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Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down

Stewie 04 Jan 00 - 04:13 AM
harpgirl 04 Jan 00 - 10:05 AM
Pete peterson 04 Jan 00 - 11:32 AM
Jacob Bloom 04 Jan 00 - 12:44 PM
Barry Finn 04 Jan 00 - 05:38 PM
Jacob Bloom 04 Jan 00 - 05:56 PM
Barry Finn 04 Jan 00 - 06:08 PM
Stewie 04 Jan 00 - 07:44 PM
Stewie 04 Jan 00 - 08:05 PM
Barry Finn 04 Jan 00 - 08:43 PM
Stewie 04 Jan 00 - 08:55 PM
Stewie 05 Jan 00 - 03:00 AM
GUEST,Thomas 28 May 07 - 06:47 PM
Charley Noble 28 May 07 - 07:45 PM
GUEST,harpgirl 28 May 07 - 11:45 PM
Goose Gander 28 May 07 - 11:46 PM
Charley Noble 29 May 07 - 09:07 AM
EBarnacle 29 May 07 - 10:06 AM
Greg B 29 May 07 - 10:22 AM
GUEST,Lighter 29 May 07 - 12:26 PM
Goose Gander 29 May 07 - 01:02 PM
GUEST 30 May 07 - 03:59 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 May 07 - 05:21 PM
Goose Gander 19 Jun 07 - 12:03 PM
Goose Gander 19 Jun 07 - 12:19 PM
Lighter 19 Jun 07 - 06:24 PM
Goose Gander 19 Jun 07 - 06:32 PM
GUEST,harpgirl 19 Jun 07 - 07:08 PM
Lighter 20 Mar 11 - 09:55 PM
GUEST,Gerry Wales 17 Apr 11 - 05:59 PM
Gibb Sahib 10 Jul 13 - 01:24 AM
Lighter 10 Jul 13 - 07:48 AM
GUEST,James Stewart 10 Oct 15 - 06:48 PM
Steve Gardham 11 Oct 15 - 03:22 PM
GUEST,Ewan McVicar 12 Oct 15 - 02:25 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HOLD THE WOODPILE DOWN^^
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 04:13 AM

Here is my transcription of Uncle Dave Macon's version of 'Hold the Woodpile Down'. Though doubtless from the same root stock, it is quite different from the 'Roll the Woodpile Down' in the DT. Uncle Dave's is more of a fun song than a work song or shanty. Stan Hugill noted that the shanty originated in the black tradition, and Uncle Dave's song probably did as well - or was from the common stock of tunes and songs.

Here is my transcription of Uncle Dave Macon's version of 'Hold the Woodpile Down'.

HOLD THE WOODPILE DOWN

Saw my love the other night
Hold the woodpile down
Everything wrong, just a-nothing was right
Hold the woodpile down
She can make me lovely, can make me glad
Hold the woodpile down
I kissed her, till here come her dad
Hold the woodpile down

But I was travellin', travellin'
As long as the world goes around
Oh the black gals shine on the Georgia line
Oh hold the woodpile down

Come to town the other night
Hold the woodpile down
Heard a little noise and I see'd a little fight
Hold the woodpile down
Police watchin' and a-runnin' all around
Hold the woodpile down
Glory, white lightning done come to town
Hold the woodpile down

But he was travellin', travellin'
As long as the world goes around
Oh the black gals shine on the Georgia line
Oh hold the woodpile down

Boat keeper swallowed a nickel one day
Hold the woodpile down
Run him most crazy, I must say
Hold the woodpile down
Oh listen now and I'll tell you what it's about
Hold the woodpile down
He's a nickle in and and a nickle out
Hold the woodpile down

But he was travellin', travellin'
As long as the world goes around
Oh the black gals shine on the Georgia line
Oh hold the woodpile down

Down to the packing house, stoled a ham
Hold the woodpile down
Folks don't know how bad I am
Hold the woodpile down
Carried it home and I laid it on the shelf
Hold the woodpile down
Just so bad, I'm scared of myself
Hold the woodpile down

But I was travellin', travellin'
As long as the world goes around
Oh the black gal shine on the Georgia line
Oh hold the woodpile down

