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Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'

Shogun 27 Jan 21 - 11:56 AM
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Subject: Discovering the world legacy of shanties
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jan 21 - 11:56 AM

The full title of the thread is: Discovering the world legacy of shanties and forebitters by Jerzy "Shogun" Brzezinski.


This thread is about my discovery of an almost forgotten world of shanties and forebitters. In my opinion, an authentic shanty, sung in the same way as it was done on the decks of the merchant navy of the golden age of the sail, hardly exists anymore.

Authenticity has been completely forgotten. Slowly over the years, the authenticity has been replaced by beautiful performances and catchy arrangements. It happened as I suppose thanks to the desire to please as many people as possible. Unfortunately, thanks to this, the connection between the original genuine shanties and the modern successors are getting weaker if it still exists.

The goal of my passion is to try to recreate the forgotten songs of work in the way they were sung during the period when they performed their task, which was to consolidate efforts during work that was beyond human strength. Shanties were the factor that made the sailors believe that they could cope with the task. A strenuous task followed by another and another.

Of course, you can find various types of shanties, which are very authentic, for example, they are also modeled on or are helpful to me, I would like to thank all their creators and the performer for their help and inspiration.

The main goal is to record the shanties that have been written in the greatest works of world collectors such as Stan Hugill, Joanna C. Colcord, Cecil Sharp, Frederic Peace Sharp, William Doerflinger, and so on.
The first work where I'm going to record all the songs, without exception, is Stan Hugill's "Shanties From the Seven Seas".

I will try to record all the shanties without any arrangement, only maybe in the background you will hear the noise of mosaics or storms, however, each of the shanties will be sung with the thought of the work it was used for, I will try to explore each task as much as possible, of course as the imagination will allow. All forgotten things that were special to shanties, such as pace, effort in pulling, heaving, or spinning, will be reminded by me.

Unfortunately, I do not have a gang, so as long as I play the shanties myself, maybe one day someone will want to take part in my project, then the crew will respond by singing the chorus. The content of this thread will be shanties, a link to my performance, and a description of the song from the first to the last of each subsequent work taken as the subject of research.


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Subject: RE: Discovering the world legacy of shanties
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jan 21 - 12:08 PM

Stan Hugill's "Shanties From the Seven Seas"

for my recordings and work, I will be using the first edition of the above work (published 1961).

will be the first book I am going to sing all the shanties out of this "shantymen bible". If possible, I will try posting shanties along with a description.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties -Brzezinski
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jan 21 - 12:10 PM

Chapter one - "Shanties telling of John's ShoreActivities; of the Gals; of Booze and Limejuice; Shanghaiing; the Lowlands Family; the Stormalong Group; Mexico and Rio; the Sacramento and California; Goodbyes and Hurrahs".


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by "Shogun"
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jan 21 - 01:18 PM

001 - A-Rovin (a)

The only difference between this version and version (a2) from page: 46 of the book, is this melody line of the first verse. I think this melody line changes a lot in the climate of the song, so this is a reason why I decided to record it in full, also tempo will be pumping chantey one.
Still too fast tempo, maybe ok for first 10 minutes work on pumps.
Lyrics from Shanties from the Seven Seas, by Stan Hugill.


A-Rovin'

In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
An' she wuz mistress of her trade,
We'll go no more a-ro-o-vin' with you fair maid.

A-rovin', a-rovin',
Since rovin's bin my ru-i-in,
We'll go no more a-rovin',
With you fair maid.

One night I crept from my abode,
Mark well what I do say!
One night I crept from my abode,
To meet this fair maid down the road.
We'll go no more a-ro-o-vin' with you fair maid.

A-rovin', a-rovin',
Since rovin's bin my ru-i-in,
We'll go no more a-rovin',
With you fair maid.

I met this fair maid after dark,
An' took her to her favourite park.

I took this fair maid for a walk,
An' we had such a lovin' talk.

I put me arm around her waist,
Sez she, "Young man, yer in great haste!"

I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, "Young man, yer rather free!"

I put my hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, "Young man, yer rather high!"

I towed her to the Maiden's Breast,
From south the wind veered wes'sou'west

An' the eyes in her head turned east an' west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol' sea-chest.

We had a drink - of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wuz soft as silk.

Her heart wuz poundin' like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

We laid down on a grassy patch,
An' I felt such a ruddy ass.

She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

She swore that she'd be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

In three weeks' time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.

In a bloodboat Yank bound round Cape Horn,
Me boots an' clothes wuz all in pawn.

Bound round Cape Stiff through ice an' snow,
An' up the coast to Callyo.

An' then back to the Liverpool Docks,
Saltpetre stowed in our boots an' socks.

Now when I got back home from sea,
A soger had her on his knee.


About Pump Shanty:
On the sailing ship, there were two types of bilge pumps:
First, the older one was a pump with two handles where pumping happens by crew placed on opposite sites, each site worked two to four sailors. When sailors from one site had a handle above the head, another site was on the level of the ankles on the opposite side. In this case, the pumping shanties pace was as follows: the first tact, pulling the handle to the waist, the second pushing it up, the third pushing down to the waist, the fourth lowering it down to the ankles.
Old Type Leaver Pump


The second type of pump:
it operated on the principle of two flywheels, where the sailors on the opposite side rotated their handles on the flywheels to make the work lighter. This pump calls the Downton pump.

In this type of pump, sailors installed on ends of bars ropes (bell-rope), to make the job easier by taking more sailors involved in pumping. In this 0.25 min of this super unique movie you can watch real pumping with bell ropes: bell ropes pumping work.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by "Shogun"
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jan 21 - 01:52 PM

002 - A-Rovin’ (A2)

The song I do recreate here is a version taken from "Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill, name of the version is: A-Rovin' (a), is printed on page 46 (US Edition published in 1994 by Mystic Seaport). But the beginning of this melody is from the first edition of the book from the beginning of page 50 (between versions b and c, ok I know it sounds complicated, haha but it's true).
W. B. Whall, Master Mariner in his "Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties(Glasgow, James Brown & Son, Publishers, 1910), mentioned is that: "The motive of this favorite sea song is very old indeed, and appears (in slightly varying forms) in many writings, e.g., in Thomas Heywood's Rape of Lucrece (first performed in London in 1630).

As far as I'm aware the record of this song singing by Stan Hugill didn't survive. The oldest record I found is A-Rovin' (Recorded 1947) by Leonard Warren.
… A-Rovin was originally sung at the pumps and old-fashioned windlass. In both labors - at the pump and at the windlass - two long leavers were worked up and down by the men: a back-breaking job. … Stan Hugill.
NOTE! - this tempo is a little too quick for work on pumps, the next version will be slightly slower much closer to actual work on "Downton - pump".

Below you can find the full text of this beautiful song.


A-Rovin' (A)

In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
An' she wuz mistress of her trade,
We'll go no more a-ro-o-vin' with you fair maid.

A-rovin', a-rovin',
Since rovin's bin my ru-i-in,
We'll go no more a-rovin',
With you fair maid.

One night I crept from my abode,
Mark well what I do say!
One night I crept from my abode,
To meet this fair maid down the road.
We'll go no more a-ro-o-vin' with you fair maid.

A-rovin', a-rovin',
Since rovin's bin my ru-i-in,
We'll go no more a-rovin',
With you fair maid.

I met this fair maid after dark,
An' took her to her favourite park.

I took this fair maid for a walk,
An' we had such a lovin' talk.

I put me arm around her waist,
Sez she, "Young man, yer in great haste!"

I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, "Young man, yer rather free!"

I put my hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, "Young man, yer rather high!"

I towed her to the Maiden's Breast,
From south the wind veered wes'sou'west

An' the eyes in her head turned east an' west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol' sea-chest.

We had a drink - of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wuz soft as silk.

Her heart wuz poundin' like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

We laid down on a grassy patch,
An' I felt such a ruddy ass.

She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

She swore that she'd be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

In three weeks' time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.

In a bloodboat Yank bound round Cape Horn,
Me boots an' clothes wuz all in pawn.

Bound round Cape Stiff through ice an' snow,
An' up the coast to Callyo.

An' then back to the Liverpool Docks,
Saltpetre stowed in our boots an' socks.

Now when I got back home from sea,
A soger had her on his knee.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by "Shogun"
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jan 21 - 02:49 PM

003 - A-Rovin’ (B) - (WITH PRESENTATION)

Anderson, the Scottish carpenter already mentioned, said that in his ship - one of Vickers' big four-masters from Liverpool - the usual method of singing this shanty was as follows.
Note the omission of the refrain "Mark well what I do say!"

Due to my research, I discover a big mismatch of speed on how the shanties are sung in nova days. So the first question is what type of pump has been used when sailors sang this song, Stan Hugill talks about "Downton" pump, so I did research everywhere to find the movie showing sailors at work, and it was the only one which looks sensible to me is the movie you can find on YouTube the title "Traditional bilge pump worked on James Craig tall ship". This will be a template to me when I will sing all "Downton" Shanties such as "Lowlands" family, "Strike The Bell" and so on.
Last Clarification, the "Downton" pump is a bilge pump. Downton is the name of the inventor of the pump of that type. The important distinction is the method of operation, not whether or not the pump is exactly the same as Downton's invention. The method is to turn a wheel. This can be distinguished from previous methods of operation, including the type of pump that has "hand brakes" on each side of the pump. Hugill is making reference to this when he says "old-fashioned levers" (1961, pf. 45).
Conclude this version will be sung in exact as possible (probably forgotten decades ago), tempo and way of singing pump shanty.


A-ROVIN' (B)
(alternate titles: Amsterdam or The Maid of Amsterdam)

                *1*
In Amsterdam there lived a maid
And she was mistress of her trade
       We'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

       A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's bin me ru-i-in
       We'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

                *2*
One night I crept from my abode
To meet this fair maid down the road.
       We'll go no more a-rovin' with you, fair maid.

       A-rov-in', a-rovin', Since rovin's bin me ru-i-in,
       We'll go no more a-rovin', With you, fair maid.

               *3*
I met this fair maid after dark,
An' took her to her favourite park.

               *4*
I took this fair maid for a walk,
An' we had such a lovin' talk.

               *5*
I put me arm around her waist,
Sez she, 'Young man, yer in great haste!'

               *6*
I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, 'Young man, yer rather free!'

               *7*
I put me hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, 'Young man, yer rather high!'

               *8*
I towed her to the Maiden's Breast,
From south the wind veered wes'sou'west [sou'sou'west].

               *9*
An' the eyes in her head turned east an' west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol' sea-chest.

             *10*
We had a drink—of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

             *11*
Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wus soft as silk.

             *12*
Her heart wuz poundin' like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

             *13*
We laid down on a grassy patch,
An' I felt such a ruddy ass.

             *14*
She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

             *15*
She swore that she'd be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

             *16*
In three weeks' time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 Jan 21 - 06:59 AM

004 - A-Rovin’ (C)

Most versions given in print have been camouflaged beyond all recognition, and others are far too sentimental for Sailor John to have sung them. The following version, which I picked up in Port Adelaide, South Australia, has a genuine ring to it. This too omits the ‘Mark well’, etc., refrain, but uses the full tune.
Two verses that are difficult to bowdlerize have been omitted!
The tune of the following version, given only by Terry and Sharp, is probably the older one—it has the jerkiness of all shanties which were sung at the earlier brake-pumps and lever windlasses.
Still too fast tempo, maybe ok for first 10 minutes work on pumps.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 50).


A-ROVIN' (Hugill Version C)

                   *1*
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
An’ she wuz tall an’ fair.
Her eyes wuz blue, her lips wuz red,
For Salt John’s money, O, she had -a flair.

      I’ll go no more a-rovin’, etc.

                   *2*
But when it came to leavin’ her,
An’ I told her I must go,
She cried a bit, she cursed a bit,
An’ then she cried, ‘Here’s Holy Joe!’

                   *3*
The anchor’s up, our sails are set,
An’ we are homeward bound.
Another gal I never shall see,
Until we reach ol’ Plymouth Sound.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 Jan 21 - 10:33 AM

005 - A-Rovin’ (D)

The following version tune, according to Stan Hugill's Book is given only by Terry and Sharp, is probably the older one - it has the jerkiness of all shanties which were sung at the earlier brake-pumps and lever windlasses.
Below the text of the version, I will try to recreate: Lyrics from Shanties from the Seven Seas, by Stan Hugill.


A-ROVIN' (Hugill Version d)

In Amsterdam there lived a maid
    Bless you young women!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid
    Now mind what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid
    An' she was mistress of her trade
    I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

   A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's bin me ru-i-in
   I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

             *2*
I took this fair maid for a walk.
    Bless you, young women!
I took this fair maid for a walk.
    Now mind what I do say!
I took this fair maid for a walk,
An’ we had such a lovin’ talk.
    I’ll go no more, etc.

             *3*
An’ didn’t I tell her stories true,
Of the gold we found in Timbuctoo.

             *4*
But when she’d spent me bloomin’ screw,
She cut her cable an’ vanished too.

Other stanzas with a genuine ring are:

             *5*
I met her walking on the Strand,
Dressed up for to beat the band.

             *6*
In Number One New England Square,
Me Nancy Dawson she lives there.

             *7*
This last ten months I’ve bin to sea,
Ah’ hell, this gal looked good to me.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 Jan 21 - 04:30 PM

006 - Go Roving (Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

In a fine old Norwegian shanty book called Opsang fra Seilskibstiden —‘Shanties from the Sailing-Ship Days’— D. H. Brochmann gives, as as a few stanzas of the English version, several in Norwegian. This Norwegian version was composed by a Norwegian poet, Henrik Wergelands, a fine character who took many of the obscene shanties of his time and rewrote them, building his themes mainly around some famous ship. In each case he rewrote enough stanzas for a long heave or hoist; in this version of A-Rovin’ —Shanty for the Christiania Packet —he made sixteen verses. Most of his versions are patriotic and nostalgic. After giving the first few stanzas of the usual English version, the text in Opsang explains: ‘. . . these first three verses only are decent. It is now preferable to continue with Wergeland’s version’!

I found full text of this beautiful chantey in: Frederik Barfod.(Udg.),"Brage og Idun, et nordisk Fjærdingårsskrift".
Sommernummer 1841.



GO ROWING
(Capstan Song for the Christiania Packet)

Nu muntres op saa mangt et Sind.
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Nu muntres op saa mangt et Sind.
Paketten er nu halet ind.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

    go roving, go roving,
    Since rovin's bin my ru-i-in,
    We'll go no more a-rovin',
    With you fair maid.

            *2*
Nu stiger Hjertet i vor Barm.
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Nu stiger Hjertet i vor Barm.
Med Styrke løfter sig vor Arm.      
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *3*
Nu ruller Blodet i vort Bryst.
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Nu ruller Blodet i vort Bryst.
Nu heise vi med Kraft og Lyst.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *4*
I Veiret Oxehov'det gaaer.
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
I Veiret Oxehov'det gaaer.
Paa Bryggen endnu flere staaer.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *5*
De undres hvad vel deri er:
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
De undres hvad vel deri er:
om Porter eller Gingerbeer?
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *6*
Men gid vi brygged Porter selv
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Men gid vi brygged Porter selv
af eget Malt og egen Elv!
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *7*
Ja gid vi brygged selv vort Øl!
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Ja gid vi brygged selv vort Øl!
Og drak det saa i Krus af Sølv!
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *8*
Saa drak vi og med bredfuldt Maal
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Saa drak vi og med bredfuldt Maal
Det gjæve gamle Norges Skaal.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *9*
Saa drak vi og med Velbehag
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Saa drak vi og med Velbehag
en Skaal for Norges røde Flag.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *10*
Saa drak vi til vi drak os mæt
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Saa drak vi til vi drak os mæt
en lystig Skaal for vor Paket.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *11*
Tilsidst vi letted paa vor Spunds;
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Tilsidst vi letted paa vor Spunds;
og drak Kapteinens Skaal tilbunds.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *12*
Og altiblandt, med muntre Vers,
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Og altiblandt, med muntre Vers,
vi heise Baller under Mers.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *13*
Og Damen stryger strunk forbi.
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Og Damen stryger strunk forbi.
Hun undres hvad vel er deri.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *14*
Til Tjeneste, der er, Madam!
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Til Tjeneste, der er, Madam!
en Mængde fremmed Modenskram.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *15*
Men gid du gik -- Hurra my boy!
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Men gid du gik -- Hurra my boy!
i eget hjemmevirket Tøi!
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid

            *16*
Saa fik du før du gik herfra
    Maerk vel hvad jeg vil si!
Saa fik du før du gik herfra
et ærligmeent Matroshurra.
    I’ll go no more a-rowing with you fair maid


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 07:43 AM

007 - The Gals O’ Chile

This chantey is outward-bound anchor song, and a version is also to be found in Captain Robinson's collection; Miss Colcord also gives it, but she had it from Captain Robinson. He gives it the title of "Hero Bangidero", his first and third refrains being "To my hero Bangidero", but this refrain, on his own admission, was never sung - being bawdy, it hat been camouflaged by Stan Hugill.

