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Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English

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Ideas for Mudcat Singaround 2nd Birthday-June 6 (33)


Joe Offer 21 Nov 22 - 09:05 PM
Monique 21 Nov 22 - 02:18 PM
Monique 14 Nov 22 - 02:13 PM
Monique 07 Nov 22 - 05:04 AM
Monique 07 Nov 22 - 04:05 AM
Monique 31 Oct 22 - 02:25 PM
Felipa 26 Oct 22 - 05:49 PM
Felipa 20 Oct 22 - 05:33 PM
Monique 18 Oct 22 - 01:24 PM
Felipa 17 Oct 22 - 06:29 PM
Monique 17 Oct 22 - 02:21 PM
Monique 10 Oct 22 - 05:52 PM
leeneia 10 Oct 22 - 04:22 PM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Joe Offer
Date: 21 Nov 22 - 09:05 PM

I sang "Somos el Barco" by Lorre Wyatt. It has a chorus that's half in Spanish. It has Spanish verses, but I haven't learned them yet.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 21 Nov 22 - 02:18 PM

QUE SE NOS VA LA PASCUA (Spanish) (1582)
Luis de Góngora y Argote (1561-1627) / Paco Ibañez (1934 - )
(Only verses 1, 4, 5 and 6 are sung)

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!


1 Mozuelas las de mi barrio,
Loquillas y confiadas,
Mirad no os engañe el tiempo,
La edad y la confianza.
No os dejéis lisonjear
De la juventud lozana,
Porque de caducas flores
Teje el tiempo sus guirnaldas.

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!


2 Vuelan los ligeros años,
Y con presurosas alas
Nos roban, como harpías,
Nuestras sabrosas viandas.
La flor de la maravilla
Esta verdad nos declara,
Porque le hurta la tarde
Lo que le dio la mañana.

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!


3 Mirad que cuando pensáis
Que hacen la señal del alba
Las campanas de la vida,
Es la queda, y os desarman
De vuestro color y lustre,
De vuestro donaire y gracia,
Y quedáis todas perdidas
Por mayores de la marca.

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!


4 Yo sé de una buena vieja
Que fue un tiempo rubia y zarca,
Y que al presente le cuesta
Harto caro el ver su cara,
Porque su bruñida frente
Y sus mejillas se hallan
Más que roquete de obispo
Encogidas y arrugadas.

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!


5 Y sé de otra buena vieja,
Que un diente que le quedaba
Se lo dejó este otro día
Sepultado en unas natas,
Y con lágrimas le dice:
«Diente mío de mi alma,
Yo sé cuándo fuiste perla,
Aunque ahora no sois caña.»

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!


6 Por eso, mozuelas locas,
Antes que la edad avara
El rubio cabello de oro
Convierta en luciente plata,
Quered cuando sois queridas,
Amad cuando sois amadas,
Mirad, bobas, que detrás
Se pinta la ocasión calva.

¡Que se nos va la Pascua, mozas,
Que se nos va la Pascua!
EASTER IS LEAVING US, GIRLS
(or "Our Easter is leaving")


Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!


Girls from my neighborhood,
Fool and confident,
Take heed that time, age and confidence
Do not deceive you.
Do not let yourself be flattered
By the glowing youth,
Because of faded flowers
Time weaves its garlands.

Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!


The light years fly,
And with swift wings
They steal from us, like harpies,
Our tasty food.
The "flower of wonder"*
This truth tells us,
Because the afternoon steals from it
What the morning gave to it.

Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!


See that when you think
That the bells of life
Make the dawn signal,
It is the curfew, and they disarm you
Of your color and glory,
Of your elegance and grace,
And you are all at lost
For being beyond the line**.

Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!


I know of a good old woman
Who once was blonde and blue eyed,
And to whom it costs very much
To see her own face,
Because her shiny forehead
And her cheeks are,
More than a bishop's rock,
Shrunken and wrinkled.

Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!


And I know of another good old woman,
Who had one tooth left
She left it, this other day,
Buried in some cream,
And with tears she says:
«Tooth of my very soul,
I know when you were a pearl,
Although now you are nothing.»

Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!


That's why, crazy girls,
Before the greedy age
Turns the blond hair of gold
Into shining silver,
Like when you are liked,
Love when you are loved,
Look out, fools, for after,
Your opportunities will be lost***.

Easter is leaving us, girls,
Easter is leaving us!
* probably marygold
** to be now too old
*** lit. "Look out, fools, for behind / the occasion is painted bald", refering to the Greek god or Roman goddess "Occasion", that is Kairos, represented with hair on the front but with the back of the head bald, meaning that once you've let him/her pass, you have nothing to grab him/her. Hence the "grab the opportunities while you still can".

Recordings by Paco Ibáñez (1964 + 2008)
Recording by Isabel Parra

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 14 Nov 22 - 02:13 PM

LAS FIELAIRAS

Aval a la ribièra
I a una rica meison
Dedins son tres fielairas
Que fielan tot lo jorn.

Una s'apela Joana
E l'autra Marion,
L'autra s'apela Clara
Esclaira nèit e jorn.

Sa maire la penchena
D'un penche d'argenton,
E son paire la còfa
D'una auna de galon.

Quand ela se miralha
Dins l'aiga de la font,
Un aucelon se pausa
Per li far una orason.

Lo filh del rei passava
L'a trobada a la font,
"Digatz, bèla fielaira,
Aquò's vos Janeton?

-Nani, ma sòr ainada
S'apela d'aquel nom,
Se cercatz una amiga
Dintraz dins la meison.
THE SPINNERS

Down there, near the river
There's a rich house.
Inside are three spinners
Who spin all day long.

One is called Joan,
And the other Marion,
The other one is called Claire
She illuminates/shines* night and day.

Her mother combs her
With a silver comb,
And her father covers her head
With an ell of braid.

When she looks at herself
In the water of the spring,
A little bird sits
To tell her a prayer.

The king's son passed by,
He found her at the spring,
"Say, beautiful spinner,
Are you Janeton?"

"No, my elder sister
Is called this name,
If you're looking for a sweetheart,
Enter the house.

*Pun between "Clara" (Claire = clear, bright…) and "esclaira" (to light up, illuminate, shine….), both having the same "clar…" Latin root.

Recording by Gofannon
Recording by Rosina de Pèira
Recording by Flour de Rose (which means "River Rhône Flower" and is not related with roses whatsoever!)
Live rendition by a young Amaïa

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 07 Nov 22 - 05:04 AM

Last Monday, Maria sang "Red Samhain", 1st track of Башня Rowan's "Пчеловечность (Phumanity) album (2002)
КРАСНЫЙ САМАЙН (Russian)

Где же я тогда была?
Как жила все это время?
Наступили дни мои
на стеклянную траву.

Ворох листьев наотрез
разлетелся между теми,
кто уверен, что они
знают правду обо мне
сквозь листву,

что осыпалась тогда
с ослепительной рябины,
и с березы у окна,
и у клена над ручьем.

Ярким пламенем огня,
языком неугасимым
шорох листьев не молчит
над моею головой
каждым днем.

Где и краски, как не здесь?
Где и сгинуть, как не в осень!
На начало ноября
души листьев над землей.

Не коснется их зима -
вихри листьев вдаль уносят
всех, метнувшихся в костер,
всех, вступивших в хоровод,
оставляя золой.

В вихре пламени листвы,
в огнерыжем лисьем танце,
в вечных странствиях листа,
в буром, рдяном, золотом,
осеняя по пути
крыши, башни, колыбели,..

Когда буду улетать,
на прощание махну тебе крылом.
RED SAMHAIN

Where was I then?
How have I been living all this time?
My days have come
On the glass grass.

A pile of leaves
scattered amongst those
who are sure that they
know the truth about me
Through the leaves,

that fell then
from the dazzling rowan tree,
and the birch tree by the window,
And the maple tree over the brook.

The bright flame of fire,
the unquenchable tongue
The rustling of the leaves is not silent
above my head
and every day.

Where is there no paint if not here?
Where to die but in autumn!
For the beginning of November
Souls of leaves above the earth.

No winter touches them.
The whirlwinds of leaves take away
Of all those who dashed into the fire
all who have joined the circle,
Leaving ashes behind.

In a whirlwind of flaming leaves,
in the fiery dance of the fox,
in the eternal wanderings of the leaf,
in brown, ruddy, gold,
and the leaves, in brown, bark and gold.
roofs, towers, cradles...

When I fly away,
I'll wave goodbye to you.
(Translated by Deepl)
I don't speak any Slavic language so I rely on online translators. I found this one better than the one by Google but if someone does speak Russian and can make a better translation, please pm me and I'll fix this one.
Thanks!

Live rendition by Тикки Шельен (Tikki Shelyen)
Recording by Башня Rowan (Rowan Tower)
Live rendition by Tauran

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 07 Nov 22 - 04:05 AM

Last Monday Patty Clink and Joe Offer sang Du, du liegst mir im Herzen".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 31 Oct 22 - 02:25 PM

VOCES DABA UN MARINERO
(Spanish)

Voces daba un marinero
que el agua se le llevaba,
le ha respondido el demonio
al otro lado del agua:

- ¿Qué me darías, marinero,
si la vida te salvara?
- Te daré mis tres navíos,
cargados de oro y de plata.

- Yo no quiero tus navíos,
ni tu oro, ni tu plata.
- Yo te daré mis tres hijas
y mi mujer por esclava.

- Yo no quiero tus tres hijas,
ni tu mujer por esclava,
que quiero que cuando mueras,
a mí me entregues el alma.

-El alma la entrego a Dios,
el cuerpo a la mar salada.
y el corazón que me queda
a la Virgen Soberana.

Y el marinero daba voces
y nadie le contestaba.
THE SAILOR WAS SCREAMING OUT


The sailor was screaming out
That the water was taking him away,
The Devil answered him
From the other side of the water:

"What would you give me, sailor,
If I saved your life?"
"I'll give you my three ships
Loaded with gold and silver."

"I don't want your ships,
Neither your gold nor your silver."
"I'll give you my three daughters
And my wife as a slave."

"I don't want your three daughters
Nor you wife as a slave,
I want that when you die
You give your soul to me."

"My soul I give to God,
My body to the salty sea,
And whatever heart I still have
To the Sovereign Virgin.

And the sailor was screaming out
And nobody was answering.
Recording by Joaquín Díaz


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Felipa
Date: 26 Oct 22 - 05:49 PM

This week I sang a song in Irish Gaelic, Thíos Cois na Trá Domh
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=99906
and Linn Phipps sang a song in Scottish Gaelic, 'Illean Bithibh Sunndach
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=171812


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Subject: translation of Flicka från Backafall
From: Felipa
Date: 20 Oct 22 - 05:33 PM

translation as given by the singer in the chat column on last Monday's zoom singaround

Flicka från Backafall (Girl from Backafall)
        
        Girl from Backafall, the brig Three Brothers
        is cruising tonight in the Caribbean Sea
        While a land wind from the coast to the south
        caresses like the Sound back home around the island.
        The air is spiced with a thousand perfumes
        but I would abandon them, every one,
        toward being allowed to wander among Backafall's mallows
        - all while the moon keeps watch over Hven.
        
        Do not wait for me in the summer Ellen;
        then I shall still sail the line in the North.
        But when you stand by the church in the evening
        then think I'm a fllitting insect
        which without leave annoys your temple
        and - while you flick with your small hands -
        peeks down under the neck of your blouse
        - all while the moon shines on the mallows.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 18 Oct 22 - 01:24 PM

You can find the lyrics to Flicka från Backafall in this pdf or this page or this one and some others if you put "Flicka från Backafall, briggen Tre Bröder" in a search engine. You can also find a score here. I couldn't find a translation but an online translator might give you an idea (IMO it's better to try several of them...)

Excerpt from the 1953 movie including the song. The lyrics are below the video.
Recording by Tommy Körberg"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Felipa
Date: 17 Oct 22 - 06:29 PM

Sung in Irish Gaelic earlier this month
Oró 'S é do Bheatha Bhaile
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=38159

Mo Ghille Mear
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7161

Tonight both Jerry O'Neill and I sang Douglas Hyde's Irish language translation of The Castle of Dromore. Caislean Droim an Óir. That song is already in the thread index, having been sung last Oct. And Ann Coleman sang a song in Scottish Gaelic, Breisleach https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=171776

Jim Lucas sang a Swedish song,Flicka från Backafall (girl from Backafall), text by Gabriel Jönsson, tune by Gunnar Turesson


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 17 Oct 22 - 02:21 PM

QU'ALLAIS-TU FAIRE À LA FONTAINE (French)

[Mari]. Qu'allais-tu faire à la fontaine
Corbleu*, Marion
Qu'allais-tu faire à la fontaine ?
[Femme] -J'étais allée quérir de l'eau mon Dieu, mon ami.
J'étais allée quérir de l'eau.

[M] -Mais qui est-ce donc qui te parlait ?
[F] -C'était la fille de not' voisine.

[M] -Les femmes ne portent pas d' culottes** !
[F] -C'était sa jupe entortillée.

