Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


BS: Helpful ointments & medications

Donuel 04 Dec 18 - 05:08 PM
Tattie Bogle 04 Dec 18 - 09:30 AM
Jack Campin 04 Dec 18 - 09:26 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Dec 18 - 09:16 AM
Donuel 04 Dec 18 - 08:40 AM
Helen 03 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM
Jos 03 Dec 18 - 04:04 PM
Helen 03 Dec 18 - 03:06 PM
Helen 03 Dec 18 - 03:04 PM
Senoufou 03 Dec 18 - 03:01 PM
Helen 03 Dec 18 - 02:42 PM
Steve Shaw 03 Dec 18 - 01:24 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Dec 18 - 12:22 PM
Senoufou 03 Dec 18 - 09:12 AM
Donuel 03 Dec 18 - 08:44 AM
Jack Campin 03 Dec 18 - 07:38 AM
Senoufou 03 Dec 18 - 06:21 AM
Steve Shaw 03 Dec 18 - 05:49 AM
Dave the Gnome 03 Dec 18 - 05:35 AM
Jack Campin 03 Dec 18 - 05:24 AM
Jos 03 Dec 18 - 05:04 AM
Mr Red 03 Dec 18 - 04:47 AM
Senoufou 03 Dec 18 - 04:09 AM
Dave the Gnome 03 Dec 18 - 03:52 AM
Backwoodsman 03 Dec 18 - 03:45 AM
Thompson 03 Dec 18 - 03:41 AM
Helen 03 Dec 18 - 02:54 AM
Backwoodsman 03 Dec 18 - 01:50 AM
Helen 03 Dec 18 - 01:03 AM
Backwoodsman 03 Dec 18 - 12:23 AM
Backwoodsman 03 Dec 18 - 12:18 AM
Helen 02 Dec 18 - 11:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Dec 18 - 08:36 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 08:01 PM
robomatic 02 Dec 18 - 07:55 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 07:53 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 07:43 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 07:29 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 07:28 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 06:59 PM
Helen 02 Dec 18 - 03:47 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM
Jack Campin 02 Dec 18 - 02:48 PM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 02:47 PM
Helen 02 Dec 18 - 02:22 PM
Senoufou 02 Dec 18 - 02:21 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 02:18 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 01:52 PM
Donuel 02 Dec 18 - 01:33 PM
robomatic 02 Dec 18 - 12:36 PM

Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 05:08 PM

Jim I think there was an outcry when that method was exposed years ago.
It was cheap. It only cost electricity, a small room, air pump and duct tape.

I don't need Aspercreme since the cause of my ankle pain is under my own behavioral control. It is exacerbated by high blood sugar. But you know there are times I don't want to be controlled and I eat some chocolate cake anyway.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 09:30 AM

Xylitol is an ingredient of many brands of chewing gum: never touch it myself, but not for that reason!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 09:26 AM

I don't believe Donuel's description of dog euthanasia. Evacuating a chamber is slow and expensive. Asphyxia by carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide or nitrogen would be cheaper as well as less painful - they are used more for small animals though. For dogs the usual methods use anaesthetic agents (isoflurane or pentothal).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 09:16 AM

I go all stiff, but only in the wrong places.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 04 Dec 18 - 08:40 AM

YOU NEVER KNOW, MAYBE XYLITOL WOULD BE MORE HUMANE THAN PUMPING ALL THE AIR OUT OF A CHAMBER THAT BURSTS LUNGS AND EYES WHICH IS HOW DOGS ARE DOGS ARE EXTERMINATED IN THE US
CAPS ARE UNINTENTIONAL
Dogs with owners are given a sedative and potassium.

Steve what do you mean you can't move without 'it'. Rheumatism?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 04:58 PM

Thanks Jos. The page I linked to has a section entitled "Xylitol is toxic to dogs".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jos
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 04:04 PM

If you are tempted to use xylitol, beware if you are a dog owner. For dogs, xylitol is lethal.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:06 PM

Senoufou, I think my vertigo was triggered by a virus, but it responded to the Epley Manoeuvre.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:04 PM

Sinus, nasal allergies, tummy bugs etc:

Back in 2004 my hubby read an article about an artificial sugar called xylitol. Scientific community reactions to the claims of it's health benefits followed the usual path: 1. pooh-poohed as an old wives' tale, 2. well maybe there is some benefit to using it, but we don't know how it works 3. amazing new scientific discovery!