Stan Hugill left recorded on his album: "A Salty Fore Topman" were singing with Stormalong John, and this is a version of what I try to replicate.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 53).


The Gals O' Chile

To.. Chile's coast we are bound away
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
To.. Chile's coast we are bound away
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
We are bound away, at the break o'day,
Where they little Spanish gals are so bright an'gay,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals! (spanish - dago)

          *2*
An' when we get to Vallipo,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
An' when we get to Vallipo,
    We'll all drink lots of vino!
Dance the gals up the street with a roll-'n'-go,
Grab 'em round the middle an' we won't let go.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!

          *3*
Them gals o'Chile, they are hard to beat.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
Them gals o'Chile, they are hard to beat.
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
From truck to keel they are trim an' sweet,
They're all a-pullin' on the ol' main-sheet.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!

          *4*
Them senioritas, they are smart and gay,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
Them senioritas, they are smart and gay,
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
They dance an' drink till the break o' day,
Then clean ye out an' blow yer pay.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!

          *5*
Rosita, Anna, and Carmen too,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
Rosita, Anna, and Carmen too,
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
They'll greet ye with a hullabaloo,
An' soon ye'll know what they can do.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!

          *6*
My trim little frigate is very smart(sharp) craft,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
My trim little frigate is very smart craft,
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
She's armed to the teeth both fore 'n' aft,
Sharp at the bows with a fine view abaft.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!

          *7*

Them ol' senyoras, as we know well,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
Them ol' senyoras, as we know well,
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
They're red-hot divils from the other side o' hell,
An' ye'll niver get a chance for to ring a Chile belle.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!

          *8*

When the time comes for to sing farewell,
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
When the time comes for to sing farewell,
    (An') we'll dance an all drink pis-co!
Goodbye to the gals an' our money as well,
Callyo, Caquimbo, an' ol' Corynel.
    Timme heave-ho, hang'er Hi-lo!
    Sing olay for them dago gals!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 07:46 AM

008 - The Girl In Portland Street

Another shanty from "Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill,
name "The Girl in Portland Street". Curious shanty related in theme to A-rovin'. Harlow gives us this chantey under the title: "Fal-de-lal-day. This song called "whistling chantey from the fact that the first refrain was sometimes whistled. According to Stan Hugill in sailors version was always sung at pumps, and in this tempo, I will sing this song (however Harlow states this shanty was often sung at the windlass while heaving up the anchor).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 54, 55).


The Girl in Portland Street


I met a gal in Portland Street,
Fol-de-lol, fol-de-lol, fol-de-lol, lol day, (or else repeat solo with wistle)
I met a gal in Portland Street,
With a fol-de-lol-day, fol-de-lol-day, fol-de-lol-lol-de, lol-de, lol-day!

This gal I met in Portland Street,
Was the sweetest gal I ever did meet.

Sez I, 'Me gal, ,Ow do ye do?'
Sez she, ,The worse for seein' of you.'

'Now, miss,' sez I, 'I like yer style.'
Sez she, 'Young man, just wait a while.'

'Just wait until you try an' play,
And then I’ll send ye on yer way.'

I took her hand into my own,
And we headed soon for her old home.

And in her room, not far away,
We drank until the break o' day.

I pulled her down on my lap,
Sez she, 'Young man, your face I’ll slap.'

On her ankle next I placed my hand,
Says she, for this, I will not stand.'

I pulled her dress above her knee,
Sez she, 'Young man, please let me be.'

'And why did I no further go?
Alas! her leg was cork, you know!'


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 08:10 AM

009 - So Early In The Morning (A)

This is another shanty telling of Sailor's shore amusements. It was used both for halyards and pumps. The first line is the chorus, sung as many shantymen sang the chorus of other shanties, as an introduction when they were in doubt as to whether a greenhorn crowd knew the refrain or not. This version is a Liverpool-Irish one.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (p 52).



So Early In The Morning

    So! early in the mornin: the sailor likes... his bottle O!

                     *1*
The mate was drunken' and he went below to take a swig at his bottle O,
    So! early in the mornin: the sailor likes... his bottle O!

                     *2*
The bottle-O, the bottle-O, the sailor loves his bottle-O,

                     *3*
A bottle o' rum, a bottle o' gin, a bottle o' irish whisky-O

                     *4*
The baccy-O, terbaccy-O, the sailor loves his baccy-O.

                     *5*
A packet o' shag, a packet o' cut, a plug o' hard terbaccy-O

                     *6*
The lassies-O, the maidens-O, the sailor loves the judies-O.

                     *7*
A lass from the 'Pool, a gal from the Tyne, a chowlah so fine an' dandy-O.

                     *8*
A bully rough-house, a bully rough-house, the sailor likes a rough-house-O

                     *9*
A Tread on me coat, and all-hands-in, a bully good rough an' tumble-O.

                   *10*
A sing-song-O, a sing-song-O, the sailor likes a sing-song-O.

                   *11*
A drinkin' song, a song o' love, a ditty o' seas and shipmatessing-song-O,


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 08:17 AM

010 - So Early In The Morning (B)

Miss C. F. Smith writes that it was a favorite in the old Black-wallers. Is opening solo bears a striking resemblance to the shanty "Miss Lucy Long". Stan Hugill claims that is this version he took from Ezra Cobb, a bluenose (Nova Scotian) seamen of the old school, he says: this version was sung only at pumps, although he did say that "Twere used sometimes at caps'n.'
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (p 57).


So Early In The Morning (B)

                      *1*
The bottle-O, the bottle-O, the sailor loves The bottle-O,
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!
                      *2*
A bottle o' rum, a bottle o' beer, a bottle o' Red-eye whisky-O
    So! early in the morning the sailor likes... his bottle O!

                      *3*
The baccy-O, terbaccy-O, the sailor loves his baccy-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

                      *4*
A packet o' shag, a packet o' cut, a plug o' hard terbaccy-O
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

                      *5*
The lassies-O, the maidens-O, the sailor loves the judies-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

                      *6*
A lass from the 'Pool, a gal from the Tyne, a chowlah so fine an' dandy-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

                      *7*
A bully rough-house, a bully rough-house, the sailor likes a rough-house-O
    So! early in the morning the sailor likes... his bottle O!

                      *8*
A Tread on me coat, and all-hands-in, a bully good rough an' tumble-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

                      *9*
A sing-song-O, a sing-song-O, the sailor likes a sing-song-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor likes... his bottle O!

                      *10*
A drinkin' song, a song o' love, a ditty o' seas and shipmatessing-song-O,
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 09:05 AM

011 - So Early In The Morning (C)

Another version of "So Early In The Morning", sung at the capstan and pumps, and usually heard aboard ships in the West Indian Trade.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed. p 57, 58).
The Last Two verses have been added by me, they come from version (A) of the song to extend this song a bit, and give it minimal full song length.



So Early In The Morning (C)


When ye gits to Bristol Town,
drink a health to them chowlah's me boys,
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!
   Bottle-O! Bottle-O!
   Bottle of very good whisky-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!

Now we're bound to Kingston Town,
Where the rum flows round an' round.
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!
   Bottle-O! Bottle-O!
   Bottle of very good whisky-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!

The Mate wuz drunk an' he went below
To take a swing o' his Bottle-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!
   Bottle-O! Bottle-O!
   Bottle of very good whisky-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!

A Tread on me coat, and all-hands-in
A bully good rough an' tumble-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!
   Bottle-O! Bottle-O!
   Bottle of very good whisky-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!

A drinkin' song, a song o' love!
a ditty o' seas and shipmatessing-song-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!
   Bottle-O! Bottle-O!
   Bottle of very good whisky-O!
   So early in the mornin;      
   Sailor love the Bottle-O!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 09:14 AM

012 - The Limejuice Ship (Long Horus)

This song is forebitter really but was often used at pumps and sometimes at the capstan.
The Merchant Shipping Act came out in the year 1894, and in it was laid down the amount of food, water, etc., Sailor was allowed when on shipboard. This doling out of rations was known to him as "Pound and Pint". The Act also covered fines and punishments for delinquent mariners, such as "For concealing Knuckledusters, Slung-shot, sword-stick, etc. 5s. for each day of concealment', and many commandments and regulations in a similar strain. But the item around which the sarcastic song was built was also the origin of the Yanks calling English sailors "Limejuicers." This was the daily issuing of lime juice to British crews when they had been a certain number of days at sea.
Stan Hugill's version of the song is partly that of his father and partly that of a shipmate, Arthur Spencer. The tune is also to be heard in Nova Scotia, the song being one about "Sauerkraut and bully" sung in the Lunenburg dialect.

"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 57, 58).
I will sing this song as a forebitter.



The Limejuice Ship

Now, if ye want a merchant ship to sail the sea at large
Ya'll not have any trouble if ye have a good discharge,
Signed by the Board o' Trade an' ev'rything exact,
For there's nothin' done on a Limejuice ship contrary to the Act.

    So haul, boys, yer weather main brace an' ease a-way yer lee
    Hoist jibs an' tops'ls lads an' let the ship go free,
    Hurrah, boys, hurrah! We'll sing this Jubilee,
    Damn an bugger the Navy, boys, A merchant ship for me!

Now when ye join a merchant ship ye'll hear yer Articles read.
They'll tell ye of yer beef an'pork, yer butter an' yer bread,
Yer sugar, tea an' coffee, boys, yer peas an' beans exact,
Yer limejuice an' vinegar, boys, according to the Act.

No watch an' watch the first day out, according to the Act.
Ten days out we all lay aft to get our limejuice whack.
Fetch out her handy billy, boys, and clap it on the tack,
For we gonna set the mains'l, oh, according to the Act.

Its up the deck, me bully boys, with many a curse we go,
Awaiting to hear eight bells struck that we might go below.
Eight bells is struck, the watch is called, the log is hove exact;
Relieve the wheel an' go below, according to the Act.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 09:18 AM

013 - The Limejuice Ship (Short Horus)

This song is forebitter really but was often used at pumps and sometimes at the capstan.
This version is sung to a similar tune for verses as the "long chorus" version, but with five verses, the fifth one being the long chorus. And the chorus however is shorter.

"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 57, 58).
I will sing this song as a forebitter.


The Limejuice Ship

Now, if ye want a merchant ship to sail the sea at large
Ya'll not have any trouble if ye have a good discharge,
Signed by the Board o' Trade an' ev'rything exact,
For there's nothin' done on a Limejuice ship contrary to the Act.

   Shout, boys, shout! For I tell you it's a fact
   There's nothin' done on a Limejuice ship contrary to the Act.

Now when ye join a merchant ship ye'll hear yer Articles read.
They'll tell ye of yer beef an'pork, yer butter an' yer bread,
Yer sugar, tea an' coffee, boys, yer peas an' beans exact,
Yer limejuice an' vinegar, boys, according to the Act.

No watch an' watch the first day out, according to the Act.
Ten days out we all lay aft to get our limejuice whack.
Fetch out her handy billy, boys, and clap it on the tack,
For we gonna set the mains'l, oh, according to the Act.

Its up the deck, me bully boys, with many a curse we go,
Awaiting to hear eight bells struck that we might go below.
Eight bells is struck, the watch is called, the log is hove exact;
Relieve the wheel an' go below, according to the Act.

So haul, boys, yer weather main brace an' ease a-way yer lee
Hoist jibs an' tops'ls lads an' let the ship go free,
Hurrah, boys, hurrah! We'll sing this Jubilee,
Damn an bugger the Navy, boys, A merchant ship for me!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 09:20 AM

014 - Larry Marr

According to Stan Hugill, this shanty was often used at the capstan and also at the pumps, as sometimes also called "Five Gallon Jar". In the chorus it is related to the "short refrain" version of "The Limejuice Ship", this version was taken by Stan Hugill from Irish Sailor, Paddy Delaney, and its pretty certain that is of Irish origin.

"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 60).
I will sing this song as a capstan shanty. And try to recreate this song from
hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Shanties From The Seven Seas" (1962), with The York & Albany Crew.


Larry Marr

There wuz five or six old drunken shellbacks standin' before the bar
An' Larry he wuz servin' them from a big five-gallon jar


    Then hoist up yer flag, long may it wave
    Long may it lead us to....... the glory or the grave
    Steady boys steady.., we'll sound this Jubilee
    For Babylon's a fallen a...n' the Diggers are set free!

                   *2*
In Larry's place way on the coast there lived old Larry Marr
Missus an' Larry did employ such a big five-gallon jar.

                   *3*
The pair they played the Shanghai game, wuz known both near an' far'
They never missed a lucky chance to use the five-gallon jar.

                   *4*
A hell-ship she wuz short o' hands, o' full red-blooded tars,
Missus an' Larry would prime the beer in their ol' five-gallon jar.

                   *5*
Shellbacks an' farmers jist the same sailed into Larry Marr's,
And sailed away around the Horn, helped by the five-gallon jar.

                   *6*
In 'Frisco town their names is known, as is the Cape Horn Bar,
An' the dope they serve out to ol' Jack, from the big five-gallon jar.

                     *7*
From the Barbary Coast steer clear, me boys, an' from ol' Larry Marr,
Or else damn soon shanghaied ye'll be by Larry's five-gallon jar.

                     *8*
Shanghaied away in a skys'l-ship around Cape Horn so far,
Goodbye to all the boys an' girls an' Larry's five-gallon jar.


(Verses 1&7 have the first tune – rest have the second tune)


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 09:30 AM

015 - The Five-Gallon Jar

This version is a forebitter (Only first verse and all choruses are Hugill's version),
Stan Hugill took from old Irish Sailor Paddy Delaney. We see the story of Jack Ratcliffe and
Marry-Ann, a couple who was a crimp and took profit from the "Shanghaying" sailors.
Shanghaiing or crimping is the practice of kidnapping people to serve as sailors by coercive techniques such as trickery, intimidation, or violence. Those engaged in this form of kidnapping were known as crimps.

The first full verse and all Choruses come from: "Shanties from the Seven Seas"
by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 61). To make the song story complete, and give it a sensible
length I added other 3 verses from (Doerflinger - 'Songs of the Sailor and Lumberman' - p111)
Doerflinger's version of "The Big Five-Gallon Jar" comes from Capitan Henry E. Burke.

To keep the consistency of the song I replaced in Doerflinger verses I replaced the original wife name
from "Caroline" into Hugill's "Mary Ann".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 61).


The Five-Gallon Jar

In Liverpool there lived a man, Jack Ratcliffe was his name
An'in the days of the Cape Horn Trade, he played the Shanghai Game,
His wife's name was Mary Ann, sailors knew both near an'far,
an' when they played the Shanghai Game, They used the big stone Jar,

   In The Old Virginia Lowlands, Lowlands Low
   In The Old Virginia Lowlands Low.

*2*

There were drunkards in the corner and bummers at the bar
And [Mary Ann]Caroline was supplying them with a big five-gallon jar
...............
...............

*3*

Said old Jack to old [Mary Ann]Caroline, I'll tell you what we'll do,
There's a ship lying down to McKinnon's Wharf; I think she wants a crew.
We'll go down around the corners to get some drunken tars
We'll shanghai them away out of Liverpool Bay with a big five gallon jar.

*4*

So Jack and Cal[Ann] they worked their game when the ships signed on their tars,
Skys'l Jack and Pete and Bowline Bill helped to judge old Cal's five gallon jar.
Now we'll bid adieu to Cal and Jack and set our sails for ports afar
Dear Shanghai Cal, we'll all come back, and sample Jack's five-gallon jar.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 09:42 AM

016 - The Lowlands Low (A)

The lilt of the word 'Lowlands' seemed to have a fascination for the shantyman and sailor in general. A very ancient song of the sea sings of the Lowlands of Holland, those of Scottland, and even the Lowlands of Virginia were all woven into the songs of the shantyman. Stan Hugill mentioned is that Capitan Davis ("Sailors' Songs and Shanties" - 1887) gives it as a shanty, but Stan Hugill and many of his shipmates have sung this old song at both capstan and pumps.
The version I will try to recreate is capstan, and I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - "A Salty Fore Topman" (1989).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 62).


