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BS: Helpful ointments & medications

Donuel 29 Nov 18 - 10:47 PM
Senoufou 30 Nov 18 - 03:53 AM
Steve Shaw 30 Nov 18 - 06:04 AM
Steve Shaw 30 Nov 18 - 06:09 AM
Senoufou 30 Nov 18 - 06:16 AM
Dave the Gnome 30 Nov 18 - 06:38 AM
Steve Shaw 30 Nov 18 - 08:19 AM
Dave Hanson 30 Nov 18 - 08:49 AM
gnomad 30 Nov 18 - 09:25 AM
keberoxu 30 Nov 18 - 11:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 30 Nov 18 - 11:33 AM
leeneia 30 Nov 18 - 11:43 AM
Donuel 30 Nov 18 - 01:48 PM
Mr Red 30 Nov 18 - 04:08 PM
Dave the Gnome 30 Nov 18 - 05:29 PM
Helen 30 Nov 18 - 06:02 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Dec 18 - 04:52 AM
peregrina 01 Dec 18 - 05:48 AM
Senoufou 01 Dec 18 - 06:06 AM
gnomad 01 Dec 18 - 10:59 AM
Charmion 01 Dec 18 - 11:56 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Dec 18 - 12:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Dec 18 - 12:35 PM
Backwoodsman 01 Dec 18 - 10:29 PM
JHW 02 Dec 18 - 05:39 AM
Jim Carroll 02 Dec 18 - 05:54 AM
Backwoodsman 02 Dec 18 - 06:06 AM
Jack Campin 02 Dec 18 - 06:34 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 06:50 AM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 06:59 AM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 07:19 AM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 07:35 AM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 07:39 AM
Jack Campin 02 Dec 18 - 07:54 AM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 08:14 AM
Tattie Bogle 02 Dec 18 - 11:13 AM
The Sandman 02 Dec 18 - 11:27 AM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 11:50 AM
robomatic 02 Dec 18 - 12:36 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 01:33 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 01:52 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 02:18 PM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 02:21 PM
Helen 02 Dec 18 - 02:22 PM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 02:47 PM
Jack Campin 02 Dec 18 - 02:48 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM
Helen 02 Dec 18 - 03:47 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 06:59 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 07:28 PM

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Subject: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 29 Nov 18 - 10:47 PM

Aspercreme. USA name. It works so well I think I may have a placebo association for relieving bogus (severed) nerve pain. 2 minutes! wow
level 7 pain goes down to a 2 with multiple applications. After 2 weeks so far, so good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 03:53 AM

It contains Lidocaine Donuel. I think that's a derivative of cocaine, but I may be wrong.
Glad you're getting some relief from your pain.

If it's phantom nerve pain, Amitriptyline is good. It's an old-fashioned anti-depressant, but for some reason has a blocking effect on severe nerve pain. I eventually had to have it for agonising post-herpetic neuralgia. After getting shingles, I was left in awful torment, like being burned with a flame-thrower. But after two weeks on Amitriptyline, it had gone. It does dope one up a bit though.

Topical Capsaicin (from fiery chillies) is supposed to be good, but I didn't try that. My husband was disappointed, he would have loved smearing me with some of his Fiery Horror sauce!


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:04 AM

Asda bite and sting relief cream, £1.50. It contains 1% hydrocortisone and it is the best thing for easing any bit of skin irritation caused by detergent residues on clothing (armpits, sock top region and groin), or by hearing aid tips, or anything else. This is not medical advice and I care not a jot for any naysayer who sez I shouldn't be using steroid cream that way. It works and life's too bloody short.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:09 AM

And cheap mouthwashes that contain chlorhexidine gluconate are totally hunkydory for sore gums and ulcers. No need to buy Corsodyl at ripoff prices. Our local chemist sells one that's just as good for £1.29 the bottle. Mouthwashes tend to stain the teeth so I use them only when there's summat going on and for the shortest time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:16 AM

I tend to follow my old father's advice. He always said to 'leave your body alone, and it will sort itself out'. Not applicable with serious illnesses of course. But with minor stuff he had a point.

