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BS: Cheesey reminiscences!

Dave the Gnome 24 Jun 19 - 11:47 AM
Mr Red 24 Jun 19 - 11:56 AM
Mrrzy 24 Jun 19 - 12:07 PM
Charmion 24 Jun 19 - 12:31 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 01:50 PM
Jos 24 Jun 19 - 02:28 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 02:35 PM
Raggytash 24 Jun 19 - 02:43 PM
Dave Hanson 24 Jun 19 - 02:54 PM
Mrrzy 24 Jun 19 - 03:10 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Jun 19 - 03:22 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 04:22 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 04:32 PM
beardedbruce 24 Jun 19 - 04:52 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Jun 19 - 05:04 PM
Helen 24 Jun 19 - 05:33 PM
Joe_F 24 Jun 19 - 06:29 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jun 19 - 08:01 PM
Mr Red 25 Jun 19 - 04:09 AM
Steve Shaw 25 Jun 19 - 04:52 AM
Mrrzy 25 Jun 19 - 09:57 AM
beardedbruce 25 Jun 19 - 10:59 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Jun 19 - 02:35 PM
beardedbruce 25 Jun 19 - 02:59 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Jun 19 - 03:04 PM
beardedbruce 25 Jun 19 - 04:13 PM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 25 Jun 19 - 05:30 PM
Steve Shaw 25 Jun 19 - 06:08 PM
Mrrzy 26 Jun 19 - 04:05 PM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 27 Jun 19 - 06:07 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 27 Jun 19 - 06:40 PM
Steve Shaw 28 Jun 19 - 07:54 AM
Mr Red 29 Jun 19 - 06:14 AM
CupOfTea 30 Jun 19 - 11:39 AM
David Carter (UK) 30 Jun 19 - 12:22 PM
Raggytash 01 Jul 19 - 06:20 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Jul 19 - 07:11 AM
Steve Shaw 01 Jul 19 - 07:14 PM
Tattie Bogle 01 Jul 19 - 07:51 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Jul 19 - 08:34 PM
Dave the Gnome 02 Jul 19 - 03:07 AM
Mrrzy 03 Jul 19 - 02:32 PM
Raggytash 03 Jul 19 - 05:39 PM
Tattie Bogle 03 Jul 19 - 07:24 PM
Steve Shaw 03 Jul 19 - 09:40 PM
Mr Red 04 Jul 19 - 01:02 PM
Dave Hanson 04 Jul 19 - 02:56 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Jul 19 - 04:25 PM
Tattie Bogle 04 Jul 19 - 05:59 PM
Mr Red 05 Jul 19 - 01:59 AM

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Subject: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 11:47 AM

When I was a kid in 50s/60s Manchester there were only 2 kinds of cheese. Eating and cooking. The former was invariably white and crumbly. More than likely Cheshire. The latter was yellow and harder. Probably a Cheddar of some sort. Cheese spread was Dairylee and if you were lucky you got a triangle of said cheese with a wooden "spreader", a couple of salted crackers and a little pickled onion in a snack pack. Later on I remember Kraft cheese slices but they really were the bees knees and decidedly a luxury food.

In the 70s strange things started happening, like putting cheese cubes on cocktail sticks with pineapple chunks as part of a buffet. If you were really posh you had half a grapefruit with the sticks stuck in it alongside the other half a grapefruit with cocktail sausages on sticks. Looked like a couple of demented hedgehogs had been rolling in the party food. I always refer to the 70s as the decade that taste forgot :-)

Not sure when it was but Edam was probably the first foreign cheese I came across and, luckily, it did not put me off continental cheeses for life. I soon discovered Danish blue, which was promptly trumped by our own Derbyshire Stilton. Now I am narked if my local shop doesn't have a full compliment of French Compte, Spanish Marchengo, Somerset Cheddar and, the king of all, Lancashire in all its variants.

Can anyone tell it is a dull afternoon awaiting a lift to a dinner party in about an hour? With British chicken, a locally made cheesecake and a selection of wines from Italy. (Yes, Steve. Including Mossers Nero d'Avola) Our hosts have a selection of fine malts too. Don't expect any sense from me after nine.

Not that you get much anyway.

:D tG


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mr Red
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 11:56 AM

I thought you wer going to sing the praises...............

"The Bries and I"





I'll get my pinny..............


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 12:07 PM

The cheese shop exploded. All that was left was de Brie.

I was lucky enough to grow up with a cheese course as a normal part of the meal. Thanks, Mom & Dad.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Charmion
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 12:31 PM

Cheese used to be Cheddar, in two colours: white and orange. I have no idea why mild (i.e., young) Cheddar had to be (and still is) orange in Ontario. Old cheddar was (and still is) white.