[M] -Les femmes ne portent pas d'épée !
[F] -C'était son fuseau qui pendait.

[M] -Les femmes ne portent pas d' moustaches !
[F] -C'étaient des mûres qu'elle mangeait.

[M] -Le mois de mai n'a pas de mûres !
[F] -C'était une branche d'automne.

[M] -Va m'en quérir une assiettée
[F] -Les oiseaux les ont toutes mangées !

[M] -Alors, je te coup'rai la tête
[F] -Alors, que ferez-vous du reste ?

[M] -Je le jett'rai par la fenêtre
[F] -Adroite et souple je saurai être.

[M] -Vite, sans crier, fais ta prière
[F] -Mettrez au moins mes os en terre ?

[M] -Pour une fois je te pardonne
[F] -Pour une fois et pour bien d'autres.
WHAT DID YOU GO AT THE FOUNTAIN FOR?

[Husband] "What did you go at the fountain for?
Zounds, Marion!
What did you go at the fountain for?"
[Wife] "I'd gone to fetch some water. My God, my dear!
I'd gone to fetch some water."

[H] "But who was speaking to you?"
[W] "It was our neighbor's daughter."

[H] "Women don't wear pants."
[W] "It was her wrapped skirt."

[H] "Women don't carry a sword."
[W] "It was her spindle that was hanging."

[H] "Women don't have a moustache."
[W] "It was blackberries she was eating."

[H] "The month of May has no blackberries"
[W] "It was an autumn branch."

[H] "Go fetch me a plateful."
[W] "The birds have eaten them all."

[H] "Then I'll cut your head off!"
[W] "And then, what will you do with the rest?"

[H] "I'll throw it through the window!"
[W] "I'll know how to be handy and supple!"

[H] "Quick, without crying, say your prayer!"
[W] "Will you at least bury my bones?"

[H] "For once, I forgive you."
[W] "For once and many other times."

*"Corbleu" was an euphemism for "Corps de Dieu" (God's body)
**"culotte" used to mean "men's pants/breeches" while nowadays it means women's panties

This song is said to be from the 17th century. Eugène Rolland (1846-1909) collected some more in several areas in France in at least 3 languages (= more than 3 dialects!) in his Recueil de chansons populaires, 2 (1883) -with scores.

Here is an Occitan version of the song
LAS REVIRADAS DE MARION (Occitan)

[Òme] Ont èras tu tantòst anada?
Per Diu! Sanc Diu!Còrblu!* Marion!
Ont èras tu tantòst anada?
[Femna]-Al jardin culir d'ensalada.
Jèsus! Mon Diu! Jèsus! Mon amic!
Al jardin culir d'ensalada.

[Ò] -Qual es que te fasiá companha?
[F]- Èra ben lèu ma sòr l'ainada.

[Ò] -Las femnas pòrtan pas de bragas.
[F] -Éra sa farda retroçada

[Ò] -Las femnas pòrtan pas d'espasa.
[F] -Es sa conolha que fialava.

[Ò] -Las femnas pòrtan pas mostachas.
[F] -Éra d'amoras que minjava

[Ò] -D'amoras n'i a pas per gelada.
[F] -Éran de l'annada passada.

[Ò] -Vai te'n me'n quèrre una assietada.
[F] -Los aucelons las an minjadas

[Ò] -Tu n'es una garça provada!
[F] -Non! La soi pas encara estada.

[Ò] -E ieu te coparai la crèsta!
[F] -E puèi que faràs tu del reste?

[Ò] -Lo jetarai per la fenèstra!
[F] -Los aucelons ne faràn fèsta!
MARION'S RIPOSTES

[Husband] "Where did you go lately?
By God! Damnit! Zounds! Marion!
Where did you go lately?"
[Wife] "To the garden to pick salad.
Jesus! My God! Jesus! My dear!
To the garden to pick salad."

[H] "Who kept you company?"
[W] "It was maybe my elder sister."

[H] "Women don't wear pants."
[W] "It was her rolled-up skirt."

[H] "Women don't carry a sword."
[W] "It was the distaff she was spinning."

[H] "Women don't have a moustache."
[W] "It was blackberries she was eating."

[H] "There's no blackberries when there's frost."
[W] "They were from last year."

[H] "Go fetch me a plateful."
[W] "The little birds have eaten them."

[H] "You're a proven bitch!"
[W] "No! I'm not one yet!"

[H] "I'll cut your crest off!"
[W] "And then, what will you do with the rest?"

[H] "I'll throw it through the window!"
[W] "The little birds will have a feast!"
*Per Diu = "by God", "Sanc Diu" "[by] God's blood", "Còrblu", from the French "Corbleu" euphemism for "Corps de Dieu" ([by] God's body). Cf. the French "Palsambleu, corbleu…" in which "bleu" replaces "Dieu".

There are different tunes to this song though the lyrics are more or less the same.
There are also French versions such as the one above

Louis Lambert (1835-1908) collected a few versions in his "Chants et chansons populaires du Languedoc, 2" (1906) -with scores.

Recording of a slightly different version by Laüsa, a Gascon band + its live rendition
Here is a live rendition of another version by the late Jean-Marie and Odette Vidalenc.
Another one by the late Henriette Durand.

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 10 Oct 22 - 05:52 PM

Oh yes it does! Have a look at these versions on "Pan-Hispanic Ballad Project" by the University of Washington. In many versions the wife says "Kill me as I deserve it" and the husband does kill her -usually by stabbing her. He sometimes stabs her without "her permission"!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: leeneia
Date: 10 Oct 22 - 04:22 PM

Hi, Monique. When I heard you sing this song, with its jaunty melody and its jaunt "que que que," I knew I had heard it somewhere else. Finally it came to me - it's on an album of French Canadian music I have had for many years.

I think the last verse doesn't really belong. It's too mean for the rest of the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 10 Oct 22 - 02:23 PM

LA ESPOSA INFIEL (Spanish)

Estaba una señorita sentadita en su balcón,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
sentadita en su balcón.

Esperando que pasara el segundo batallón,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
el segundo batallón.

Pasó por allí un soldado de muy mala condición,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
de muy mala condición.

- Suba, suba, caballero, dormirá una noche o dos,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
dormirá una noche o dos.

Mi marido está de caza en los montes de León,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
en los montes de León.

Y para que no regrese, le echaré una maldición,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
le echaré una maldición.

Que se caiga del caballo y muera sin confesión,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
y muera sin confesión.

Estando en estas palabras, el maridito llamó,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
el maridito llamó:

- Ábreme la puerta luna, ábreme la puerta sol,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
ábreme la puerta sol.

Que te traigo un conejito de los montes de León,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
de los montes de León.

Bajaba por la escalera, cambiadita de color,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
cambiadita de color.

Al entrar en el portal, el marido preguntó,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
el marido preguntó:

¿De quién es aquella capa que en mi percha veo yo,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
que en mi percha veo yo?

- Tuya, tuya, maridito, que te la he comprado yo,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
que te la he comprado yo.

- ¿De quién es aquel sombrero que en mi percha veo yo,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
que en mi percha veo yo?

- Tuyo, tuyo, maridito, que te lo he comprado yo,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
que te lo he comprado yo.

Se fueron para la cama, y una cabeza encontró,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
y una cabeza encontró.

- ¿De quién es esa cabeza que en mi cama veo yo,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
que en mi cama veo yo?

- Del niño de la vecina que en mis brazos se durmió,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
que en mis brazos se durmió.

- Caramba con el chiquillo, tiene barba como yo,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
tiene barba como yo.

Le cogió por la cabeza, le tiró por el balcón,
que que con el oritín, que que con el oritón
le tiró por el balcón.
THE UNFAITHFULL WIFE

There was a young lady sitting on her balcony,
with the oritin, with the oriton*
sitting on her balcony.

Waiting for the second battalion to pass…



A soldier passed by there, in very poor condition…



"Come up, come up, sir, you'll sleep a night or two…



My husband is hunting in the mountains of Leon…



And so that he doesn't come back, I'll put a curse on him…



Let him fall from his horse and die without confession…"



As she was saying these words, the hubby called…



"Open the door for me, [my] moon, open the door for me, [my] sun…



I bring you a bunny from the mountains of Leon…"



She went down the stairs, with her complexion changed…



Entering the door, the husband asked…



"Whose cape is that, that I see on my hanger…?"



"Yours, yours, hubby, I bought it for you…"



"Whose hat is that, that I see on my hanger…?"



"Yours, yours, hubby, I bought it for you…"



They went towards the bed, and he found a head…



"Whose head is that, that I see in my bed…?"



"To the neighbor's child who fell asleep in my arms…"



"Oh, what a little boy, he has a beard like me…"



He grabbed her** by the head, [he] threw her** off the balcony…
*This has no meaning.
**There's no way to know for sure if it's "her" or "him" as "le" can be either in Spanish. In other versions, the husband throws her ("la") off the balcony but in others he grabs "le" by the moustache, so it can only be the lover.

This is a version of an anonymous ballad from the 1500's. It's also known as "Blanca Niña", "Albaniña"... It was first published in "Tercera Parte de la Silva de Romances", Zaragoza, 1551. You can read the original version of this ballad in "Primavera y flor de romances ó Colección de los más viejos y más populares romances castellanos", vol. 2, by Ferdinand Wolf, Berlin, 1856, where the source is mentioned.
You can also read it in Antología de poetas líricos castellanos: desde la formación del idioma hasta nuestros días vol. 3, by Marcelino Menéndez y Pelayo, Madrid, 1900

You can find 126 versions of this ballad in Spanish, Catalan and Portuguese on Pan-Hispanic Ballad Project, University of Washington.
I find that this version lacks a 4th line in which the soldier tells her he'd like to sleep with her, which better explain "Come up, come up, sir, you'll sleep a night or two".
I find some versions kind of funny as the husband takes his wife to give her back to her father but the father gives him some "Now-it's-not-my-business" answer and in others versions he kills her but dies an hour later and the lover "as a scoundrel, remained in bed". All that for this!

Recording by Joaquín Díaz

A different tune and slightly different lyrics recorded by Candeal

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 26 Sep 22 - 02:20 PM

MAIULIN (Italian)

Maiulin bela Maiulin – (Maiulin)
dove l'hai messo quel bambino che avevi
oi mamma della mia oi mamma l'ho gettato in peschiera.

Figlia mia parla più pian- (parla più pian-)
parla più piano che nessuno ti senta
ti sente la giustizia che ti viene a prendere.

Mentre faceva quei discorsin -(quei discorsin)
si sente dare un colpettino alla porta
la bella Maiulin l'è casca in terra morta.

Puoi l'hanno presa, l'hanno legà- (l'hanno legà-)
l'hanno legata con catene sicure
la bella Maiulin-a l'è in prigioni oscure.

Mamma mia, portèm del pàn, (portèm del pan)
portèm del pane e del'acqua ben fresca
l'aria della prigione mi fa male alla testa".

Oi mamma mia mandeme un bà- (mandeme un bà-)
mandeme un bacio sopra alle catene
che chi ha peccato ha da scontà alle pene
mandeme un bacio sopra alle catene
che chi ha peccato ha da scontà alle pene.
MAIULIN

Maiulin, beautiful Maiulin – (chorus) Maiulin
Where have you put this baby you had
oh mamma, oh mamma I threw him in the fishpond.

Daughter, speak lower -(speak lower)
Speak lower so that nobody can hear you
The justice hears you, who comes to take you away.

While she was doing these little speeches (these little speeches)
A tiny knock on the door could (lit. "can") be heard
The beautiful Maiulin fell dead on the floor.

Then they took her, they tied her (they tied her)
They tied her with secure chains
The beautiful Maiulina is in a dark jail.

"Mamma, bring me bread, (bring me bread)
Bring me bread and very cool water
The air of the jail gives me a headache".

Oh mamma, send me a kiss (send me a kiss)
Send me a kiss over the chains
For who has sinned must serve their sentence
Send me a kiss over the chains
For who has sinned must serve their sentence.
*Maiulin/Maiulina is a pet name for Mary.

Recording by Alberto Cesa e Cantovivo
Recording by Almanacco popolare
Recording by Nadia Gabi E Le Due Nel Cappello

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 19 Sep 22 - 02:22 PM

L’Escriveta - Occitan ballad, aka "L’Escribòta", "Flurança" / "Florença", "Ne maridan Liseta"... There are several versions of it in Occitan. You’ll get a version, a long bibliography where the song can be found and a study in "Le romancéro populaire de la France; choix de chansons populaires françaises: textes critiques par George Doncieux, avec un avant-propos et un index musical par Julien Tiersot"
You’ll find several versions (lyrics and score) in "Romania Vol.15". Both books are in French.
The Piedmontese version is 'L Moru Sarazin’ (among other spellings). Constatino Nigra collected some versions that you’ll find in Canti popolari del Piemonte -in Italian
There’s at least one Catalan version of it.
There's at least one longer Occitan version that I'll post later.
L'ESCRIVETA (Occitan)

Guilhaume se marida Guilhaume tan polit
La pren tan joveneta que se sap pas vestir

Lo sèr la desabilha, l'abilha lo matin
E la balha a sa maire per la i far noirir.