He never visited his GP, or bought anything at the pharmacy, he was tough as old boots. But on one occasion he had an infected wound on his finger and needed an antibiotic.

In those days, one's medical records were written on a small card in a little cardboard envelope. The receptionist ferreted around for ages and apologised red-faced, saying they couldn't find his records, his envelope was empty.
This was because he didn't have any. They had to start a new card for his finger.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:38 AM

Sudacrem. Used it on nappy rash when our kids were babies. Recently discovered it is very effective for all sorts of other skin conditions.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 08:19 AM

The cheapie mouthwash is made by Healthpoint, by the way. Any flavour will do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 08:49 AM

An old friend of mine reccomended Tiger Balm for everything, he said   smeared on the forhead it even cured headaches.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: gnomad
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 09:25 AM

Bag Balm is recommended for animal use, but is quite widely used by humans too. For minor abbrasions rashes etc, something that at bottom just wants soothing.
It appears to be mostly vaseline plus 0.3% Hydroxyquinoline sulphate. The vaseline may be all that's really needed for minor injuries.
The aroma will be a matter of taste, but pleases me, and BB seems not given to causing an allergic reaction (in me at any rate), which can be a problem with some preparations.
Prices vary (a lot, 8oz costing little more than 1oz is not particularly unusual) so shop around if you decide to try it.
On the whole though I tend to agree with Sen's dad, lots of matters cure themselves if left to do so.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: keberoxu
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 11:09 AM

This is second-hand, never tried this myself
as I stay out of the sun in order to avoid sunburn.

But an acquaintance who does the odd landscape assignment, and ends up sunburned, has a recommendation for severe sunburn.

It's that high-powered ointment/creme for severe diaper rash,
the kind that cools the baby's skin down so fast that
you can see vapor rise off the treated skin.
He uses the diaper-rash formula for his sunburns.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 11:33 AM

Bag balm is lanolin, not petrolatum. At least that's the old-fashioned formula in the green box in North America.

For many years I looked for a product that would soothe my dry and broken-out hands. I got some relief from an Rx cream, but also was able to use 1% hydrocortesone cream (inexpensive in generic versions). Then I discovered that I am allergic to coconut and when I stop eating it and avoid creams and lotions and foods containing coconut or byproducts, my hands cleared up. Here's a glimpse of what coconut becomes. Sodium laurelth sulfate is in soaps, shampoos, etc. and is a big dermatitis culprit.

Steve, for $10 a pop my vet used to give me a little bottle of about 4 ounces of chlorhexidine that could be diluted for treating wounds on the dogs. I went through my various vet products and looked online to see what could be purchased OTC. I found a gallon of chlorhexidine for $20. It seems to be in various human cleaning products, I saw it for cleaning contact lenses on one search.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: leeneia
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 11:43 AM

I agree about Aspercreme, Donuel. It helped with my migraines without triggering nausea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 01:48 PM

No added lidocaine in my aspercreme. I think it works so fast since the formerly dissolved/cut nerve is only 3 mm deep. leenia, you have the real thing if a migraine hurts so bad you "toss your cookies", call up chuck or had the ultimate nausea. Time was my cure. But I suppose it was not as bad as having epilepsy from what I have seen.

I didn't mess with serotonin levels with pills but if some need it, take it. I'd rather be good than feel good.

"Its better to look good than feel good" :^/
Bill Crystal-comedian


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Mr Red
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 04:08 PM

The cheapie mouthwash

Know your mouth wash - most stain yer teeth, eventually. And beware drinking fruit juices too soon after - especially citrous fruits.

Been known fer years, dentists will tell you - mine suggested salty water for killing infections.

Pure Neatsfoot Oil can help with creaking joints. It ain't no miracle cure, and the placebo quotient is hard to define, but the old chemist's** tale is that ostlers were known for suffering much less from arthritis. I buy the pure stuff, which in cold weather can harden, but not in a heated house. Neatsfoot Compound is adulterated with mineral oils to prevent hardening. Mind you, I am not a martyr to arthritis, just wear and tear from dancing.