Fancy cheese came from Oka, a Trappist monastery just over the border in Quebec, and it was (and still is) round and semi-soft with a gentle whiff of adulthood and, just maybe, port after dinner.

Another type of fancy cheese was Danish blue, which was not Danish or even European but just as Canadian as all the other cheese we ate. It had visible mold in it and therefore seemed risky. Its complex and decidedly emphatic flavour announced its status as food intended only for the grown-ups of the household. Consequently, we children insisted we loved it, though we actually had second thoughts after the first bite.

Fake cheese was Kraft plastic-wrapped slices or a hunk of Velveeta, and it, too, was always orange because it was pretending to be mild Cheddar. Its proper habitat was the sandwich lunch your mother made for you to take to school, and it tasted of nothing much in particular unless she augmented it with a sliced pickle, in which case it tasted of sliced pickle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 01:50 PM

Well here are my favourites. I think Appleby's is the best Cheshire. Mrs Kirkham's is the best Lancashire. Morrison's sell an excellent Wensleydale under their "the best" label. I've researched all the much-vaunted cheddars such as Montgomery's, Gould's, Green's, Westcombe's, Keen's and Barber's, as well as Mrs Quicke's excellent range, but I think the best is Wookey Hole cave-aged. Buy it at M&S and it still has its washed rind. Superb. I find Stilton far too variable, often not creamy enough or unevenly veined or bitter or too salty, so I avoid it. Instead I seek out Stichelton, which is really Stilton but made with unpasteurised milk (not allowed under the Stilton name). It's made by one very careful and proud cheese maker and it's a masterpiece. Another superb blue is Bath Blue, but you have to hurry up and eat it it before it starts to darken. I'm a big fan of three triple-creme cheeses: Vallage from France, Montagnolo d'Affine from Germany and that ubiquitous masterpiece St Agur. A lot of bries are unreliable, often too salty or decidedly bitter or with that horrid chalky middle. Sharpham's brie, made in Devon, is lovely and rich when at its runny peak. The French Brie de Meaux is a grand, tangy example best eaten just before the rot sets in. There's a very nice English camembert made at Cricket St Thomas in Somerset. You might have to leave it out of the fridge for a few days to get it flowing, a not uncommon issue with camembert. I'd rather hack off the family jewels with a rusty machete than eat "mild cheddar" or Edam or anything pre-sliced or in triangles. A bit of philly on oatcakes makes a good lunch. And I have lots of ways of employing mozzarella and proper parmesan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Jos
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:28 PM

Once, back in the 1960s or 1970s, we had a whole Cheshire cheese that had gone well past its sell-by date (not that they had them in those days). It came free as it couldn't be sold because it no longer resembled Cheshire - it had gone soft and runny like a Brie or Camembert. Unforgettable.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:35 PM

I'd eat cheese on toast when ah were a lad, or I'd grill an ugly mixture of cheddar, milk and chopped onion. Delicious mopped up with nasty sliced Wonderloaf. But I don't remember eating much raw cheese. Maybe a bit of crumbly Lancs...


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Raggytash
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:43 PM

When I was a child on Saturday mornings we would go to Eccles market and buy (small amounts) of Lancashire, Cheshire,Cheddar, Green Sage Derby (dyed) Red Leicester (dyed) and Danish Blue.

That was the entire range of cheeses available at the time.

Since then, although now sadly lactose intolerant, I have sampled literally hundreds of cheeses. My Favourite English cheese, if I was forced to choose, would either be Poachers Imp, a mature Lincolnshire Poacher or a Colston & Basset Blue Stilton.

My favourite "foreign" cheese of all time was a Weisslacker cheese from Bavaria, the smell was appalling but the cheese tasted sublime.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 02:54 PM

Derby's got green bits because of it's age,
And when it gets older it's kept in a cage,
And what does it sing when it reaches this age,
Oh the hard cheese of old England,
In old England very hard cheese,

Les Barker, The Hard Cheese of Old England.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 03:10 PM

After my kids started loving Wallace and Grommet they went through a What's wrong with Wesleydale? phase. Tastes like a good cheddar, Wesleydale does.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 03:22 PM

Growing up in the suburbs of Sydney in the 70s, I also recall those triangles DTG mentions, but also clear these plastic tubes where we would cut or bite off the top, then extrude out some kind of soft cheese for a snack.

Now, a vegan most of the time, I quite like such varieties of cheese on a sandwich for a change.