Love my wife, I love my baby
Hold the woodpile down
Love them biscuits a-broken in gravy
Hold the woodpile down
Carry my dice for to throw my passes
Hold the woodpile down
Love them flapjacks floating in molasses
Hold the woodpile down

But I was travellin', travellin'
As long as the world goes around
Oh the black gals shine on the Georgia line
Oh hold the woodpile down

Source: Uncle Dave Macon 'Hold the Woodpile Down' Recorded 7 May 1927. Reissued on Uncle Dave Macon 'Go Long Mule' County CO-CD-3505.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: harpgirl
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 10:05 AM

..some similarity to "Roll the Woodpile Down in the DT. What does this phrase and its derivative mean?...harpgirl


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Pete peterson
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 11:32 AM

I Don't KNOW what it means. John Cohen of the NLCR has speculated that it takes a lot of wood to keep a still running and that the original word was HAUL the woodpile down and that it's really a song about making moonshine. I hear the words somewhat differently from Stewie, and like his interpretations better than some of mine! The Holy Modal Rounders (who, thanks to a posting on Mudcat, I am going to get to see for the first time in some 30 years on Saturday) add some extra verses, one of which goes, more or less, Amanda, you're a crazy witch (Hold the woodpile down)
You make me want to jump and itch (H t W D)
You turn my brain into a fog (H t W D)
Oh, let me be your salty dog (H t W D)

I don't think it NEEDS to make sense.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Jacob Bloom
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 12:44 PM

My understanding was that the nautical version was "Row The Woodpile Down" - the "woodpile" was the ship, and this shanty was used when the ship was becalmed and the sailors were sent out in a rowboat with a cable tied to the ship, to give the ship some headway by rowing. I don't have an authoritative source for this, it's just something that a friend told me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Barry Finn
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 05:38 PM

Hugill mentions it may have come down river first which would sound logical for Jacbob's "Row The Woodpile Down" & then changing to Roll as in "One More Day", "Row (to roll) me cross the river". Hugill also mentions (p.364 Shanties of the 7 Seas) it may reference the woodpiles dotting the banks of the Mississippi used for the early paddle-steamers.
Hi Jacob, what you said about towing a ship in calm weather which was a tatic used by Old Ironsides off the coast of New Jersery & gave her enough of the sea room she needed to avoid being taken be 5 Ships of the Line but you can shoot me if I'd call her a woodpile.
Barry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Jacob Bloom
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 05:56 PM

Hi Barry,

I wouldn't call her a woodpile either - but if the crew of a working ship wanted to call her a woodpile, and the captain didn't mind, then I guess it would be their prerogative.

Jacob


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Barry Finn
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 06:08 PM

Hi Jacob if the captain put me below I'd probably have some choice words for him as well as the ship. Barry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 07:44 PM

The more one delves into the background of recordings of this song, the more curious it becomes.

Stan Hugill ('Shanties from the Seven Seas') noted (pp 160-161) that his 'Roll the Woodpile Down' was had from a West Indian seaman and 'it is fairly obvious that it originated in either the West Indies or the Southern States of America, most probably the latter, being, perhaps one of the many rivermen songs that reached deep water'. He commented also that it was 'the sea version of the Negro song "Haul the Woodpile Down"'. He went on to say that 'a Negro shore version starts':

Old Aunt Dinah had a farm
Way down in Florida
Old Aunt Dinah had a farm
Haul the woodpile down

In his note to 'Hold that wood pile down' on Uncle Dave Macon 'The Dixie Dewdrop' Vetco LP 101, Bob Hyland wrote:

This number done by Uncle Dave Macon and His Fruit Jar Drinkers, Uncle Dave, Sam and Kirk McGee and Mazy Todd, was probably worked up by Uncle Dave from an old work song. It tells of the excitement when word got out that 'a load of moonshine done come to town' during the dry days. The term 'hold the wood pile down' also appears in one of Fiddlin' John Carson's early Okeh records.