**bought it for the bodhran from a really old chemist 30 years ago. And he told the tale.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 05:29 PM

What do you do with the neatsfoot oil then, Mr R? Rub it in the joint?


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 30 Nov 18 - 06:02 PM

Tea tree oil

The first brand I ever saw in Oz - many decades ago, before other brands jumped on the bandwagon.

Caution: if you are treating something likely to sting or if you have sensitive skin, it's best to dilute it. I wet a bit of cotton wool and dab a little tea tree oil onto that.

Also, you can't drink it so keep out of reach of children and other curious critters.

If I got dumped on a desert island, I would survive with tea tree oil, I reckon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 04:52 AM

I used neatsfoot oil to treat the underside of my Brooks B17 leather bike saddle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: peregrina
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 05:48 AM

Vetericyn
Amazing stuff


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 06:06 AM

I'm so wrinkled now I reckon I need saddle soap for my face.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: gnomad
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 10:59 AM

SRS; Bag Balm as sold here (UK) lists both Petrolatum AND Lanolin, in that order, as ingredients. Being earlier in the list indicates the greater proportion, though I do not know whether this rule applies in N.America.
The packaging would generally lead me to believe that this is a USA product, but either way thanks, it's a good 'un.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 11:56 AM

Ibuprofen. Since arthritis entered my life, it's a food group.

The little red 200-mg tabs (Army smarties) are for locked-up knuckles, and the big oval translucent bombs (Advil) are for those days when the weather has changed sharply and all the joints from the knees on down are hurting at once.

I agree with Steve Shaw on mouthwash. I use a purple version of Listerine that has all kinds of promises on the label. It has not stained my teeth, or indeed anything else.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 12:25 PM

I used a mouthwash to soak my orthodontia retainers and the dentist suggested I switch to the non-alcohol version because the alcohol was irritating my gums. I made the switch and am happier with the feel of it. You can pay more for the name brand (usually Crest) or you can pay much less at Dollar General or Family Dollar for the generic version of exactly the same stuff.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 12:35 PM

I just looked at the bag balm. It lists an active ingredient, "8- hydroxy quinoline sulfate 0.3% in a petrolatum, lanolin base." The can has a date on it that is a long, long time ago, so should probably be tossed. Whether this is the manufacture date, the sell-by date, or the expiration date, 9/11/2008 is a long time ago. It shows you how long I was struggling with testing various products before discovering the coconut allergy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 01 Dec 18 - 10:29 PM

Have we decided yet how to use Neatsfoot Oil to treat arthritic joints? 57 years playing guitar has buggered both thumb joints and my left-hand finger joints, and playing is now very painful. Because of other medications I'm on, I can't have anti-inflammatories such as Ibuprofen or Naproxen.

I have a litre of Neatsfoot Oil which I used to soften my custom-made natural leather guitar and mandolin straps, I'm tempted to slather some on my thumbs and fingers, if that's the recommended modus operandi?


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: JHW
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 05:39 AM

Neutrogena hand cream tube (scent or not) is my suggestion. Use every winter when hands may become cold. Stops the very painful split ends on fingers and thumbs. Ten minutes of cold without it and there they are.
Used it 30 years or more (after chemist shop advice)

Will seek the ASDA bite cream. Used to get a good pink one with a gritty texture but they stopped making it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 05:54 AM

Some good reccommendations here - from an old thread

LYDIA PINKHAM
(Anonymous)

Have you ever heard of Lydia Pinkham
And her compound so refined?
It turns pr***s into glowing fountains,
And makes c***s grow on behind.

CHORUS: So we'll sing, we'll sing, we'll sing of Lydia Pinkham,
Saviour of the human race.
How she makes, she bottles, she sells her Vegetable Compound,
And the papers publish her face.