Also, on an office Christmas do, I was once served a Brie Wellington that had to go back as it had only a large flat mushroom in it...I doubt the chef got the boot, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 04:22 PM

Cheeses that contain bits of fruit or herbs or garlic are abominations. I heard a while ago that only inferior cheese is used for this purpose. I'd make a single honourable exception for Boursin, though even that can be lived without I find.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 04:32 PM

Mature cheddar is fine for those who are lactose-intolerant.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: beardedbruce
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 04:52 PM

From the DT:

WHAT A FRIEND WE HAVE IN CHEESES

What a friend we have in cheeses,
Mozzarella, Cheddar, Swiss!
Bleu and Limberger's sweet breezes
Lingering like a lover's kiss.
Humble milk's apotheosis,
Muenster, Provolone, Brie
Damn cholesterol's thrombosis
Cheese is Gouda stuff by me!

Heed the U. S. Dairy Council,
Keep the Gruyere on the shelf.
Even just a tiny ounce'll
Give you vitamin B-12.
Gather, pilgrims at the deli
Buying Edam and Havarti,
Wedges moist and cold and smelly,
Bring home lots and have a party!



Now we are above the line!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 05:04 PM

That pleases


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Helen
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 05:33 PM

When I and some of my friends used to gather on a regular basis about 30 years ago for a light meal, we used to pick a theme.

At the time one of the large department stores had a huge array of cheese in all varieties. I always found it difficult to decide which ones to try, so on one occasion I suggested to my friends that we go to the cheese shop and choose varieties starting with the initials of our names. That was the first time I tried Havarti cheese. I liked it.

I'd rather eat cheese than chocolate. That's how serious my cheesaholism is.

Hubby started making cheese for a while but he hasn't done it in the last year or so. I've tried to wind him up to make some more but I might have to wait until he retires in a couple of years.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Joe_F
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 06:29 PM

Take us to your liederkranz.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jun 19 - 08:01 PM

Tread caerphilly, please...you don't want to lose your whey...


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mr Red
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 04:09 AM

I once bought 100gm of Stinking Bishop because of Wallace & Grommet, and because I live near to its home.


Well it does stink!


Boursin, though even that can be lived without

So does Boursin!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 04:52 AM

A few years ago I was trying out various soft rinded cheeses. There was one from France that tasted great but you couldn't keep in anywhere in the house, such was the rank, all-pervading pong. Fridge, outhouse cupboard, wrapped in polythene...nothing worked. I think it was pie d'Angloys though I could be mistaken...


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 09:57 AM

Cheese, glorious cheese... What is that song? Oliver, Kermit?


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: beardedbruce
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 10:59 AM

HARD CHEESE OF OLD ENGLAND
(Les Barker)

There's Cheddar and Cheshire and Lancashire too,
Leicester's bright orange and Stilton is blue.
It waxes so lyrical, what can you do but sing,

Oh the hard cheese of old England,
In old England very hard cheese.

Derby got green bits because of the sage,
And when it gets older its kept in a cage.
What does it hum when it reaches this age but,

They say double Gloucester is twicest as nice,
They say double Gloucester there, I've said it twice,
Its nice in potatoes but nicest in mice.

Those damn foreigners aren't worth a mention,
Old Gorgonzolas is renowned for it stenchen,
His brother Emil wrote novels in French and sing,

There's Swaledale and Wendslydale, Rutland to add,
Shropshire and Cornish you may not have had,
It's not bad on salads this ballad's not sad and sing,

My young love said to me my mother won't mind,
And my father once liked you for your lack of rind,
No cheese greater love for his food than mankind.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 02:35 PM

They say double Gloucester is twicest as nice,
They say double Gloucester there, I've said it twice,
Its nice in potatoes but nicest in mice.

...isn't that the one locals run/fall madly down a hill after, BB?


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: beardedbruce
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 02:59 PM

No idea- While I have been to Norway, spent the night in Germany, and 40 minutes in Denmark, I am the only one of my family to have never gotten to the UK.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 03:04 PM

It is indeed near Gloucester - wiki


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: beardedbruce
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 04:13 PM

Thank you for the link.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 05:30 PM

I like a good Cheddar but they are hard to find. Most is just "cooking cheese" as my Lancashire mother-in-law called it.
I found Cheshire and Wesleydale when I went to uni and used to buy them instead of sweets.
Creamy Lancashire is my favourite, particularly the black wax "bombs".
I was looking forward to trying some French cheeses when we went to Brittany for the first time, what a disappointment!