Xylitol is the active ingredient in cranberry juice which has been used by women for some time as a way of relieving urinary tract infection symptoms, hence the pooh-poohing by the scientific community. "If it makes you think it is working, and it has no negative side-effects, then there is no reason to stop using it, but it won't cure you."

xylitol

After reading the article, we went out and bought some from the health food shop. As it happened, there was a really bad tummy bug doing the rounds at work. It came on suddenly and people were sick for days. I was sitting at work and suddenly this wave of nausea hit me, out of the blue. I thought I was in for the whole experience, however, I took a teaspoonful of xylitol in some water, and the nausea subsided straight away. Every couple of hours the nausea came back and I hit it again with the xylitol. This went on for a day or so, but I managed to avoid the whole yucky experience.

Xylitol was used in experiments originally on children to see if the sugar substitute was better for their teeth than sugar. What the scientists found was that the side benefit for the children on xylitol was that they had significantly less ear infections than the other control subjects.

The especially interesting bit is that the xylitol bonds with the "bugs" which would normally bond with the cell walls of your nasal passages or your tummy, etc so most of the bugs get flushed out of your system without creating the havoc they were created to make.

Since reading the article, I have used an empty Sinex bottle which I fill with boiled water and about half a teaspoon of xylitol. If my sinuses are playing up, I use that instead of the steroid based over-the-counter medications.

I still have a scanned copy of the original article. There has been more research since then, including using it for cystic fibrosis patients. It's the best all round treatment I have found for tummy and nasal issues.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:01 PM

Hello there Helen.
Yes, I've known about the Epley Manoeuvre. But it's mainly for addressing benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

I'm only going by what my sister told me, but for vestibular neuronitis, one should avoid ingesting bacteria such as those found in ripe, runny cheese or blue cheese. It can also be triggered by a virus.
I think my sis was right as I've avoided any more episodes. (But I do so miss my smelly Camembert and Danish blue cheese!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 02:42 PM

Senoufou, just before the Easter break this year I woke in the middle of the night with severe vertigo, which I had never experienced before, except for a couple of very mild episodes a long time ago.

I did a Google search and found out about The Epley Manoeuvre

This works only if the problem is the little particles swishing around in the chamber of your ear and setting off the balance receptors (that's the highly technical description - not!). You also need to know which ear has the problem. I knew it was my right ear because when I lay on my right side and then sat up, the problem occurred.

Read all the information and decide if it is worth a try. There are also videos online showing how to do it, but look for the one by Dr John Epley himself. Interestingly, the medical community pooh-poohed his technique for many years until there was enough of a wave of satisfied clients to turn the tide.

Prior to finding out about the EM, I was vomiting and off my food for a couple of weeks. When I used the EM, it fixed it within a few attempts.

I told my doctor that I didn't need him, because I had found Doctor Google. He laughed. Some wouldn't. LOL


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 01:24 PM

"Flonase" sounds like a rather unfortunate word, seemingly alluding to a runny nose. A well-known haemorrhoid cream this end is called "Anusol," even more unfortunately named, I'd say... :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 12:22 PM

The physician I saw about 20 years ago explained that part of my sinus allergy problems may be that the receptors in my nose respond to things that I'm not actually allergic to any more. So he recommended using one of the nasal sprays (Flonase) that work with the nasal receptors, reducing the need for the systemic treatment (Zyrtec, Allegra, etc.) The theory is "why treat the whole body when only the nose needs it?" When I was diagnosed with PMR I decided I needed to treat the symptoms of allergies with the nasal spray and only add the Zyrtec (generic is cetirizine) when there is a larger load of pollen or fungus in the air. I am off of the steroids now but am still following treatments that involve fewer medications.