Note that the title is different from that transcribed above: it has 'that' instead of 'the' and 'wood pile' instead of 'woodpile'. Hyland also gives a different, and later, recording date of 7 July 1927, but gives no indication of the label or record number. Obviously, the Vetco is a second recording of the song. However, to my ears, it differs from the earlier version that I transcribed in one line only: 'A load of moonshine done come to town' instead of 'Glory, white lightning done come to town'. The Vetco version is exactly the same as that given on Uncle Dave Macon 'Same' RBF Records RF 51 - not surprisingly, since Bob Hyland was responsible for that compilation also, together with Joe Hickerson and Norman Tinsley. The RBF issue has no recording date, but its dateless discography of Uncle Dave gives the recording as Vocalion 5151 and gives no indication of any other recording of the song by Uncle Dave and His Fruit Jar Drinkers.

This is where things become quite curious. [And it was remiss of me not to indicate that the version that I transcribed also included Uncle Dave's Fruit Jar Drinkers - the McGees and Todd]. Pete Peterson referred in his posting above to the New Lost City Ramblers who recorded the song on 'New Lost City Ramblers Vol 3' Folkways LP FA 2398. Their title also is 'Hold That Wood Pile Down' and they give their source as 'Uncle Dave Macon - Vocalion 5151', but no recording date. Their version differs in significant respects from that sung by Uncle Dave on the RBF and Vetco LPs and identified on the RBF as Vocalion 5151. For example, they have in the first verse:

Gave her a little kiss to make her happy
Hold the wood pile down
(She)gave me a little lick and in came her pappy

Uncle Dave does not sing anything like that. They also sing 'For the backyard shine on the Georgia line' instead of 'Oh the black gals shine on the Georgia line', but that is perhaps for the sake of PC [but unusual bowdlerism for the NLCR]. They sing 'Police running and jumping all around' instead of 'Police watchin' and a-runnin' all around'. There are other minor textual changes such as 'sopped in gravy' and 'sopped in molasses'. I had 'a-broken in gravy', but listening carefully again, I believe it should be 'a-floating in gravy' and 'floating in molasses'. The NLCR sing 'storekeeper swallowed a nickel' and that is probably right. In both versions that I have, Uncle Dave whoops the word before 'keeper' and it sounded more like 'boat' to me - however, 'storekeeper' is more likely. Of course, the NLCR were quite at liberty to change all the lyrics if they so wished, but it is unlike them to have done that without so indicating. Were the changes deliberate or based on yet another Uncle Dave version [if so, their Vocalion 5151 reference is incorrect].

Does anyone have access to the bio-discography of Uncle Dave and associates issued by the John Edwards Memorial Foundation which might shed some light on how many times Uncle Dave recorded the song? I have no access to it unfortunately.

I suspect the Holy Modal Rounders verses mentioned by Pete above were simply added by Stampfel who freely admitted to making up verses to old songs because he couldn't be bothered learning the original words.

Sorry for rambling on, but this has sparked my curiosity.

Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 08:05 PM

Hi Barry, you posted your Hugill reference while I was working on my above long-winded posting. I must have an old edition of Hugill (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd, second impression (with corrections) 1966) because I can't find your reference on p364. Page 364 in my edition relates to 'Coal Black Rose'. Is there an updated edition that is readily available. It is interesting that the song caught the fancy of mariners and moonshiners alike.

Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Barry Finn
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 08:43 PM

Hi Stewie, Yup, my edition is 1994 published by Mystic Seaport Museum. You may find what I was refering to if you check out his comments on the song "One More Day". "Coal Black Rosie" is another powerhouse of a song from the Afro American sailor. Barry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Jan 00 - 08:55 PM

Many thanks, Barry. Found them at p491 of my edition.

Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Stewie
Date: 05 Jan 00 - 03:00 AM

I have done a little more research on this, but it has shed no light on the mysterious NLCR version. The Traditional Ballad Index quotes some of the lyrics of the NLCR version [and references Cohen/Seeger/Wood] of 'Hold the wood pile down' as its only offering, but gives no specific recording date apart from Uncle Dave Macon 'in the 1920s'. I would like to hear that version from Uncle Dave - if it exists. If it does not, it would make one wonder about people writing about song versions that they have not actually listened to. However, it has this interesting note about the cross-reference to 'Roll the woodpile down':

CROSS-REFERENCES: cf. "Roll the Woodpile Down" (chorus) Notes: This song is a conundrum. The verses are pure minstrel (Uncle Dave played minstrel shows in his youth), but the chorus is almost identical to that of "Roll the Woodpile Down", a chanty from African-American riverboat workers: "Rolling, rolling/Yes, rolling the whole world around/That brown gal of mine's down the Georgia line/And we'll roll the woodpile down." Other versions of "Hold the Woodpile Down" say, "Black gals shine on the Georgia line", which is closer to the chanty form. -PJS I'll admit that I would have classified this as a "Dave Macon-ised" version of "Roll the Woodpile Down" -- but Paul has probably examined the matter more than I have. - RBW

Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,Thomas
Date: 28 May 07 - 06:47 PM

My take on it is "hold the woodpile down" because you're too drunk to walk. With all the moonshine and bad luck (pappy bursting in, etc.) it seems like a drinking song to me.

The other research y'all have done here is very interesting and probably more accurate than my reading between the lines. In any event, it sure is a fun song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Charley Noble
Date: 28 May 07 - 07:45 PM

Another possibility with regard to interpreting a West Indies adaptation would be that "Roll the woodpile down" was used for launching a ship. See DEEP THE WATER, SHALLOW THE SHORE by Roger Abrahams. Typically the West Indies folks would lay out a set of logs as rollers and then haul on lines to "roll" the ship down into the water.

They would use similar shanties for rolling buildings from one place to another.

I don't understand "hold the woodpile" at all, except as a mis-hearing of "roll."

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,harpgirl
Date: 28 May 07 - 11:45 PM

I believe this is a "coonjine" song which thus implies it was a riverboat song sung to make the work of loading steamboats more efficient, less tedious, and as a balancing song while walking the planks. Now I guess I'll have to provide references.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Goose Gander
Date: 28 May 07 - 11:46 PM

A few more versions . . .

Hold the Woodpile Down as sung by Jerry Garcia.

Roll the Woodpile Down from the Digital Tradition.

Roll the Woodpile Down collected by Stan Hugill, arranged by Tom Lewis.

Roll the Woodpile Down as sung by Nola Johnston at the VFSS shanty workshop, Nov 30, 1988 - from Shanties and Sea Songs

Haul the Woodpile Down from American Folklife Center

From the Folk Music Index . . . .

Roll the Woodpile Down [Me II-Y 39]
Rt - Hold the/that Woodpile Down
Booger Hole Revival. Rollin' the Woodpile Down, No Nukes, LP (1979), trk# B.02
Clam Chowder. Clam Chowder Stewed, Clam Chowder, LP (197?), trk# B.05
Giles, Ian; Group. Sea Shanties, Gift of Music CCL CDG1024, CD (2004), trk# 21
Schneyer, Helen Bonchek. Ballads, Broadsides and Hymns, Folk Legacy FSI-050, LP (1974), trk# 7
Unknown Singer. Folk Songs of America. The Robert Winslow Gordon Collection...., Library of Congress AFS L68, LP (1978), trk# 1a [1923ca] (Haul the Wood Pile Down)
Webb, Bob. From Salthouse Dock. Shanties and Sailors Songs, Richmond Webb RWA 4112, Cas (1995), trk# A.11


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Charley Noble
Date: 29 May 07 - 09:07 AM

The above link to the American Folklife Center is interesting. "Haul" the woodpile down makes more sense then "hold" the woodpile down, if sense is important to such songs:

Yankee John with his sea boots on,
Haul the woodpile down.
Yankee John with his sea boots on,
Haul the woodpile down.
Way down in Florida,
Way down in Florida,
Way down in Florida,
Haul the woodpile down.

Although it's not much of a stretch to change from "hold" to "roll."