Robin


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Jun 19 - 06:08 PM

Well M&S sell Wookey Hole, Robin, £2.50 a lump. I don't think there's a better cheddar and I've tried a lot of the supposed elites. Now I don't usually speak up for mass-produced cheese, but Davidstow creamery (a fancy name for a cheese factory just up the road from me that looks like a Soviet gulag), which makes Cathedral City, turns out a very nice version of said cheese called Extra Mature. If you don't see those words on the wrapper, you haven't found it. It isn't half bad and it's brilliant for cheese on toast or to put in an omelette. Or just to eat.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 26 Jun 19 - 04:05 PM

All these years I have pronounced it Wendsleydale... Spell checker told me I was wrong.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 27 Jun 19 - 06:07 PM

And now I notice that I can't spell it either!

Robin


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 27 Jun 19 - 06:40 PM

A couple of the supermarkets here in England now have a "free from" range, and I find Tesco's vegan soft cheese very nice in a sandwich with lettuce, olives and tomato sauce. Coconut oil and soya replace milk. My poem "My Diet"


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 28 Jun 19 - 07:54 AM

I understand that M&S sell a three-year-old Cornish Cruncher that is highly regarded. I'll be in Hayle M&S in about half an hour so I shall avail myself of a hunk thereof. I'll let you know. By the way, it's scarily windy here today. Very useful for anyone who, whilst in company, can't stop the mselves from "cutting the cheese" (aka "floating an air biscuit" or "treading on a duck").


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mr Red
Date: 29 Jun 19 - 06:14 AM

...isn't that the one locals run/fall madly down a hill after, BB?

Yest but be only one, which would make it a single Gloucester.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: CupOfTea
Date: 30 Jun 19 - 11:39 AM

Spotted this thread just after last night's delightful dinner held in friends' lovely garden. My part of the feast included a cheese tray with a selection from the best cheese shop in tge West Side market. The hosts are very fond of cheese, have made cheese & sampled widely on travels to France & Ireland. I had to have Sage Darby because of Les Barker (having previously gone for some Doublr Glouster for the same reason, which pleased Judy Cook considerably), some "4-year Chedder" frim Quebec, a sheep milk chese from Italy, Ossau, another I think from Italy- Ubriaco, that had a crust of wine must that was WONDERFUL. At that point I'd maxed out my budget.

I've been surprised to find some very good cheeses at ALDI's. When I heard they were part of Trader Joes (or vice -versa) it explained the gift packs of interesting cheeses that included cranberry Wenslydale. Irish cheeses show up often, as well.

Leftover cheese for noshing on between dances today. A nice thing for a summer Sunday.

Joanne in Cleveland


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: David Carter (UK)
Date: 30 Jun 19 - 12:22 PM

ALDI in the UK have very passable Roquefort, Brie de Meaux, aged Gouda, Manchego, Gorgonzola, Fetta. To do much better you would have to order direct from continental suppliers. Tesco have a wider range at higher prices, Sainsbury not so much.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Raggytash
Date: 01 Jul 19 - 06:20 AM

I'd skip the Cranberry in Wensleydale Joanne it's bloody awful.

I am not a fan of adding anything to cheese, especially fruit. I can just about except chives in Double Gloucester at a push.

If you visit the Wensleydale Creamery in Hawes it's a joke. There's cheese with cranberries, apricot, ginger, mango, pineapple, spice, caramelised onions, balsamic onions, gin, beer and garlic (ugh).

I think there are other that are "seasonal" all spoiling what is basically a decent cheese.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Jul 19 - 07:11 AM

I heartily concur with that. I will not countenance cheese with added fruit. I understand that only cheese that is likely to turn out to be disappointing is treated in this way. So you're buying inferior cheese whose poor quality is masked by fruity bits. No thanks!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Jul 19 - 07:14 PM

I promised I'd be back with my thoughts on the much-vaunted three-year-old Cornish Cruncher from M&S. To be clear, it's the stuff in a gold wrapper, not the stuff in a black wrapper. It's £5.25 per hunk, but, to be fair, it's not a bad sized hunk. Still quite dear.

Well it does have that crunch, for sure. And it's nice cheese. But the overriding feeling is one of saltiness. I'm not getting that sort of lactic, cheesy tang that I thought I might expect from such an aged cheese. So the saltiness, probably needed to preserve the stuff for three years, seems excessive and not in harmony with the less assertive cheesy aspects. I won't be buying it again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 01 Jul 19 - 07:51 PM

Reminiscences: having discovered the delights of Reblochon cheese during a holiday on the French Alps (Savoie): we brought a whole one back home, which was then in Shropshire - by train and car, so quite a long journey. Although well-wrapped, and (unrefrigerated!) it made its presence known. You can now get it in the UK, but not then.

