Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Folklore: city that sank into the sea

GUEST,Big Al Whittle 03 Nov 20 - 11:46 AM
GUEST,leeneia 03 Nov 20 - 12:41 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 03 Nov 20 - 03:53 PM
Jack Campin 10 Nov 20 - 04:40 AM
rich-joy 20 Nov 20 - 08:15 PM
leeneia 21 Nov 20 - 12:39 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: RE: Folklore: city that sank into the sea
From: GUEST,Big Al Whittle
Date: 03 Nov 20 - 11:46 AM

https://www.cornwalls.co.uk/myths-legends/lyonnesse.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyonesse
Thanks Derrick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: city that sank into the sea
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 03 Nov 20 - 12:41 PM

It's interesting that there are so many of these tales. We are always reading that a people's myths are not mere fantasies, that they reflect deep beliefs. In this case, they reflect deep fear of the sea. And that's logical. The sea has great capacity for destruction.

I'm trying to think of modern-day equivalents. Of course, our fears are cloaked in pseudoscience and pseudosophistication, we having rejected fantasy as a basis for decisions. So many people are buying bottled water when city water is just as good or better. Why?

Gotta go. Any thoughts?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: city that sank into the sea
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 03 Nov 20 - 03:53 PM

Leeneia: We are always reading that a people's myths are not mere fantasies, that they reflect deep beliefs. In this case, they reflect deep fear of the sea. And that's logical. The sea has great capacity for destruction.

michaelr: The two words seem to be from different root languages, according to a quick search. I've seen the Skellig islands from the west coast of Kerry; they are quite a sight.

Rocks & shoals have been scary things for so long it's hard to say which word is describing what.

Old school Catholics didn't believe in “water rites” or consecrated burials at sea. No rest for the eternal soul and no benefits for the widows and orphans. Deliberate stranding at low tide was a form of capital punishment. Davy Jones Locker-v-Fiddler's Green.

Etymology
The term skerry is derived from the Old Norse sker, which means a rock in the sea (which in turn derives from the Proto-Indo-European root sker-, "cut", in the sense of a rock cut off from the land). The Old Norse term sker was brought into the English language via the Scots language word spelled skerrie or skerry. It is a cognate of the Scandinavian languages' words for skerry – Icelandic, Faroese: sker, Danish: skær, Swedish: skär, Norwegian: skjær / skjer, found also in German: Schäre, Finnish: kari, Estonian: skäär, Latvian: šera, Lithuanian: Šcheras and Russian: ????? (shkhery). In Scottish Gaelic, it appears as sgeir, e.g. Sula Sgeir, in Irish as sceir, in Welsh as sgeri, and in Manx as skeyr.” [Skerry]


scare (v.)
1590s, alteration of Middle English skerren (c. 1200), from Old Norse skirra "to frighten; to shrink from, shun; to prevent, avert," related to skjarr "timid, shy, afraid of," of unknown origin. In Scottish also skair, skar, and in dialectal English skeer, skear, which seems to preserve the older pronunciation. To scare up "procure, obtain" is first recorded 1846, American English, from notion of rousing game from cover. Related: Scared; scaring.

"scare (n.)
something that frightens; sudden panic, sudden terror inspired by a trifling cause, false alarm," 1520s, alteration of Middle English sker "fear, dread" (c. 1400), from scare (v.). Scare tactic attested from 1948.”
[https://www.etymonline.com/word/scare]


No cities, bells or songs, just a sailor's tall tale: Hy-Brasil or Porcupine Bank depending on the particular ice age.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: city that sank into the sea
From: Jack Campin
Date: 10 Nov 20 - 04:40 AM

Any Mexican songs about Bermeja?

https://www.spacedaily.com/2006/090211185744.8z1tpwk3.html


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: city that sank into the sea
From: rich-joy
Date: 20 Nov 20 - 08:15 PM

Just came across this YT British Pathe clip from 1967 about the flooding of old JINDABYNE, a town in SE x NSW, Australia, dating from the 1840s, which was flooded (but rebuilt higher up) for Lake Jindabyne and Dam, as part of the Snowy Mountains Scheme. Much was saved, but all the big old trees were cut down and the army blew up the bridge.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLoUO4PYV_0

Apparently at very low water levels, the Catholic church foundations can still be seen .... and Rolf Harris had a 1972 lullaby about the old town under the lake, that I'd never heard before : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncAD-3_nwLQ

Plus there was this song (Jindabine Farewell), from The Settlers (the folk group who were Snowy Mtn Scheme workers) :   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIvbeDsk8_Q


R-J


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: city that sank into the sea
From: leeneia
Date: 21 Nov 20 - 12:39 AM

Thanks for the info, Rich-joy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 16 January 1:07 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.