Flonase is available over the counter now and I can buy it inexpensively in bulk with a year's supply at a local warehouse club.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 09:12 AM

That's very interesting Jack. He may well be allergic to a whole range of things.
I had thought of suggesting he gets one of those allergy tests at the doctor's, where they put lots of different stuff all up your arm then see if a reaction occurs.
The thing is he lived in a totally different environment for the early part of his life, and had never seen bread, potatoes, flour, no trees around at all, no flowers or bees, no agricultural crops, no butter, milk or dairy foods. He may well be reacting to those as well as the pollens.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 08:44 AM

Note that the jagged cresant phenomenon is sensed in your field of vision in both eyes, no matter which one you close, which means that the disturbance happens past the corpus callosome in the brain, most likely in the occipital rear region of the brain itself. If you try you can effect the lightning eye patterns by increasing it or diminishing it. Usually the pattern goes away after 20 minutes for me.

These are clues as to how the storm in the electric brain is sensed but what causes it or what it is, I have no idea.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 07:38 AM

I get ferocious fits of allergic sneezing too - pollen or scented cleaning materials mostly. (Synthetic scents in cleaning sprays can set me off at levels so low I can't actually smell them; some trees are so allergenic at some times of year I avoid bus routes that go past them).

Antihistamines (loratadine, acrivastine, cetirizine) help, but what makes the largest difference is avoiding certain grain products, particularly bread and pastry wheat and dry-cooked oat biscuits. The concept is called "total allergic load" - if you're slightly allergic to one thing, exposure to it may produce a reaction to something else entirely. In my case it seems to be particles of dry foods like bread that cause trouble when they float up my nose.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 06:21 AM

Dave, yes he's tried Vaseline around his nostrils, and also Beconase.
He has shelves stacked with products, poor chap.

The main problem is that Africans have very short, wide nostrils extremely well-adapted to their hot climate. Air can be drawn in easily, unlike Caucasian noses (especially Scandinavian ones) which are quite long and let the air warm up before it reaches the lungs.

So in his case, air goes zooming in straight through his nasal passages without let or hindrance. Pollen isn't filtered, and of course his body had never encountered pollen in his home territory.

His sinuses become very painful too, which leads to headaches.
He's very stoic though, and soldiers on regardless. (I'd be moaning my head off if it were me!)

My vertigo was very debilitating. I'd be vomiting for England and everything would be spinning round. Visually it looked as if our bedroom was turning. Four days of this and I was at the end of my tether.
My sister thinks it's a kind of vestibular neuronitis. But thankfully, abstaining from delicious blue/runny cheeses and dark, strong chocolate :( has prevented any more episodes!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 05:49 AM

"Mine is more like a curve than a circle and, like you, that's all I get - no actual headache, although my head feels 'dull' or 'muzzy' for an hour or two..."

I could just as well have said curve rather than broken circle. By the time it extends to the periphery of my field of vision it's definitely more of a curve. I can be headachey before it happens and feel fuzzy for a while afterwards. I'm definitely not safe to drive for an hour or more.

The visual disturbance is a painless phenomenon while it's happening and I too have learned to relax, do nothing for half an hour and, well, sort of enjoy it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 05:35 AM

Sen, has your hubby tried Vaseline smeared inside each nostril? Did not work too well for me but other people swear by it. What helps with mine (dust allergy, all year round) is a generic cetitizine tablet every day combined with beconase nasal spray.

I also use Sterimar saline nasal spray to clear any congestion and that is very good. Found out yesterday that it also stops your eyes stinging after cutting up onions!:-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 05:24 AM

When using OTC liquid or gloppy preparations, read the label. They nearly all contain scents, emulsifiers or microbicides that some people can be seriously sensitive to. (You don't want to end up taking your partner into A&E at 2am because of a reaction to thiazolinone as I did once).

Scents (aka "Parfum") don't have to be named on the label and can be lethally allergenic. All thiazolinone-related microbicides can cause sensitivity reactions and are included in the standard sets of patches used by allergists. Parabens may cause reactions in people who are sensitized to aspirin.

If the same chemical is available as either a cream or an ointment, go for the ointment. Creams contain water, which germs can breed in - so the manufacturers add microbicides to stop them. Solid preparations (powders, soaps) also don't need stuff to stop germs.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jos
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 05:04 AM

I get those multicoloured spreading circles occasionally, usually as a result of stress, but no headache or anything else. I don't drive so no problem there. I rather enjoy them - very jazzy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Mr Red
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 04:47 AM

What do you do with the neatsfoot oil then, Mr R? Rub it in the joint?