Guilhaume part en guèrra per la daissar grandir
Al cap de sèt annadas, es tornat al païs.

S'en va tustar a sa pòrta: "Escriveta, durbis!"
Sa maire a la fenèstra respon: "N'es plus aicí.

Los Moros te l'an presa, los Moros Sarrasins.
- Trobarai Escriveta quand sauriái de morir!"

Rencontra de lavairas, lavavan linge fin
"Digatz, digatz, lavairas, qu'es lo castèl d'aicí?

- Es lo castèl del Moro, del Moro Sarrasin.
- Cossí que se pòt faire per i dintrar, cossí?

- Abilhatz-vos en fòrma de paure pelegrin
Demandaretz l'almoina tot lo long del camin."

Tot en fasent l'almoina, reconeis son marit
"Dintratz dins l'escuriera, selatz lo bèl rossin!

Ieu monti dins ma cambra, de serga me vestir."
E del còfre del Moro, prenguèt l'aur lo plus fin.

"Escriveta es partida, delial de pelegrin!
De tot l’aur que n'empòrta, fariá la mar lusir!

Sèt ans ieu l'ai noirida de bon pan, de bon vin,
Sèt raubas l'i ai crompadas, de seda, de satin.

- Se sèt ans l'as noirida, al diable, Sarrasin!
Èra la mia femneta, la flor de mon païs."
L'ESCRIVETA

Guilhaume (William) gets married, Guilhaume so handsome,
He takes her so young than she can't get dressed.

In the evening, he undresses her, he dresses her in the morning
And he gives her to his mother to get her fed.

Guilhaume goes to war to allow her to grow up,
After seven years, he's come back home

He knocks on the door, "Escriveta, open up!"
His mother answers, "She's no longer here.

The Moors took her away from you, the Saracen Moors."
"I will find Escriveta, even if I should die!"

He runs into washerwomen washing fine laundry,
"Tell me, tell me, washerwomen, what's this castle?"

"It's the Moor's castle, the Saracen Moor's."
"How can I enter it, how?"

"Dress up as a poor pilgrim,
You'll beg for alms along the way."

While giving alms, she recognizes her husband,
"Get into the stable, saddle the fine russet horse.

I go up to my bedroom to dress with serge."
And from the Moor's coffer, she took the finest gold.

"Escriveta has left, disloyal pilgrim!
With all the gold he takes away, the sea would shine!

Seven years I fed her with good bread and good wine,
Seven dresses I bought to her, [made] of silk, of satin."

"If you've fed her for seven years, to hell with you Saracen!
She was my little wife, the flower of my land."
Recording by the late Alberto Cesa

A different tune and slightly different lyrics by Los Mourres de Porcs

A medley of both Provençal (L'escriveta) and Piedmontese (Il Moru Sarasin) versions by Dona Bela

A Piedmontese version by Cantovivo

A different version audio only

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 13 Sep 22 - 02:56 AM

Yesterday, as Mudcat was down, I couldn't copy and paste the lyrics and translation of the song I meant to sing as I usually do, so I sang something else. It reads here that it's a traditional kids song.
We have it on Mama Lisa's World where you'll find a midi and a sheet music along with the lyrics and this very English translation -and a French and a Spanish one if you switch to these languages on the site.
PAPETA CALHAU (Occitan)

I aviá un cat e un chin (x2)
Que fasián la terralha
Traulala, Papeta Calhau
I aviá un cat e un chin
Que fasián la terralha

I aviá una mosca al plafond (x2)
Que s'espetava de rire
Traulala, Papeta Calhau…

Tombèt de la muralha
Se copèt las doas cuèissas…

Lo lendeman matin
La menèrem a l'ospici…

Lo suslendeman matin
La retrobèrem mòrta…

Lo jorn de l'enterrament
Faguèrem una panta de rire…

I aviá per capelan
Un chin vestit de negre…

I aviá per enfants de còr
Dos cats vestits de roge…

I aviá per corbilhard
La carreta de Lazari…

I aviá per carretièr
Denis vestit en mosca

Sortiguent del cementèri
Rescontrèrem una nòça

Aquí lo dòl passat
De la paura mosqueta…

Nos metèrem a dançar
Al mitan de la carrièra…
GRANDPA STONE

There were a cat and a dog (x2)
Who were washing the dishes
Trawlala, Grandpa Stone
There were a cat and a dog
Who were washing the dishes

There was a fly on the ceiling (x2)
Who was laughing his head off
Trawlala, Grandpa Stone…

He fell down from the wall
He broke his two thighs…

The next morning
We brought him to the hospital…

The morning after
We found him dead…

On the day of the burial
We had a lot of fun…

There was as a priest
A dog dressed in black…

There were as altar boys
Two cats dressed in red…

There was as a hearse
Lazarus' cart…

There was as a driver
Dennis dressed up as a fly.

When going out from the churchyard
We came across a wedding.

When the poor fly's mourning
Was over

We started to dance
In the middle of the street…
Recording by Aqueles -a band from around here who have a Sète accent where they pronounce the final stressless "a" as /a/ instead of the usual Languedoc /ɔ/.
Recording by Gérard Franco that you'll also find at the 1st link at the top.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 13 Sep 22 - 02:16 AM

Damn! I hadn't checked and there's already a Mudcat thread about its origin where you'll find other Mudcat threads links but now it's too late and here is my stuff anyway!

On Monday 09/05, Barrie Mathers sang…
SCHÖN IS DER MORGEN
Traditional/Gerd Koethe, Roland Heck

Schön ist der Morgen
Schau aus dem Fenster
Ganz neu geboren
Schenkt er den Tag
Nimm ihn und freu dich
Danke und denke
Wieder kommt für mich ein neuer Tag!

Schön ist der Morgen
Singen die Lärchen
Was nützen Sorgen
Schenk sie der Nacht
Nimm dir ein Beispiel
Und sei zufrieden
Oft willst du zu viel?
Frag dich warum!

Schön ist der Morgen
Fang wieder neu an!
Gestern und Sorgen
Alt und vorbei!
Danke und denke
Die Welt kann schön sein?
Darum verschenke nie deinen Tag!

Schön ist der Morgen
Schau aus dem Fenster
Ganz neu geboren
Schenkt er den Tag
Nimm ihn und freu dich
Danke und denke
Wieder kommt für mich ein neuer Tag!
THE MORNING IS BEAUTIFUL
(Literal translation)

The morning is beautiful
Look out of the window
Brand new born
It gives the day [as a gift]
Take it and be happy
Thank and think
Another day is coming for me again!

The morning is beautiful
Sing the larches.
What's the use of worrying?
Give them to the night
Take an example
And be content
Do you often want too much?
Ask yourself why!

The morning is beautiful
Start again anew!
Yesterday and worries
Old and gone!
Thank and think
The world can be beautiful?
So never give your day away!

The morning is beautiful
Look out of the window
Brand new born
It gives the day [as a gift]
Take it and be happy
Give thanks and think
Another day is coming for me!
Verses 2 & 3 by Art Garfunkel Jr.

Schön ist der Morgen
Singen die Lerchen
Ganz ohne Sorgen
Freu'n sie sich nur
Nimm dir ein Beispiel
Sei mehr zufrieden
Oft willst du zu viel
Frag' mal, warum

Schön ist der Morgen
Sonne und Regen
Du bist geborgen
Solang du glaubst
Kommen und gehen
Können die Stunden
Alles verstehen
Kann der Mensch nie


The morning is beautiful
Sing the larks
Without any worries
Just being happy
Take an example
Be more satisfied
You often want too much
Ask yourself why

The morning is beautiful
Sun and rain
You are safe
As long as you believe
Come and go
Can the hours (the hours may come and go)
Understand everything
Man never can
ORIGINAL VERSION
Traditional/Eleanor Farjeon

Morning has broken like the first morning
Blackbird has spoken like the first bird
Praise for the singing
Praise for the morning
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word

Sweet the rain's new fall, sunlit from heaven
Like the first dew fall on the first grass
Praise for the sweetness of the wet garden
Sprung in completeness where His feet pass

Mine is the sunlight
Mine is the morning
Born of the One Light Eden saw play
Praise with elation, praise every morning
God's recreation of the new day

Morning has broken like the first morning
Blackbird has spoken like the first bird
Praise for the singing
Praise for the morning
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word


"Morning Has Broken is a Christian hymn first published in 1931. It has words by English author Eleanor Farjeon and was inspired by the village of Alfriston in East Sussex, then set to a traditional Scottish Gaelic tune, "Bunessan". It is often sung in children's services and in funeral services
Bunessan is a hymn tune based on a Scottish folk melody, first associated with the Christmas carol "Child in the Manger" and later and more commonly with "Morning Has Broken". It is named for the village of Bunessan in the Ross of Mull. -From Wikipedia


Cat Steven's version:

Morning has broken like the first morning,
Blackbird has spoken like the first bird.
Praise for the singing! Praise for the morning!
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word.

Sweet the rain's new fall sunlit from heaven,
Like the first dewfall on the first grass.
Praise for the sweetness of the wet garden,
sprung in completeness where God's feet pass.

Mine is the sunlight! Mine is the morning
Born of the one light Eden saw play!
Praise with elation, praise every morning,
God's recreation of the new day!


Recording in German by Nana Mouscouri
Recording in German by Art Garfunkel Jr

Recording in English by Cat Stevens

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 05 Sep 22 - 01:51 PM

BRAVE MARIN (French)

Brave marin revient de guerre,
Tout doux,
Brave marin revient de guerre,
Tout doux,
Tout mal chaussé, tout mal vêtu :
"Pauvre marin, d'où reviens-tu ?
Tout doux.

- Madame, je reviens de guerre,
Tout doux,
- Madame, je reviens de guerre,
Tout doux,
- Que l’on apporte du vin blanc
Que le marin boit en passant !"
Tout doux.

Brave marin se mit à boire,
Tout doux,
Brave marin se mit à boire,
Tout doux,
Se mit à boire et à chanter
Et la belle hôtesse à pleurer,
Tout doux.

" Ah ! dites-moi, la belle hôtesse,
Tout doux,
Ah ! dites-moi, la belle hôtesse,
Tout doux,
Regrettez-vous votre vin blanc
Que le marin boit en passant ?
Tout doux.

- C'est pas mon vin que je regrette,
Tout doux,
C'est pas mon vin que je regrette,
Tout doux,
Mais c'est la mort de mon mari,
Monsieur, vous ressemblez à lui !"
Tout doux.

- Ah ! dites-moi, la belle hôtesse,
Tout doux,
Ah ! dites-moi, la belle hôtesse,
Tout doux,
Vous aviez de lui trois enfants.
En voici quatre à présent !
Tout doux.

- J'ai tant reçu de tristes lettres,
Tout doux,
- J'ai tant reçu de tristes lettres,
Tout doux,
Qu'il était mort et enterré,
Que je me suis remariée."
Tout doux.

Brave marin vida son verre,
Tout doux,
Brave marin vida son verre,
Tout doux,
Sans dire un mot, tout en pleurant
Il regagna son bâtiment.
Tout doux.
GOOD SAILOR

Good sailor comes back from war,
Softly,
Good sailor comes back from war,
Softly,
Very ill shoed, very ill dressed,
"Good sailor, whence do you come back?"
Softly,

"Madam, I'm coming back from war,
Softly,
Madam, I'm coming back from war,
Softly,
Let some white wine been brought
That the sailor will drink passing by!"
Softly,

Good sailor started to drink,
Softly,
Good sailor started to drink,
Softly,
Started to drink and to sing,
The beautiful hostess [started] to weep,
Softly,

"Ah, tell me, beautiful hostess,"
Softly,
"Ah, tell me, beautiful hostess,"
Softly,
"Do you regret your white wine
That the sailor drinks when passing by?"
Softly,

"It's not my wine I regret,"
Softly,
"It's not my wine I regret,"
Softly,
But it's my husband's death,
Sir, you look like him!"
Softly,

"Ah, tell me, beautiful hostess,"
Softly,
"Ah, tell me, beautiful hostess,"
Softly,
You had three children by him,
Here are four of them now."
Softly,

"I received so many sad letters,"
Softly,
"I received so many sad letters,"
Softly,
"That he was dead and buried,
So I married again".
Softly,

Good sailor emptied his glass,
Softly,
Good sailor emptied his glass,
Softly,
Without saying a word, while crying
He went back to his ship.
Softly.
In France the sailor is very seldom a soldier but some versions do exist about a soldier (my mom used to sing one). The lyrics are the same but for "soldat" instead of "marin" and "régiment" instead of "bâtiment" at the very end.
In Canada the sailor is always a soldier. Here are several versions collected in Canada. In these versions, the soldier gets angry at the end, sometimes so angry that he kills wife and children.