The Lowlands Low (A)

There once was a skipper who was boastin' on the quay,
Oh, I have a ship and a gallant ship is she,
Of all the ships I know. She is far the best to me,
an' she's sailing in the Lowlands Low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, she's sailing in the Lowlands Low!

                     *2*
Oh, I had her built in the North a-counterie,
And I have her christened The "Golden Vanitee".
I armed her and I manned her an' I sent her off to sea
And she's sailing in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and she's sailing in the lowlands low!

                     *3*
Then up spoke a sailor who had just returned from sea
'Oh, I wuz aboard of the "Golden Vanitee"
When she wuz held in chase by a Spanish piratee
And we sank her in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and we sank her in the lowlands low!

                     *4*
Oh, we had aboard o' us a little cabin-boy
Who said, - "What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?"
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
If ye sink her in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, if ye sink her in the lowlands low

                     *5*
'Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I'll give to thee galore,
If ye sink her in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, if ye sink her in the lowlands low!

                     *6*
So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An' he swam until he came to the rascal pirate's side
He climbed on the deck an' went below, by none was he espied
And he sank'em in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and he sank'em in the lowlands low!

                     *7*
He bore with his auger, he bored once an' twice
And some were playin' cards an' some were playin' dice
An' water flowed in an' dazzled their eyes
An' he sank'em in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, an' he sank'em in the lowlands low!

                     *8*
Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an' some were playin' dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin' with their wives
An' then he let the water in an' put out all their lights
And he sank her in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and he sank her in the lowlands low!

                     *9*
Then the cabin-boy did swim o'er to the starboard side
Sayin' - "Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide."
"I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
I will sink ye in the lowlands low."
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, I will sink ye in the lowlands low!

                   *10*
Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin' – "Shipmates take me up for I'm drowinin' with the tide."
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
And they buried him in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and they buried him in the lowlands low!

                   *11*
'And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o'er him, and they dropped him in the tide
And they sailed from the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and they sailed from the lowlands low!

                   *12*
Here's a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
And to leave him in the lowlands low.
    In the Lowlands, Lowlands, and to leave him in the lowlands low!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 12:05 PM

017 - The Lowlands Low (B)

This version Stan Hugill had from his shipmate Jack Birch of Plymouth. This song is known as "Lowlands", "The Lowland Sea", "The Golden Vanitee", or "The Lowlands Low" seems to have been based on a ballad of seventeenth-century entitled "Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing in the Lowlands".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 64).


The Lowlands Low (B)

There was a lofty ship boys, an' she put aut to sea
An' she goes by the name of the Golden Vanitee
An' we thought she would be taken by the spanish piratee
    as we sailed along the lowlands, lowlands
    as we sailed along the lowlands low!

                      *2*
Oh, we had aboard o' us a little cabin-boy
Who said, - "What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?"
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
    If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
    If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

                      *3*
'Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I'll give to thee galore,
    If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
    If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

                      *4*
So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An' he swam until he came to the rascal pirate's side
He climbed on the deck an' went below, by none was he espied
    And he sank'em in the lowlands, lowlands
    And he sank'em in the lowlands low!

                      *5*
He bore with his auger, he bored once an' twice
And some were playin' cards an' some were playin' dice
An' water flowed in an'    dazzled their eyes
    An' he sank'em in the lowlands, lowlands
    An' he sank'em in the lowlands low!

                      *6*
Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an' some were playin' dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin' with their wives
An' then he let the water in an' put out all their lights
    And he sank her in the lowlands, lowlands
    And he sank her in the lowlands low!

                      *7*
Then the cabin-boy did swim o'er to the starboard side
Sayin' - "Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide."
"I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
    I will sink ye in the lowlands, lowlands
    I will sink ye in the lowlands Low!

                      *8*
Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin' – "Shipmates take me up for I'm drowinin' with the tide."
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
    And they buried him in the lowlands, lowlands
    And they buried him in the lowlands low!

                      *9*
'And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o'er him, and they dropped him in the tide
    And they sailed from the lowlands, lowlands
    And they sailed from the lowlands low!

                      *10*
Here's a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
    And to leave him in the lowlands, lowlands
    And to leave him in the lowlands low!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 12:07 PM

018 - The Lowlands Low (C)

This one is a slightly more modern version. This is much the same tune as Bullen Gives. In all three versions, the words are very similar. But the name of the ship differs widely; some versions give the "Gold China Tree", or the "Marry Golden Tree"; others have the "Weep Willow Tree", "Golden Willow Tree" and "Sweet Trinitee". Also, the pirate ship has various names: the "Turkish [or Spanish] Canoe", the "Turkish Roveree" and "Spanish Gahalee" being some.
This shanty is sung as a pump shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 64).


The Lowlands Low (C)

Oh, there was a lofty ship boys, an' she put aut to sea
An' she goes by the name       of the Golden Vanitee
An' we feared she would be taken by a spanish piratee
    as we sailed along the lowlands, lowlands
    as we sailed along the lowlands low!

                           *2*
Oh, we had aboard o' us a little cabin-boy
Who said, - "What will ye give me if the galley I destroy?"
Oh, ye can wed my daughter, she is my pride and joy
    If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
    If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

                           *3*
'Of treasure and of gold I will give to ye a store,
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,
Of treasure and of fee as well I'll give to thee galore,
    If ye sink her in the lowlands, lowlands
    If ye sink her in the lowlands low!

                           *4*
So the boy bared his breast and he plunged into the tide
An' he swam until he came to the rascal pirate's side
He climbed on the deck an' went below, by none was he espied
    And he sank'em in the lowlands, lowlands
    And he sank'em in the lowlands low!

                           *5*
He bore with his auger, he bored once an' twice
And some were playin' cards an' some were playin' dice
An' water flowed in an' dazzled their eyes
    An' he sank'em in the lowlands, lowlands
    An' he sank'em in the lowlands low!

                           *6*
Oh, some were playing cards, oh, an' some were playin' dice
And some wuz in their hammocks a-sportin' with their wives
An' then he let the water in an' put out all their lights
    And he sank her in the lowlands, lowlands
    And he sank her in the lowlands low!

                           *7*
Then the cabin-boy did swim o'er to the starboard side
Sayin' - "Capen, take me up, I am drifting with the tide."
"I will ink ye, I will kill ye, if ye claim my child as bride,
    I will sink ye in the lowlands, lowlands
    I will sink ye in the lowlands Low!

                           *8*
Then the cabin-boy did swim all to the lardboard side
Sayin' – "Shipmates take me up for I'm drowinin' with the tide."
They hauled him up so quickly, but when on deck he died
    And they buried him in the lowlands, lowlands
    And they buried him in the lowlands low!

                           *9*
'And his shipmates took him up, and when on deck he died
They sewed him in his hammock which was so strong and wide
They said a short prayer o'er him, and they dropped him in the tide
    And they sailed from the lowlands, lowlands
    And they sailed from the lowlands low!

                         *10*

Here's a curse upon that Captain, wherever he may be
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
For taking a poor cabin-boy so far away to sea
    And to leave him in the lowlands, lowlands
    And to leave him in the lowlands low!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Jan 21 - 12:10 PM

019 - Lowlands Away (A1)

This originally pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular. Terry claims that after the China clipper era it was seldom heard.
Its "Dead Lover" theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This "dead lover" pattern one I sing, of four is:
    "The dead lover is a male"
another three patterns are:
    "The dead lover is a female",
    "Sailor's dream of his sweetheart"
    "Later southern States version"
The version I will try to recreate I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - "Aboard the Cutty Sark" (1979).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 65,66).


Lowlands Away    (a) ( i)

    Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
    Lowlands Away I heard them say,
    [My] Lowlands away!

          *1*
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
    Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
   [My] Lowlands away!

          *2*
I dreamt I saw my own true love,
He stood so still, he did not move,

          *3*
I knew my love was drowned and dead,
He stood so still, no word he said.

          *4*
All dank his hair, all dim his eye,
I knew that he had said goodbye.

          *5*
All green and wet with weeds so cold,
Around his form green weeds had hold.

          *6*
I'm drowned in the Lowland Seas,' he said,
'Oh, you an' I will ne'er be wed.'

          *7*
I shall never kiss you more,' he said,
'Never kiss you more --- for I am dead.'

          *8*
I will cut my breasts until they bleed.'
His form had gone --- in the green weed.

          *9*
I will cut away my bonnie hair,
No other man will think me fair.'

          *10*
I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.

          *11*
My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,
My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 05:41 AM

020 - Lowlands Away (A2)

This originally pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular.
Strangely Enough, c.F. Smith gives it as halyard shanty, It is maybe because it doesn't have a grand chorus, and in Stans Hugill theory from -"The Bosuns Locker" book, is that four-line construction - two solos and two intermittent refrains (more details you can find there).
Its "Dead Lover" theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This "dead lover" pattern one I sing, of four is:
    "The dead lover is a female"
another three patterns are:
    "The dead lover is a male",
    "Sailor's dream of his sweetheart"
    "Later southern States version"
The version I will try to recreate I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - "Aboard the Cutty Sark" (1979).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 66,67).



Lowlands Away (a) (ii)

    Lowlands, Lowlands, away, my John,
    Lowlands away I heard them say,
    My Lowlands away.

          *1*
I dreamed a dream the other night,
    Lowlands, Lowlands, away, my John.
My love she came dressed all in white,
    My Lowlands away.

          *2*
I dreamed my love came in my sleep,
Her cheeks were wet, her eyes did weep.

          *3*
She came to me as my best bride (at mt bed-side),
All dressed in white like some fair bride.

          *4*
And bravely in her bosom fair,
A red, red rose did my love wear.

          *5*
She made no sound-no word she said,
And then I knew my love was dead.

          *6*
I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.

          *7*
She waved her hand-she said goodbye,
I wiped the tear from out my eye.

          *8*
And then awoke to hear the cry,


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 05:46 AM

021 - Lowlands Away (B)

EN
This originally pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular.
Its "Dead Lover" theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This "dead lover" pattern one I sing, of four is:
    "Sailor's dream of his sweetheart"
another three patterns are:
    "The dead lover is a female",
    "The dead lover is a male"
    "Later southern States version"
This version has also slightly different hours, I did change, it is just to seek to try out some different.
The version I will try to recreate I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - "Aboard the Cutty Sark" (1979).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 67).


Lowlands Away (b)

    Lowlands, Lowlands, hurrah my Jo!
    Lowlands, high, Lowlands, alay!
    My Lowlands away!

          *1*
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
    Lowlands, Lowlands, hurrah my Jo!
I dreamt a dream, the other night,
    Lowlands, alay!

          *2*
I dreamt I saw my own true love,
She flew to me like some young dove.

          *3*
This maid she stood close by my side,
All dressed in white like some fair bride.

          *4*
She spoke in accents sweet an' low.
I love you, dear, this well you know.'

          *5*
And then i sang in sweetest voice,
That song which made my heart rejoice.

          *6*
Oh, Lowlands maids are fair an' true,
This Lowlands maid she loves you too.

          *7*
And Lowlands men are strong an' brave:
The one I love sails o'er the wave.

          *8*
I held her in my fond embrace,
And kissed her sweet an' shinin' face.

          *9*
And then awoke to her the cry,
'Rouse out the watch, ho! watch ahoy!'


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 05:50 AM

022 - Lowlands or My Dollar An' A Half A Day

This originally pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. This the Southern States version, Bullen believes it to be of Negro origin, Whall calls it' American', from the cotton ports. "Mr. Perring said this was a 'typical' ('ti' rhymes with 'my') Negro Chantey, sung by Negro sailors in the East India trade, in complaint at their being harder worked and lower-waged than white seamen. Doerflinger disagrees and thinks it is an English song, taken to the Gulf ports by the English and Irish pocket seamen who worked there loading cotton.
The version I will try to recreate I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - "Aboard the Cutty Sark" (1979).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 68,69).

Its "Dead Lover" theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
This "dead lover" pattern one I sing, of four is:
    "Later southern States version"
another three patterns are:
    "The dead lover is a male",
    "Sailor's dream of his sweetheart"
    "The dead lover is a female"


Lowlands (My Dollar An' A Half A Day)

    Lowlands, Lowlands away my John
    Lowlands away, I heard them say,
    My Dollar an' a half a day.

                      *1*
A dollar an' a half a day is a black man pay,
   - Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
I thought I heard out Old Man say,
   - My Dollar an' a half a day.

                      *2*
A white man's pay is rather high.
A black man's pay is rather low,

                      *3*
Five dollars a day is a hoosier's pay,
Five dollars a day is a hoosier's pay,

                      *4*
A dollar an' a half a day is mathlow's pay,
A dollar an' a half a day won't pay my way.

                      *5*
Ohwhat shall we poor shellbacks do?
We've got no money an' we can't git home.

                      *6*
I packet me bag an' I'm bound away,
I'm bound away for Mobile Bay.

                      *7*
We're bound away for Mobile Bay,
We're bound away at the break o' day.

                      *8*
Oh, say wuz ye never down in Mobile Bay?
A-screwin' cotton all the day.

                      *9*
Oh, me poor ol' mother, oh, she wrote to me,
She wrote to me to come home from sea

                      *10*
We'll heave 'er up from down below,
Oh, heave 'er up an' away we'll go!

                     *11*
Oh, I though I heard the Ol' Man say,
He'd give us rum three times a day.

                     *12*
I wish I had ten thousand pound,
I'd steer me ship for miles around.

                     *13*
I'd load her up with grub an' gin,
An' stay in the port where we wuz in.

                   *14*
I'd stand ye drinks three times a day,
An' feel ye well am' raise yer pay.

                   *15*
With a bully ship an' a bully crew,
An' a bucko skipper for to kick her though.

                   *16*
Oh, I wished I wuz in Liverpool Town,
With them Liverpool judies I'd dance around.

                   *17*
Wake up, yer bitch, an' let us in,
Wake up, yer bitch, cos we want some gin.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 05:54 AM

023 - Lowlands Low (Halyards) - (WITH PRESENTATION)

Another shanty from Lowlands family, but this time is a halyard one. Stan Hugill had it from Old Smith of Tobago, a fine old coloured shantyman who given to Stan a lot of little-known shanties, it was happening in the 30s of XX century. It is a West-Indian song, according to Sharp, it comes from West Indian Trade (Sugar and Rum).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 70,71).
In this time I did a little presentation, with yard pull, as this is a halyard chantey. According to Stan Hugill, it was two hard pulls, and after every pull, yard goes up couple inches.
Three sails have ben hoisted (those with raising up yards) to be raised in single mast: Upper Topsail, Upper Topgallant and Royal, in those sails where hoisted to the singing of "Halyard Shanties". It was one of the hardest work on the ship.


Lowlands Low (Halyards)

Our packet is the Island Lass,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
There's a lad howlin' at the main top-mast,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!


The Ol' Man hails from Barbados,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
He's got the name Ol' Hammertoes,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!


He gives us bread as hard as brass,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
Our junk's as salt as Balaam's ass.
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!


The monkey's rigged in the sijer's clo'es,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
Where he gottem from God 'lone knows.
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!


We'll haul 'em high an' let 'em dry,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
We'll rtice 'em up into de sky.
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!


Lowland, me boys, an' up she goes,
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!
Git changed, me boys, to her shore-goin' clo'es.
   - LOWlands, Lowlands, LOWlands Low!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 06:41 AM

024 - Mister Stormalong (A1)

A fine old shanty was "Stormalong". Same as in "Lowlands Away" it was originally used at the pumps and later as a capstan. There are Those who believe it was built around John Willis- the owner of "Cutty Sark". But true it is negro origin and of much older vintage than then "Cutty Sark" period.
In Stan Hugill's book are described 6 versions of this family. In this particular version are two patterns:
   - Praising the dead seamen,
   - Praising the benevolent son of the dead seamen.
The second pattern was usually added after the dirge-like regulation stanzas run out. It happens for reason is that work at pumps was a constant job especially od wooden ships, when every change course or trim the sails, the hull was liked literally "everywhere". I do separate these 2 patterns because in the second version I plane do a little "presentation" of work at leaver "Jiggity-Jig" (older type) pump.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 73, 74).



Mister Stormalong (A1)

Old Stormy   he    is   dead and gone,
   - To    me      way      you    Stormalong!
Old Stormy he is dead and gone,
   - Ay!    Ay!    Ay!    Mister    Stormalong!

               *2*
Of    all    ol'    skippers he was best,
But now he's dead an' gone to rest.

               *3*
He slipped his cable off Cape Horn,
Close by the place where he was born.

               *4*
Oh, off Cape Horn where he was born,
Our sails wuz torn an' our mainmast gorn.

