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BS: Nicknames

Donuel 15 Mar 20 - 05:13 PM
Steve Shaw 15 Mar 20 - 07:10 PM
Donuel 15 Mar 20 - 08:07 PM
Rapparee 15 Mar 20 - 10:15 PM
Senoufou 16 Mar 20 - 05:22 AM
Doug Chadwick 16 Mar 20 - 05:37 AM
Dave the Gnome 16 Mar 20 - 09:00 AM
Mrrzy 16 Mar 20 - 09:22 AM
Doug Chadwick 16 Mar 20 - 09:47 AM
meself 16 Mar 20 - 11:07 AM
Newport Boy 16 Mar 20 - 11:28 AM
Mr Red 16 Mar 20 - 11:29 AM
Dave the Gnome 16 Mar 20 - 03:14 PM
meself 16 Mar 20 - 03:15 PM
Donuel 16 Mar 20 - 03:18 PM
Senoufou 16 Mar 20 - 03:51 PM
Doug Chadwick 16 Mar 20 - 06:09 PM
Dave the Gnome 17 Mar 20 - 04:29 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 17 Mar 20 - 04:56 AM
Mr Red 17 Mar 20 - 05:22 AM
Dave the Gnome 17 Mar 20 - 05:44 AM
Raedwulf 17 Mar 20 - 10:46 AM
Newport Boy 17 Mar 20 - 10:52 AM
Dave the Gnome 17 Mar 20 - 11:04 AM
Steve Shaw 17 Mar 20 - 11:16 AM
Mr Red 17 Mar 20 - 12:45 PM
Donuel 17 Mar 20 - 01:39 PM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 17 Mar 20 - 06:32 PM
Raedwulf 18 Mar 20 - 04:28 AM
Ed T 20 Mar 20 - 10:16 PM
Gurney 20 Mar 20 - 11:12 PM
Phil Cooper 20 Mar 20 - 11:43 PM
Steve Shaw 21 Mar 20 - 07:25 AM
Doug Chadwick 21 Mar 20 - 07:56 AM
Senoufou 21 Mar 20 - 08:17 AM
Mr Red 21 Mar 20 - 09:20 AM
Steve Shaw 23 Mar 20 - 06:25 PM
robomatic 23 Mar 20 - 10:51 PM
Senoufou 24 Mar 20 - 04:54 AM
Dave the Gnome 24 Mar 20 - 05:29 AM
Mr Red 25 Mar 20 - 03:37 AM
Jim Carroll 25 Mar 20 - 04:06 AM

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Subject: BS: Nicknames
From: Donuel
Date: 15 Mar 20 - 05:13 PM

Before avatars were nicknames.

A nickname is a substitute for the proper name of a familiar person, place or thing. Commonly used to express affection, it is a form of endearment and amusement. In rarer cases, it can also used to express defamation of character, particularly by school bullies. As a concept, it is distinct from both pseudonym and stage name, and also from a title (for example, City of Fountains), although there may be overlap in these concepts. A hypocoristic is a nickname of affection between those in love or with a close emotional bond. "Moniker" is a synonym. From the Latin Nicuel, a derivative of the Greek Nikolaos (victory of the people), a compound name composed of the elements nike (victory) and uel (the people). The name was borne by St. Donuel, and was once called Hackpaw.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Mar 20 - 07:10 PM

I doubt whether the bloke we called "five holes," or the woman we called "seven cheeks," or the teacher we called "jelly belly" thought that we were expressing affection.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Donuel
Date: 15 Mar 20 - 08:07 PM

At work the Prez is known as the Cheeto.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Rapparee
Date: 15 Mar 20 - 10:15 PM

Long ago and far away our physical education teacher, Mr. Barrett, was known as "Mr. Bare Nuts."


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Senoufou
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 05:22 AM

I was known as 'Skinny Lizzie' (character in the Beano comic, a member of Lord Snooty's gang) because I was skeletally thin, with knock knees and also bandy legs. I didn't mind though - nearly everyone had a nickname in those days.
Later I got called 'The Galloping Hairpin' when I started horse-riding.
But for most of my life I've been known as Paddy, due to being half-Irish. (No, I haven't got a temper!) There was a TV show in the 1960s called 'The Rag Trade', and Miriam Karlin played a shop steward called Paddy. I think that's where the idea came from.

I rather wish I was slender enough these days to warrant a skinny nickname.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 05:37 AM

In rarer cases, it can also used to express defamation of character, particularly by school bullies.

Not so rare here on Mudcat, where people invent "clever" names for those whose politics they don't agree with. Ganging up like schoolyard bullies is also a feature.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 09:00 AM

Where's Nick when you need him? :-)

I have not noticed any such nicknames on here, Doug. Would you care to elaborate?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 09:22 AM

I was called "Marty Feldman eyes" in college... By one person. It did not spread. But I took it as affectionate.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 09:47 AM

I have not noticed any such nicknames on here, Doug. Would you care to elaborate?