Recording by Nana Mouscouri

Live rendition by Guy Béart

YouTube Brave marin page

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 05 Sep 22 - 01:40 PM

Dilmana Dilbero: Here are the lyrics, the transliteration and an English translation. Please note that I don't speak Bulgarian so if the person who sang it has a better translation, please pm me. Thanks.

ДИЛМАНО, ДИЛБЕРО (Bulgarian)

Дилмано дилберо, Дилмано дилберо
кажи ми как се сади пиперо (x2)

Да цъфти да върже, да цъфти да върже
да береш береш береш как сакаш (x2)

Помуни го побуцни го, помуни го побуцни го
та така се сади сади пиперо (x2)
BEAUTIFUL DILMANA

"Beautiful Dilmana, beautiful Dilmana
Tell me how to plant peppers? (x2)

So that they bloom, they bind,
And I can have as much as I wish? (x2)"

"Push them deep, push them deep,
It's how you plant the peppers."

Transliteration:

Dilmano dilbero, Dilmano dilbero
kazhi mi kak se sadi pipero (x2)

Da tsufti da vurzhe, da tsufti da vurzhe
da beresh beresh beresh kak sakash (x2)

Pomuni go pobutsni go, pomuni go pobutsni go
ta taka se sadi sadi pipero (x2)

Bulgarian lyrics with a transliteration, French and English translations on Tous aux Balkans website

Live rendition here.
Dilmano dilbero YouTube page

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 05 Sep 22 - 01:14 PM

Last week "Di Zaposhkelekh" was sung in English and Yiddish, along with "The Song of the Volga Boatmen" in Russian (link to a Mudcat thread about it, "Ey, Ukhnyem!") and "Dilmano dilbero" (link to "Tous aux Balkans" but you'll find it below).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 15 Aug 22 - 02:24 PM

This popular ballad derives from a "romance" by Juan del Encina (1468-1529) well spread in the 16th century (Cf. below the video links).
EL ENAMORADO Y LA MUERTE
(Anonymous / Joaquín Díaz)

Yo me estaba reposando, durmiendo como solía,
soñaba con mis amores que en mis brazos los tenía.
Vi entrar señora tan blanca, aún más que la nieve fría.
- ¿Por dónde has entrado amor? ¿Cómo has entrado, mi vida?
Las puertas están cerradas, ventanas y celosías.
- No soy el amor, amante; la Muerte que Dios te envía.
- Ay Muerte tan rigurosa; déjame vivir un día.
- Un día no puedo darte; una hora tienes de vida.
Muy deprisa se levanta, más deprisa se vestía.
Ya se va para la calle en donde su amor vivía.
- Ábreme la puerta, blanca; ábreme la puerta, niña.
- ¿Cómo te podré yo abrir, si la ocasión no es venida?
Mi padre no fue al palacio; mi madre no está dormida.
- Si no me abres esta noche, ya no me abrirás, querida.
La Muerte me está buscando; junto a ti, vida sería.
- Vete bajo la ventana, donde labraba y cosía;
te echaré cordón de seda para que subas arriba,
y si el cordón no alcanzare, mis trenzas añadiría.
La fina seda se rompe, la Muerte que allí venía:
- Vamos el enamorado, la hora ya está cumplida.
THE LOVER AND DEATH


I was resting, sleeping as usual,
Dreaming of my love, [dreaming] that I had her in my arms,
I saw a very white lady come in, even whiter than the cold snow.
"Where did you enter through, love? How did you enter, my life?
The doors are closed, [so are] the windows and slatted shutters."
"I'm not love, lover; [I'm] the Death that God sends you."
"Ah! Death so harsh, let me live one day."
"One day I cannot give you; you have an hour of life [left]."
Very fast he gets up, even faster he dressed.
Now he's heading to the street where his love lived.
"Open the door for me, fair one*; open the door for me, girl."
"How could I open [the door] for you since the opportunity isn't appropriate/the time isn't right?
My father did not go to the palace, my mother isn't asleep."
"If you don't open tonight, you won't open any more, beloved.
Death is looking for me; next to you, it'd be life."
"Go under the window where I would embroider and sew,
I'll throw a silk string for you to come up,
And if the string wouldn't reach, I'd add my braids."
The fine silk breaks, Death was coming by:
"Let's go, the lover, the hour has expired."
*Lit. "white". "blanca" (white), "niña" (girl, child) were used to address or to refer to female sweethearts to highlight their purity/innocence.

Note that I kept the verbs in present or past tenses as they are in the original version, which can sound quite weird in English but so does it in Spanish as some tenses are more about rhyming than time consistency.

There are slightly different lyrics for this ballad sung on different tunes.

Live rendition by Joaquín Díaz.

Recording by Víctor Jara.

Recording by Washington Carrasco y Cristina Fernández.

Recording and live rendition by Paco Ibáñez.

Live rendition by Alalumbre Folk.

YouTube "El enamorado y la muerte" page

This popular ballad derives from a "romance" by Juan del Encina (1468-1529) well spread in the 16th century:
Original work.
Here is the transcription in the original spelling of old copies:
Yo me estava reposando,
durmiendo como solía.
Recordé, triste, llorando
con gran pena que sentía.
Levanté me muy sin tiento
de la cama en que dormía,
cercado de pensamiento,
que valer no me podía.
Mi passión era tan fuerte
que de mí yo no sabía.
Conmigo estava la Muerte
por tenerme compañía.
Lo que más me fatigava
no era porque muría,
mas era porque dexava
de servir a quien servía.
Servía yo una señora
que más que a mí la quería,
y ella fue la causadora
de mi mal sin mejoría.
La media noche passada,
ya que era cerca el día,
salíme de mi posada
por ver si descansaría.
Fui para donde morava
aquella que más quería,
por quien yo triste penava,
mas ella no parecía.
Andando todo turbado
con las ansias que tenía,
vi venir a mi cuidado
dando bozes, y dezía:
«Si dormís, linda señora,
recordad por cortesía,
pues que fuestes causadora
de la desventura mía.
Remediad mi gran tristura,
satisfazed mi porfía,
porque si falta ventura
del todo me perdería.»
Y con mis ojos llorosos,
un triste llanto hazía
con sospiros congoxosos,
y nadie no parecía.
En estas cuitas estando,
como vi que esclarecía,
a mi casa sospirando
me bolví sin alegría.
I was resting
Sleeping as I used to,
I remembered, sad, crying
With the great sorrow I was feeling.
I got up very carelessly
From the bed I was sleeping in,
[So] Assailed with thoughts
That I couldn't fend for myself.
My distress was so strong
That I did not know myself;
Death was with me
To keep me company
What bothered me most
Was not because I was dying
But it was because I was stopping
To serve the one I served.
I served a lady
Whom I loved more than myself,
And she was the cause
Of my illness without improvement
After midnight,
When it was close to daybreak,
I get out of my dwelling
To see if I would rest
I headed to the dwelling
Of the one I loved most,
Because of whom I sadly mourned,
But she wasn't not appearing.
Walking all confused
With/from the anguishes that I had,
I saw caution come to me
Crying out, and I said:
"If you sleep, pretty lady,
Remember for courtesy,
As you were the cause
Of my misfortune.
Heal my great sadness,
Satisfy my tenacity,
Because if happiness is lacking,
You would totally lose me."
And with my teary eyes
I was making a sad moan,
And sorrowful sighs,
And nobody was appearing.
Being in these troubles,
As I saw that it was dawning,
To my house, sighing,
I returned without joy.
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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 08 Aug 22 - 02:22 PM

RE GILARDIN (Piedmontese)

Re Gilardin, lü 'l va a la guera
Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada (x2)

O quand 'l'è stai mità la strada
Re Gilardin 'l'è restai ferito (x2)

Re Gilardin ritorna indietro
Dalla sua mamma vò 'ndà a morire (x2)

O tun tun tun, pica a la porta
O mamma mia che mi son morto (x2)

O pica pian caro 'l mio figlio
Che la to dona 'l g'à 'n picul fante (x2)

O madona*, la mia madona
cosa vol dire ch’i sonan tanto? (x2)

O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria al tuo fante (x2)

O madona la mia madona
Cosa vol dire ch'i cantan tanto? (x2)

O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g'fan 'legria ai soldati (x2)

O madona , la mia madona
Disem che moda ho da vestirmi (x2)

Vestiti di rosso, vestiti di nero
Che le brunette stanno più bene (x2)

O quand l'è stai 'nt l'üs de la chiesa
D'un cirighello si l'à incontrato
Bundì bungiur an vui vedovella

O no no no che non son vedovella
g'l fante in cüna e 'l marito in guera (x2)

O si si si che vui sei vedovella
Vostro marì l'è tri dì che 'l fa terra (x2)

O tera o tera apriti 'n quatro
Volio vedere il mio cuor reale (x2)

La tua boca la sa di rose
'nvece la mia la sa di terra. (x2)
KING GILARDIN

King Gilardin goes to war,
He goes to war wielding his sword. (x2)

When he was in the middle in the street,
King Gilardin was wounded. (x2)

King Gilardin goes back home,
At his mother’s house he wants to die. (x2)

Knock, knock, he knocks at the door.
"O Mother, I am dying (lit. "I'm dead")." (x2)

"Don’t thump so hard, my dear son,
For your wife has just given birth to a baby boy." (x2)

"Mother-in-law, my mother-in-law,
What does so much playing music mean?" (x2)

"Oh, little daughter-in-law, my little daughter-in-law,
They're celebrating/entertaining your baby." (x2)

"Mother-in-law, my mother-in-law,
What does so much singing mean?" (x2)

"Oh, little daughter-in-law, my little daughter-in-law,
They're entertaining the soldiers." (x2)

"Mother-in-law, my mother-in-law,
Tell me how I must dress." (x2)

"Dress in red or dress in black,
It fits brunettes much better." (x2)

When she came to the church door,
She encountered an altar boy:
"Good day, good day, young widow."

"Oh, no, no, no, I'm not a young widow,
I’ve my child in its cradle and my husband at war." (x2)

"Oh, yes, yes, yes, indeed you are a young widow,
Your husband was buried three days ago." (x2)

"Oh earth, oh, earth, open up in four corners!
I want to see the king of my heart**.” (x2)

"Your mouth has a taste of rose,
Whereas mine has a taste of earth." (x2)
*"Madona", lit. "milady" was the way of addressing one's mother-in-law in Piedmont. She was in charge of holding the economic, relational and decision-making reins of the newlyweds so was addressed as "Mother milady"
**Lit. "my royal heart" so is it "the king of my heart" or "my beloved king"?

You'll find slightly different versions on this Mudcat thread

Sheet music

A long article on Terre celtiche about the song and its different versions in several languages. Many interesting links.

Recording by La Ciapa Rusa.
Recording by Tendachënt


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 01 Aug 22 - 02:20 PM

LE GALANT INDISCRET (French)

De bon matin j' me suis levé,
Au chant de l'alouette ;
Dans mon chemin rencontre
Un garçon allemand
Qui allait voir sa blonde,
À la rigueur du temps.

— Où t'en vas-tu ? D'où reviens-tu ?
Voilà minuit qui sonne.
— Je vas voir ma maîtresse,
Là-bas, dans sa maison,
D'entrer dans sa chambrette
J'ai bien la permission.

— Ouvrez, ouvrez la porte,
Marguerit' ma mignonne,
Je suis nu, je grelotte,
En danger de geler ;
Belle, ouvrez-moi la porte
Et laissez-moi rentrer.

— Gèlerais-tu, mour-e-rais-tu,
Je n'ouvre pas ma porte.
En passant par la ville,
Galant, tu t'es vanté
Que j'étais une fille
Faite à tes volontés.

- Que me donnerez-vous belle
Pour me faire tant de peine
- Je te donnerai la mer
Pour aller t'y noyer
Ton père aussi ta mère
Pourront te regretter.

O Dieu de Dieu ! que j'ai d' malheur !
Combien je suis à plaindre !
J'ai perdu ma maîtresse
Pour avoir trop causé ;
Jamais homme ni femme
N' sauront plus mes secrets.
THE INDISCRET SUITOR

Early in the morning I got up,
At the song of the lark;
On my way I met
A German boy
Who was going to see his girlfriend
In the rigor of the weather.

"Where are you going? Where are you coming from?
The clock is striking midnight."
"I'm going to see my mistress,
Over there, in her house.
To enter her bedroom
I do have permission."

"Open, open the door,
Marguerite, my darling;
I'm naked, I'm shivering,
In danger of freezing;
Sweetheart, open the door for me
And let me in."

"Would you freeze, would you die,
I don't open my door.
Passing through the city,
Sweetheart, you boasted
That I was a girl
Who does as you wish."

"What will you give me, beautiful,
To hurt me so much?"
"I will give you the sea
To go and drown in it
Your father also your mother
May regret you."

O my God! how unfortunate I am!
How much I am to be pitied!
I lost my mistress
For talking too much;
Never man or woman
Will know my secrets any longer.
Recording by Malicorne
Sheet music
Several versions collected from the Nivernais region in Chants et chansons populaires by Achille Millien (1906)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 25 Jul 22 - 02:26 PM

Farm workers used to be hired either on All Saints' Day (Nov. 1st), or on St Michael's Day (Sept. 29th) or on Saint John's Day (June 24th) depending on the area and the type of work.
MIA, TOTSANTS S'APRÒCHA (Occitan)

Mia, Totsants s'apròcha, la bèla, la le,
I a pas res que l'empacha, la bèla, le la.