               *5*
We'll dig his grave with a silver spade,
His shroud of finest silk was made.

               *6*
We lowered him down with a golden chain,
Our eyes all dim with more than rain.

               *7*
He lies low in his salt-sea [earthen] bed,
Our hearts are sore, our eyes were red.

               *8*
An able seaman bold an' true,
A good ol' skipper [bosun] to his crew.

               *9*
He's moored at last an' furled his sail,
No danger now from wreck or gale.

               *10*
Old Stormy heard the Angel call,
So sing his dirge now one an' all.

               *11*
Oh, now we'll sing his funeral song,
Oh, roll her over, long an' strong.

               *12*
Old Stormy loved a sailors' song,
Hes voice wuz tough an' rough an' strong.

               *13*
His heart wuz good an' kind an' soft,
But now he's gone 'way up aloft.

               *14*
For fifty years he sailed the seas,
In winter gale and summer breeze.

               *15*
But now Ol' Stormy's day is done;
We marked the spot where he is gone.

               *16*
So we sunk him under with a long, long roll,
Where the sharks'll have his body an' the divil have his soul.

               *17*
An' so Ol' Stormy's day wuz done,
South fifity six, west fifty one.

               *18*
Ol' Stormy wuz a seaman bold,
A Grand Ol' Man o' the days of old.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 08:21 AM

025 - Mister Stormalong (A2) - (WITH PRESENTATION)

A fine old shanty was "Stormalong". Same as in "Lowlands Away" it was originally used at the pumps and later as a capstan. There are Those who believe it was built around John Willis- the owner of "Cutty Sark". But true it is negro origin and of much older vintage than then "Cutty Sark" period.
In Stan Hugill's book are described 6 versions of this family. In this particular version are two patterns:
   - Praising the dead seamen,
   - Praising the benevolent son of the dead seamen.
The second pattern was usually added after the dirge-like regulation stanzas run out. It happens for reason is that work at pumps was a constant job especially od wooden ships, when every change course or trim the sails, the hull was liked literally "everywhere". I do separate these 2 patterns.
This is the second version, I will do a little "presentation" of work at the leaver "Jiggity-Jig" windlass.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 74, 75).


Mister Stormalong (A2)

I wisht I wuz Ol Stormy's son,
   - To    me      way      you    Stormalong!
I'd build a ship o' a thousant ton
   - Ay!    Ay!    Ay!    Mister    Stormalong!

               *2*
I'd sail this wide world round an' round,
With plenty o' money I'd be found..

               *3*
We'd sail this ol' world round an' round,
An' get hot rum oh, I'll be bound.

               *4*
I,d load her up with Jamaicy rum,
An' all me shellbacks they'd have some.

               *5*
We'd git our drinks, lads, every man,
With a bleedin' big bottle for the shantyman.

               *6*
I'd load 'er up with grup an' gin,
An' stay in the port that we wuz in.

               *7*
I'd feed ye well, an' raise yer pay,
An' stand ye drinks three times a day.

               *8*
An' whin we git to Liverpool Town,
We'll dance them judies round an' round.

               *9*
Oh, Stormalong an' around we'll go,
Oh, Stormalong through ice an' snow.

               *10*
When Stormy died he made a will,
To give us sailors gin to swill.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 08:23 AM

026 - Stormy Along, John

A fine old shanty was "Stormalong". Same as in "Lowlands Away" it was originally used at the pumps and later as a capstan. There are Those who believe it was built around John Willis- the owner of "Cutty Sark". But true it is negro origin and of much older vintage than then "Cutty Sark" period.
In Stan Hugill's book are described 6 versions of this family.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 75, 76).



Stormy Along, John


Oooh... Stormy's gone that good ol' man,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
Oh, Stormy's gone that good ol' man,
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *2*
Oh, poor Ol' Stormy's gone to rest,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
Of all ol' seamen he wuz best,
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *3*
He slipped his cable off Cape Horn.
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
Close by the place where he wuz born.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *4*
We dug his grave with a silver spade
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
His shroud o' finest silk wuz made.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *5*
I wisht I wuz Ol Stormy's son,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
I'd build a ship o' a thousant ton
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *6*
I'd sail this wide world round an' round,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
With plenty o' money I'd be found..
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *7*
We'd sail this ol' world round an' round,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
An' get hot rum oh, I'll be bound.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *8*
I,d load her up with Jamaicy rum,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
An' all me shellbacks they'd have some.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *9*
We'd git our drinks, lads, every man,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
With a bleedin' big bottle for the shantyman.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *10*
I'd load 'er up with grup an' gin,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
An' stay in the port that we wuz in.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *11*
I'd feed ye well, an' raise yer pay,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
An' stand ye drinks three times a day.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *12*
An' whin we git to Liverpool Town,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
We'll dance them judies round an' round.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *13*
Oh, Stormalong an' around we'll go,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
Oh, Stormalong through ice an' snow.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!

               *14*
When Stormy died he made a will,
   - Stormyalong boys, Stormalong, John!
To give us sailors gin to swill.
   - Ah, ha, come-along, git-along, stormy along, John!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 10:46 AM

027 - Stormalong, Lads, Stormy

The words of this shanty are much the same as those in "Across the Western Ocean", this song Stan Hugill learn from seamen which had the most famous name I ever heard, He was called "Harding, the Barbadian Barbarian" from Barbados, and having sailed in British, American, and Bluenose (Nova Scotian) ships, as well as West Indian traders, and he was Shantyman himself. It was originally used at the halyards.
I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Shanties From The Seven Seas" (1962), with The York & Albany Crew.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 76).


Stormalong, Lads, Stormy

Stormalong an' around we'll go,
   - Ol' Stormalong!
Oh, Stormalong an' around we'll go,
   - Stormalong, lads, stormy.

                *2*
If ever you go to Liverpool,
If ever you go to Liverpool,

                *3*
To Liverpool that packet school,
To Liverpool that packet school,

                *4*
Yankee sailors ye'll see there,
Yankee sailors ye'll see there,

                *5*
With red-topped boots an' short cut hair,
With red-topped boots an' short cut hair,

                *6*
There 's Liverpool Pat with his tarpaulin hat,
An' 'Frisco Jim, the packet rat.

                *7*
Wake up, yer bitch, 'n' let us in,
Get up, yer bitch, 'n' service us gin.

                *8*
Oh, I wisht I wuz in Liverpool Town,
Them Liverpool judies I'd dance around.

                *9*
O long Stormy-stormalong,
O long Stormy-stormalong.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 10:50 AM

028 - Way Stormalong, John

This shanty same as "Stormalong, Lads, Stormy", came from the same shantyman "Harding, the Barbadian Barbarian" from Barbados. About Harding, Stan Hugill calls him master of the 'hitch" - the singing wild yelps at certain points in hauling song. In both foregoing shanties and in the one which follows - which Stan Hugill also obtained from him - he would give vent to many wild 'hitches', absolutely impossible for a white man to copy. It was originally used at the pumps.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 77).


Way Stormalong, John

Oh, Stormy's gone that good ol' man,
   - 'Way, Stormalong John!
Oh, Stormy's gone that good ol' man,
   - 'Way-ay, Mister Stormalong John.

                   *2*
A good ol' skipper to his crew,
An able seamen bold an' true,

                   *3*
We dug his grave with a silver spade,
His shroud o' finest silk wuz made.

                   *4*
Old Stormy heard the Angel call,
So sing his dirge now one an' all.

                   *5*
He slipped his cable of Cape Horn,
Close by the place where he wuz born.

                   *6*
I wisht I wuz Ol Stormy's son,
I'd build a ship o' a thousant ton

                   *7*
I'd sail this wide world round an' round,
With plenty o' money I'd be found..

                   *8*
We'd sail this ol' world round an' round,
An' get hot rum oh, I'll be bound.

                   *9*
I'd load her up with Jamaicy rum,
An' all me shellbacks they'd have some.

                  *10*
We'd git our drinks, lads, every man,
With a bleedin' big bottle for the shantyman.

                  *11*
I'd load 'er up with grup an' gin,
An' stay in the port that we wuz in.

                  *12*
I'd feed ye well, an' raise yer pay,
An' stand ye drinks three times a day.

                  *13*
An' whin we git to Liverpool Town,
We'll dance them judies round an' round.

                  *14*
Oh, Stormalong an' around we'll go,
Oh, Stormalong through ice an' snow.

                  *15*
When Stormy died he made a will,
To give us sailors gin to swill.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 12:01 PM

29 - Walk Me Along, Johnny - (WITH PRESENTATION)

The origin of this shanty it is West Indian, and it is probably stemmed from a slave song. Chas. Nordhoff in his "The Merchant Vessel" gives us a similar song as a cotton Stowers' chant, but fits the words the tune must have been slightly different. Stan Hugill gives this song the halyard shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 78).


Way Stormalong, John

Stormy he is dead an'gone,
   - WALK me along Johnny, CARry me along!
Stormy he is dead an'gone,
   - CARry me to the BURyin' ground,

   - Then away ay-ay-ay-ay O Storm an' Blow,
   - WALK me along Johnny, CARry me along!
   - Way ay-ay-ay-ay O Storm an' Blow,
   - CARry me to the BURyin' ground,

                      *2*
We dug his grave with a silver spade
His shroud o' finest silk wuz made

                      *3*
Oh, ye who dig Ol' Stormy's grave,
Dig it deep an' make it safe

                      *4*
Oh, lower him down with a golden chain,
Make sure that he don' rise again.

                      *5*
Oh, General Tailor died long ago,
He's gone, me boys, where the winds don's blow.

                      *6*
He died on the field of ol' Monterey,
An' Santiana he gained the day.

                      *7*
Dan O'Connell he died long ago,
Dan he was an Irish boy-O

                      *8*
We'll haul, me boys an' wake the dead
Let,s stow him in his little bed.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 31 Jan 21 - 12:06 PM

30 - Walk him along, Johnny (R. R. Terry's Version)

Stan Hugill took this variation from Richard Runciman Terry "The Shanty Book part II", he also mentioned is that this version Terry and Sharp gained from the same shantyman, (John) Short of Watchet, and both it states is a halyard shanty, but the construction of song (like a grand chorus), it makes possible this shanty would be pump or capstan, Stan Hugill gives this song as the halyard shanty.
Text and melody come from Richard Runciman Terry "The Shanty Book part II", and Cecil J. Sharp "English Folk-Chanteys" (unfortunately they both give only two verses).

Despite the fact that this Song is very short (only two verses), I have the impression, that in this shape, in which Terry and Sharp give it to us, (i.e. the one in which I will try to sing it), this shanty has not been sung for at least 60 years, (i.e. since the time when Stan Hugill wrote about this version in his work).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 79).



Walk him along, Johnny


Gen'ral Taylor gained the day.
   - Walk him along, Johnny carry him along.
General Taylor gained the day.
   - Carry him to the burying ground.

   - Then away-ay you Stormy,
   - Walk him along, Johnny carry him along.
   - Way-ay you Stormy,
   - Carry him to the burying ground.

                      *2*
Dan O' Connell died long ago.
Dan O' Connell died long ago.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:35 AM

031 - Yankee John, Stormalong

This Is the last member of the Stormalong family from "Shanties From The Seven Seas", an alternative title for this shanty is "Liza Lee".
Stan Hugill gives this song the halyard shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 80).


Yankee John, Stormalong

Oh, you Liza Lee,
   - Yankee John, Stormalong!
Liza Lee she'in the gal for me,
   - Yankee John, Stormalong!

                   *2*
Liza Lee she promised me,
She promised to get spliced to me,

                   *3*
So I shipped away acros the sea,
In a hard-case Dawn-Easter to Miramashee.

                   *4*
I promesed her a golden ring,
I promesed her that little thing.

                   *5*
I promised I would make her mine,
Oh, wouldn't we have a Jamboree fine?

                  *6*
Liza Lee she's jilted [slihgted] me,
Now she will not marry me.

                  *7*
Oh, up aloft that yard must go,
Up aloft from down below.

                  *8*
Oh, stretch her, boys, and show her clew,
We're the boys to kick through!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:38 AM

032 - Santiana (A)

"Santiana" and "Mister Stormalong", together with the shanty "Lowlands Away", started life in the same as pump shanties. They have also been used in brake or leaver windlasses. later when iron ships replaced wooden once, has been used at pumps to great extent, and after been adapted to the capstan work, and so they remained to the end of the sail. This
reconstruction will be singing as the pump shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 82, 83).


Santiana (A)

Oh, Santiana gained the day,
   - Away Santiana!
Santiana gained the day,
   - All across the Plains of Mexico!

                     *2*
He gained the day at Molley-Del Rey,
An' General Taylor ran away,

                     *3*
All of his men were brave an' true,
Every soldier brave an' true.

                     *4*
Oh, Santiana fought for fame,
An, Santiana gained a name.

                     *5*
An' Zacharias Taylor ran away,
He ran away at Molley-del-ray.

                     *6*
Santiana's men were brave,
Many foud a solider's grave.

                     *7*
"Twas a fierce an' bitter strife,
Hand to hand they fought for life.

                     *8*
An' Santiana's name is known,
What a man can do was shown.

                     *9*
Oh, Santiana fought for his gold
What deeds he did have oft been told.

                   *10*
'Twas on the field of Molley-del-rey,
Santiana lost a leg that day.

                   *11*
Oh, Santiana's day is o'er,
Santiana will fight no more.

                   *12*
Oh, Santiana's gone away,
Far from the fields of Molley-del-rey.

                   *13*
Oh, Santiana's dead an' gone,
An' all the fightin' has bin done.

                   *14*
Santiana was a damn fine man,
Till he fouled hawse with Old Uncle Sam.

                   *15*
Now Santiana shovels his gold,
Around Cape Horn in the ice an' cold.

                   *16*
We'll dig his grave with a silver spade,
An' mark the spot where he was laid.

                   *17*
Oh, Santiana now we mourn,
We left him buried off Cape Horn.

                   *18*
We left him deep 'way off Cape Horn,
Close by the place where he was born.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:40 AM

033 - The Plains of Mexico (B)

Santianna was very popular with whalers, and this version of this beautiful tune was sang to Stan Hugillby an old Norwegian whaler Captain Larsen of Magallanes (Punta Arenas).
This reconstruction will be singing as a pump shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 84).



The Plains of Mexico (B)

In Mexico where the land lies low,
   - Hooraw, boys, hooraw ho!
Where there ain't no snow an' the whale fishes blow,
   - Heave away for the plains of Mexico

                   *2*
In Mexico so I've heard say,
There's many a charm' senorita gay,

                   *3*
Twas there I met a maiden fair,
Black as night was her raven hair.

                  *4*
Her name wuz Carmen so I'm told,
She wuz a Spanish senorita bold.

                  *5*
But she left me there, an' I did go
Far away from the plains of Mexico,

                  *6*
Them gals is fine with their long black hair;
They'll rob ye blind an' skin ye bare.

                  *7*
In Mexico I long to be,
With me tight-waisted gal all on me knee.

                  *8*
Them little brown gals I do adore,
I love 'em all, each sailor-robbin' whore.

                  *9*
In Mexico where I belong,
Them gals all sing this rousin' song.

                *10*
Why do them yaller gals love me so?
Because I don't tell 'em all I know.

                *11*
Them Dago gals ain't got no combs,
They comb their hair with whale-fish bones.

                *12*
When I wuz a young man in me prime,
I courted them yaller gals two at a time.

                *13*
Oh, Mexico, My Mexico,
where the wind don't blow.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:43 AM

034 - The Plains of Mexico (C)

The three tunes what gives us Stan Hugill, they very similar, however, each has its own character. In this family of the shanties we can observe three different patterns:
   1. The unhistorical story of Santianna,
   2. The Spanish Senoritas (no mention of Santiana),
   3. The Benevolent Sailor.
This version is the belovement sailor version. These three versions (this and the previous 2 from my channel: "Santiana" A and "The Plains of Mexico (B)"), they were not necessarily sung with exactly the same text. It was common that shantyman sings a mixture of verses, or sing versions in the tune with another one. This reconstruction will be singing as a pump shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 87).


The Plains of Mexico (C)

I wish I wuz Old Stormy's son,
   - Horraw Santiano!
Oh, I wisht I wuz Old Stormy's son,
   - All along the Plains o' Mexico!

                     *2*
I'd build a ship of a thousand ton,
An' load her up with Jamaicy rum,

                     *3*
I'd give ye whisky an' lots o' gin,
An' stay in the port where we wuz in.

                     *4*
Though times is hard an' the wages low,
'Tis time for us to roll 'n' go!