Then there was the local speciality in Asturias, Cabrales cheese: a blue cheese with a green wax coating. Totally delicious and often featured in sauces to go over meat dishes: I got the recipe for the sauce from the chef at our hotel: basically just cheese cream and brandy! Just had to bring some back, and they were very big cheeses, so we bought a quarter of a whole one: by then it was ferry from Santander to Plymouth and drive all the way back to Edinburgh! Anther smelly journey.

Agree about the Davidstow very mature cheddar, which we can get in Waitrose, and also the Cornish tickler, but ASDA have Devonshire Vintage Tickler, which is as good, and ALDI do a very good Scottish Vintage Cheddar (strength 6). And there are some other good regional "Cheddar" cheeses here in Scotland, from Islay, Mull of Kintyre, Orkney and Arran, as well as the oatmeal rolled soft cheese Caboc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Jul 19 - 08:34 PM

Well Mrs Steve and I were introduced to Cabrales by a lovely lady who ran a wine/tapas bar in Potes, in the Picos de Europa, in 1998. In those halcyon days you could wash down your tapas with a bottle of El Coto Rioja for three euros, or was it quids. She was so keen for us to try the queso that she wouldn't let us pay for it. It tasted magnificent, but I've never found the Cabrales on sale here to be anything like as alluring. Could be that it doesn't travel well.

To change tack, is there anything finer than a hunk of halloumi grilled on the barbie?


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 02 Jul 19 - 03:07 AM

I spotted Yorkshire squeaky cheese in Mossers the other day. I'm guessing a halloumi style but I didn't try it. I'll let you know if I do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Jul 19 - 02:32 PM

Why do some cheeses (swiss) change flavor a lot when melted, but others (cheddar) don't?


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Raggytash
Date: 03 Jul 19 - 05:39 PM

Halloumi...........ugh .............. tasteless, rubbery nonsense.

I wouldn't feed it to my cat!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 03 Jul 19 - 07:24 PM

Not seen Cabrales cheese on sale here, but even bringing it home was a bit of a disappointment: just like that amazing new shirt that looked so great on you in Spain, but now at home makes you just look ridiculous!
We stayed several times in Arenas de Cabrales, where our evening 3-course mesl cost 5 euros each, inclusive of 1/2 litre of wine each. That was late 90s too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 Jul 19 - 09:40 PM

We stayed three nights in Arenas in 1999 (or was it 1998...). I was that argumentative northerner who supped many a glass of Rioja...Did we cross paths? :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mr Red
Date: 04 Jul 19 - 01:02 PM

This week I was returning home on a long journey, on a hot day. Included in the luggage was a Brie - that was about 40% Camembert, which I had forgot.
Note to self don't buy French Brie from Sainsbury's. Mind you it is similar in the Auvergne - Brie is infra dig, Camembert fills the shelves.
Every time I stopped to photograph OS Benchmarks and got back in - the smell was vaguely , er , um , bodily. I politely turned up the fan to get some fresh air. My passenger probably had acclimatised and didn't realise, and I thought it was her!

Good job I didn't say anything.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 04 Jul 19 - 02:56 PM

Brie is notably taste free.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Jul 19 - 04:25 PM

Unless it's Sharpham's.


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 04 Jul 19 - 05:59 PM

"We stayed three nights in Arenas in 1999 (or was it 1998...). I was that argumentative northerner who supped many a glass of Rioja...Did we cross paths? :-)"
Aw, sadly (?) I think we missed you Steve! We were the ones with the Bolshie 15-year-old in tow - "No, you're too young to go to Majorca with your pals" - but he did in the end enjoy the holiday, even if he and his Dad left me miles behind on any walks we did!
And although this is a BS thread, have to mention the fab music that was played in the restaurant at breakfast: how often do you ever experience really nice music at breakfast - along with the orange-crushing machine? Proper wonderful Asturian music from Tejedor, as I found out when I enquired of the staff: took me another 2 years to get one of their CDs - when they eventually came to Glasgow's Celtic Connections as a support band!


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Subject: RE: BS: Cheesey reminiscences!
From: Mr Red
Date: 05 Jul 19 - 01:59 AM

Brie is notably taste free.

Not in Sainbury's or in the Auvergne! Camembert is an acquired taste and it produces an acquired smell from the digestion thereof. Give me Brie every time.

To those of us that science refers to as "supertasters" any strong taste is too much. We seek the calm haven that is subtle. And a good Brie is all of that.
FWIW taste perception varies with texture - it is all about expectation and the human brain. Anyone who can figure that is destined to be a millionaire.


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Mudcat time: 22 July 11:43 PM EDT

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