Yes. on rather than in and what residue is left on yer hands - is good fer the bodhran. (cue badhran (sic) jokes)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 04:09 AM

We have a village bee-keeper, and my husband tried a teaspoonful of his honey every day last winter in order to desensitise him from the pollen which poleaxes him every Spring. His hay fever really is very serious.

It worked quite well, but gave no no protection from tree pollen, local airborne pesticides/fertilisers or fungal spores. He also has to use certain cleaning products at work, which I suspect also cause reactions.
He's tried Piriton, Piritese, Pirinase (in fact anything beginning with Piri...!) also various rather strong decongestants (eg Otrivine), which only cause reactive congestion/inflammation and make him worse.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:52 AM

Forget all about it but the mention of Vick reminded me. Vick standard vaporub works for getting rid of fungal nail infections. Daft as it sounds someone recommended it to me and, where the expensive treatment failed, a smear of Vick every evening until the discoloration had grown out cured mine!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:45 AM

I'll try that next time Helen. And I'll try to remember to report back here!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Thompson
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 03:41 AM

Sablons Healing Gel is magic for cuts and grazes.
Neilmed saline rinse is great for keeping sinuses clear, and Vick’s make a gadget like a mask with a cup under it that you fill with hot water and a squirt of oregano or rosemary essential oil and then breathe the steam in through your nose to de-inflame your sinuses.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 02:54 AM

So, Backwoodsman, this may mean that the coffee trick would work for you too. It's worth a try. I have used espresso coffee once when I was out somewhere and it did work but instant coffee seems to work better.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 01:50 AM

Helen, my visual disturbance is yellow and purple.

I drink very little coffee - probably less than one cup per day on average, say five or six a week. I'm English, I drink tea! ;-) :-)

I used to drink coffee all day when I worked but, since I retired six years ago, tea and water are my tipples. I don't drink alcohol at all, haven't touched the stuff since December 2005.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 01:03 AM

I just re-read what I quoted from Steve. I forgot to say that my crescent moon pattern is more light yellow than multicoloured. More like the colour of the filament in an incandescent light bulb.

Yes, stress seems to be a trigger sometimes for me, too.

Backwoodsman, if you are not a big coffee drinker, try the instant coffee trick. It fixes my visual migraines within a few minutes. If I don't stop the visual part then I do tend to get the nausea and muzzy headedness, accompanied by grumpiness - well, more grumpiness than usual, that is. LOL


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 12:23 AM

Helen, thanks for that link - that's precisely what I see when I get a migraine, and your description exactly matches my own experiences.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 03 Dec 18 - 12:18 AM

"For the sake of transatlantic harmony, paracetamol is the same thing as acetaminophen and Tylenol.

Interesting discussion about migraine auras (which is what I call them). I don't get migraine headaches, though I can feel ropey for hours before an aura. Once the aura has passed I'm OK. The aura consists of a visual disturbance which is more than bad enough to stop me from driving. It lasts about half an hour and consists of a scintillating, multicoloured broken circle of light which has jagged teeth on the inside of the circle. Over time the circle enlarges until it extends to the edges of my visual field, then disappears, leaving me feeling a bit knackered but otherwise OK. I've had five auras over about five years, but, since my dad died six weeks ago, I've had two."


In Revelstoke, BC, Mrs Backwoodsperson and I searched a large drugstore high and low for paracetamol. Eventually, we had to ask the pharmacist, who laughed and said, "You guys must be British! It's over there, called 'acetaminophen'!". Well duh! :-)

You've described perfectly the visual attacks I get three or four times a year, usually apparently brought on by tiredness or stress. Mine is more like a curve than a circle and, like you, that's all I get - no actual headache, although my head feels 'dull' or 'muzzy' for an hour or two afterwards. As soon as I get the visual disturbance, if possible, I draw the curtains and lie down for an hour or so, and it clears leaving me with the 'muzzy' head.

Mrs. Backwoodsperson gets the full migraine blast - very bad headache, strong visual disturbance and, eventually, she throws up, after which she's very quickly back to normal. Her attacks can last for several hours.

Great, innit?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 11:18 PM

Yep, Steve. Same here:

"It lasts about half an hour and consists of a scintillating, multicoloured broken circle of light which has jagged teeth on the inside of the circle. Over time the circle enlarges until it extends to the edges of my visual field, then disappears"

See the image on this page. The circle starts as a visual disturbance for me, then enlarges into a half moon shape towards the left or right side, and eventually gets so large that it leaves the "screen" of my vision.

