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Music links from Facebook, other sources

Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 19 - 12:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 19 - 10:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 19 - 10:57 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Aug 19 - 11:01 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Aug 19 - 10:27 AM
DaveRo 29 Aug 19 - 12:05 PM
r.padgett 29 Aug 19 - 02:24 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Aug 19 - 05:28 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Aug 19 - 05:34 PM
r.padgett 30 Aug 19 - 12:56 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Jan 20 - 10:57 AM
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Subject: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 12:56 PM

Too often people start discussions or share great resources and links on the Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/groups/mudcat/) but never take the trouble to post it here on Mudcat.org, the place where all of this stuff should be stored. That's why I'm in many ways not a fan of that Facebook page, too much material is lost over there, and Facebook benefits from all of the Mudcatter eyeballs that follow those links.

Some of these may not be visible to all people, they may be shared in groups or to friends, but anyone who shares those links here should try to find a way to post so the most people can see it.

In no particular order, here are some of posts that recently appeared there:

With Henry Hunt We'll Go - a Song About the Peterloo Massacre

Based on a song remembered from the singing of Harry Boardman. I use his chorus and tune (The Nutting Girl) but have reworked several broadsides of the time to tell the story of Peterloo in as few words as possible.

We sung this at Bodmin Folk Club on the 200th anniversary of the massacre.

Mary Humphreys - voice
Anahata - Anglo concertina
mics: vox Røde NT2A, concertina 2x Royer R-10

The Moron Brothers - Bluegrass

A review of Delia’s Gone: Murder Ballads & Other Songs of Love & Death by Marc Nerenberg

A review of Ian & Sylvia – The Lost Tapes

Mark Nerenberg - Nightmare Blues - stroke recovery video # 18 (how many Mudcatters have run threads talking about recovery from illness or injury?)

Kossoy Sisters - Express Checkout Line Catastrophe
The Kossoy Sisters (Irene Saletan and Ellen Christenson) sing a hilarious song about a supermarket catastrophe sparked by a woman with too many items in her cart in the express checkout lane. This is from the Sunday night concert at the FSGW (Folkmusic Society Of Greater Washington) Getaway concert 10-5-2008,


ZZ Top Documentary 1994 MTV ZZ Top Rockumentary - Bad and Nationwide

This are just going back five days. Several of them should be added to other threads on the topic, or be the anchor of new threads. Let's bring more eyeballs back to Mudcat and keep the content where it can be found again, not lost in the quagmire that is Facebook.


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 10:54 PM

Mike from Alaska is a long time Mudcat member. Back In The Clydesdale.

What a great song!


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 10:57 PM

This was shared on Facebook - why? It will disappear within a day.

Going and Staying

Thought this Howard Evans/Brass Monkey setting of Hardy’s poem a fitting way to finish—with a hint of optimism to finish!

lyrics
Going and Staying

The moving sun-shapes on the spray,
The sparkles where the brook was flowing
Pink faces, plightings, moonlit May
These were the things we wished would stay:
But they were going

Seasons of blankness as of snow,
The silent bleed of a world decaying
The moan of multitudes in woe
These were the things we wished would go
But they were staying

Then we looked closelier at time
And saw his ghostly arms revolving
To sweep off woeful things with prime
Things sinister with things sublime
Alike dissolving.

credits
from Losing Battles., track released May 18, 2019
Julia Taylor: lead vocal and english concertina


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Aug 19 - 11:01 PM

This isn't the kind of "announcement" we want to see on the Facebook page, this needs to be shared here for researchers to discover if they search for it. That means putting it in an appropriate thread and using some keywords on the description so it turns up in search results. In 2019 the book is for sale for $29.

The Big Red Songbook: 250+ IWW Songs!

From the site, this description:


In this book about the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World union, the editors have gathered songs, rare artwork, personal recollections, discographies, and more into one big all-embracing book.

Description:

In 1905, representatives from dozens of radical labor groups came together in Chicago to form One Big Union—the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), known as the Wobblies. The union was a big presence in the labor movement, leading strikes, walkouts, and rallies across the nation. And everywhere its members went, they sang.

Their songs were sung in mining camps and textile mills, hobo jungles and flop houses, and anywhere workers might be recruited to the Wobblies’ cause. The songs were published in a pocketsize tome called the Little Red Songbook, which was so successful that it’s been published continuously since 1909. In The Big Red Songbook, the editors have gathered songs from over three dozen editions, plus additional songs, rare artwork, personal recollections, discographies, and more into one big all-embracing book.

IWW poets/composers strove to nurture revolutionary consciousness. Each piece, whether topical, hortatory, elegiac, or comic served to educate, agitate, and emancipate workers. A handful of Wobbly numbers have become classics, still sung by labor groups and folk singers. They include Joe Hill’s sardonic “The Preacher and the Slave” (sometimes known by its famous phrase “Pie in the Sky”) and Ralph Chaplin’s “Solidarity Forever.” Songs lost or found, sacred or irreverent, touted or neglected, serious or zany, singable or not, are here. The Wobblies and their friends have been singing for a century. May this comprehensive gathering simultaneously celebrate past battles and chart future goals.

In addition to the 250+ songs, writings are included from Archie Green, Franklin Rosemont, David Roediger, Salvatore Salerno, Judy Branfman, Richard Brazier, James Connell, Carlos Cortez, Bill Friedland, Virginia Martin, Harry McClintock, Fred Thompson, Adam Machado, and many more.