And reference should be made to the sister shanty "Roll the Cotton Down" which shifted from the stevadors to the high seas for work on the halliards, from CHANTEYING ABOARD AMERICAN SHIPS, by Frederick Pease Harlow, © 2004, pp. 144-145:

Were ever you down in Mobile Bay?
Roll the cotton down!
A-screwing cotton all the day,
Oh, roll the cotton, roll him down.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: EBarnacle
Date: 29 May 07 - 10:06 AM

If you look in most of the books which are more than just collections of songs, you will find that the minstrel/music hall tradition was a prime source of material for chanteys. Especially when the folk process worked on a piece it would be easy for songs to move in either direction. A recent example can be found in the several threads discussing "The Lion Sleeps Tonight."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Greg B
Date: 29 May 07 - 10:22 AM

Apparently the original lyric came from orders given up a
speaking tube. On steam vessels which were fired by wood,
the chief engineer would call an order up to the deck when
more wood was required to 'roll the wood pile down' below
so it could be used in the boilers.

Maybe 'hold the woodpile down' is a mondegreen. More than
one have been recorded.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 29 May 07 - 12:26 PM

If shanties were still in use as real work songs, not entertainment or re-enactment, the lyrics would undoubtedly be filled out with lines from current pop, rock, and rap songs.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Goose Gander
Date: 29 May 07 - 01:02 PM

According the Guthrie Meade's Country Music Sources, 'Haul the Woodpile Down' written by Edward Harrigan and Tony Hart in 1887.

'Haul the Woodpile Down' also was printed in Merchant's Gargling Oil Songster in 1890.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST
Date: 30 May 07 - 03:59 PM

Pardon my staying anonymous, but I have no wish to be thought racist by careless readers.

Both "hold" and "haul" the woodpile would be legitimate usages if they referred to the old "n----r in the woodpile" calumny. It was used to indicate something wrong somewhere. Often regarded as a slur on a (white) woman's reputation, that a black lover was a little too handy. Similar to "a black cat on the line," referring to telephone line, and dating to a recording by one of the black ministers of the time -- Rev J. M. Gates I think, though I can't be sure as my references aren't handy at the moment.

"Hold the woodpile down" -- if the black lover is concealed in it (either on his behalf, to keep him hidden, or to keep him from getting away), OR

"Haul the woodpile down: -- to find him inside it.

The Harrigan and Hart original might tip us off to the meaning that H&H in their colorful & comic stage personas may have assigned to it. But that isn't to say Macon, the unnamed Bay Area singer recorded by Robert Gordon, and other carriers of the minstrel / shanty versions may not have had their own divergent meaning(s) in mind.

I also suspect that H&H did not originate the phrase, but that it probably derived from earlier street usage.

Re steamboat usage, "Haul the woodpile down" sounds like a phrase used to indicate making speed -- as in, during one of the numerous riverboat races, to stuff the boiler as full as it will hold, get up more steam, and beat the other boat. But I have no special knowledge of this.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 May 07 - 05:21 PM

N- in the woodpile seemingly was first used by minstrels, D. Emmett, in 1843, but the quotation is "Nigger on a woodpile barkin like a dog." H. Nathan, biography of D. Emmett.
In 1847, "N- in de fence" entered the Dictionary of American Regional English. "N- in the woodpile" appeared in print in 1852 and continued to be used through the 1980's. Lighter, 1997, vol. 2, "Historical Dictionary of American Slang."

Guest I think is correct- To 'haul the woodpile down' means to put on speed (pile on the coal in RR language). 'Haul,' meaning to move, has long usage among sailors.
1805- "Then go! Your behavior is so unlike that of an officer's lady, that the sooner you brace up and haul aft the better." J. Davis, "Post-Captain" (Close to our more modern 'haul ass').
Quote also from Lighter.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HAUL THE WOOD-PILE DOWN
From: Goose Gander
Date: 19 Jun 07 - 12:03 PM

Here's the earliest text I have (1890 according to the Roud Index, though I can find no date on the songster). The first stanza suggests that "haul the wood-pile down" refers to fueling a steam engine. Though minstrelsy obviously is the direct source, perhaps it was derived from an earlier work song (or maybe the work song came from the minstrel song?).

(Apologies in advance for some of the lyrical content).

HAUL THE WOOD-PILE DOWN

De red cow brushing de old blue fly
Away down in Florida
De white man laugh when de coon go by
Now haul de wood-pile down
De steamboat ready to burn dat pine
Away down in Florida
De grape am ripe on de old black vine
Now haul de wood-pile down.