This is similar to my visual migraine experience

Do a Google image search "scintillating scotoma" for more representations of what other people see.

My other eye/brain issue does not relate to Moiré patterns, which do their thing for everyone, including me.

It is Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome. Black print on white backgrounds jump up and down for me, or have grey shadows around all the letters, and close black and white line patterns do little jiggly dances which can be nauseating. I have special coloured lenses in my glasses and use a neutral, darker than usual background on my computer for print.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 08:36 PM

Sudafed is strong - the "full" dose of two has me bouncing off the walls. I haven't read that rebound is an effect, though. There is a nasal clearing spray called Afrin that has been noted for years to be problematic that way.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 08:01 PM

Sudafed and other decongestants are bad news. Rebound congestion can easily outweigh the original problem.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: robomatic
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:55 PM

The original Sudafed is still on the market. It is no longer over the counter (OTC) because its active ingredient can be misused to make drugs.

Bitter Lemon (Schweppes and other brands) became harder to find over the late 90s and I haven't seen it retail (i.e. in stores) this whole millenium. It had quinine.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:53 PM

Cox-2s are rarely if ever prescribed here any more. I don't know what Alleve is, so good luck with that. Naproxen may be statistically safer, but it doesn't work. Wot works is wot is allegedly bad for you. Thing is, diclofenac is supposed to be bad for you. I have taken the daily max dose for twenty years and I can move. Two days without it and I can't move. So what's worse for me, not moving or taking a slightly risky tablet that enables me to move?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:43 PM

Like Tattie said Cox-2inhibitors can cause heart problems but NSAIDS like Alleve and Naproxen are less harmful.
You would think we would be closer to creating natural organic endomorphines that would not be addictive.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:29 PM

For the sake of transatlantic harmony, paracetamol is the same thing as acetaminophen and Tylenol.

Interesting discussion about migraine auras (which is what I call them). I don't get migraine headaches, though I can feel ropey for hours before an aura. Once the aura has passed I'm OK. The aura consists of a visual disturbance which is more than bad enough to stop me from driving. It lasts about half an hour and consists of a scintillating, multicoloured broken circle of light which has jagged teeth on the inside of the circle. Over time the circle enlarges until it extends to the edges of my visual field, then disappears, leaving me feeling a bit knackered but otherwise OK. I've had five auras over about five years, but, since my dad died six weeks ago, I've had two.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 07:28 PM

Moire' patterns are an interference pattern of many types as you can see on Wikipedia. Like wave-particle interactions some patterns are confusing and complex.

2 levels of interference are simple and 4 layers are a challenge like seeing a hypercube for most humans.
I sense they are a good jumping in point into visualizing some quantum effects like the mysterious quantum 'pilot wave'. Deep and fun stuff.

I have never automatically generated Moire' patterns in my minds eye.
But I can see them by will. I was introduced to them 50 years ago by the Scientific American Magazine.

Moire' patterns can also be used in cryptography.

So dizzy is normal :^/


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 06:59 PM

MISTAKE ALERT

I MEANT TO SAY ACETOMETAPHEN not Ibuprophen interacts with alcohol with deadly effect.


Helen the bright light sensitivity is alresdy a symptom of a migraine voyage and rarely causal. I did get a headache from a laser once. I say voyage because there are distinct stages which range from subtle to excruciating. The after effects can also exist for days.

Morae' patterns make you dizzy? They are kind of suppose to.
The lines I internally experience like a horizontal graph that jags up and down. They are in contrast to smooth junk imagery. It is almost a visual indication of a toxic reaction.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 03:47 PM

Bright lights are the usual cause of my visual migraines, but they started when I was lifting and carrying lots of boxes upstairs when we were clearing out our old house, so I think it was the pressure on a dyed-in-the-wool lounge lizard of doing extended heavy lifting and carrying.

Sometimes I don't know what brings them on. They seem to just come out of nowhere, but the bright lights is the most common cause for me, especially sunlight glinting off car windscreens and chrome fittings. There is a particular time of year when I am driving to work and the sun is angled exactly on both the morning and afternoon drive to create maximum visual migraine probability. Polarising sunglasses are my normal outdoor accessory, but sometimes even they can't prevent the problem.