Nos cal cambiar de mèstre, la bèla, la le,
Nos cal cambiar de bòria, la bèla, le la.

Regrete pas lo mèstre, la bèla, la le,
Ni mai la mestressa, la bèla, le la.

La sopa èra cauda, la bèla, la le,
Mes i aviá pas que d'aiga, la bèla, le la.

E lo jorn de la paga, la bèla, la le,
Los mèstres èran malautes, la bèla, le la.

Mia, Totsants s'apròcha, la bèla, la le,
I a pas res que l'empacha, la bèla, le la.
SWEETHEART, ALL SAINTS' DAY IS GETTING NEAR

Sweetheart, All Saints' Day is getting near, la bèla, la le,*
Nothing can stop it, la bèla, le la.

We must change master,
We must change farm.

I don't regret the master,
Neither do I the mistress.

The soup was hot
But it was only water.

And on pay day
The masters were ill.

Sweetheart, All Saints' Day is getting near,
Nothing can stop it.
*"La bèla" means "the beautiful one/the beauty" but I'm not sure it's intended to address anyone here.

Recording by Los del Sauveterre

There are more well-known versions on a different tune with more or less long descriptions of their bad living conditions (the master is brutal, stingy…, the mistress is evil, a bad cook -on purpose-, stingy…)
You can watch it sung here or listen to this recording by the late Rosina de Peira and her daughter Martina.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 18 Jul 22 - 05:54 PM

Today Lois sang a song from 1930 that she amended. You'll understand why she did so when you read the full version of the lyrics below her own...
LE GRAND FRISÉ 1930's cabaret waltz/song...as amended for Mudcat

Refrain
Quand je danse avec le grand Frisé
Il a la façon de m'enlacer :
J'en perds la tête,
Je suis comme une bête.
Y'a pas ! je suis sa chose à lui,
Je l'ai dans le sang quoi, c'est mon chéri,
Car moi je l'aime, je l'aime mon grand Frisé.

Pour lui, j'ai du cœur comme pas une.
Être avec lui, j' suis au clair d' la lune
Moi je ne veux que m'en occuper
Le regarder à rêvasser
Car moi je l'aime, je l'aime mon grand Frisé

(Refrain)


(Chorus)
When I dance with the tall one with curly hair
He has a way of hugging me
That makes me lose my mind,
I'm like an animal/a dummy.
Nothing can be done*, I'm his very thing,
I have him under my skin**, well, he's my darling,
Because I love him, I love him, my tall one with curly hair.

For him I have a heart like no other.
To be with him… I'm in the moonlight.
I only want to take care of him,
To watch him as he's daydreaming
Because I love him, I love him, my tall one with curly hair.

(Chorus)

Here are the full lyrics of the original version.
LE GRAND FRISÉ
(©Léo Daniderff - Émile Ronn / Henry Lemonnier) 1930

Refrain
Quand j' danse avec le grand frisé
Il a un' façon d' m'enlacer
Qu' j'en perds la tête,
J' suis comme un' bête.
Y'a pas, je suis sa chose à lui,
J' l'ai dans l' sang, quoi, c'est mon chéri,
Aussi, je l'aime, je l'aim', mon grand frisé.

Y m' cogne, y m' démolit, y m' crève,
Mais, que voulez-vous, moi, j'aim' ça.
Après, je m'endors dans un rêve,
En m' p'lotonnant bien dans ses bras.
Je m' r'vois, lorsque j'étais tout' gosse
Et que m' câlinait ma maman,
Qu' j'ai tuée d' chagrin en f'sant la noce.
Aussi, tout ce qui m' reste maint'nant,
Quoi, c'est mon homme...

(Refrain)

Maintenant j'ai du cœur comme pas une
Quand il s'agit de s'occuper
Je ne vais pas au clair de la lune
Perdre mon temps à rêvasser
Y'a pas. Faut que le pognon rapplique
Pour que l'hiver quand il fait froid
J' lui paie une pelure en poils de bique
Et des godasses en peau d' chamois
Quoi, c'est mon homme

(Refrain)
Je l'aime…
Quoi, c'est mon homme !
THE TALL ONE WITH CURLY HAIR


Chorus
When I dance with the tall one with curly hair
He has a way of hugging me
That makes me lose my mind,
I'm like an animal/a dummy.
Nothing can be done*, I'm his very thing,
I have him under my skin**, well, he's my darling,
So, I love him, I love him, my tall one with curly hair.

He hits me, he knocks me down, he kills me,
But, what can you do, I like it.
Then I fall asleep in a dream,
Snuggling up well in his arms.
I see myself again, when I was just a kid
And my mom cuddled me,
[My mom] I killed of grief by my partying
So, all that remains to me now,
Well, is my man...

(Chorus)

Now I have a heart like no other
When it comes to caring
I don't go in the moonlight
To waste my time daydreaming
Nothing can be done. The moolah must turn up
So that in winter, when it's cold,
I [can] pay him a goat hair coat
And chamois leather shoes.
Well, he's my man

(Chorus)
I love him…
Well... he's my man!
*Or "There are not two ways about it/There's no getting out of it". The French "Y'a pas" is short for the very slangy "Y'a pas à chier".
**Lit. "I have him in the blood"

Recording by Damia
Recording by Lucienne Delyle
Recording by Barbara

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 18 Jul 22 - 02:02 PM

TODO TIENE QUE VER (Spanish)
© Eduardo Carrasco (1940 - ) sung by Quilapayún.

Todo tiene que ver con las palomas,
todo tiene que ver con un tranvía,
todo tiene que ver con la mirada,
con una carta que no se escribe,
un cigarrillo y una guitarra.

Todo tiene que ver con cerraduras,
todo tiene que ver con una almohada,
todo tiene que ver un perfume,
con los botones de una camisa,
con un vestido que cae al suelo.

Todo tiene que ver con una duda,
todo tiene que ver con otra historia,
todo tiene que ver con calles solas,
con los andenes, con ciertas lluvias,
con despedidas y con faroles,
con la memoria, con el olvido.(x2)
EVERYTHING HAS TO DO


Everything has to do with doves,
Everything has to do with a streetcar,
Everything has to do with glancing,
With a letter that is not written,
With a cigarette and with a guitar.

Everything has to do with locks,
Everything has to do with a pillow,
Everything has to do with a perfume,
With the buttons of a shirt,
With a dress that falls to the ground.

Everything has to do with a doubt,
Everything has to do with another story,
Everything has to do with lonely streets,
With the platforms, with certain rains,
With farewells and with lanterns,
With memory, with oblivion. (x2)
Live rendition in 1986.
Much later live rendition by members who live in Chile permanently.
Recording by Quilapayún as they were in 1987.
Live rendition by Paloma San Basilio and Quilapayún in 1992.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 14 Jul 22 - 05:43 AM

On Monday Casey sang…
LE ROI EUGÈNE - LA FLEUR DE LYS (French)
As sung by Malicorne

Un jour, le roi Eugène, en sortant de Paris, (x2)
Il vit venir quinze hommes, vive le jour,
Ses plus grands ennemis, vive la fleur de lys.

Il vit venir quinze hommes, ses plus grands ennemis. (x2)
Ah, dis-moi, roi Eugène, vive le jour,
Qu'as-tu fait dans ta vie ? Vive la fleur de lys

Ah, dis-moi, roi Eugène, qu'as-tu fait dans ta vie  ? (x2)
J'ai parcouru les villes, vive le jour,
Pour aller à Paris, vive la fleur de lys.

J'ai parcouru les villes pour aller à Paris. (x2)
C'est aujourd'hui, beau prince, vive le jour,
Que mort te faut subir, vive la fleur de lys.

C'est aujourd'hui, beau prince, que mort te faut subir. (x2)
J'en tuerai bien quatorze, vive le jour,
Avant que de mourir, vive la fleur de lys.

J'en tuerai bien quatorze avant que de mourir. (x2)
Tira sa claire épée, vive le jour,
Vaillamment se battit, vive la fleur de lys.

Tira sa claire épée vaillamment se battit. (x2)
Il en tua quatorze, vive le jour,
Sans pouvoir s'y lassir,* vive la fleur de lys.

Il en tua quatorze sans pouvoir s'y lassir, (x2)
Quand ça vint au quinzième, vive le jour,
Son épée d'or rompit, vive la fleur de lys.

Quand ça vint au quinzième, son épée d'or rompit (x2)
Oh, petit Jean, mon page, vive le jour,
Viens donc me secourir, vive la fleur de lys.

Oh, petit Jean, mon page, viens donc me secourir. (x2)
Va-t'en dire à ta reine, vive le jour,
Qu'elle n'a plus de mari, vive la fleur de lys.
KING EUGENE – THE FLEUR DE LYS
(Non-singable translation by Casey)

On a day, King Eugene, as he rode out of Paris,
Saw fifteen men a-coming, Long live the day
His greatest enemies. Long live the fleur-de-lys

Saw fifteen men a-coming, his greatest enemies. (x2)
Tell me King Eugene, Long live the day
What you’ve done in your life? Long live the fleur-de-lys

Tell me King Eugene, what you’ve done in your life? (x2)
I’ve traveled the towns all over, Long live the day
A-going to Paris Long live the fleur-de-lys

I’ve traveled the towns all over, a-going to Paris. (x2)
Today’s the day, Eugene, Long live the day
The day you’ll suffer death. Long live the fleur-de-lys

Today’s the day, Eugene, the day you’ll suffer death. (x2)
Then I’ll kill fourteen of you Long live the day
Before I die! Long live the fleur-de-lys

Then I’ll kill fourteen of you before I die! (x2)
Drew out his bright sword, Long live the day
And valiantly fought he. Long live the fleur-de-lys

Drew out his bright sword, and valiantly fought he. (x2)
Killed fourteen Long live the day
Without growing weary. Long live the fleur-de-lys

Killed fourteen without growing weary. (x2)
When it came to the fifteenthLong live the day
His gold sword snapped. Long live the fleur-de-lys

When it came to the fifteenth, his gold sword snapped. (x2)
Oh little Jean my page, Long live the day
Come and lend your aid! Long live the fleur-de-lys

Oh little Jean my page, come and lend your aid! (x2)
Go and tell your Queen Long live the day
That her husband is no more. Long live the fleur-de-lys
*The actual verb is "lasser" but in old songs the infinitive or participle ending was sometimes changed for rhyming purposes.

Recording by Malicorne (1973)

This is an article with the history of this song in France, and identifying a descendent of this song that has evolved into a Canadian canoe-paddling song. (If you can access it as a member)
You can find a version with score and lyrics collected by Marius Barbeau on the Canadian Museum of History.
You can find another version on this copy of the texts (so no scores) included in "Folk Songs of Old Quebec" by Marius Barbeau.
You can listen to a slightly different version sung by Jacques Labrecque.
In this pdf copy of "Le Fureteur Breton, 1911, (in French) you'll find "La chanson de Bois-Gilles" that has some verses in common with the King/Prince Eugene song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: DaveRo
Date: 04 Jul 22 - 02:37 PM

I know this from the McGarrigles:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bFeEjiWuGFg

"V'là M'sieur l' curé qu'arrive"
Kate and Anna sing "Voilà l'Curé qu'arrive" which is much better - a great piece of assonance.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 04 Jul 22 - 01:48 PM

This song has already been posted on Mudcat but had no translation posted. So here it is again with a literal one.
PERRINE ÉTAIT SERVANTE (French)

Perrine était servante, (x2)
Chez Monsieur le curé, digue don da dondaine
Chez Monsieur le curé, digue don da dondé !

Son amant vint la vouère (x2)
Un soir après l' dîner...

Perrine, ô ma Perrine (x2)
J' voudrais-ti bien t' biser

Oh ! grand nigaud, qu' t'es bête ! (x2)
Ça s' prend sans s' demander !...

V'là M'sieur l' curé qu'arrive (x2)
Où j' vas-ti bien t' cacher ? ...

Cache-té dedans la huche ! (x2)
I' saura pas t' trouver ! ...

Il y resta six s'maines (x2)
Elle l'avait oublié ! ...

Au bout de six semaines (x2)
Les rats l'avaient bouffé ! ...

Z' avaient rongé son crâne (x2)
Et puis tous ses doigts de pied ...

On fit creuser son crâne (x2)
Pour faire un bénitier...

On fit monter ses jambes (x2)
Pour faire un chandelier...

Voilà la triste histoire (x2)
D'un jeune homme à marier...

Qu'allait trop voir les filles (x2)
Le soir après l' dîner ! ...
PERRINE WAS A SERVANT MAID

Perrine was a servant maid, (x2)
At the priest's house, digue don da dondaine
At the priest's house, digue don da dondé!

Her lover came to see her (x2)
One evening after dinner...