                     *5*
When I leave this ship I'll settle down,
An' marry a tart called Sally Brown.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:45 AM

035 - Santy Anna (R. R. Terry's Version)

Richard Runciman Terry described In his "The Shanty Book Part I", mentioned by Stan Hugill, is that version he gives it is "windlass and capstan." shanty. Here full version is taken from Terry's book. This reconstruction will be singing as a capstan shanty(faster / first phase of capstan rotation, before the chain, was still vertical below the ship).
"Shanties From Seven Seas" Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 85).


Santy Anna

Oh Santy Anna won the day.
   - Way-Ah, me Santy Anna.
Oh Santy Anna won the day.
   - All on the plains of Mexico.

                      *2*
He beat the Prooshans fairly,
And whacked the British nerly.

                      *3*
He was a rority gineral;
A rorty snorty gineral.

                      *4*
They took him out and shot him.
Oh when shall we forget him.

                      *5*
Oh Santy Anna won the day.
Oh Gin'ral Taylor run away.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:47 AM

036 - Santiana D (Norwegian)

This version of Santiana, Stan Hugill had from the shanty book "Opsang", hails from the port of Stavanger, and is a 'Westland' version. This reconstruction will be singing as a capstan shanty(faster / first phase of capstan rotation, before the chain, was still vertical below the ship). At this point, I would like to thank Karl Smithback, who is a native Norwegian, for his help in learning the pronunciation of the text of these beautiful shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 86).


Santjanna D (Norwegian)

Fra Kjøbenhavn vor reise stod,
    - Hivaavei! Santjanna!
Vi satte kursen imod nord,
    - Hivaavei, hurra for rullangaa!

                   *2*
For Storm, uveir, kontrarig vind,
Til Kristiansand saa gik vi ind.

                   *3*
En aften stod vi fire mand,
Beredte til at gaa iland.

                   *4*
Paa bryggen stod der snese fem,
Og onsket os velkommen hjem.

                   *5*
Men da jeg opad gaten gaar,
En pike staar der paa sytten aar.

                   *6*
jeg talte tiden liljavaand;
Kom raek mig nu din venskaps haand!

                   *7*
Den pike straks i tanker faldt;
En styresmand--det var ei galt!

                   *8*
En deilig mø i ungdoms vaar,
Med oiner blaa og kruset haar.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 10:51 AM

037 - Santiana D (English)

This version of Santiana, Stan Hugill had from the shanty book "Opsang", hails from the port of Stavanger, and is a 'Weistland' version. This reconstruction will be singing as a capstan shanty(faster / first phase of capstan rotation, before the chain, was still vertical below the ship). Here is the English translation by B. Streiffert. It also possible that the song has never been sung, and Hugill just posts a translation of a Norvegian song, whatever, in My opinion, this beautiful translation deserves to use it. And even feel proud of the possibility I will be the first person to singing it this text.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 86).



Santiana D

From Copenhagen, we sailed away,
   - Have away! Santiana!
To the nor'ard then our course we set,
   - Heave away, hurrah for roll an' go!

                        *2*
Through storm and rain, contrary wind,
To Christiansands, oh, we steered in.

                        *3*
One afternoon stood we men four,
Awaiting for to go on shore.

                        *4*
On the warf there stood five girls,
Waiting to wish us welcome home.

                        *5*
As I was rolling up the street,
A teen-age gal I chanced to meet.

                        *6*
To this fair gal I then did talk,
'Oh, let's be friends an' take a walk.'

                        *7*
The girl she thought unto herself,
'To catch a Mate is luck itself!'

                        *8*
She was a nice girl in her teens,
With eyes of blue and curly hair.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 11:02 AM

038 - Round The Bay Of Mexico

A different form of "Santanna" commonly known as "Round the Bay of Mexico", in which there is no reference at all to Santianna either in the solos or refrains, is probably the older Hoosier version as was once sung round the Gulf ports.
I will sing this song as a capstan shanty. And try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Sailing Days" (1991), with "Stormalong John" as a crew.
Last note, this song was recorded two years ago and at the time I record it I didn't have as much knowledge about shanties as I have now so pronunciation can be not perfect.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 87).



Round The Bay Of Mexico


Heave away me bully boys,
   - Wayay, heave away!
Heave away, why don't ye make some noise boys?
   - Round the Bay of Mexico!

Heave away an' around goes she,
Six for you an' seven for me-e,

Heave around an' with a will,
If she don't go she'll stay there still.

Heave away for she's trimmed tight,
Bend yer back if yer wanner sleep ternight.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 11:05 AM

039 - Rio Grande A

This is one of the most popular shanty family in the days of sail. It was not the Mexican Rio Grande about which they were singing but the one further south in Brasil; not "Rio Grande del Nord" but "Rio Grande do Sul". The reference in some versions of the song to "Golden Sand", whether taken literally or symbolically, applies to the southern Brazilian tiver and port, for both banks of the Brazilian Great River are heaped high with sand dunes, and also in the past gold was a commodity found in this district.
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. The last three verses from 15-17 are Other Liverpool Stanzas mentioned by Stan Hugill. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 90, 91).


Rio Grande A

Oh, a ship went a-sailin' out over the Bar,
   - Way for Rio!
They've pointed her bow to the Southern Star,
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, bullies away!
   - Away for Rio!
   - Sing fare-ye-well, me Liverpool gels,
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande!

                         *2*
Oh, say wuz ye niver down Rio Grande?
Them smart senoritas, they sure beats the band.

                         *3*
We wuz sick of the beach when our money wuz gone,
So we signed in this packet to drive her along.

                         *4*
There's some of us sick, there's some of us sore,
We've scoffed all our whack an' we're looking for more.

                         *5*
Our anchor we'll weigh an' the rags we will set,
Them Liverpool judies we'll never forget.

                         *6*
Ye parkee Lane judies we'll 'ave ye to know,
We're bound to the south'ard, oh, Lord let us go!

                         *7*
Oh, pack up yer donkeys an' git under way,
Them judies we're leavin' will git our half-pay.

                         *8*
Cheer up, Mary Ellen, now don't look so glum,
On white-stockin' day ye'll be drinkin' hot rum.

                         *9*
We're a deep-water ship with a deep-water crew;
Ye can stick to the coast, but I'm damned if we do,

                        *10*
It's goodbye to Ellen an' sweet Molly too,
Ye Parkee Lane chowlahs, 'tis goodbye to you.

                        *11*
Now blow, ye winds westerly, long may ye blow,
We're a starvation packet--Good God let us go!

                        *12*
Saltfish an' lobscouse for the next 'alf year,
She's a Liverpool pocket an' her Ol' Man's the gear.

                        *13*
Them Liverpool judies they never use combs,
They combout their locks with a haddock's backbone.

                        *14*
Heve only one pawl, then 'vast havin', me sons,
Sing only one chorus - it's blowin' big guns!

      ***Other Liverpool Stanzas***

                        *15*
An' now we are leavin' the sweet Salthouse Dock,
An' soon we'll be oh a-roundin' the Rock.

                        *16*
We're a Liverpool ship wid a Liverpool crew
Wid a Liverpool mate an' an Old Man too.

                        *17*
We're Liverpool born, an' Liverpool bred,
Oh, thick in the arm, an' thick in the head!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 03 Feb 21 - 11:07 AM

040 - Rio Grande B

"How the Shantyman were chosen?"

Looking up from his sidelong inspection of the dripping links of the anchor chain as one by one they slowly emerge from the muddy surface of the water, the mate, clapping his hands to his mouth and with a roar like the Bull of Basham, queries, "Who's the bloody nightingale among yer? Aw ye men or aw ye cawpses? If there's ruddy shantyman among yer lot of hobos, fer Gawd's sake strike a light, will yer!"

In answer to this challenge, from the cavernous throat of some true son of a Neptune comes the hurricane reply:

       "Oh, say wuz ye niver darn Ri-i-o Grande?"

The refrain, a bit seedyat first, comes from half of the heaving men:

       "Wa-a-ay darn Ri-O!"

The self-imposed shantyman now really gets into his stride:

       "Ooh! Them smart senioritas, they sure beats the band!"

And the sailormen, taking heart, bring in a fuller and beefier refrain:

      "Ror we're barnd for the Ri-i-o Grande!"

A satisfied smile crosses the lips of the mate. He's got a good crowd; the shanty tells him that. "When the men sing right, the ship goes right" was the old sea adage.

Stan Hugill - "Sea Shanties!"

According to Stans Hugill's research "Rio Grande" was heard most on the decks of ships leaving the West Coast of England and Wales than in any other vessels.
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 91).



Rio Grande B

Oh, say wuz ye ever down Rio Grande?
   - Way for Rio!
It's there that the river flows down golden sands.
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, bullies away!
   - Away for Rio!
   - Sing fare-ye-well, me Liverpool gels,
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande

                              *2*
So heave up the anchor, let's get it aweigh,
It's got a good grip, so heave, bullies, 'way-ay!

                              *3*
Oh, where are yiz bound to, my bully boys all?
An' where are yiz bound for to make yer landfall?

                              *4*
We're bound to the south'ard, me bully boys all,
Bound out to the Brazils, me bully boys all.

                              *5*
An' what'll ye do there, me bully boys all?
What job will ye do there, me bully boys all?

                              *6*
We'll dig for red gold, oh, me bully boys all,
We'll dig for a fortune, me bully boys all.

                              *7*
Or die o' the fever, me bully boys all,
Or die o' the fever, me bully boys all.

                              *8*
Heave with a will boys, oh, heave long an' strong,
Sing a good chorus, for 'tis a good song.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Feb 21 - 03:41 PM

041 - Rio Grande C - (Patterson version)

The possible origin of the "Patterson" version from Hugill's book is possibly dated in the XVIII century.
In the sheet music from the Lester Levy Collection, “Nobody Ask’d You” is undated, but the music includes the notation at the top that it was “printed and sold at Carrs Music Store Baltimore.” Benjamin Carr (1760-1831) was a composer, organist, and music publisher who was born in London but came to the United States in 1793. He ran a number of stores, but his Baltimore store closed in 1822 and he left the publishing business entirely in 1831. Any music printed by him would have dated prior to 1831.

"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 92).


Rio Grande C - (Patterson version)

Oh, where are ye goin' to, my pretty maid?
   - Way for Rio!
I'm going a milkin', kind sir, she said.
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, bullies away!
   - Way for Rio!
   - Stead o' milkin' her cow, She wuz courtin' her boy
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande

                              *2*
Oh, have ye a sweatheart, my pretty maid?
'I'm lookin' for one, kind sir,' she said.

                              *3*
Then may I come wid ye, my pretty maid?
'Well, yes, since ye axed me, sir,' she said.

                              *4*
'But I guess yer a bad one, kind sir,' she said.
'Ye want for to love me, but yer dont't want ter wed,'

                              *5*
Jack took her in tow, an' away they did go,
The bulls did a grunt, an' the cows did a low.

                              *6*
They came to a haystack but the maid she wuz shy,
They backed and they filled an' heaved many a sigh.

                              *7*
The haystack capsized an' Jack got all bent,
With hay in his gaff-tops'l, his breeches all rent.

                              *8*
So he left her a-sittin' a-lookin' forlorn,
An' shipped ro the south'ard away round Cape Horn.

                              *9*
Now, all ye young sailors that round the Horn sail,
Don't take a young milkmaid away from her pail.

                              *10*
Or else ye'll regret it an' wish ye were dead,
So don't go a-courtin' in a haystack for a bed.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Feb 21 - 03:56 PM

042 - Rio Grande D

This Shanty of all the work-songs of the sea is the one with the least variation in tune. Some versions give three notes to the final "Rio", others give two.
The main patterns of this shanty are:
   1 - Leaving Liverpool
   2 - Gold Rush Version
   3 - The Milkmaid
   4 - Leaving New York,
   5 - The Fishes,
   6 - The Mail ("Gam").
We have also at least 6 different versions of the chorus.
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 92).


Rio Grande D

A ship went a-sailing out over the bar,
   - Way for Rio!
They've pointed her bow to the southern star,
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, bullies away!
   - Way for Rio!
   - Sing fare-ye-well, me Liverpool gels,
   - An' we're bound for the Rio Grande

                           *2*
Oh, farewell to Sally an' farewell to Sue,
An' you on the pierhead it's farewell to you.

                           *3*
Yeu Bovery laides we's have ye to know,
We're bound to the south'ard--O Lord, let us go!

                           *4*
We,ve a bully good ship an' a bully good crew,
But we don't like the grub, no I'm damned if we do.

                           *5*
Oh fare ye well, all ye ladies o' town,
We,ve left ye enough for to buy a silk gown.

                           *6*
We'll sell our salt cod for molasses an' rum,
An' get back again 'fore Thanksgivin' has come.

                           *7*
Oh, New York town is no place for me,
I'll pack up me sea-chest an' git off to the sea.

                           *8*
Oh, man the good caps'n an' run her around,
We'll heave up the anchor to this bully sound.

*9*
To the Brazils we're bound an' we hope ye don't mind,
We soon will return to the Molls left behind.

*10*
The chain's up an' down now the Bosun did say,
It's up to the hawse-pipe, the anchor's aweigh!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Feb 21 - 04:00 PM

043 - Rio Grande E

This version is apart of the first stanza, the same text as the 'Fishes' version of "Blow The Man Down".
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 92).

PL
Ta wersja z wyjatkiem pierwszej zwrotki, jwsl i chodzi o tekst jest identyczna z "Blow The Man Down" (wersja 'Fishes', tejze).
„Rio Grande” zawsze spiewano przy kabestanie kotwicznym lub windzie kotwicznej i byla to piesn wyjscia z portu. Ta piesn bedzie spiewane jako szanta kabestanowa.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 92).


Rio Grande E

Oh, a ship she wuz rigged, an' ready for sea,
   - Away down Rio!
An' all of her sailors wuz fishes to be.
   - We're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, love away!
   - Away down Rio!
   - Sing fare-ye-well, my bonnie young girl,
   - We're bound for the Rio Grande,

                                 *2*
There wuz once an old skipper, I don't know his name,
But I know that he once played a ruddy smart game.

                                 *3*
When his ship lay becalmed in a tropical sea,
He whisteled all day but he could get no breeze.

                                 *4*
But a seal heard his whistle an' loudy did call,
Just smow yer light canvas, jib spanker, an' all.

                                 *5*
I'll send ye some fish to consult if ye please,
The best way to get ye a nice whistling breeze.'

                                 *6*
Oh, first came the herring, sain', 'I'm King o' the Seas',
He jumped on the poop: 'Oh, the Capen I'll be!'

                                 *7*
Next came the flatfish, they call him a skate:
'If ye'll be the capen, why then I'm the mate.'

                                 *8*
Then next came the hake, he wuz black as a rook,
Sez he, 'I'm no sailor, I'll ship as the cook.'

                                 *9*
Next came the shark with his two rows of teeth,
'Cook, mind you the cabbage, an' I'll mind the beef!'

                               *10*
Then came the eel with his slippery tail,
He climbed up aloft an' he cast off each sail.

                               *11*
Next came to codfish with his chuckle-head,
He jumped in the chains an' began heavin' the lead.

                               *12*
Next came the flounder that lies on the ground,
Sayin', 'Damn yer eyes, chucklehead, mind how ye sound!

                               *13*
Then came the conger, as long as a mile,
He gave a broad grin an' continued to smile.

                               *14*
Then came the porpoise with his pointed snout,
He went to the wheel shoutin', 'Ready about!'

                               *15*
Then came the mackrel with his his pretty striped back,
He hauled aft each street, an' he boarded each tack.

                               *16*
Then came the whale, the biggest in the sea,
Shoutin', 'Haul in yer head sheets, now, hellums a lee!'

                               *17*
Then came the sprat, he wuz smalled o' all,
He jumped on the poop cryin', 'Maintawps'l haul!'

                               *18*
The mackerel the skipper did scoff for his tea,
The herring he salted, the seal harpooned he.

                               *19*
He baited a hook, an' he thougt it a lark,
To catch as he did that hoary ol' shark.

                               *20*
The eel it wuz tasty, the hake it wuz strong,
The flounder he speared with a lance o' three prongs.

                               *21*
The skate he speared next, but the purpose wuz fast,
The conger it grinned an' it grinned to the last.

                               *22*
He caught the ol' whale, which wuz no simple task,
An' soon with whale-oil he had filled up each cask.

                               *23*
With the head o' the codfish he made a fine pipe,
The sprat then he salted, but 'twas only a bite.