Den traveling, den traveling
As long as de moon am round
Dat black girl mine on de Georgia line
Now haul de wood-pile down.

De muskrat hide in de old burnt log
Away down in Florida
De chipmunk laugh at de old house dog
Now haul de wood-pile down
Dars Captain Jim of de old Bob Lee
Away down in Florida
He drinks more rum den he does hot tea
Now haul de wood-pile down

De old roof leaks and de rain comes thro'
Away down in Florida
De nig done die if he touch hoodoo
Now haul de wood-pile down
When I grow wear den I lay down
Away down in Florida
De wench looks sweet in a new clean gown
Now haul de wood-pile down.

"Published by permission of Wm. A. Pond & Co., owners of the copyright."

Source:
Merchant's Gargling Oil Songster (Buffalo, NY: G. H. Dunston, Lith., n.d.), p. 23.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Goose Gander
Date: 19 Jun 07 - 12:19 PM

"De steamboat ready to burn dat pine"

A little background on wood and coal-burning steam engines from steamboats.com


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Jun 07 - 06:24 PM

Here is a missing link, from Master Mariner W. E. Dexter's "Rope-Lines, Marline-Spikes and Tar" (1938). Dexter is recalling the 1890s:

"In an American ship, where we had some good chantey men, we adapted many...[supposed] negro plantation songs to our own use; one...stands out...." Dexter goes on to say, "I taught it to others later on.," and "chanteys...passed from ship to ship as the crews were dispersed.

"The red cow brushing the old blue fly,
Way down in Florida,
And the white gals laugh as the coon goes by,
And we'll haul the wood pile down.

"Chorus:

"Then trabelling, then trabelling,
As long as the moon am round,
This yellow girl is mine, on the Georgia Line,
And we'll haul the wood pile down.

"The words were nothing much, but it was a favourite with us, and could be used as a hauling chantey, without the chorus, or as one for the capstan."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Goose Gander
Date: 19 Jun 07 - 06:32 PM

Yes, that's a very clear missing link, as well as a straight-from-the-horse's-mouth description of how a folk/popular song became a worksong in a specific situation.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,harpgirl
Date: 19 Jun 07 - 07:08 PM

thanks, michael. Dan Emmett wrote some very interesting songs. There is even a festival about his work in Mount Vernon: Dan Emmett Festival

I've enjoyed this thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Lighter
Date: 20 Mar 11 - 09:55 PM

Goose Gander's text (almost precisely) appeared in Wehman's Collection of Songs No. 14 (N.Y., ca.1891), p. 14, with the note "Copyright 1887 by Wm. A. Pond & Co."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,Gerry Wales
Date: 17 Apr 11 - 05:59 PM

'Boat keeper swallowed a nickel one day' -
I think it's book-keeper (accountant etc) - he wouldn't want to be a nickel out. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Haul the Woodpile Down
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 01:24 AM

Hmm, I hope this has not already been posted.

A recording from 1894 (?) can be found HERE.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Lighter
Date: 10 Jul 13 - 07:48 AM

Terrific find, Gibb.

A minstrel song later used as a shanty. The words match the fragment I posted six years ago - including "the moon *am* round."

"Way down in Florida" had some use as a shanty chorus too.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,James Stewart
Date: 10 Oct 15 - 06:48 PM

I note in regard to this, and some other threads, that the reference to Florida in a shanty is reasonable because Pensacola, Florida was long a major sea port and naval base. One could pick up cotton in Pensacola as well as Mobile, only some ninety miles away. Depending on the antiquity of the song Florida might have included Mobile as the entire north gulf coast was once part of Florida and or Louisiana, depending on what maps you believe. Pensacola, unlike Tampa, which was also a fine port, but not a rail head.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 11 Oct 15 - 03:22 PM

Mudcat at its very best! well done, all! A 15 year gap between OP and most recent doesn't matter. We get there in the end.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Hold the Woodpile Down
From: GUEST,Ewan McVicar
Date: 12 Oct 15 - 02:25 PM

I agree with Steve. Several puzzles within Uncle Dave's version resolved into sense. Thank you to all.
Ewan


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