Perrine, oh my Perrine (x2)
I would like to kiss you

Oh! big booby, how stupid you are! (x2)
It's taken without asking  !...

Here comes the priest (x2)
Where am I going to hide you? ...

Hide in the bread bin! (x2)
He won't be able to find you! ...

He stayed there six weeks (x2)
She had forgotten about him! ...

After six weeks (x2)
The rats had eaten him! ...

They'd gnawed his skull (x2)
And then all his toes...

His skull was hollowed out (x2)
To make a stoup...

His legs were put up (x2)
To make a candle holder...

That's the sad story (x2)
Of a marriageable young man...

Who was going to see the girls too much (x2)
On the evenings after dinner! ...
On 08/05/02, Joe posted the notes I'd sent him about this song but here they are again with some edition:

Here is the version I have on different books (and the way I learned it) with accents and all.
On the second verse, the spelling "vouère" reflects the old pronounciation of the "oi" spelling now pronounced [wa] though the aperture of the [a] varies from a wide open "a" in the South to a rather closed "é" in some parts of France and tends to "o" in other parts. So it's no real clue to trace it back but it's said to be from the 19th century.
"Cache-té" is "Cache-toi" (Hide /Hide yourself) for the same reason.
The "ti" (2nd, 5th verse) is a popular particle added after the verb in questions (J'y vas-ti, j'y vas-ti pas?) in some areas.
The conjugation "je vas" (5th verse) is also popular (standard "je vais"), so is saying "i" instead of "il" before consonant (i' saura pas t' trouver),
9th verse: the "z" (z'avaient rongé...) is what remains from the original liaison "ils_avaient"


Note also that "Monsieur le curé" is the formal way to address or to speak about a catholic priest. We use "Monsieur le..." to address or speak about a mayor, a president, a secretary/minister... etc. "Madame la ..." is used for a woman.
"bouffé" is slang for "eaten".
This song originated in Western France. Different variants have been collected from Poitou to High Britanny.
The song as we know it now has been popularized by Les Compagnons de la Chanson (1946) and is quite recent.

Recording by Anne Sylvestre
Recording by Les compagnons de la chanson
Live rendition by Les compagnons de la chanson at their beginnings.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 29 Jun 22 - 02:43 AM

On Monday Dawn Berg sang Cha Bhi Mi Buan (I Will Not Survive).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 28 Jun 22 - 01:04 AM

Last night, Steve sang...
PIVNIČKOVÁ

Stará Pivničková na jarmark sa strojá
jaj danom tanaj danom na jarmark sa strojá

Ja ty cero moja pozor dávaj doma
jaj danom tanaj danom pozor dávaj doma   

Ona pozor dala zle se zachovala
jaj danom tanaj danom zle se zachovala   

Jak práh překročila syna porodila
jaj danom tanaj danom syna orodila

Dúhý nůž si vzala krk mu podřezala
jaj danom tanaj danom krk mu podřezala 

Na milého lúce zakopala ruce
jaj danom tanaj danom zakopala ruce

Na milého roli zakopala nohy
jaj danom tanaj danom zakopala nohy

Na milého nivu zakopala hlavu
jaj danom tanaj danom zakopala hlavu

Do kosně běžela bielé groše brala
jaj danom tanaj danom bielé groše brala

Zahrajte ně hudci za mé bielé groše
jaj danom tanaj danom za mé bielé groše

Abych já užila panenskej rozkoše
jaj danom tanaj danom panenskej rozkoše

Bože múj přebože co sem udělala
jaj danom tanaj danom, co sem udělala
PIVNIČKOVÁ

Old Pivničková was getting dressed for the fair,
Jaj danom, danaj danom*, was getting dressed for the fair.

Oh my daughter, be careful and take care of our house,
Jaj danom, danaj danom, be careful and take care of our house.

She was careful, but did something bad,
Jaj danom, danaj danom, but did something bad.

As she stepped into the house, she gave birth to a son,
Jaj danom, danaj danom, she gave birth to a son.

She took a long knife and slit his throat,
Jaj danom, danaj danom, and slit his throat.

On her lover's meadow, she buried the hands,
Jaj danom, danaj danom, she buried the hands.

On her lover's field, she buried the feet,
jaj danom, danaj danom, she buried the feet.

On her lover's grassland, she buried the head,
Jaj danom, danaj danom, she buried the head.

She run to the wardrobe, took out the white coins
Jaj danom, danaj danom, took out the white coins.

Fiddlers, play me a song for my white coins.
Jaj danom, danaj danom, for my white coins.

That I can enjoy the virginal pleasures.
Jaj danom, danaj danom, the virginal pleasures.

God, oh my god, what have I done?
Jaj danom, danaj danom, what have I done?
*"jaj danom, danaj danom": "j" should be pronounced as "y" in "you" and "a" as "ah".

This translation by Michal Majek has been borrowed from LyricsTranslate

Lyrics and score, it's the 4th song.
Lyrics and chords in this pdf document, # 119 on page 74 of the pdf = page 72 of the document.
Longer and alternate versions on this pdf college document, page 69 -all in Czech.

Live recording by Čechomor
Live rendition by Čechomor

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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 27 Jun 22 - 02:21 PM

L'INGLESINA

1 E l'era il fiöl d'un conte e voleva pià mujé
Lui voleva l'inglesina, perché figlia d'un cavalier (x2)

2 La sera l'impromete e la notte la sposò
E poi l'indoman matina verso Merica se ne andò

3 L'ha fai seicent chilometri senza mai parlar
E poi ne fece altri cento, poi cominciò a sospirar

4"Cosa sospiri oi mia, cosa sospiri tu?"
"Io sospiro la mia o mamma che non la rivedrò mai più"

5"Oh se sospiri questo hai tutte le ragion,
oh ma se tu sospiri d'altro, il pugnale l'è preparà."

6 "Che mi presta signor conte, che mi presta il suo pugnal?
Ho da tagliare un ramoscello per far d'ombra al mio caval!"

7 Appena lo ebbe in mano sul cuore lo piantò.
E poi volta indré il cavallo, verso casa se ne andò.

8 Appena arriva in piazza suo fratello comincia dir:
"Oh come mai sorella mia, come mai ritrovarti qui?"

9 "Due brutti assassini m'hanno ucciso mio marì.
Oh se vuoi che dica il vero, l'ho ucciso propi mi."
THE YOUNG ENGLISH GIRL

1 He was the son of a count and he wanted to take a wife
He wanted the young English girl, because she was the daughter of a knight (x2)

2 In the evening he got engaged to her and at night he married her
And then the next morning towards Merica he went.

3 She did six hundred miles without ever speaking
And then she did another hundred, then she began to sigh

4 "What do you regret oh sweetie, what do you regret?"
"I regret my mother for I'll never see her again"

5 "Oh if you regret this, you are very right,
Oh but if you regret someone else, the dagger is prepared."

6 "Will you lend me, sir, who will lend me your dagger?
I have to cut a twig to shade my horse!"

7 As soon as she had it in hand, in his heart she planted it.
And then she turned her horse back, toward home she went.

8 As soon as she reached the square her brother began saying:
"Oh how come, my sister, how come to find you here?"

9 "Two evil murderers killed my husband.
Oh if you want me to tell the truth, I killed him myself."
This song is an Italian version of Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight. In a comment at one of the links below, it reads that the informer probably forgot to sing the stanza (between 5 and 6) in which the count/earl tells her how many wives he killed before.
In some versions, he takes her to France, in this one he takes her to 'Merica (America). In many versions they ride for "miles" while here they ride for "chilometri" so the lyrics change happened after the French Revolution, the "km" length unit was created in 1790.

Lyrics and comments here at the bottom of the page.

Tagliani Family's version
Slightly different version by Vox Populi
Live rendition in Piedmontese.
Different sets of lyrics in an article in Terre Celtiche -Italian & English.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Felipa
Date: 24 Jun 22 - 11:48 AM

The song listed as "Jesus Jesus (sung in Irish Gaelic)" in the summary of songs sung in the 6 June 2022 sing about may have been Fáilte Romhat, a Íosa

The following week, Linn Phipps sang a Scottish Gaelic song, Crò Chinn t-Sàile, The Cattle Fold of Kintail. https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=171400


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 16 Jun 22 - 03:33 PM

On Monday, Elsa sang Dodi Li in Hebrew, and Casey sang Je suis trop jeunette in French.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 13 Jun 22 - 01:01 PM

ROMANCE DE ISABEL (Spanish)

En Madrid hay un palacio que le llaman de oropel
y allí vive una señora que le llaman Isabel.

No la quieren dar sus padres a ningún Conde o Marqués
por más dinero que cuenten tres contadores al mes.

Una noche muy oscura, al juego del alfiler
la ha ganado un bello mozo, bello mozo aragonés.

Para casarse con ella, mató a sus hermanos tres,
mató a su padre y su madre, y luego con ella fue.

En el medio del camino, llora la niña Isabel.
¿Por qué lloras niña mía, por qué lloras, Isabel?

Si lloras por tus hermanos, por tus hermanitos tres,
a tu padre y a tu madre, también muertos les dejé.

-No lloro por mis hermanos, por mis hermanitos tres,
que lloro por el puñal de oro, que quiero que me lo des.

-Dime para que le quieres; dime cómo y para qué.
-Para partir una pera, que vengo muerta de sed.

Se lo ha dado del derecho, le ha cogido del revés,
Si tú mataras a mis padres, yo también te mataré.
ISABEL'S ROMANCE/BALLAD

In Madrid there is a palace that they call a tinsel/ostentatious palace
And there lives a lady called Isabel.

Her parents do not want to give her away to any count or marquis
No matter how much money three accountants count each month.

One very dark night, in a pin game,
A handsome young man won her, a handsome young man from Aragon.

To marry her, he killed her three brothers,
Killed her father and mother, and then went with her.

In the middle of the journey, young Isabel cries.
"Why are you crying, girl of mine; why are you crying, Isabel?

If you cry for your brothers, for your three little brothers,
Your father and your mother, them too I left dead."

"I'm not crying for my brothers, for my three little brothers,
I weep for the golden dagger, which I want you to give me."

"Tell me what you want it for, tell me how and what for."
"To split a pear, for I'm very thirsty (lit. I'm dying of thirst)."

He gave it to her forward, she took it backward,
"As you killed my parents, I'll kill you too."
Lyrics and recording by Joaquín Díaz.


Another version:
EN MADRID HAY UN PALACIO (Spanish)

En Madrid hay un palacio que le llaman de oropel,
y en él vive una señora, cuyo nombre es Isabel.

No la quieren dar sus padres ni a un Conde, ni a un Marqués,
ni por dinero que valga a una corona de Rey.

Estando un día jugando al juego del alfiler,
pasó por allí un caballo un guerrero montañés.

La ha cogido de la mano se la ha llevado con él,
y en la mitad del camino llora la triste Isabel.

¿Por qué lloras, niña mía? ¿Por qué lloras, Isabel?
Si lloras por tus hermanos, no los volverás a ver.

No lloro por nada de eso, ni por ningún interés.
Lloro por un puñal de oro. Puñal de oro, ¿para qué?

Ya te lo traería yo, si me dices que has de hacer.
He de cortar una fruta porque estoy muerta de sed.

Él se lo ha dado al derecho, y ella lo toma al revés
para clavarlo en su pecho, y así verse libre de él.
IN MADRID THERE IS A PALACE

In Madrid there is a palace that they call a tinsel one,
And in it lives a lady whose name is Isabel.

Her parents don't want to give her away, neither to a count, nor to a marquis,
Nor for any money worth, to a king's crown.

One day playing the pin game,
A horse passed by, a mountain warrior.

He has taken her by the hand, he has taken her away with him,
And in the middle of the trip/journey, sad Isabel cries.

"Why are you crying, girl of mine? Why are you crying, Isabel?
If you cry for your brothers, you won't see them again."

"I don't cry for any of that, nor for any interest.
I cry for a golden dagger." "Golden dagger, what for?

I would bring it to you if you tell me what you have to do"
"I have to cut a fruit because I'm dying of thirst."

He has given it to her forwards, and she takes it backwards
To stick it in his chest, and thus be free of him.
Note that in both translations, I hardly changed the verb tenses even if it sounds weird in English.
In some versions, it's not clear who was playing but in some other it's quite clear that she was gambled in some game (chess, "pin" or some gibberish name).

Recording by Joaquín Díaz along with the same recording and the lyrics on his website

Score on YouTube.

Cancionero de romances (Ballads songbook)

Rico Franco page on University of Washington Pan-Hispanic Ballad Project. Rico Franco/Ricofranco is the equivalent to Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight in languages that originated in the Iberic Peninsula.

In some versions, it's not clear who was playing but in some other it's quite clear that she was gambled in some game (chess, "pin" or some gibberish name).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Felipa
Date: 07 Jun 22 - 08:14 PM

CUMHA AN FHILE - Irish Gaelic
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=171333


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 06 Jun 22 - 12:55 PM

RATTO AL BALLO / AN SÜ LA RIVA DE LU MAR (Piedmontese)

An sü la riva de lu mar a i'è na dòna che canta, la-ra
An sü la riva de lu mar a i'è na dòna che canta, la-ra
A i'è na dòna che canta.