Widow Brown, she has no children,
Though she loved them very dear,
So she took, she swallowed, she gargled some Vegetable Compound,
And now she has them twice a year. CHORUS

Willie Smith had peritonitis
And he couldn't piss at all,
So he took, he swallowed, he gargled some Vegetable Compound,
And now he's a human waterfall. CHORUS

Mrs. Jones had rotten kidneys;
Poor old lady couldn't pee,
So she took, she swallowed, she gargled some Vegetable Compound,
And now they pipe her to the sea. CHORUS

Geraldine, she had no breastworks,
And she couldn't fill her blouse,
So she took, she swallowed, she gargled some Vegetable Compound,
And now they milk her with the cows. CHORUS

Arthur White had been castrated,
And had not a single nut,
So he took, he swallowed, he gargled some Vegetable Compound,
And not they hang all 'round his butt. CHORUS

Walter Black was a bearded lady,
And his pecker wouldn't peck,
So he took, he swallowed, he gargled some Vegetable Compound,
Now it's as long as a giraffe's neck. CHORUS


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 06:06 AM

'Lotil' moisturising cream. I use it on my hands all winter to stop my thunb- and finger-ends from cracking and the backs of my hands getting sore and itchy. Excellent stuff.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 06:34 AM

Ibuprofen greatly increases your risk of stroke and heart attack. I doubt it'll stay legal for much longer.

The pain-relief dose of amitryptiline is a third of the lowest antidepressant level. It shouldn't normally have any side effects. And it's such an old drug there won't be any surprises.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 06:50 AM

Ibuprofen gives me thumping palpitations and heartburn. In addition, shop-bought pills give you drug levels that go up and down like yo-yos in your body. I've been on control-release diclofenac for twenty years and I need a proton-pump inhibitor to stop it from attacking my gut. How bad does that sound. But I care not a jot. I've had a good life coping well with my chronic back pain as a result. Benefit 1, risk 0.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 06:59 AM

I found Amitriptyline to be an absolute Godsend. I may have felt drowsy because I hadn't been able to sleep for weeks due to the pain. Once relief arrived, I lay on the sofa and slept and slept...

After two weeks I was worried I'd find stopping it difficult, but nothing happened, except the pain had permanently gone. Phew! 'Un grand ouf de soulagement' as my husband put it!

Post-herpetic neuralgia is unendurable agony.

Ibuprofen should not be used by folk with gastro-intestinal conditions (eg ulcers) as it can cause severe bleeding. (So can aspirin.) Paracetamol is better.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:19 AM

Except that it doesn't work.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:35 AM

I sympathise Steve. One of my husband's school-cleaning colleagues has had numerous operations for back problems, and suffers all the time with awful pain.

He still turns up for work, and my husband tries to help him by lifting anything heavy and taking the large wheelie bins out for him.

It must be torture, and finding effective pain relief is difficult.
You've done well to find a solution.

I just meant that Paracetamol is better than Ibuprofen for smaller stuff such as headaches, toothache, heavy colds etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:39 AM

When people binge on alcohol drinks and take Ibuprophen even two days later they can face a fatal drug interaction that requires a liver transplant to survive.

Aspirin is not precluded from interaction dangers. If one nearly overdoses on cocaine, Aspirin will cause a fatal fibrillation and foaming of the mouth. This a possible cause of death for Bruce Lee.

BTW If I ever need a defibrillator I would prefer a defibrilNOW, not later.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:54 AM

Some people get much more pain relief from paracetamol than others, due to differences in enzyme activity. It's more likely to do nothing if you're a woman.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 08:14 AM

I've been incredibly lucky all my life. Like my old dad, I've hardly ever been to see the doctor, never had any serious illnesses, and have never even had a headache or toothache. No rheumatism or arthritis.

I had an MRI scan a couple of years ago due to a strange loss of peripheral vision in the corner of one eye. They confirmed that I do actually have a brain, which was a comfort. But no tumour or anything.

My skin is tough as old boots and I never even had acne as a teenager.