Product Details:

Editors: Archie Green, David Roediger, Franklin Rosemont, and Salvatore Salerno • Foreword: Tom Morello • Afterword: Utah Phillips
Publisher: PM Press/Charles H. Kerr Library
ISBN: 978-1-62963-129-5
Published: 05/01/2016
Format: Paperback
Size: 8.5×5.5
Page count: 560
Subjects: Music-Lyrics/Labor History


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 10:27 AM

Again, a link posted on Mudcat with no context, but I know I've seen lots of discussion of Raglan Road on Mudcat itself. So share it there, don't just drop it into the void of Facebook.

https://youtu.be/CBLWkcaca0M Raglan Road


Wylde Meade
Published on May 12, 2018
Just two of us that evening - we always feel a bit naked when that happens - so used to our three-part harmony! But we always do our best to bring you a good show! :)

RAGLAN ROAD was first published as a poem written by Patrick Kavanaugh in The Irish Press on 3 October 1946 under the title "Dark Haired Miriam Ran Away". Later when Kavanaugh met Luke Kelly, it was set to the music from the traditional song "The Dawning of the Day" (Fáinne Geal an Lae) published by Edward Walsh 1847

Audio and images courtesy of Donn Mumma Photography, taken at the Revels Houston annual Spring Fundraiser and Pub Sing!


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: DaveRo
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 12:05 PM

I'm not a member of Facebook so I don't know what people see when they visit the Mudcat group, perhaps using a mobile app. But at the URL you posted - https://www.facebook.com/groups/mudcat/ - I see an 'about' text:
This page is for announcements, as an annex to the official Mudcat.org site that has been around since the mid-1990s. It was set up by and is owned by Max Spiegel, who has created a wonderful site… More
Do members see that every time they visit or post?

It reminded me of a usenet group charter, and that some groups used to post that monthly to remind people of the group's rules. So maybe someone could post a monthly charter to the group reminding people of the website and encouraging people to archive non-ephemera here. The announcement could probably be automated.

BTW, it says the group is public and that 'Anyone can [see] what [members] post.' But as a non-member I can't read people's comments - e.g the three comments under that Raglan Road post. Do those comments ever contain discussion about, say, the origins of a song?


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: r.padgett
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 02:24 PM

Yes I have to say I do post comments from mudcat to fb ~ I cannot remember doing the opposite way as I cannot delete mudcat postings ~although I am aware that some mudcat postings are deleted

Ray


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 05:28 PM

If you're not a member of Facebook then you're seeing the text that was put in place to describe the page contents. That remark is off to one side if you click on the "About" tab to learn more about why the page is there.

The trouble is that there are a lot of members who discovered the Facebook page through Facebook itself, they were vetted and added by administrators, but don't realize that while musical stuff is shared there and substantive discussions get good and quick responses, it all vanishes from sight and is of no use to the ACTUAL Mudcat site. It is, frankly, a very selfish way to get information - people ask and learn exactly what they want to learn and move on - and share none of back to Mudcat for everyone else who comes along later with the same interest.

So to repeat myself: Facebook gets a lot of eyeballs everyday and many of them are from Mudcat members, but Facebook gets all of the ad revenue and contributes very little to this site, except it's a place where current activities can be promoted and more people are likely to see it. When the important content of music history and chords and words and versions of songs and performance links and such are listed on Facebook it is gone within a few hours, no one the wiser most of the time. The important content needs to be preserved here at Mudcat.org.

/rant off/


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Aug 19 - 05:34 PM

If you look at the thick blue line above the reply to thread box, you'll see Share Thread: __ __ __ __ __ with the lines for the five boxes. You can share posts from Mudcat to Facebook and edit your Facebook post to add photos and such. That orange box lets you share out to your accounts on lots of other types of social media. Maybe it's time we all started practicing with those and share things OUT, not watch it all slide past in other forums without landing in the Mudcat database.


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: r.padgett
Date: 30 Aug 19 - 12:56 AM

A bit technical for me ~ sorry ~ I do credit any postings to fb from mudcat as the source so that anyone can post any necessary music related information ~ I think Jon Boden in his "Folk song a day" comments also makes reference to mudcat as the central body of information

Facebook tends to be more conversational than folk music historical
content

Ray


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Subject: RE: Music links from Facebook, other sources
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Jan 20 - 10:57 AM

Philly podcast ‘Music for the New Revolution’ spotlights today’s protest music
The sounds of change

This is one of many links posted at Facebook that really should be shared over here on the Mudcat mothership.

Posted January 14, 2020

After the 2016 election, shocked and dismayed musicians David Heitler-Klevans and Rodney Whittenberg immediately ruled out running for office, but they protested, held MoveOn.org events, and tried to figure out how to best use their talents for a good cause at home in Philly. Whittenberg thought a provocative podcast would be perfect, called Heitler-Klevans to collaborate, and Music for the New Revolution was born.

Heitler-Klevans (a guitarist and composer) and Whittenberg (an Emmy-winning composer and filmmaker) met one day while both were involved in musical events for local kids. Heitler-Klevans and his wife, Jenny, a percussionist, are well-known as the children’s-music duo Two of a Kind, with nine albums, a DVD, and 16 national awards in their creative lunchbox. Whittenberg owns the Plymouth Meeting-based MelodyVision, an audio, video, and music production company with a heavy slate of A-list corporate clients as well as hungry artists and struggling nonprofits. The age of Donald J. Trump was a catalyst for both of these artists to do something.


The rest of the article is at the link.


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