El fiöl del re dis ai so scudiè "Chi l'è c'la dòna che canta? la-ra
El fiöl del re dis ai so scudiè "Chi l'è c’la dòna che canta? la-ra
Chi l'è c'la dòna che canta."

"Bela che canta fa pà per vüi, l'è dòna maridèia, la-ra
"Bela che canta fa pà per vüi, l'è dòna maridèia, la-ra
L'è dòna maridèia."

"O maridà o da maridé, la vöi ai me cumandi, la-ra
"O maridà o da maridé, la vöi ai me cumandi, la-ra
La vöi ai me cumandi."

El fiöl del re fa dé d'ün bal per dòne maridèie, la-ra
El fiöl del re fa dé d'ün bal per dòne maridèie, la-ra
Per done maridèie.

La bela dis a so marì "Laseme ‘ndé cun i'autre" la-ra
"Se vüi andè turnerai pà chi sei pì bela che i autre", la-ra
Chi sei pì bela che i autre.

Quan che la bela l’è sta' sül bal el fiöl del re s'la vistla, la-ra
L'à faie fé dui o tre gir, pöi l'à mnala in sua stansia, la-ra
L'à mnala in sua stansia

"Cos na diran le mie masnà ch'i vad pì nen a casa?", la-ra
"Pensé pa' pì a vostre masnà, pensé d'aveine d'autre, la-ra
Pensé d'aveine d'autre"

S' l'é la dui o tre dì, l'à mnala in riva al mare, la-ra
L’avia mac fait dui o tre pas as sent a ciamé "mare",
As sent a ciamé "mare".

L’à fait 'l segn d’la Santa Crus e ant'el mar s'è campéia, la-ra
"Sia maledét, maledét l'amùr di dòna maridèia, la-ra
Di dòna maridèia".
ABDUCTION AT THE BALL

On the seashore, there's a woman a-singing, la-ra
On the seashore, there's a woman a-singing, la-ra
There's a woman a-singing.

The king's son says to his squires, "Who's that woman who's singing? la-ra
The king's son says to his squires, "Who's that woman who's singing? la-ra
Who is that woman who's singing."

"Woman (lit. "beauty") a-singing is not for you, she's a married woman, la-ra
"Woman a-singing is not for you, she's a married woman, la-ra
She's a married woman."

"Either married or marriageable, I want her at my disposal, la-ra
"Either married or marriageable, I want her at my disposal, la-ra
I want her at my disposal."

The king's song has given a ball for married women. la-ra
The king's song has given a ball for married women, la-ra
For married women.

The beauty says to her husband, "Let me go with the others" la-ra
"If you go, you won't come back because you're more beautiful than the others", la-ra
You're more beautiful than the others.

When the beauty was at the ball, the king's son saw her, la-ra
He had her do two or three turnarounds, then he took her to his (bed)room, la-ra
He took her to his (bed)room.

"What will my children say as I don't go home anymore?", la-ra
"Think no more about your children, think about having some others, la-ra
Think about having some others"

After two or three days at his place, he took her on the seaside, la-ra
She hadn't made two or three steps that she heard call "mother"
She heard call "mother"

She made the sign of the holy cross and threw herself in the sea, la-ra
"Let it be cursed, cursed, the love of a married woman, la-ra
Of a married woman "
Recording from Il canzioniere del Piemonte
Recording by La Ciapa Rusa

Article in Italian with different versions on Terre Celtiche Blog

Several versions collected by Constantino Nigra in Canti popolari del Piemonte (1888)

Pdf displaying the different versions collected in the book at the link just above.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 30 May 22 - 02:20 PM

LA FILHA D’UN PAÏSAN (Occitan)

De bon matin se lèva
La filha d’un païsan.

Se lèva amai s’abilha
Ne pren sos abits blancs.

Son paire ie damanda :
- Filha, ont volètz anar ?

- Voli’nar a Lauzun, paire,
Veire lo rèi passar.

- Non i anguètz pas ma filha,
Que vos’n tornariatz pas !

- Si farai ben, mon paire,
Que non me veiràn pas..

Lo rèi n’èra en fenèstra,
La regardèt passar.

- Qual es aquela dama
Que passa per mon prat ?

- Sire, non sèi pas dama,
Sèi filha d’un païsan.

- Poiriatz l’èstre d’un prince,
Que vos’n tornariatz pas.

M' zo aviá plan dit mon paire,
Que me’n tornariái pas.
A FARMER'S DAUGHTER

A farmer's daughter
Gets up early

She gets up and she gets dressed
She puts her white clothes on (lit. "takes").

Her father asks her,
"Daughter, where do you mean to go?"

"I want to go to Lauzun, father,
To see the king pass by."

"Don't go, daughter,
As you wouldn't come back."

"I'll do so well, father,
That they won't see me."

The king was at the window,
He watched her pass by.

"Who's that lady
Who passes by my meadow?"

"Sire, I'm no lady,
I'm a farmer's daughter."

"You could be a prince's,
You wouldn't go back [home]"

"My father had indeed told me so,
That I wouldn't go back."
Recording by Rosina de Pèira e Martina
Live rendition by Las Salvajonas of a merging of 2 different versions.

You can find the scores of different tunes in Les vieilles chansons patoises du Périgord by Eugène Chaminade, chez Cassard Jeune, Périgueux, 1903 (2ème édition) as "Dé boun mati che lèbo". Note that the versions D and E are not about the king but some local lord who kidnaps her "to wash the dishes and clean the house".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 23 May 22 - 01:03 PM

DIGA, JOANETA (Occitan)
(Mont-Jòia version)

1. Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
Lalireta !
Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
-Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.
Lalireta !
Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.

2. Prendrai un òme que sache laurar.
Lalireta !
Prend ne un òme que sache laurar,
Fòire la vinha, meissonar lo blat.
Lalireta !
Fòire la vinha, meissonar lo blat.»

Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
Lalireta !
Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
-Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.
Lalireta !
Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.

3. Tendrem botiga, vendrem de tabat.
Lalireta !
Tendrem botiga, vendrem de tabat :
Cinc sòus lo roge, dotze lo muscat.
Lalireta !
Cinc sòus lo roge*, dotze lo muscat*.

Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
Lalireta !
Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
-Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.
Lalireta !
Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.

4. Per lo dimenge, n'aurem lo cabanon**,
Lalireta !
Per lo dimenge, n'aurem lo cabanon,
E per lo vèspre, la television,
Lalireta !
E per lo vèspre la television

Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
Lalireta !
Diga, Joaneta, te vòs ti logar ?
-Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.
Lalireta !
Nani, ma maire, me vòle maridar.
TELL, JANET


1. Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
Larireta!
Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
No, mother, I want to get married,
Larireta!
No, mother, I want to get married.

2. I'll take a man who knows how to plow
Larireta!
I'll take a man who knows how to plow,
To hoe the vineyard, to reap the wheat,
Larireta!
To hoe the vineyard, to reap the wheat.

Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
Larireta!
Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
No, mother, I want to get married,
Larireta!
No, mother, I want to get married.

3. We'll run a store, we'll sell tobacco,
Larireta!
We'll run a store, we'll sell tobacco,
Five cent the red one, twelve the muscat
Larireta!
Five cents the red one, twelve the muscat

Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
Larireta!
Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
No, mother, I want to get married,
Larireta!
No, mother, I want to get married.

4. For the Sunday, we'll have the little cabin,
Larireta!
For the Sunday, we'll have the little cabin
And for the evening, the television
Larirera!
And for the evening, the television.

Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
Larireta!
Tell, Janet, do you want to be hired?
No, mother, I want to get married,
Larireta!
No, mother, I want to get married.
Note that the spelling of the girl can be "Joaneta", "Jeaneta", "Janeta", "Janeto"…
*"roge", "muscat": old names of certain snuffs unless she also intended to sell wine
** "cabin": the last verse was penned by Mont-Jòia themselves, so from Provence where a "cabanon" was/is a "little cabin" (lit.) on the coast or in the countryside where people went/go on Sunday to spend some time relaxing with family and/or friends.

Alternate/additional verses
2. Amb un violonaire que me farà dançar…
Vòli prendre un òme que sache trabalhar…

3. Fòire la vinha e dalhar lo prat...
Farem botica e vendrem de tabat...

4. Cinq sòus lo roge, quinze lo muscat...
Riques e paures, totis aquí vendràn…

5. Farem un dròlle per fin de cada an...
Quand n'aurem dotze, per nos trabalharàn...
2. With a fiddler who'll make me dance…
I want to take a man who knows how to work…

3. Hoe the vineyard and scythe the meadow…
We'll run a store and we'll sell tobacco…

4. Five cents the red one, fifteen the muscat
Rich and poor, all will come here…

5. We'll make a child every end of year…
When we have twelve, they'll work for us…
Source: Anthologie de la chanson occitane, Cécile Marie, G.P Maisonneuve et Larose, 1975.

You'll find it with a score on this page of "Chants populaires de la Provence" tome 1, Damase Arbaud, 1802, where he says that the song was sung by young Savoy boys when making their groundhog dance. -Note that the spelling on this book is based on French spelling while the one I gave is in normalized spelling.

For those who know French:
Wikitrad" page of "Diga Janeta".
A pdf with a score, some background and an alternate verse 2 that goes "Un violonaire te farem donar… De violonaire, ieu ne' vòli pas" (We'll have you given a fiddler… A fiddler, I don't want him)
More information about the song and its variants on Thibault Plantevin's valuable website Zic Trad.

Recording by Mont-Jòia
Recording by La Ferigouleto
Recording by Mezzaluna Tarbes
Recording by Lhi Balòs
Recording by Hombeline


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: GerryM
Date: 23 May 22 - 03:31 AM

Joan, my apologies. I have edited the faulty entry in the song list.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: GUEST,Guest Joan F
Date: 22 May 22 - 03:59 AM

I sang it in English, as I *can't* sing in Irish. Trust me on that one.

I did do the chorus in what my source for the song, Ciara Thompson at her lecture at the Traditional Song Forum, said were "vocables", i.e. nonsense syllables used in Irish lullabies.

Turns out I was mispronouncing one & its not just a vocable, said Felipa, but a real Irish word, seoithin (sp?), meaning "sough of the wind".

I wrote to Ciara T. about this & she says that its thought that the vocables in Irish lullabies are what remain of ancient charms/spells, so they can have both retained real-word meanings & nonsense-for-lullaby "meanings".

Makes sense to me!

I still don't pretend to get Irish pronunciations right.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Felipa
Date: 18 May 22 - 08:04 PM

This week Joan Frankel sang a song in Irish, A Bhean Úd Thios air Bhruach an tSrutháin. I have created a discussion thread for the song (Not to be confused with An Bhean Úd Thall) https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=171283. One of the links in the first message is not clickable, but if that link doesn't get repaired you can copy and paste it or use the clickable link to https://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/music/petrie_and_music_of_clare2.htm towards the end of the second message.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 17 May 22 - 06:55 PM

Yesterday, Casey sang...
LE MARIAGE ANGLAIS (French)

C'était la fille d'un roi français
Que l'on marie à un Anglais
Oh ! Mes chers frères, empêchez de m'emmener
J'aimerais mieux soldat français que roi anglais

Et quand ce vint pour l'épouser
Dedans Paris, fallut passer
Il n'y a dame de Paris qui ne pleurait
De voir partir la fille du roi à un Anglais

Et quand ce vint pour embarquer
Les yeux lui a voulu bander
Bande les tiens, laisse les miens, maudit Anglais !
Car j'ai la mer à traverser, je la verrai

Et quand ce vint pour débarquer
Tambours, violons de tous côtés
Retirez-vous, tambouriniers et violoniers !
Car j'aime mieux le son du hautbois du roi français

Et quand ce vint pour le souper
Du pain lui a voulu couper
Coupe le tien, laisse le mien, maudit Anglais !
Car j'ai des gens de mon pays pour me nourrir

Et quand ce vint pour le coucher
L'Anglais voulut la déchausser
Déchausse-toi et laisse-moi, maudit Anglais !
Car j'ai des gens de mon pays pour me servir

Et quand ce vint vers la minuit
L'Anglais ne faisait que pleurer
Retourne-toi, embrasse-moi, mon cher Anglais !
Puisque nos pères nous ont mariés, il faut s'aimer.
THE ENGLISH WEDDING

She was the daughter of a French king
Who was married off to an Englishman;
Oh! My dear brothers, stop my being taken away
I would rather a French soldier than an English king

And when time came to marry her
Inside Paris they had to pass
There was no lady in Paris who did not cry
To see the king's daughter go to an Englishman

And when time came to board
He wanted to blindfold her eyes
Blindfold yours, leave mine, damn Englishman!
For I have the sea to cross, I will see it

And when time came to land
Drums, fiddles everywhere.
Withdraw, drummers and fiddlers!
For I prefer the sound of the oboe of the French king

And when time came for supper
He wanted to cut bread for her
Cut yours, leave mine, damn Englishman!
For I have people from my country to feed me

And when time came to go to bed
The Englishman wanted to take her shoes off
Take off your shoes and leave me, damn Englishman!
For I have people from my country to serve me

And when time came around midnight
The Englishman did nothing but cry.
Turn around, embrace* me, my dear Englishman!
Since our fathers married us off, we must love each other.
*Note: at that time "embrasser" meant what it literally says, i.e. "embrace". It passed to mean "to kiss" in the late 1700's early 1800 (according to the Académie Française then dictionaries) as the verb "baiser" originally meaning "to kiss" had changed its meaning to "to fuck".