My husband however has a series of allergies, and due to his past starvation his bones are a bit fragile. He likes oils and greasy stuff on his skin after showering (eg Nivea moisturiser) and has to watch which shower gels he uses.

He gets severe headaches due to sinusitis and has Paracetamol for this.

I reckon it's just the luck of the draw.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 11:13 AM

I was sorry to see Co-proxamol taken off the pharmacy shelves: it was a compound painkiller containing paracetamol and dextro-propoxyphene. I am one of those for whom paracetamol on its own does very little: co-proxamol worked well for me and many of my patients, was especially useful for those intolerant of anything containing codeine or dihydrocodeine. But it was taken "off the market" as the dextropropoxyphene was thought to be more dangerous than codeine/dihydrocodeine when taken in deliberate overdose/suicide attempts - more likely to induce respiratory depression/failure. While I'm sad for those who felt driven to such actions, I'm am also unhappy that many people who derived benefit from safe and responsible use of their painkillers were then deprived of them. Many did not do well on the alternatives then offered or simply could not take them. The people who made this decision said that co-proxamol was no more effective than paracetamol for pain control: on that they were wrong!
And as for ibuprofen, I have never been convinced how safe it is to allow over-the-counter sales: the risk of stroke IS increased, but not massively compared with other anti-inflammatories such as prescription-only -coxib drugs, some of which have been withdrawn because of the clotting risk - strokes and coronaries. And conversely there is the risk of gastro-intestinal bleeding.
Some people seem to think that if they can buy it in the supermarket without prescription, it must be safe.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 11:27 AM

Paracetomol and alcohol can be lethal


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 11:50 AM

We're teetotal, so no danger of reactions with Paracetamol.

Has anyone any experience of cannabis for alleviation of pain, seizures and other afflictions? I heard a while back that people are campaigning for its authorisation so that it can be legally purchased/prescribed.

It's difficult to decide which medicines should be sold to the public and in what quantities. Even Paracetamol is only sold in packets of sixteen tablets, in an attempt to prevent overdose. But of course, someone could stockpile it and then take the lot.

What I would never recommend is buying any medication on the internet.
It could be something horribly toxic instead.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: robomatic
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 12:36 PM

The original Sudafed, the little red pills. They dry you out when you've got a cold and won't put you to sleep.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 01:33 PM

The reason I look twice as young as Senofou (no wrinkles) is that I had no pigment therefore I avoided the sun and ran from shade to shade.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 01:52 PM

Pain shaped my life in demonstrable ways including career and hobbies.
Nearly 100,000 Americans a year are dying in their quest to escape many kinds of pain through synthetic opioids and such.

I believe Earth could banish hunger and pain epidemics if we abandoned all military budgets for ten years and devoted our energies cleverly.

Energy would be the next advancement.

There is another thing we won't do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:18 PM

I am not advocating a numb and fat life which is what many of us have become, but saying pain is useful for survival, but BS pain makes cowards of too many.
-End of lofty BS transmission.-

Aspercreme with lidocaine seems to work even better.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:21 PM

Ha Donuel, you're right about avoiding the sun. I've spent so long under the African sun off and on over the years, that my skin is permanently tanned on the exposed bits, making me strongly resemble a Siamese cat! And quite wrinkled like leather.

But my husband's skin (and that of his entire family, including his ancient old mum) is smooth and beautiful, no wrinkles at all. I suppose it's down to the melanin pigment which protects all Africans.

You're right too about inner pain. The prisoners I visited usually had such pain as you describe, and I have a feeling that is what had driven them to drugs plus alcohol. Very sad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:22 PM

This is-but-isn't a medication, but I started getting visual migraines about 10 years ago. They come on suddenly with no warning.

I did a "Dr Google" search and found some information on instant coffee and migraines or visual migraines which was very interesting. The accepted belief is that drinking coffee can bring on migraines, but many of these websites were saying that, in fact, it is not the coffee which brings them on, but when the effect of the coffee wears off after a couple of hours.