                               *24*
The breeze it blew merrily sailed he,
But what an' ol' bastard than skipper must be!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Feb 21 - 04:10 PM

044 - Rio Grande F

"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 93).



Rio Grande F

Oh, Capitain, Capitan, heave yer ship to,
   - Away down Rio!
For we,ve got some mail to be carried home by you.
   - We're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, love away!
   - Away down Rio!
   - Sing fare-ye-well, my bonnie young girl,
   - We're bound for the Rio Grande,

                         *2*
Oh, Cap'tan, you're sailin' to England away,
An' we will not see it for many a day.

                         *3*
Oh, Cap'tan, you've weathered full many a gale,
So have yer ship to for to pick up our mail.

                         *4*
Oh, Cap'tan, ye'll pick up our letters for home,
To carry a letter from us who do roam.

                         *5*
Oh, Captain, Cap'tan, our ensign we'll dip,
Pray tell'em at home that you,ve spoken our ship.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Feb 21 - 04:13 PM

045 - Bound for the Rio Grande (R. R. Terry's Version)

This version is Richard Runciman Terry's version from "The Shanty Book Part I" (1921).
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
In "Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 93), Stan Hugill Mentioned only this version.


Bound for the Rio Grande (R. R. Terry's Version)

I,ll sing you a song of the fish of the sea.
   - Oh Rio
I,ll sing you a song of the fish of the sea
   - And we're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, love away!
   - Way down Rio!
   - So fare-ye-well, my pretty young gel,
   - For we're bound for the Rio Grande.

                              *2*
Sing goodbye to sally, and goodbye to Sue.
And you who are listening, goodbye to you.

                               *3*
Our ship went sailing out over the Bar
And we pointed her nose for the southeren Star.

                               *4*
Farewell and adieu to you laidies of Spain
And were all of us comming to see you again.

                               *5*
I said farewell to Kitty my dear,
And she waved her white hand as we passed the South Pier.

                               *6*
The oak and the ash, and the bonny birk tree
They're all growing green in the North Countrie.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 11:05 AM

046 - Rio Grand (Cecil Sharp Version)

This version is Cecil Sharp's version from "English Folk Chanteys" (1914). Sharp's shantyman sings of what one can see when one arrives in port.
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
In "Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 93), Stan Hugill Mentioned only this version.


Bound for the Rio Grande (R. R. Terry's Version)

I think I heard the old man say:
   - O you Rio,
I think I heard the old man say:
   - We're bound for Rio Grand.

   - And away, for Rio,
   - O you Rio,
   - So fare you well, my bonny young girl,
   - We're bound for Rio Grand.

*2*
O Rio Grand is my native land.
O Rio Grand is my native land.

*3*
It's there that I wound take my stand.
It's there that I wound take my stand.

*4*
She's buxom young maid with a rolling black eye.
She's buxom young maid with a rolling black eye.

*5*
She came from her dwelling a long way from here.
She came from her dwelling a long way from here.

*6*
I wish I was in Rio to-day.
I wish I was in Rio to-day.

*7*
Buckle sailors you'll se there,
With long sea-boots and close cropped hair.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 11:07 AM

047 - Rio Grande (A. Conan Doyle version)

Stan Hugill in the description of this version said, is that his friend Mr. T. E. Elwell informed him that when he was a shantyman he often sang the words of certain song A. Conan Doyle had written in his series "Tales of the High Seas". This was all about a certain pirate "Captain Shankey" of the ship "Happy Delivery".
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 93).


Rio Grande (A. Conan Doyle version)

A trader sailed from Stepney Town,
   - Way down Rio!
With a bag of gold and a silken gown,
   - And we're bound for the Rio Grande,

   - Then away, love away!
   - Way down Rio!
   - Sing fare-ye-well, my pretty young girl,
   - And we're bound for the Rio Grande,

                            *2*
Where is the trader of Stepney Town?
His gold's on the capstan, his blood's on his gown.

                            *3*
Then it's up an' it's over to Stornaway Bay,
Where the whisky is good and the lassies are gay.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 11:09 AM

048 - Rio Grande (Norvegian sailor version)

A few verses are given to Stan Hugill by a Norwegian sailor.
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 94).


Rio Grande (Norvegian sailor version)

Oh, were ye ever at Rio Grand?
   - Rolling Rio!
Oh, were you ever on that strand?
   - To me Rolling Rio Grande,

   - Way Rio!
   - Rolling Rio!
   - Then Sing fare-ye-well, to me pretty young gel,
   - To me Rolling Rio Grande,

                            *2*
Where the Portugee girls can be found,
And they're the girls to waltz around.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 11:11 AM

049 - Oh, Aye, Rio

This song was first printed in a book by Stan Hugill, and he stated that he learned it from an old sailor at Port Adelaide, South Australia. It's a dragging song, totally dirty, so Stan Hugill had to camouflage it a bit, keeping the original theme as much as possible. According to too Stan Hugill, this song is a forebitter.
I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Shanties From The Seven Seas" (1962), with The York & Albany Crew.
Intriguingly, in this song, Stan Hugill only sings himself, without the crew in the chorus.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 96).



OH, AYE, RIO

Oh, lady have you a daughter fine?
   - Oh, aye, Rio!
Oh, lady have you a daughter fine,
Fit for a sailor that's crossed the line.
   - To me way, hay, ho, high, a long, long time ago!
   - To me way, hay, ho, high, a long, long time ago!

*2*
Oh, yes I have a daughter fine,
Oh, yes I have a daughter fine,
Fit for a sailor that's crossed the line.

*3*
But madam, dear madam, she is too young,
But madam, dear madam, she is too young,
She's never been courted by anyone.

*4*
Oh, sailor, oh, sailor, I'm not too young,
Oh, sailor, oh, sailor, I'm not too young,
I've just been kissed by the butcher's son,


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 11:12 AM

050 - A Long Time Ago (A)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Shanties From The Seven Seas" (1962).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 97).



A Long Time Ago (A)

O-ho, there ships they lay in Frisco Bay,
   - Timme WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
There ships they lay in Frisco Bay,
   - Oh a LONG time aGO!

*2*
These smart Yankee packets lay out in the Bay,
All a-waiting a fair wind to get under way,                           

*3*
With all their poor sailors so weak an' so sad,
They'd drunk all their limejuice, no more could be had.

*4*
With all their poor sailors so sick an' so sore,
They'd scoffed all their whack an' they couldn't get more.

*5*
Oh, I sailed out of 'Frisco in a full rigged ship,
I sailed out o' 'Frisco in a full-rigged ship.

*6*
Her masts wuz of silver an' her yards wuz of gold,
Her masts wuz of silver an' her yards wuz of gold.

*7*
We wuz bound for New York with a cargo o' gold,
Bound south 'round the Hotn through the ice an' the cold.

*8*
In eighteen hundred and ninety-four,
We shipped in a drogher bound for Singapore.

*9*
An' I fell in love with young Malay maid,
She swiped all me money, before I wuz paid

*10*
My ol' mum she wrote to me,
She wrote to me to come home from sea.

*11*
Says she 'Me son, ye'll rue the day,
When the girls have blown, lad, all yer pay.

*12*
She sent me some money, she sent me some clothes,
But I spent all the money an' pawned the clothes.

*13*
An' ever since then I have thought of her word,
'Twas the finest advice that a man ever heard.

*14*
An' as soon as I gits me feet on shore,
I,ll ship as a bosun of a little rum store.

*15*
An' if ever I gits me feet on land,
I'll ship as some young lady's fancyman.

*16*
Oh, a long time, an' a very long time,
Tis a very long time since I first made this rhyme.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 11:47 AM

051 - Opsang For Brasiliefareren, Briggen Preciosa (Norwegian)

A Norwegian version from "Opsang" is a good example of the type of verse Henrik Wergeland, the Norwegian composer, wrote to supplant the usual ribald ones. In "Opsang" can be found the other fifty-four verses, He wrote - quite enough to finish a long heave!
"Rio Grande" was always sung at the anchor capstan or windlass, and was an outward-bound song. This song will be singing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 94, 95).



Opsang For Brasiliefareren, Briggen Preciosa

Nu tage vi et langt Farvel
      - O Rio!
med dig, du gamle, norske Fjeld.
      - To my rolling Rio Grande!

      - Way Rio!
      - O Rio!
      - Then sing fare-ye-well, to me pretty young gel,
      - To my rolling Rio Grande!

*2*
Farvel, du gamle Graa! Farvel!
Vi tænke, at du staaer nok lel.

*3*
Vi tænke, at du staaer endda,
mens vi er i Amerika.

*4*
I Golfen under Mexico
vi skifte ei vor norske Tro.

*5*
I Rio og i Pernambuc
paa Norge tænke vi med Suk.

*6*
Ja vestenfore selv Cap Horn
i Hjertet sidder Hjemvees Torn.

*7*
Det bløder, bløder op igjen
i Paradiis-Brasilien.

*8*
Did er det Preciosa skal,
langt udenfor den blaa Kanal.

*9*
Da er det først hun fører Seil,
naar England seer vort Agterspeil.

*10*
Farvel, Europa! Cap Lizard
er Næsen paa din gamle Nar.

*11*
Men herlig som en Aftensky
i Vest gaaer op en Verden ny.

*12*
Did stunder Preciosas Lyst
med Seil saa fuldt som Svanens Bryst.

*13*
Da er det først ved Finisterr`
hun lufter sine hvide Fjer.

*14*
Da er det som en Svane roer
fra Cap Vincent til Mogador.

*15*
Og bagud gaaer den hvide Foss.
Følg os, du vilde Albatross!

*16*
Følg os, du vaade Flyvefisk!
Vi paa Madera faa en Pidsk.

*17*
Det blæser varmt fra Afrika.
Men Pico gi'e vi et Hurra.

*18*
Thi Sneen skinner fra dets Top.
Den frisker norske Hjerter op.

*19*
Tørhænde kommer en Korsar.
Da Gutter, op! Kanonen klar!

*20*
Op flyver da vort norske Flag.
Nu kan det bli'e saa varm en Dag.

*21*
Vi tænke paa Jorsalafar.
Hans Klinge Blaamandshovder skar.

*22*
Vi tænke, at vi hævde maa
Normannanavnet paa det Blaa.

*23*
Den sorte Skonnert braser væk.
Han saae det blinked paa vort Dæk.

*24*
Han saae et Glimt af en Musket
og Spidsen af en Bajonet.

*25*
Han tænkte da: der er vel fleer?
At dreje af det bedste er.

*26*
Han gik i Læ, den slu Pirat.
Da kom en fygende Dravat.

*27*
Men lad staa til! Passat vi faaer.
Mod Vest, mod Vest, mod Vest det gaaer.

*28*
Vi bære af, og Hajen med.
Af Os skal han ei blive feed.

*29*
Jo bi! Der har du din Portion!
Du pryde skal vor Gallion.

*30*
Vi hale ham med Lænker ind,
og spænde ud den Morders Skind.

*31*
Vi bære af mod Vest, mod Vest!
Vi Linjen skar. Det var en Fest.

*32*
Da drak vi Norges Skaal med Skjemt.
Kaptainens blev ei heller glemt.

*33*
Og Rhederen paa sit Kontor,
han fik en Bommert, som var stor.

*34*
Vor vakkre Preciosa med
vi gjorde i en Skaal Besked.

*35*
Hun, før vi vidste Ord deraf,
har gjennemkløvt det store Hav.

*36*
Der blaaner alt i Havets Rand
Brasiliens Slaraffenland.

*37*
Og Rio aabner alt sin Bugt.
Der, Preciosa, hvil din Flugt!

*38*
Som ungen Brud sin Rosenkrands,
sit Flag hun bær' -- vort Fædrelands.

*39*
Forundret knapt Kreolen troer,
at det er Nordens Trikolor.

*40*
Men Negren kommer med sin Sæk.
Saa stuve vi fra Bund til Dæk.

*41*
Og naar vi synes, vi har nok,
saa op med Bramseil! ud med Fok!

*42*
Saa maa vi hjem til gamle Moer.
Hun veed vi efter Kaffe foer.

*43*
Hun sidder bag det gamle Fjeld,
og ønsker os paa Reisen Held.

*44*
Hun ønsker vi maa komme snart.
Tilbage derfor i en Fart!

*45*
Følg os, Atlanterhavets Hai!
Tilbage over Porto Pray!

*46*
Ja fra den takkede Azor
tilbage til det elskte Nord!

*47*
Kanalen aabner sig, Hurra!
Nu er vi ikke langt derfra.

*48*
Da raabe vi til Vinden: blæs!
Vi længes efter Lindesnæs.

*49*
Vi længes svarlig hjem igjen.
Det gjør vi i Brasilien.

*50*
Og Apelsinen gyldenmalt
vi spise tidt til Taarers Salt.

*51*
Men naar vi Norge faa at see,
da er forbi al Sorg og Vee.

*52*
Hvis Visen synes dig for lang,
saa syng en Stub deraf hvergang!

*53*
Matrosen hugger af sin Bus.
Med Visen gjør det samme Puds!

*54*
Og blev den lang, saa glem dog ei,
Preciosa har saa lang en Vei.

Hurra! Hurra! for Singsallijo!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 12:32 PM

052 - A Long Time Ago (B)

EN
According to Stan Hugill, the patterns sang to this shanty He knows, are:
(1) "The 'Frisco Ship" (from an A.B. of the New Zeland tops'l schooner Huia);
(2) The "If" version (Captain Kihlberg, ex-scots barque "Fasces");
(3) The "Noah's Ark" version (Bosun Chenoweth, ex-"Mount Stewart");
(4) A "Roll the Cotton Down" version (this version was very popular);
(5) A "Blow the Man Down" version (from the singing of Paddy Delaney);
(6) An "A-rovin'" version (mainly bawdy);
(7) A "Time for us to go" version;
(8) A "China Clipper" version (from the singing of Jock Anderson).

This song was sung as halyard shanty. I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Shanties From The Seven Seas" (1962).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 98).


A Long Time Ago (B)

A ship lay becalmed off Portland Bill,
   - Timme WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
If she hasn't a fair wind she's layin' there still.
   - Oh a LONG time aGO!

                         *2*
There once wuz a family which lived on a hill,
If they're not dead they're livin' there still.                           

                         *3*
There once wuz a sailor shipped a ballon,
An' if he's still floatin' he's now reached the moon.

                         *4*
There once wuz a farmer in Norfolk did dwell,
If he went off an' died, oh, he's sure bound to hell.

                         *5*
There wuz an ol' woman that lived in a shoe,
If she'dhadten bras more, oh, she'd have forty-two.

                         *6*
There wuz an ol' lady who lived in Dundee,
If she hadn't been sick she'd have gone off to sea.

                         *7*
There wuz an ol' yokel in Sussex did dwell,
He had an ol' wife an' he wished her hell.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 12:42 PM

053 - A Long Time Ago (C) - (WITH PRESENTATION)

The shanty sometimes was sung in lively fashion, other times slow and melancholy, depending on the shantyman. Sometimes it was used at the capstan and then a full chorus been added. This song will be singing as an ancor-capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 99,100).



A Long Time Ago (C)

The ships they lay in 'Frisco Bay,
   - To me WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
The ships they lay in 'Frisco Bay,
   - A LONG time aGO!

   - A long, long time, an' a very long time,
   - To me WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
   - A long, long time, and a very long time,
   - A LONG time aGO!
                     *2*
An' one o' these packets wuz ol' Noah's Ark,
All covered all over with hickory bark.

                     *3*
They filled up her seams with oakum an' pitch,
Her sails wuz baldly in need o' a stitch.

                     *4*
Her bow it wuz bluff an' her counter wuz round,
Her knees wuz so thin, an' her timbers unsound.

                     *5*
Her fo'c'sle wuz low, an' her starn wuz too high,
The hold for the animals never wuz dry.

                   *6*
Her pumps they wuz jammed and her fores'l wuz torn,
She looked like an ol' Spanish galley-eye-orn.

                   *7*
Now this is the gangway the animals went down,
An' this is the hold were they walk round an' round.

                   *8*
Ol' Noah of old he commanded this Ark,
His cargo wuz animals out for a lark.

                   *9*
He boarded the animals, two of each kind,
Birds, snakes, an' jiggy-bugs, he didn't mind.

                   *10*
The animals rolled up, oh, two by two,
The elephant casin' the kangaroo.

                   *11*
The bull an' the cow they started a row,
The bull did his best to horn the cow.

                   *12*
Then Ol' Noah said with a flick o' his whip,
'Stop this bloody row, or I'll scuttle the ship.'