Recording by Malicorne
Live rendition by Malicorne (song begins around 1:30)
On Gabriel Yacoub's website you'll find this piece of information in French:(translated by Google -that late at night, I don't translate much by myself)
This song is of Norman origin but the date of its composition is uncertain. It "celebrated" either the marriage of Henriette de France, daughter of Henry IV, with Charles 1st of England, or according to Amélie Bosquet (1815- 1904), Norman folklorist, that of Catherine de Valois, daughter of Charles VI, with Henry V, King of England
The first verse is a melody of Quebec origin. The song is followed by "Domino Fidelium" Gregorian motet from the school of Notre-Dame.

Here is what Amélie Bosquet says in her book
La Normandie, romanesque et merveilleuse ; traditions, légendes et superstitions populaires de cette province (1845) -in French, translated by Google translate.
"The romance we are about to quote is still sung today in the vicinity of Saint-Valéry-en-Gaux. Without being able to indicate precisely the origin of this popular song and the time of its primitive composition, we believe that we are not forming a conjecture devoid of probability, by saying that it seems to us to have been composed on the occasion of the marriage of the princess Catherine of France, daughter of Charles VI, with Henry V, King of England. "

And here are the lyrics she collected.
Le Roi a une fille à marier,
A un Anglois veut la donner,
Elle ne veut mais :
- Jamais mari n'épouserai s'il n'est François.-

La belle ne voulant céder,
Sa sœur s'en vint la conjurer.
- Acceptez, ma sœur, acceptez à cette fois,
C'est pour paix à France donner avec l'Anglois.-

Et, quand ce vint pour s'embarquer,
Les yeux on lui voulut bander :
- Eh ! Ôte-toi, retire-toi, franc traître Anglois
Car je veux voir jusqu'à la fin le sol françois.-

Et, quand ce vint pour arriver,
Le châtel étoit pavoisé,
- Eh ! Ôte-toi, retire-toi, franc traître Anglois,
Ce n'est pas là le drapeau blanc du roi françois.-

Et, quand ce vint pour le souper,
Pas ne voulut boire ou manger  :
- Éloigne-toi, retire-toi, franc traître Anglois,
Ce n'est pas là le pain, le vin du roy françois-

Et, quand ce vint pour le coucher,
L'Anglois la voulut déchausser :
- Éloigne-toi, retire-toi, franc traître anglois,
Jamais homme n'y touchera, s'il n'est François. -

Et, quand ce vint sur la minuit,
Elle fit entendre grand bruit.
En s'écriant avec douleur : -O Roi des rois
Ne me laissez entre les bras de cet Anglois. -

Quatre heures sonnant à la tour,
La belle finissoit ses jours,
La belle finissoit ses jours d'un cœur joyeux.
Et les Anglois y pleuraient tous d'un cœur piteux !
The King has a daughter to marry off,
To an Englishman he wants to give her,
She doesn't want to:
- No husband will I ever marry if he's not a Frenchman.-

[As] The beauty didn't want to give in,
Her sister came to beseech her.
- Accept, my sister, accept this time,
It's to give France peace with the English.-

And, when time came to embark,
Her eyes they wanted to blindfold:
- Hey! Get out, withdraw, utter English traitor
For I want to see French land until the end.-

And, when time came to arrive,
The castle was decked out,
- Hey! Get out, withdraw, utter English traitor,
This is not the white flag the French king.-

And, when time came for supper,
She didn't want to drink or eat:
- Go away, withdraw, utter English traitor,
This is not the bread, the wine of the French king.-

And, when time came for bed,
The Englishman wanted to take her shoes off:
- Go away, withdraw, utter English traitor,
No man will ever touch it, if he is no Frenchman. -

And, when time came about midnight,
She made a loud noise.
Crying out in pain: -O King of kings
Do not leave me in the arms of this Englishman. -

Four o'clock strikes at the tower,
The beauty was ending her days,
The beauty ended her days with a happy heart.
And the English all wept there with pitiful hearts!
LE MARIAGE ANGLAIS - singing of Malicorne
Here is the singable translation penned by Casey

Once was a daughter of a king of France
Promised in her youth to an English man
Dearest brothers, do not let them give my hand
Better I should marry a soldier lad of my own land

When came the hour they two were wed
She through the streets was royally led
Not a Parisian lady but wept most bitterly
To see the princess betrothèd to an English King

When came the hour to put to sea
The Englishman sought to bind her ee
Bind your own, let mine alone, foul Englishman
I will see the water divide me from my native land.

When came the hour they come to land
Fiddlers and drums on every hand
Get you from me, English players, cease your dance
I prefer the *hautboys of the King of France

When came the hour their meal to take
The Englishman sought her bread to break
Break your own, let mine alone, foul Englishman
I will take my bread from a serving maid of my own land

When they retired unto their room
The Englishman knelt to unlace her shoon
Unlace your own, leave mine alone, foul Englishman
I have a tiring maid of my own land

And as the midnight hour drew near
The Englishman sighed and shed many a tear
Turn again, and take my hand dear Englishman,
Since we are wed, we must love one another if we can.

*an instrument like an oboe


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 16 May 22 - 02:11 PM

LOS DOS FILHETS DEL REI (Occitan)

A la guèrra qui i va,
Qui i va non tòrna gaire.
Òc, los dos filhets del rei
A la guèrra son anadis.

Joanet jamai n'es tornat
E Joan-Francesc pas encara,
Sa maire lo vic venir
Per un prat que verdavaja.

Qué ne pòrtas, mieu filhòt ?
Qué pòrtas de las batalhas ?
Entre jo e mon caval
Ne portam vint-e-nòu plagas.

Mon caval pòrta las nòu,
Jo paubret totas las autras.
Ma maire fètz-me lo lèit,
No i demorarai pas gaire.

Serai mòrt a mièja nuèit,
Mon caval a punta d’alba,
M'enterraretz al sagrat,
Mon caval a la passada.

M'enramelaretz de flors,
Mon caval de totas armas,
Passaràn los passejants,
Diràn : quina bèla tomba !

La tomba del filh del rei
Qu’a ganhat fòrça batalhas,
La tomba del filh del rei
Que n’es mòrt a las batalhas.

Las campanas de Madrid
Sonaràn a punta d'alba,
Sonaràn per mon baron
Qu’a ganhat fòrça batalhas,
Sonaràn per mon baron
Que n'es mòrt a las batalhas.
THE TWO YOUNG SONS OF THE KING

To war, whoever goes,
Whoever goes, seldom comes back.
Yes, the two young sons of the king
Have gone to war.

Johnny never returned
And John-Francis [has] not [returned] yet,
His mother saw him come
Across a verdant meadow.

"What do you bring, my little son?
What do you bring from the battles?"
"Between I and my horse,
We bring twenty-nine wounds.

My horse brings nine [of them],
I, poor little me, all the others.
Mother, make my bed,
I won't stay there long.

I'll be dead at midnight,
My horse at daybreak,
You'll bury me in holy ground,
My horse in the pathway.

You'll adorn me with flowers,
My horse with all [my] arms.
The strollers will pass by,
They'll say, 'What a beautiful grave!

The grave of the king's son
Who won many battles,
The grave of the king's son
Who died at war'.' (lit. at the battles)

Madrid bells
Will ring at daybreak,
They'll ring for my baron
Who won many battles,
They'll ring for my baron
Who died at war. (lit. at the battles)
It's the first song rehearsed in this workshop.
Recording by Renat Jurié
Recording by Ramon Manent


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 15 May 22 - 06:52 AM

On Monday, Anne Coleman sang "Sios Dhan An Abhainn", a Scottish Gaelic version of "Down to the River to Pray". You'll find the lyrics and a translation posted by RunrigFan in this post along with English versions and background.
You'll also find the lyrics below this beautiful recording by Mary Ann Kennedy & Na Seoid.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 15 May 22 - 06:23 AM

On Monday Joe Fineman sang "Auprès de ma blonde".
The lyrics are already in Mudcat DT
There's also a thread about the song but no translation. So here is the version I learned as a child and a translation.
Note that the 2nd line of each verse becomes the 1st line of the next one making the song 11 verses long instead of 6.

AUPRÈS DE MA BLONDE (French)

1. Au jardin de mon père les lilas sont fleuris (x2)
Tous les oiseaux du monde viennent y faire leurs nids

Chorus
Auprès de ma blonde, qu'il fait bon, fait bon, fait bon,
Auprès de ma blonde, qu'il fait bon dormir.

2. La caille, la tourterelle, et la jolie perdrix (x2)
Et la jolie colombe qui chante jour et nuit.

3. Qui chante pour les filles qui n'ont pas de mari (x2)
Pour moi, ne chante guère car j'en ai un joli.
11
4. Dites-nous donc, la belle, où donc est vot' mari ? (x2)
Il est dans la Hollande, les Hollandais l’ont pris.

5.Que donn'riez-vous, la belle, pour avoir vot' mari ? (x2)
Je donnerais Versailles, Paris et Saint-Denis.

6. Les tours de Notre-Dame et les cloches de mon pays (x2)
Et ma jolie colombe qui chante jour et nuit.
NEXT TO MY GIRLFRIEND

1. In my father's garden the lilacs are in bloom (x2)
All the birds in the world come to build their nests here.

Chorus
Next to my girlfriend, how good, how good, how good,
Next to my girlfriend, how good it is to sleep.

2. The quail, the dove, and the pretty partridge (x2)
And the pretty dove that sings day and night.

3. That sings for girls who have no husband (x2)
It hardly sings for me as I have a pretty one.

4. Tell us, beauty, where is your husband? (x2)
He is in Holland, the Dutch took him.

5.What would you give, beauty, to have your husband? (x2)
I would give Versailles, Paris and Saint-Denis.

6. The towers of Notre-Dame and the bells of my home area (x2)
And my pretty dove that sings day and night.
From English Wiki "Auprès de ma blonde" (French for "Next to My Girlfriend") or "Le Prisonnier de Hollande" ("The Prisoner of Holland") is a popular song dating to the 17th century... It appeared during or soon after the Franco-Dutch War (1672–78), during the reign of Louis XIV, when French sailors and soldiers were commonly imprisoned in the Netherlands.
The song's quick pace and lively melody made it well-suited to military marches, and it is still commonly played at parades. For the same reasons, it gained widespread popularity as a drinking song and nursery rhyme.
According to French Wiki, it's often attributed to André Joubert du Collet, lieutenant of the royal navy during the reign of Louis XIV: taken prisoner by the Dutch, he would have composed it after his release in 1741.

YouTube "Auprès de ma blonde" page where you'll find the song sung and/or played.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 15 May 22 - 03:25 AM

On Monday, Carol Sue Engleman recited a fragment of the prologue to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, in Middle English. You can't say it's not English but it isn't nowadays English either. So here's a link to the original text and translation into Modern English of the Prologue on Harvard's Geoffrey Chaucer Website. You'll find all the Canterbury tales in their original Middle English with a Modern English translation.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 13 May 22 - 02:44 AM

On Monday, Pattie Clink sang...
AL DI LÀ (Italian)
© Mogol (1936- ) Carlo Donida (1920-1998)

Non credevo possibile
Si potessero dire queste parole:
Al di là del bene più prezioso, ci sei tu.
Al di là del sogno più ambizioso, ci sei tu.
Al di là delle cose più belle.
Al di là delle stelle, ci sei tu.
Al di là, ci sei tu per me, per me, soltanto per me.
Al di là del mare più profondo, ci sei tu.
Al di là dei limiti del mondo, ci sei tu.
Al di là della volta infinita, al di là della vita.
Ci sei tu, al di là, ci sei tu per me.
BEYOND


I didn't think it was possible
These words could be said:
Beyond the most precious good/asset, there is you.
Beyond the most ambitious dream, there is you.
Beyond the most beautiful things.
Beyond the stars, there is you.
Beyond, there is you for me, for me, only for me.
Beyond the deepest sea, there is you.
Beyond the limits of the world, there is you.
Beyond the infinite vault, beyond life.
There is you, beyond, there is you for me.
Live rendition by Emilio Pericoli
Live rendition by Connie Francis


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Mudcat singaround songs NOT in English
From: Monique
Date: 12 May 22 - 02:36 PM

Thank you Leeneia for posting it!
The German dictionary and Wiki read that a weeping willow is called "Trauerweide" whether it's called "Echte Trauerweide" or "Babylonische Trauerweide".


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