I experimented on my visual migraines. Instant coffee works a treat, within a very short time. Normally, I only have two cups of brewed coffee a day so an extra cup of instant coffee is not excessive.

I try not to take lots of medications if I can help it, so the only time I take ibuprofen is if the visual migraine comes on suddenly and fast. Then I have a cup of instant coffee and an ibuprofen. If it comes on slowly, I just take the coffee. It usually works.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:47 PM

I used to get vertigo, but when I discovered it was runny/blue cheeses that were the cause, I've avoided them ever since and haven't had a single episode for ages.
For bad seasickness (even on a boat trip along the river Thames) I find only Stugeron is effective.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:48 PM

I started getting visual migraines a few years ago. Coffee and strong dark chocolate did make them more likely, but the immediate trigger was always bright points of light - if I didn't look at cars in the sun or chandeliers, they never started. Haven't had one in a long time.

The original Sudafed (pseudephedrine) is not fun if you have a tendency to cardiac arrhythmia, though that isn't why it was taken off the market. The quinine in a G&T is enough to wobble my heart as well.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM

I was a victim of the synthetic opioid Tramadol. Week one, brilliant. Worked amazingly well. Week two, wearing off and noticed that I was getting a bit unsteady and felt insecure driving. Week three, we were having a day out so I missed a couple of doses. Result: the most dreadful withdrawal symptoms. Never felt worse in my life. I realised, after taking the next dose which restored my sanity, that I had become dependent. Week four, threw them in the bin and endured four frenetic sleepless nights and panic attacks. Just thought I'd mention it in case anyone's doctor recommends it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 03:47 PM

Bright lights are the usual cause of my visual migraines, but they started when I was lifting and carrying lots of boxes upstairs when we were clearing out our old house, so I think it was the pressure on a dyed-in-the-wool lounge lizard of doing extended heavy lifting and carrying.

Sometimes I don't know what brings them on. They seem to just come out of nowhere, but the bright lights is the most common cause for me, especially sunlight glinting off car windscreens and chrome fittings. There is a particular time of year when I am driving to work and the sun is angled exactly on both the morning and afternoon drive to create maximum visual migraine probability. Polarising sunglasses are my normal outdoor accessory, but sometimes even they can't prevent the problem.

As I said above, because I don't drink much coffee I am not prone to coffee withdrawal symptoms and the instant coffee works like a charm for me. If someone drinks lots of coffee on a regular basis, it's possible that migraines come on due to withdrawal symptoms, so the coffee fix would be counterproductive in that case. Horses for courses, I guess. One person's meat is another person's poison.

Also, regarding bright lights, I have another problem and sometimes black and white images or designs which are made up of lots of close lines can cause my eyes/brain to get dizzy so that can bring on visual migraines for me in some circumstances.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 06:59 PM

MISTAKE ALERT

I MEANT TO SAY ACETOMETAPHEN not Ibuprophen interacts with alcohol with deadly effect.


Helen the bright light sensitivity is alresdy a symptom of a migraine voyage and rarely causal. I did get a headache from a laser once. I say voyage because there are distinct stages which range from subtle to excruciating. The after effects can also exist for days.

Morae' patterns make you dizzy? They are kind of suppose to.
The lines I internally experience like a horizontal graph that jags up and down. They are in contrast to smooth junk imagery. It is almost a visual indication of a toxic reaction.


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Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:28 PM

Moire' patterns are an interference pattern of many types as you can see on Wikipedia. Like wave-particle interactions some patterns are confusing and complex.

2 levels of interference are simple and 4 layers are a challenge like seeing a hypercube for most humans.
I sense they are a good jumping in point into visualizing some quantum effects like the mysterious quantum 'pilot wave'. Deep and fun stuff.

I have never automatically generated Moire' patterns in my minds eye.
But I can see them by will. I was introduced to them 50 years ago by the Scientific American Magazine.

Moire' patterns can also be used in cryptography.

So dizzy is normal :^/


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