It's difficult to give chapter and verse, Dave, when so many deletions have been made in the political threads. As these would normally be the most contentious posts, the insults will have disappeared with them. I normally lose interest when I reach such insults so I don't commit them to memory, but a couple that spring to mind are "abacus" for Diane Abbot and "magic grandad" for Jeremy Corbyn. There was also a reference to a Conservative MP, I forget who, as "cone head".

Without trawling back through past, closed threads, that's the best I can do for now.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: meself
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 11:07 AM

I'm getting long in the tooth - but I'm still hoping I'll go out one day and find that the world has given me a really cool nickname.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Newport Boy
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 11:28 AM

The Welsh are good at nicknames. A regular in The Vulcan in Cardiff (before it was sadly demolished) was called "Dai Eighteen Months". He hadn't served time (as far as I know) - he'd had half his ear bitten off in a fight!


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Mr Red
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 11:29 AM

meslf - did you not give yourself one, or should that be handle, mask, subriquet, tag, byname, diminutive of oneself/myself, appellation, or label?

I came across a beauty - Ian Duncan who was adjutant to Theresa May at one time and had to pick up the mess after negotiations failed. He was apparently referred to as Monsieur le Poop Scoop. That's Brexshit for you!


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 03:14 PM

Ah, ok. Got it, Doug. I thought you meant people giving other catters insulting nicknames. Thanks for the clarification.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: meself
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 03:15 PM

Nope - it's a mere nom de guerre.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Donuel
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 03:18 PM

One girlfriend nicknamed me for my kiss; Mushy


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Senoufou
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 03:51 PM

My husband has a nickname for me. It's 'Honky'.
And mine for him is ...er... 'Nigger Man'.
When he gets home from his work he bellows "'Ello 'Onky!" as he locks the car, and I shout back "Bonsoir mon Nigger Man!"
Our lovely neighbours (who are often outside unloading their two vans) grin every time, so luckily nobody seems to mind.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 16 Mar 20 - 06:09 PM

I thought you meant people giving other catters insulting nicknames.

I imagine that an insult was intended when "Has the goblin popped up for a troll?" was the response to one of your posts.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 04:29 AM

It probably was, Doug, but that is a rare occurrence perpetrated by one poster who then laughably goes on to complain about ad hominem attacks. It shows up the poster's lack of substance and, even as a gnome, I am big enough to ignore such nonsense :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 04:56 AM

Another good Welsh one that I heard was "Harry Glider". Also to do with ears, in this case large ones.

Robin


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Mr Red
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 05:22 AM

nom de guerre
hmmmm, nom de plume maybe or should that be nom de clavier?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 05:44 AM

I saved hundreds of lives as a volunteer firefighter but do they call me Dai the fireman? No

I single-handedly rescued the ship sinking in the harbour and saved the entire crew but do the call me Dai the lifeguard? No

But shag just one sheep...


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Raedwulf
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 10:46 AM

One thing you missed out about nicknames, Don (or got wrong if your "From the Latin Nicuel…" is intended to give the origin of the word). Originally they were eke-names, eke in the sense of something extra. There is a phenomenon in languages known as provection, which is the technical term in linguistics for the transferral of the final consonant from one word to the start of the next. Newt & nickname are two good examples. Originally, it was an ewt and an eke-name.

Although it's not technically provection, the opposite transferral also occurs. A napron & a nuncle, became an apron & an uncle. And such transferrals aren't unique to English. We got orange as orange from French / Italian, but originally it was norange!


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Newport Boy
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 10:52 AM

Still in South Wales, around 1914, the girl is school with my mother-in-law was called 'Bessie the shit' because her father collected the night soil and he was 'Will the shit'.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 11:04 AM

The vicar who lived in the flat over the shop.

Evans above.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 11:16 AM

True: a bloke with just one front tooth left (he lived in Pembrokeshire) was known as Dai Central Eating.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Mr Red
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 12:45 PM

And the funeral director was ............




Dai the Death?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Donuel
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 01:39 PM

What does one study to become grounded in Raedwulf's field?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 17 Mar 20 - 06:32 PM

I have been told that back in Shakespear's day butterflies were called flutter-bys. Anyone know if this is true.

I acquired my mudcat name as one of a series of wierd introductions from "Little Geoff" from Weston-Super-Mare.

The only other nickname that I know has been applied to me was "Hood" when I used to play darts.