                   *13*
An' the bull put his horns through the side o' the ark,
An' the little black doggie, he started to bark.

                   *14*
So Noah took the dog, put his nose in the hole,
An' ever since then the dog's nose has been cold.

                   *15*
The animals came in three by three,
The elephant ridin' the back o' the flea.

                   *16*
The animals came in four by four,
Ol' Noah wentmad an' he hollered for more.

                   *17*
The animals came in five by five,
Some wuz half-dead, an' some half-alive.

                   *18*
The animals came in six by six,
The hyena laughed at the monkey's tricks.

                   *19*
The monkey was dressed up in soger's clo'es;
Where he got 'em from, God only knows.

                   *20*
The animals came in seven by seven,
Sez the ant to the elephant, 'who are yer shovin'?'

                   *21*
The animals came in eight by eight,
A drunken big chimp an' a scabby big ape.

                  *22*
The animals came in nine by nine,
The sea-lions havin' a bloomin' fine time.

                  *23*
The animals came in ten by ten,
The Ark with a shriek blew her whistle then.

                *24*
An' Noah while working at loading her stock,
Had anchored the Ark with a bloody great rock.

                *25*
Ol' Noah he then hove the gang-plank in,
An' then the long voyage it sure did begin.

                *26*
They hadn't the foggiest where they wuz at,
Untill they piled right up on ol' Ararat.

                *27*
The ol' Ark with a bump landed high an' dry,
And the bear give the turkey a sailor's goodbye.

               *28*
I thought that I heard Ol' Noah say,
Give one more pull lads, an' then belay!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 05 Feb 21 - 12:45 PM

054 - A Long Time Ago (D)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. The stanzas from stanza 7, as suggested in the book (see Roll The Cotton Down), come from "Roll The Cotton Down (C)" from page 154-155 (same book 1st edition).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 100, 101).



A Long Time Ago (D)

Oh, away down south where I wuz born,
   - Timme WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
Among them fields o' golden corn.
   - Oh a LONG time aGO!

*2*
Oh, away down south where I wuz born,
An' away down south where I wuz born                           

*3*
Around Cape Horn where the salty winds blow,
Around Cape Horn through the ice an' the snow.

*4*
Around Cape Horn we've got to go,
Around Cape Horn to ol' Callyo.

*5*
I wisht to rhe Lord that I'd niver bin born
To be all a-ramblin' round Cape Horn.

*6*
Oh, a dollar a day is a white man's pay,
To pump all night and to work all day,

*7*
Oh, away down south around Cape Horn,
Oh, we wisht to Christ we'd niver bin born!

*8*
Oh, away down south one winter's morn,
Oh, away down south around Cape Horn.

*9*
We're bound to Mobile Bay.
We're bound away at the break o' day.

*10*
Oh, around Cape Horn we're boundcto go,
Around Cape Stiff midst the ice an' snow.

*11*
Oh, 'Frisco town is far behind,
An' the gals down south are free an' kind.

*12*
Oh, fare-ye-well we're bound to go,
Never let it be said we,ll forget you.

*13*
So stretch it aft an' start a song,
A bloody fine song and it won't take long

*14*
Oh, stretch yer backs an' haul away,
An' make yer port an' take yer pay.

*15*
I'll sing ye a song if ye'll git me some gin,
That'll bouse this block right down to the pin.

*16*
Oh, rock 'n' shake 'er is the cry,
The bloody topm'st sheave is dry.

*17*
Oh, haul away when she takes the next roll,
Why don't the Mate shake 'er, oh, Gawd blast his soul.

*18*
Oh, I wisht Johnny Slite would keep his luff,
The bastard thinks we've hauled enough.

*19*
Oh, sweat that yard the Mate do say.
Give one more pull, lads, then belay!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 03:18 AM

055 - A Long Time Ago (E)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. The stanzas from stanza 6, as suggested in the book (see "Blow the Man Down" and "The Blackball Line"), comes from "Horraw For The Blackball Line" from page 131 (same book 1st edition).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 101).



A Long Time Ago (E)

I'll sing ye a song of the Blackball Line,
   - Timme WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
That's the Line where ye can shine
   - Oh a LONG time aGO!

*2*
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
That's the Line where I wasted me prime.

*3*
It's when a Blackballer hauls out of the dock,
To see them poor 'Westers', how on deck they flock.

*4*
There's tinkers an' tailors, an' fakirs an' all,
They've all shipped as A.B.s aboard the Blackball.

*5*
It's fore tops'l halyards the Mate he will roar,
It's lay along Paddy, ye son-o-a-whore!

*6*
Blackball ship are good an' true,
They are ships for me an' you,

*7*
If yer wish to find a real goldmine,
Just take a trip on a Blackball ship.

*8*
Just take a trip to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that Yankee school.

*9*
Yankee sailors ye'll see there,
With red-topped boots an' short-cut hair.

*10*
There's Liverpool Pat with his tarpaulin hat,
An' Paddy Magee the Packet Rat.

*11*
There was once a Blackball ship,
That fourteen knots an hour could slip.

*12*
They'll carry ye along through the ice an' snow,
They'll take ye where the winds don't blow

*13*
I've seen the Line rise an' shine,
An' crossed the line 'em many a time.

*14*
Oh, drink a health to the Blackball Line,
Their ships are stout an' their men are fine.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 03:22 AM

056 - A Long Time Ago (F)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. The stanzas from stanza 5, as suggested in the book (see "A-Rovin'"), comes from "A-Rovin'" from pages 48, 49 (same book 1st edition).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 101).


A Long Time Ago (F)

In 'Frisco Town there lived a maid,
   - Timme WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
An' she wuz mistress of her trade.
   - Oh a LONG time aGO!

                     *2*
One nighy I crept from my abode,
To meet this fair maid down the road.

                     *3*
I placed my arm around her waist,
Sez she, "Young man, yer in great haste!"

                     *4*
I put me hand upon her knee,
Sez she, "Young man, yer rather free!"

                     *5*
I put my hand upon her thigh,
Sez she, "Young man, yer rather high!"

                     *6*
I towed her to the Maiden's Breast,
From south the wind veered wes'sou'west

                     *7*
An' the eyes in her head turned east an' west,
And her thoughts wuz as deep as an ol' sea-chest.

                     *8*
We had a drink - of grub a snatch,
We sent two bottles down the hatch.

                     *9*
Her dainty arms wuz white as milk,
Her lovely hair wuz soft as silk.

                     *10*
Her heart wuz poundin' like a drum,
Her lips wuz red as any plum.

                     *11*
We laid down on a grassy patch,
An' I felt such a ruddy ass.

                     *12*
She pushed me over on me back,
She laughed so hard her lips did crack.

                     *13*
She swore that she'd be true to me,
But spent me pay-day fast and free.

                     *14*
In three weeks' time I wuz badly bent,
Then off to sea I sadly went.

                     *15*
In a bloodboat Yank bound round Cape Horn,
Me boots an' clothes wuz all in pawn.

                     *16*
Bound round Cape Stiff through ice an' snow,
An' up the coast to Callyo.

                     *17*
An' then back to the Liverpool Docks,
Saltpetre stowed in our boots an' socks.

                     *18*
Now when I got back home from sea,
A soger had her on his knee.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 03:25 AM

057 - A Long Time Ago (G) - (WITH PRESENTATION)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. The stanzas from stanza 4, as suggested in the book (see "A Hundred Years Ago'"), come from "A Hundred Years Ago'" from page 510 (same book 1st edition).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 101).



A Long Time Ago (G)

Old Bully John from Baltimore
   - Timme WAY, hay, HO,high ho!
Old Bully John from the Eastern Shore
   - Oh a LONG time aGO!

*2*
Old Bully John I knew him well,
But now he's dead an' gone to hell.

*3*
A bully on land an' a bucko at sea,
Old Bully John wuz the boy for me,

*4*
He's as dead as a nail in the lamproom door,
He's dead as nail, that son-o'-a-whore.

*5*
A hundred years have passed an' gone,
'Tis a hundred years since I made this song.

*6*
They used to think that pigs could fly,
Can you believe this bloody lie?

*7*
They thought the stars were set alight
By bunch o' angels every night.

*8*
They thought the word was flat or square,
That old Columbus never got there.

*9*
They though the moon was made o' cheese;
You can believe if yer please.

*10*
They thought that merimaids were no yarn,
But we know better 'cos we can larn.

*11*
They hung a man for making steam,
They pitched his body in a stream.

*12*
Oh, a very long time an' a very long time,
'Tis a hell o' a time since I made this rhyme.

*13*
Oh, don't yiz hear the Old Man say,
Just one more pull, lads, then belay!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 03:28 AM

058 - A Long Time Ago (Harding Barbadian melody version)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. This version has melody preferred by the teacher of the Stan Hugill, the shantyman Harding the Barbadian Barbarian from Barbados. The "y' know" at the end of his second chorus was most effective. The first Stanza of this shanty comes from the notation of Harding's tune description, from page 103, other stanzas come from version H from page 102 (1st ed.).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 102).


A Long Time Ago (Harding Barbadian melody version)

Johnny Jernan' wuz Portugee man,
   - To me WAY, hay, HO, ya, ya!
Ol' Johnny Jernan' wuz Portugee man,
   - A LONG time a-GO, y' know!

There wuz an old lady in Greenock did dwell,
   - To me WAY, hay, HO, ya, ya!
She had three fine sons an' their story I'll tell.

*2*
One was a sailor an' one was a Mate
The third got his Master's a little bit late

*3*
He shipped as the Master of a big clipper ship,
An' out to fair China he made a smart trip.

*4*
The ship he commanded was no ruddy Ark,
But a dandy fine clipper as fast a shark.

*5*
When he reached far Foochow oh there met his fate,
He found him a Chink gal to serve him as mate.

*6*
He spliced this young Chink gal with a pitgail so long,
But later he wished had not met Miss Fong.

*7*
Oh, she wore the trousers an' he wore the skirt,
He was down on his luck an' his pride it was hurt.

*8*
The passage to England was a hell o' a show,
One hundred an' eighteen long days for to go.

*9*
Oh he roused uphis Chink wife an' coursed loud an' long,
Oh, you are the bastard that's caused all this wrong.

*10*
'You're a bloody big Jonah, yer a hoodoo to me,
I've had nought but bad luck since ye came to sea.'

*11*
But when he reached London, the owners did say,
'You've made a smart passage you've earn your pay-day.'

*12*
So he kissed his young Chink wife, gave rum to the crowd,
The hands gave a cheer, boys, so strong an' so loud.

*13*
An' this is the end of my salty story,
Just think o' the luck o' the heathen Chinee.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 03:46 AM

059 - A Long Time Ago (Cecil Sharp Version)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. This version is a Cecil Sharp version from the book "English Folk-Chanteys" - 1914. Unfortunately, it has only three verses. The last five bars make it possible capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 103).



A Long Time Ago (Cecil Sharp Version)

Away down south where I was born,
   - To my WAY - ay - DAY, ha!
Away down south where I was born,
   - A LONG time a-GO

   - twas a long, long time and a very long time,
   - A LONG time a-GO

*2*
O! early on a summer's morn.
O! early on a summer's morn.

*3*
I Made up my mind to go the sea.
I Made up my mind to go the sea.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 03:49 AM

060 - A Long Time Ago (Gordon Hitchcock version)

This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty. Only one stanza is given in Stan Hugill's book.
This version comes from the mentioned "Shell Book of Shanties" (which is actually the wrong title, because the true title is "The Shell Book of Sea Shanties") by Gordon Hitchcock (1952). Fortunately, I found the book, I bought one and lonely available exemplar in the whole online world, and from Germany arrived mail with this book, so I can sing this shanty to you in full four stanzas version.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 104).


A Long Time Ago (Gordon Hitchcock version)

A long, long time and a long time a-go,
   - To me WAY, hay, o-HI-o!
A long, long time and a long time a-go,
   - A LONG time a-GO!

*2*
A smart Yankee packet lay out in the bay:
Awaiting a fair wind to get under way,

*3*
With all her poor sailors all sick and all sore:
They'd drunk all their lime juice, and couldn't get more,

*4*
If she's not had a fair wind she's lying there still:
If she's not had a fair wind she's lying there still.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Feb 21 - 10:30 AM

How many languages do you speak, Jerzy? Are the Norwegian songs sounded out (phonetic) or do you speak it?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 08 Feb 21 - 09:16 AM

I speak Polish (my origin), English, Scottish some of Russian,
German, I understand Slovakian and Czech also I did have learned my
first-degree course Latin and Greek, about my Norwegian shanties, I
do not speak Norwegian, it has been recorded three shanties in
Norwegian by me till now. The effort I made on those three was I
found native Norwegians who record lyrics on audio, and I listen to
it try to remember the pronunciation. I do understand they can be not
good enough for native Norwegians, but I did try my best. Also, the
worth noting is that those shanties are written in quite an odd form,
it is not used language with a kind of Danish way of pronunciation.
You can find the names of people who helped me in those shanties in
the description.
Beware, next my shanty will be "De Hoffnung" - my first German
Shanty.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Feb 21 - 10:18 AM

It is my guess that with an ear for all of those languages that you have a better than average chance of pronouncing the Norwegian words correctly in those songs you're listening to. I haven't listened to every post's song, but I enjoy them when I drop in on the links.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 08 Feb 21 - 04:20 PM

Great stuff, Shogun. A very useful thread being compiled here.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Feb 21 - 03:10 AM

A little explanation of how a single song recreation and record process happens.

Stan Hugill, in his "Shanties From the Seven Seas," gives us shanties and forebiters not only in the English language. He also gives us shanties in foreign Languages such as Norwegian, German, and more, but I cannot confirm what other languages he used, because I'm in the stage of analysis first part of the book.


To achieve the result as close as possible to the authentic origin, I do the following steps to record the song:
Every time, when I start to recreation process after then I copy notes and generate a melody to learn and memorize, If the song is in a Language that I'm unsure about pronunciation, I find somebody who is native to the Language of the song. I ask this person to record for me text when he read it, and this is the basis for learning text to the song. But of course, are other issues like the balance of accents, and slowness or speed up of the sentences, also dynamics of the language can be different between singing and talking. So after recording, I sent the record to a person who helped me with the record.

Do I use records of the songs to learn melodies, yes but I do it only in one unique circumstance when I have an original song signing by Stan Hugill himself. In this situation I think is best to get the authentic sound and soul of the particular shanty. In other situations, I use only my intuition, and knowledge about the type of work when a particular shanty was used.

It is another exception worth noting: even if I have the performance of Stan Hugill, sometimes very rarely, I slow down the tempo of the shanty, especially when records are in later yers of Stan Hugill singing, and it is because I think and this is not only mine opinion, in the last performances of Stan Hugill, he takes more as consideration stage circumstances, i.e. speed up songs to better music and art results.

Generally, about tempo, when I do record, in most cases, especially in pump and capstan shanty I get the assumption is that sailors are tired and not very happy, due to circumstances of they hard live, and work. So the tempo can be a bit slower, but I think is really different when sailors sing the first song in pumps, and how it sounds after 2 hours of pumping. I assume after the first one or two shanties in optimistic speed, tempo stabilized on the slower but constant and still dynamic tempo (In the next posts I will try to explain tempo issue in other types of shanties).

And lastly, when I do not have access to Stan Hugill's performance, I follow my intuition and knowledge about the type of shanty and circumstances when was used. The other sources and records of particular shanty I listen to only after the record been made, so I'm sure they do not have an impact on my version. Of course, in many cases they matched with other sources, but not always, I thig the ratio is 50/50 if of course song is found.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Feb 21 - 11:21 AM

061 - De Hoffnung - (German)

EN
Stan Hugill tells, is that this shanty was popular aboard a German four-masted barque, He was shipped in called "Gustav", hailing from Bremen. The first time Stan Hugill heard this version from Ossie Ziemer, young seamen from the Fresian Islands, would often raise it at t'gallant halyards. To raise up this yard, it was always sung, long haul type halyard shanty(slower tempo), due to the huge weight of the yard.
This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 104).


De Hoffnung

De Hoffnung wor hunnert Dag ünner wegs,
         - to my way, hay, hoday.
Se seil von Hamborg no Valparaiso.
         - a long time ago.

             *2*
Se seilte good und se seilte hart,
Se harr so'ne gode kostbare Fracht.

             *3*
Un as de Ool nu flucht un gnattert,
Dor keem de Düvel över de Reeling klattert.

             *4*
Wenn mi in tein Dag nenn Kanal du bringst,
Denn krigst mien Seel, so woor as du stinkst.

             *5*
De Pott leep negentein Mielen toletzt,
Dor harr de Düvel de Skyseils bisett.

