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Lyr Add: The Lion's Den

DigiTrad:
LADY OF CARLISLE
THE LADY'S FAN


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: The Lady's Fan (9)
Why Is the Lady of Carlisle Speechless? (22)
Question about 'Lady of Carlisle' (18)


GUEST,Martin Ryan 25 Aug 20 - 11:16 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 25 Aug 20 - 11:21 AM
Steve Gardham 25 Aug 20 - 03:28 PM
Steve Gardham 25 Aug 20 - 03:30 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 25 Aug 20 - 05:03 PM
Richard Mellish 25 Aug 20 - 05:17 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: The Lion's Den
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 11:16 AM

I learned this song, as far as I recall, from Tony Holleran, a fine singer who ran a folk club in the Irish MIdlands for many years. There's a version in the recently published "A Living Voice: the Frank Harte Song Collection", which has an extra verse and some minor differences. As "The Lady of Carlisle", it was popular in the English revival, I understand - though I don't recall hearing it as such. There are also versions in European art music and poetry, I think.

The Lion’s Den

There were two brothers, two noble warriors
They fell in love with a lady gay
And for to win her they did endeavour
They tried to gain her both night and day

Now, one of them, he was a bold sea-captain
Commanded by brave Admiral Carr
While the other one, he was a First Lieutenant
On board the Tiger, man-of-war

The lady made a great resolution
That she would marry no man but he
Who would prove himself a brave man of honour
On the land and upon the sea

She ordered a coach for to be made ready
One morning early at the break of day
And with her two gallants rode o’er the mountains
Until she came where two towers lay

And when she came unto them towers
She threw her fan into the lions’ den
Saying “Whichever of you would win the lady
Must bring me back my fan again”

And then up spoke that bold sea-captain
And he was sore distressed in mind
“In battle I was ne’er thought a coward
And to kill my foes I was well inclined

But among these bears and these lions and tigers
I’m afraid my life would no ransom prove
So I’ll not venture my life in danger
Though I might never gain your love”

And then up spoke that First Lieutenant
In a voice like thunder both loud and shrill
Saying “I will venture my life in danger
All for to honour my true love’s will”

Then from his side he drew out his rapier
And two of them lions he did kill
When the others saw his manly bearing
Down at their conqueror’s feet they fell

Then he bent over, the fan to pickup
This noble warrior made no delay
While the lady in her coach was trembling
Lest he become the lions’ prey

But when she saw her bold hero coming
And that no harm to him was done
With open arms she did embrace him
Saying “Take the prize, love, that you have won.”

And it wasn’t long till the King got notice
That two of his lions, they had been slain
But he was not at all displeased
And gave him honour all for the same

He raised him from being a First Lieutenant
To being the Admiral of the Blue
And soon this lady and he were marries
Which shows us all what Love can do!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Lion's Den
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 11:21 AM

2nd last line should read "... were married...", of course. Please edit.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Lion's Den
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 03:28 PM

You're right, Martin, the story originated in France at the court of I think King Francis I (16th century) who kept a selection of big cats and used to pit them against each other as a court amusement. In the original there was only one officer, who retrieved the fan (not glove), and when he returned he threw it at her nose. Schiller wrote a version. The oldest English ballad I have is mid 18thc, 'The Distress'd lady, or The Trial of true Love', but later broadsides usually used the title The Bold Lieutenant. The full details are on another thread somewhere.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Lion's Den
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 03:30 PM

If it helps you're looking at Roud 396 or Laws O25.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Lion's Den
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 05:03 PM

Thanks, Steve.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: The Lion's Den
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 25 Aug 20 - 05:17 PM

Adam McNaughtan has a brilliant remake of The Lion's Den, with the protagonists a Glasgow man and an Edinburgh man.


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