Robin


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Raedwulf
Date: 18 Mar 20 - 04:28 AM

Don - you just have find words fascinating & looking them up irresistible! ;-)

Black belt - Nope, sorry. You'll find some very peculiar claims about the origins of butterfly on the net. And odd claims about the relationship to flutterby as well. Butterfly goes all the way back to A/S & there are similar forms in related languages such as Old Dutch. It really is simply butter + fly, the most likely explanation of origin being that several common species have creamy or yellow wings.

If Shakespeare referred to butterflies as anything else, the only other word I can think of as likely would be atomy which, related to atom, simply means any tiny creature (insect, almost certainly). But I would have thought butterflies were a bit big to be classed as an atomy. As for flutterby, I can't find any evidence of its first usage, nor that it's anything other than a simple play on the original word. Flutter, outside of its regular meaning, can refer to gambling of course, but there's also a meaning of indulging in sexual activity. Both usages date to the mid-19thC, so my guess would be that flutterby is no earlier than that at best.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Ed T
Date: 20 Mar 20 - 10:16 PM

Ok, all would-be parents be cautious about the names you give your children. A child in my adolescent neighbourhood, was given the name Lenus (last name Kelly). Any guesses as to what nick name that followed him throughout his life?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Gurney
Date: 20 Mar 20 - 11:12 PM

My only school nickname was Gurney, bestowed by a would-be bully. It was after a character in a BBC TV serial, a rather Asperger's character. In England the American usage to mean a stretcher carrier was unknown at that time. When I needed a name on this site.....
Elsewhere on-line it is Gurneytoo, because Gurney was taken.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Phil Cooper
Date: 20 Mar 20 - 11:43 PM

I had the nickname of Coop by some in high school. Others called my Ooperscoop from a gym teacher saying what's the scoop, Coop and it sort of caught on. In college I was sometimes referred to as Buzzer for some reason (this was a mid 70's). In grade school sometimes other kids would call me Cooper and other words that rhymed with Cooper. These days, I substitute teach and if I hear some kids do the rhyming thing, I just say that I've heard them all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 21 Mar 20 - 07:25 AM

During my teaching career I came across a girl called Theresa Green and one called Terri Bull. Some parents can't half be cruel.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 21 Mar 20 - 07:56 AM

At one place I used to work, there was someone called Cathy - full name: Catherine Weal. The ironic thing was that the person who pointed it out to me, and criticised her parents for their insensitivity, used his middle name of Ian. Although he always signed things as L.I. Ball, he didn't seem to notice anything odd when others addressed and labelled things with the name I. BALL.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Senoufou
Date: 21 Mar 20 - 08:17 AM

Over the years I've taught many pupils given ridiculous first names by their thoughtless parents.
Annette Kertin
Ophelia Balls
Mark Clark
Paul Small (these two boys were in the same class!)
and Mhairi Grubb in Glasgow. To my eternal shame I pronounced it 'Ma Hairy Grubb' to the utter delight of the class.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Mr Red
Date: 21 Mar 20 - 09:20 AM

I met a very nice chap (South African) called Harry Mirkin

a Merkin

And I still have the visiting card of Wayne K King (from NZ).


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 23 Mar 20 - 06:25 PM

There's just been a woman on the telly going on about home schooling in this time of trauma. Her name was Anita Bush. Mrs Steve wasn't amused when I asked if the woman was Brazilian...


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: robomatic
Date: 23 Mar 20 - 10:51 PM

We had a father and son known as "Bob One" and "Bob Two". When Bob the elder retired, the guys in the warehouse forever after just called the young one "Two!".


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Senoufou
Date: 24 Mar 20 - 04:54 AM

Hahahaaaa Steve! Good job she wasn't called Mhairi eh?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Mar 20 - 05:29 AM

Mr and Mrs Tupper. Are you sure you want to call your daughter Poppy?


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Mr Red
Date: 25 Mar 20 - 03:37 AM

DtG ha ha Tupper - how's that for a triple entendre

I was told, years ago, by a colleague about his neighbours who decided to adopt. And when the social worker told them a baby had been allocated and was coming soon they decided to call the kid Joy because it would bring them so much joy. At which the social worker pointed out Joy was not the best name for Mr & Mrs Rider.


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Subject: RE: BS: Nicknames
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 25 Mar 20 - 04:06 AM

A local 'character' around here was known as 'The Pounder' because of his somewhat pugilistic reputation
We were in the local bar one night when he came in and started chatting up an attractive young woman visitor
"They call me 'The Pounder' he said proudly
His neighbour, sitting a few stools away, down the bar cut in, "No - your father was 'The Pounder' - you're only the half-pounder'

Another local character was 'Timber Tony'
An American woman once asked him how hie got his name and, instead of replying, he took out a sharp penknife and began stabbing himself in the leg, which was wooden
Jim Carroll


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