As I said above, because I don't drink much coffee I am not prone to coffee withdrawal symptoms and the instant coffee works like a charm for me. If someone drinks lots of coffee on a regular basis, it's possible that migraines come on due to withdrawal symptoms, so the coffee fix would be counterproductive in that case. Horses for courses, I guess. One person's meat is another person's poison.

Also, regarding bright lights, I have another problem and sometimes black and white images or designs which are made up of lots of close lines can cause my eyes/brain to get dizzy so that can bring on visual migraines for me in some circumstances.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 03:14 PM

I was a victim of the synthetic opioid Tramadol. Week one, brilliant. Worked amazingly well. Week two, wearing off and noticed that I was getting a bit unsteady and felt insecure driving. Week three, we were having a day out so I missed a couple of doses. Result: the most dreadful withdrawal symptoms. Never felt worse in my life. I realised, after taking the next dose which restored my sanity, that I had become dependent. Week four, threw them in the bin and endured four frenetic sleepless nights and panic attacks. Just thought I'd mention it in case anyone's doctor recommends it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Jack Campin
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:48 PM

I started getting visual migraines a few years ago. Coffee and strong dark chocolate did make them more likely, but the immediate trigger was always bright points of light - if I didn't look at cars in the sun or chandeliers, they never started. Haven't had one in a long time.

The original Sudafed (pseudephedrine) is not fun if you have a tendency to cardiac arrhythmia, though that isn't why it was taken off the market. The quinine in a G&T is enough to wobble my heart as well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:47 PM

I used to get vertigo, but when I discovered it was runny/blue cheeses that were the cause, I've avoided them ever since and haven't had a single episode for ages.
For bad seasickness (even on a boat trip along the river Thames) I find only Stugeron is effective.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Helen
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:22 PM

This is-but-isn't a medication, but I started getting visual migraines about 10 years ago. They come on suddenly with no warning.

I did a "Dr Google" search and found some information on instant coffee and migraines or visual migraines which was very interesting. The accepted belief is that drinking coffee can bring on migraines, but many of these websites were saying that, in fact, it is not the coffee which brings them on, but when the effect of the coffee wears off after a couple of hours.

I experimented on my visual migraines. Instant coffee works a treat, within a very short time. Normally, I only have two cups of brewed coffee a day so an extra cup of instant coffee is not excessive.

I try not to take lots of medications if I can help it, so the only time I take ibuprofen is if the visual migraine comes on suddenly and fast. Then I have a cup of instant coffee and an ibuprofen. If it comes on slowly, I just take the coffee. It usually works.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:21 PM

Ha Donuel, you're right about avoiding the sun. I've spent so long under the African sun off and on over the years, that my skin is permanently tanned on the exposed bits, making me strongly resemble a Siamese cat! And quite wrinkled like leather.

But my husband's skin (and that of his entire family, including his ancient old mum) is smooth and beautiful, no wrinkles at all. I suppose it's down to the melanin pigment which protects all Africans.

You're right too about inner pain. The prisoners I visited usually had such pain as you describe, and I have a feeling that is what had driven them to drugs plus alcohol. Very sad.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 02:18 PM

I am not advocating a numb and fat life which is what many of us have become, but saying pain is useful for survival, but BS pain makes cowards of too many.
-End of lofty BS transmission.-

Aspercreme with lidocaine seems to work even better.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 01:52 PM

Pain shaped my life in demonstrable ways including career and hobbies.
Nearly 100,000 Americans a year are dying in their quest to escape many kinds of pain through synthetic opioids and such.

I believe Earth could banish hunger and pain epidemics if we abandoned all military budgets for ten years and devoted our energies cleverly.

Energy would be the next advancement.

There is another thing we won't do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: Donuel
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 01:33 PM

The reason I look twice as young as Senofou (no wrinkles) is that I had no pigment therefore I avoided the sun and ran from shade to shade.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Helpful ointments & medications
From: robomatic
Date: 02 Dec 18 - 12:36 PM

The original Sudafed, the little red pills. They dry you out when you've got a cold and won't put you to sleep.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

 


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 14 December 12:11 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.