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New musical terminology

Tattie Bogle 10 Oct 20 - 05:35 PM
leeneia 12 Oct 20 - 01:14 AM
GUEST,SqueezeMe 12 Oct 20 - 09:42 AM
fat B****rd 12 Oct 20 - 09:57 AM
leeneia 12 Oct 20 - 01:04 PM
G-Force 12 Oct 20 - 05:47 PM
G-Force 12 Oct 20 - 05:51 PM
Tattie Bogle 15 Oct 20 - 11:24 AM
Mo the caller 16 Oct 20 - 08:48 AM
PHJim 16 Oct 20 - 12:21 PM
leeneia 17 Oct 20 - 12:34 PM
Gordon Jackson 18 Oct 20 - 08:42 AM
leeneia 18 Oct 20 - 12:59 PM
Tattie Bogle 19 Oct 20 - 07:44 AM
leeneia 20 Oct 20 - 12:44 PM
GUEST,The Man from UNCOOL 20 Oct 20 - 12:50 PM
PHJim 20 Oct 20 - 11:07 PM
leeneia 21 Oct 20 - 02:21 PM
Tattie Bogle 21 Oct 20 - 06:33 PM
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Subject: Folklore: New Covid-age musical terminology
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 10 Oct 20 - 05:35 PM

Having had to study a bit of music theory and hence musical Italian terminology in the past, I do like a bit of "rubato" - very useful when playing slow airs or singing expressive songs, just for better phrasing and emphasis. Literally, it means "stolen time", but in practice means you stray from strict tempo.
In this world of music being done on Zoom sessions and Skype, a friend coined a new description for what happens when your internet connections slows you right down - then when it recovers, the next few notes or words come rattling out really fast. She called it "Zoombato" - love it!
Any other new words or phrases?


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: leeneia
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 01:14 AM

Not brand new, but it was new to me: outro, a few extra measures at the end of a song. Officially called a coda, but I've always thought coda was a stupid word. Sounds like a code of some sort.

The outro is the opposite of the intro.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: GUEST,SqueezeMe
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 09:42 AM

I first struck the word "outro" c/o "The Intro and the Outro" track from The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band, so it has been around since at least 1967. Still cracks me up whenever I hear it. The thought of Princess Anne on sousaphone, not to mention Roy Rogers on Trigger....but I digress.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: fat B****rd
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 09:57 AM

...Adolph Hitler on vibes :-)


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: leeneia
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 01:04 PM

I read a detective story recently whose main character was a young woman who wrote lyrics for rock music. She sometimes referred to music that had a "tiara." I think this is rock music's term for a descant. I like it.

I edit music at home to play with my friends, and I've decided to avoid Italian terms.   We don't speak Italian, so why bother? If it's largo, I write "very slow", and so forth.
======
Squeeze Me, thanks for the info. And what does c/o mean?


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: G-Force
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 05:47 PM

c/o usually means 'care of'. I think (s)he means c/w, i.e. 'coupled with'.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: G-Force
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 05:51 PM

Ignore my previous post, I've just read the earlier one properly.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 15 Oct 20 - 11:24 AM

Have certainly used outro during songwriting, and yes, it's been around a while, as has "middle eight" or "bridge".
I always thought if a descant as being a harmony that goes above the tune, tho one if my friends tends to use it to describe any harmony line. Tiara conveys it well!
And I guess the phenomenon I described in my OP, if happening on Skype, as it does regularly, called be called Skypato?


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: Mo the caller
Date: 16 Oct 20 - 08:48 AM

A term I've only heard recently, on Zoom choir rehearsals. 'Underlay'
I assume it means fitting the syllables of difference parts to the notes. He could be talking about the carpet though.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: PHJim
Date: 16 Oct 20 - 12:21 PM

A couple from Pete Seeger, if we interpret the word "New" very loosely, are "hammer-on" and "pull-off" which first appeared in his 1948 book, "How To Play The Five-String Banjo".


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: leeneia
Date: 17 Oct 20 - 12:34 PM

I consider 1948 new. I suppose that Italian terms for tempo and expression were started in the 1700's, so 1948 is new.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: Gordon Jackson
Date: 18 Oct 20 - 08:42 AM

I thhink of 'key' as quite new, as I usually think in terms of modes.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: leeneia
Date: 18 Oct 20 - 12:59 PM

Bass run and riff are new music terminology.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 19 Oct 20 - 07:44 AM

Or even bass walkdown? I use it a lot on the piano: very effective!


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: leeneia
Date: 20 Oct 20 - 12:44 PM

Yes, I think that would qualify.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: GUEST,The Man from UNCOOL
Date: 20 Oct 20 - 12:50 PM

"coda" means tail in Italian/Latin. In that sense, it's perfectly proper an maeningful. After all, as an Anglo-centric, there's no problem your using English in your musical terms. But music is an international 'language', so it's got to be in SOMEone's, to be understood universally. Just learn it! You're on here because you adapted to Bill Gates' / Steve Job's imposing their terminology on you, which you learned (and, I sorta guess, derived SOME benefit from, or why are you here?), so just apply the same to the folks of long ago who were fine with using Italian as a lingua franca.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: PHJim
Date: 20 Oct 20 - 11:07 PM

How long have "slash chords" been around?

"m7b5" is sometimes called "half diminished".

Double stops with only a root and a 5 are called "power chords". That sounds relatively new.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: leeneia
Date: 21 Oct 20 - 02:21 PM

Guest, I am here because I love music and like people.

PHJim, I agree "power chords" seems new. So does "half diminished." I dunno about slash chords.


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Subject: RE: New musical terminology
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 21 Oct 20 - 06:33 PM

Slash chords are so much beloved by guitarists and piano accordionists. I can never remember which way round they go - and neither sometimes, I think can they! Is it bass note first/chord or the other way about. If in doubt, I just busk it (on piano!)


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