR OLD NAPPER

(Fiddle: A and B parts; Part of A)

Napper come to my house
I Thought he came to see me
Then I come to find out
He wants my wife to leave me.


CHORUS: Poor Old Napper
Better get a home
Poor Old Napper
Better get a home

(Fiddle: A and B parts; Part of A)

He goes to his cabin
He stays there no more
My rifle shot came flying
And laid him on the floor

CHORUS: Poor Old Napper
Better get a home
Poor Old Napper
Better get a home.

(Fiddle: A and B parts; Part of A)

Napper he had money laying
And ladies so he said
If I had stayed home last night
I would have killed dead.

CHORUS: Poor Old Napper
Better get a home
Poor Old Napper
Better get a home.

The theme of this version is similar to the original Old Napper, the theif who steals.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 04:57 PM

Hi,

I'm particlarly interested in the 1846 lyrics to "Old Napper Rise" maybe titled Rise Old Napper.

Anyone?


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Subject: Lyr Add: Gougem Napper
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 06:00 PM

GOUGEM NAPPER
As sung by Wm. Chestnut and Boston Minstrels

1
When I lib'd in old Kentuck
Ol Napper plaid me a trick
He stole away my ole Banjo
An' wid it he cut stick.

Chorus:
Gougem Napper, hit him Napper
Gib him anoder bim
Whar niggers Whar
Why slap upon de shin.

2
O get me up in de morning early
Put Towser on de track,
But Napper got so far ahead
Dat Touser turn rite back;

Chorus
Gougem Napper, hit him Napper
Gib him anoder bim
Whar Niggers Whar,
Why slap upon de shin.
Gouger Napper ...
3
Den I tell dis to ole Touser
You must cotch him mighty soon
For dis Napper am a rouser
More cunning than a Coon.
Gougem Napper ...
4
Den arter him we put again
An' soon cum on his trail
Found him playin' de ole Banjo
Tume ob settin' on a rail.
Gougem Napper ...
5
Ole Touser den he cotch him
Whar his trousers day war slack
QAn' de way de dog did shook him
Was enuf to broke his back.
Gougem Napper ...
6
Den he jump an' kick an' holler out
His trousers day war thin
But Touser warn't particular
'Bout takin' hold de skin
Gougem Napper ...
7
Den I tolk de banjo from him
And wid [it] I crack'd his crown
I pull his hair and kick'd his shin
An' left him on de ground.
Gougem Napper ...

Undated sheet music (c. 1850?) piano arr. Chas. Reps. Published by C. G. Christman, NY.
Levy Collection.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 06:05 PM

Curious?:

Is it supposed to be: Gouge 'em Napper?

R-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 07:47 PM

I would think so, but 'gougem' in the sheet music.
Not a well-written minstrel song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 08:38 PM

Thanks Q,

Note that Touser, the dog, becomes Trailer in the Mississippi version above, and that Napper is a dog as well.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 08:54 PM

Towser is still around as a name for a dog, but the spelling 'touser' has disappeared.
I have seen Napper applied to terriers, but the derivation may be different, and I think it comes from UK.

There should be more minstrel versions out there. Anyone?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 09:42 PM

"Rise Old Napper" is included in "The Early Minstrel Banjo," by Joe Weidlich. Elderly.com sells it.

I have found only two lines- (Scarborough, On the Trail of Negro folk songs)
    Rise, ole Napper, ketch him, catch him
    Rise, ole Napper, ketch him by de wool.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Old Napper
From: GUEST,Tyson
Date: 10 Aug 16 - 08:21 PM

My Grandmother lives in Sullivan County in Missouri and sang this version to us kids when we were upset ...

Ol Napper went a'huntin
Way late at night
Old Man Coon jumped on his back
And Ol Napper had to fight

Cry Ol Napper
hoodlee hoodlee hoo
Cry Ol Napper
hoodlee hoodlee hoo

In this version, Old Man Coon is a big racoon that wants to fight and Old Napper is a hound dog that is howling/baying.


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