             *6*
Un as se nu kemen in'n Kanal to Stell,
Dar seegt de Düvel "Nu her mit de Seel!".

             *7*
Dar seeg de Ool „Nu lot di man tiet",
"We goot to Anker bi Cape St. Patric".

             *8*
De Düvel de weer vör Freid ganz weg,
He leep op de Back, sett de Anker op slip.

             *9*
De ole Timm'mann har grote Freid,
He harr den Düvel sien'n Steert mitvertäut.

             *10*
Un as de Anker nu suust an den Grund,
Suust de Düvel mit, disse Swienehund.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 10 Feb 21 - 12:58 AM

It's Plattdeutsch. Different pronunciation than Standard German.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 10 Feb 21 - 01:42 PM

Gibb Sahib

Thanks for your attention, this is great news for me, the shanty expert such you, look at it.
I will gently ask you to be a little bit more precise in your comments. Do you mean the song needs to be singing in Plattdeutsch? I'm not sure what you mean?
About this what says Hugill on page 105 first edition of "Shanties From the Seven Seas", is "Low German of Hamburg", which is actually called: "Hamborger Platt" which is a variety of standard German.
To be honest, I did not been as precise to find a person with "Hamborger Platt" accent, however, this is a good point, for the next shanty in German, I will try to find a person with this particular accent, but I cannot promise it until somebody agrees.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 10 Feb 21 - 02:58 PM

Gibb Sahib

So now is the question, is that "Plattedeutsh" is the same as "Hamborger Platt", I cannot answer this question and need to be researched further, and is not an easy case for me, here one of German explanation of the case:

...Platt or Plattdeutsch is the slang term for the Low German language. This consists of a large number of local dialects, which are often provided with the place name to distinguish them, for example, Oldenburger Platt, East Frisian Platt, Sauerländer Platt, or Heidjer Platt spoken in the Lüneburg Heath.

Wooden beams with the inscription
The term "Heidjer Platt" belongs, like other dialects, to different Lower Saxony dialect groups: to North Lower Saxony in the northwest and to Ostfälisch (Heideostfälisch) in the southeast. The dividing line runs roughly along the Uelzen-Celle-Wedemark line. These dialects can still be found frequently in everyday life today. Neighboring dialects are Holsteiner Platt, Hamburger Platt, the dialects around Bremen, and the East Westphalian dialects further ...

source:
naturpark lueneburger

Seems to be related, but are they pronounce exactly the same?
So maybe you have some other sources, which is giving some light, how German sailor language sound, or you just base of note from "Shanties From the Seven Seas"?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 11 Feb 21 - 02:14 AM

About difference between: "Plattedeutsh" and "Hamborger Platt"

Here two native Germans who asked my question about the difference between the two varaieties of German:

Source One:
1. Plattdeutsch ( Low German) is a germanic language variety spoken especially in northern Germany, depending in the Region you can find plenty of under categories such as ostfriesisch, Oldenburger platt, Hamburger platt and many more.
So the answer to your question is: No it's Not the Same, Hamburger Platt is an under category of Plattdeutsch
2. Following Link will direct you to an excellent Video to learn the Song, as it's Not sung by are couir. https://youtu.be/CzJNM2QF7qU

Source Two:
"Plattdeutsch ist eine eigene Sprache mit eigener Grammatik! Haben es noch in der Schule gelernt! Die Hamburger sprechen einen Dialekt! Und auch das Friesische ist eine völlig eigenständige Sprache die aber auch gar nicht mit dem Platt und dem Hamburgischen Dialekt zu tun hat!".
English Translation:
"Low German is its own language with its own grammar! Learned it in school! The people of Hamburg speak a dialect! And Frisian is also a completely independent language that has nothing to do with the Platt and the Hamburg dialect!".

That is tented me to opinion to that dialect are different, or at least German natives see this difference clearly. Of course to find what is a difference in those dialects is out of the scope of my research, but I know for sure, I need to find native German, who speak in "Hamborger Platt", to be close as possible to recreate further, German shanties and forebitters from Stan Hugill's book.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 11 Feb 21 - 02:50 AM

Moin, moin! (greeting in Platt)

"Plattdeutsch" = German name for the language/dialect
"Low German" = English name for the language/language
"Platt" = short name of it

Contrast with "Hochdeutsch" = "High German" = what tends to be considered "standard" German.

Plattdeutsch is especially associated with Hamburg (called "Hamborg" in Plattdeutsch). So, "Hamborger Platt."

Hamburg is the seaport most associated with German shipping, so most of the sailor songs are in Plattdeutsch. If I remember correctly, only 1 or 2 of the "German" songs in Hugill's book are High German. The rest are Low German.

Plattdeutsch / Low German is slightly more similar to Dutch/Nederlands and English than High German.

Plattdeutsch pronunciation is different. For example, in Standard German the letter "S" makes Z sound of "Zebra." In Plattdeutsch, S makes S sound of "Seven." The orthography/spelling resembles Dutch. "R" has "rolled" sound.

Pronunciation of "Hamborg" is like /hamboich/.

I think some of the German shanty choirs "convert" the Plattdeutsch words/pronunciation to Standard German, so be careful when you listen to examples.

I think Hannes Wader sings with proper pronunciation.
https://youtu.be/gHtybtPxrEM

I am no expert on this. I'm just sharing what I learned after studying to sing the Plattdeutsch songs.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 11 Feb 21 - 03:11 AM

Gibb Sahib

Thanks for your comment, now I do know about another bit of the puzzle, to bring me closer to authenticity. You point me to detail I miss. So now I will try to select the native speakers more carefully. If you see other bits I should focus on, please let me know, so my work will be better.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 11 Feb 21 - 03:50 AM

I will try to compare Standard German, Platt, Dutch, and English. (It is my **attempt** to convert to Standard German and Dutch equivalent. Someone will correct me, but I think it is close enough for the purpose.)

STANDARD GERMAN:
Und als sie jetzt kommen in den Kanal um zu Stelle
Dort sagt der Teufel, "Jetzt hier mit der Seele!"
[Listen to pronunciation]

PLATT:
Un as se nu kemen in'n Kanal to Stell,
Dar seggt de Düvel, "Nu her mit de Seel!"
[Listen to Hannes Wader recording for pronunciation]

DUTCH:
En als ze nu komen in het kanaal om te stellen,
Daar zegt de duivel: "Nu hier met de ziel!"

ENGLISH literal translation:
An' as they now come in the Channel to stall (anchor)
There says the Devil, "Now here with the soul!"


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 12 Feb 21 - 10:10 AM

062 - De Hoffnung - (English version)


Stan Hugill tells, is that this shanty was popular aboard a German four-masted barque, He was shipped in called "Gustav", hailing from Bremen. The first time Stan Hugill heard this version from Ossie Ziemer, young seamen from the Fresian Islands, would often raise it at t'gallant halyards. To raise up this yard, it was always sung, long haul type halyard shanty(slower tempo), due to the huge weight of the yard.
This song was very popular in English and American Ships. It was probably, in the nineties of XIX century of the most-used halyard shanty of them all. Even the German and Scandinavians popularized versions in their own tongues. This song was sung as halyard shanty.
Here is the English translation by Ingo Scharf. It also possible that the song has never been sung at sea, and Hugill just posts a translation of a German song, whatever, in My opinion, this beautiful translation deserves to use it. And even feel proud of the possibility I will be the first person to singing it this text.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 105).



De Hoffnung - English Translation



De Hoffnung was a hundreed days under way,
         - to my way, hay, hoday.
She sailed from Hamburg to Valparaiso.
         - a long time ago.

*2*
She sailed good and she sailed hard,
She had such a fine and costly cargo.

*3*
And as the Old Man swore and cursed,
The Devil came climbing over the rail.

*4*
If you bring me to the Channel in ten days time,
Surely as you stink you will get my soul.

*5*
The old hulk, at last, went nineteen knots,
THe Devil had the skysails set.

*6*
And when she came to the channel to anchor,
Then said the Devil, 'Give me your soul.'

*7*
Then said the Old Man, 'Take your time,
We have to anchor by Cape St. Patric".

*8*
The Devil now was more than overjoyed,
He ran up the fo'c'sle-head to let go the anchor.

*9*
The old carpenter was greatly pleased,
He had spliced the Devil's backside to the anchor.

*10*
And as the anchor went down to the ground,
The Devil went with it--the dirty big hound!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 13 Feb 21 - 10:05 AM

... continue on "Platedeutsh"

In conversation with Simon Spalding, which is an expert on shanties, world folk music, and musicologist who play multiple traditional instruments, also he is passionate about languages of the world. For my question: Is there "Hamborger Platt" any unique and differ from Plattdeutch" or other types, in the context of Stan Hugill's notes about language matter used in German shanties?

the answer was:

"To answer your question about Plattdeutsch - they use this term for the local dialect all over northern Germany, for dialects which are not all the same. However, I can see- from more experience in the countryside than Stan had - that what he calls “typical Hamburg sailor dialect “ is identical to typical "Ostfriesian country dialect “. This because in the past, if a young man didn’t have enough local work, he could always go to Hamburg or Bremen to find a berth on a merchant ship (often a British one), or go to Wilhelmshafen ( when it was finished) to join the navy. For young Ostfriesian males of strong mind and body, the sea has been a “default employment “ for a long time- you can still sense it."

So this slightly corrects me to move from identifying actual German sailors' dialect from "Hamborger Platt" into "Ostfriesian country dialect “. And this is probably the native dialect that "De Hoffnung" has been sung.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 14 Feb 21 - 05:04 AM

Shogun,

Just figure out how to pronounce it! Call it whatever you want; you're making it too complicated with all these names. :)

I don't see the point in reading words from a book in a foreign language without knowing how to pronounce the words.

You had called it a "German" song, and I also noticed one thing you were doing in pronunciation was Standard German style: Pronouncing "S" like Z in English "zebra." But in Platt (pick a dialect!) the S should be like S in Italian "salami". That's different than Standard German.

There are Platt songs in Hugill and there are Standard German songs in Hugill. You'll need to distinguish them.

LOW GERMAN
De Hoffnung
De Hamborger Veermaster
Wat Wi Doht
De Runer Von Hamborg
No den Süden to...
Magelhan x 2
De Kock

HIGH GERMAN
Die Gute Alte Brigg
Es Gingen Drei Mädchen
Upidee, Upidah
Frisch Auf, Alle Mann an Deck
Hamburg, Du Schöne Stadt
Das Sampanmädchen


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 16 Feb 21 - 04:11 AM

063 - California

Shortly after the young congressman, Abraham Lincoln came home from Washington and settled down again to the practice of law in Springfield, Illinois, there were announcements in news-papers occasionally, such as, "All who are interested in the California expedition will meet at candle-light to-night in the courthouse." California then was a place to talk about, to guess, and wonder about. The news came from Sutter's Creek: ten men shook pay dirt through hand screens and found a million dollars apiece in gold nuggets; the San Francisco city council adjourned without setting a date when it would meet again, churches closed their doors, newspapers stopped printing, ships lay in the harbor with no sailors, cooks, and soldiers ran away from military forts. A free-for-all rush started to the gold-digging: a spade sold for $1,000.00. It was news that made New York and London sit up. Across the Great Plains came wagon trains; in ten miles along the Plate River, a traveler counted 450 wagons. At the trial's end was gold and California...

This shanty is the first song opening the "Sacramento" family. This shanty was always sung at the capstan and especially when raising the 'mud-hook'. Stan Hugill in "Shanties From the Seven Seas" gives us only one verse, it comes from a book called "The American Songbag" by Carl Sandburg (1927). Fortunately, I found this book so I will be very proud to sing it for you, in full five stanzas version.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 106).


California


When formed our band, we are all well manned,
To journey a far to the promised land,
The golden ore is rich in store,
on the banks of the Sacramento shore,

   - Then ho, boys, ho, To California go,
   - There's plenty of gold in the world I'm told,
   - On the banks of the Sacramento shore.

*2*
As oft we roam o'er the dark sea's foam,
We'll not forget kind friends at home,
But memory kind still brings to mind
The love of friends we left behind.

*3*
We'll expected our share of the coarset fare,
And sometimes sleep in the open air.
On the cold damp ground we'll all sleep sound
Except when the wolves go howling round.

*4*
As we explore to the distant shore,
Filling our pockets with the shining ore,
How it will sound as the shout goes round,
Filling our pockets with a dozen of pounds.

*5*
The gold is there almost anywhere;
We dig it out rich with an iron bar,
But where it is thick, with spade or pick
We take out chunks as big as a brick.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 19 Feb 21 - 04:29 AM

064 - Sacramento (A)

This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook". The origin of this shanty has many controversies. Due to tune, form, and "Hoodah" or "Doodah" chorus, it has long been associated with Stephen Foster's "Camptown Races". C. F. Smith claims this shanty came after the minstrel ditty, it is very curious that a new set of words should have been fitted to the chorus of "Camptown Races", while it was still a new song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 107, 108).



Sacramento A

As I wuz rollin' down the strand,
   - Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah!                                             
I met two fairies hand in hand,
   - Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah day!

   - Blow, boys, blow!
   - For Californ-eye-O!
   - There's plenty o' gold so I've bin told,
   - On the banks o' the Sacramento

               *2*
I chose the one with the curly locks,
She let me chase her o'er the rocks,

               *3*
I chased her high, I chased her low,
I fell down an' broke me toe.

               *4*
Off to the doctor I did go,
An' I showed him my big toe.

               *5*
In came the doctor with a bloomin' big lance,
'Now, young sailor, I'll make you dance!'

               *6*
In came the nurse with a mustard poultice,
Banged it on, but I took no notice.

               *7*
Now I'm well and free from pain,
I'll never court flash gals again.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 19 Feb 21 - 08:18 AM

Hi Shogun
Why don't you tell us a bit about yourself?

Fascinating conversation between you and Gibb.

First verse of 'Sacramento A' has an important error. Your 'fairles' are 'fairies', which is of great interest to me as I'm interested in the history of the Port of Goole where many German ships docked (still do). The local girls of the night are called locally 'dock fairies'. There is a TV programme on Youtube from the 70s 'Gosling's Travels' that interviews some of the fairies on how the German seamen are much more generous than the locals.

Coincidentally I also sing a recently written song by a friend of mine about the girls of the Reaperbahn in Hamburg, the St Pauli Girls. Great song.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 19 Feb 21 - 11:52 AM

Steve Gardham

Yes, you absolutely right about the word 'fairles', It happens because of two of the things:
One    - is because I probably not understand 100 % of nautical terminology, and tars vocabulary (but I do try hard to do so).
Second - The first verses of songs in "Shanties From the Seven Seas", are written under music notation, in kind of the 'Handwriting fashion', and letters are really small, so I just misread, I checked it again with a magnifying glass, and it confirmed, you right. I will try to ask the admin to change it for me.

I will be really happy if I could add this "fairies" story to my YT Description, it could be great if I can quote your name.

About the conversation between Me and Gibb Sahib, Gibb is the person who is one of my mentors, in fact, He doesn't know about it, but His recording of Stan Hugill book, and gives a billion lines of really knowledgeable pieces of information about shanties, and maritime folk. Even more because now also I have a chance to read his book: "Boxing the Compass" (not finished yet, but already can say is a great source of knowledge), which gives a more formal way for me to deep diving into shanties and maritime knowledge. It is really great news is that He look at my thread, and already pointed out some great details about the "Dialects" of German shanties.

A bit about myself:
I love the shanties and forebitters, but my love for shanties comes from my general interest in music. My first Interest was a protest and freedom songs of Polish Bard Jacek Kaczmarski, was the time when between the civilized world and my country it was an Iron Curtain, and songs from "West" we could listen only in Radio "Free Europe", what transmitted from London (as far as I remember), in those times I took the classic guitar to my hands, and with happiness, I used it till now. The music from the west also was smuggling in the luggage of those lucky people who could travel to "West Countries". I remember it was two types of passports, one for countries of the Warsaw Pact (this one was possible to achieve), and an unlimited one (this one can have very few people). So I played on a guitar till my sailing start, around 1990ish, from this time I play and sing sailor songs, sea songs, and everything that was on Polish sailor songbooks.

The true attention and happiness to real understand shanties is about maybe 2-3 years, this time I try to use a really right academic approach, and more. I try to get all the most important books to read about shanties as close original as possible. My hunting also includes getting all possible original records of Stan Hugill, because I believe, his one song is worth a thousand books. Before every my record I try to imagine work, with this particular shanty, so this is the reason, for crazy movements on some of my records. For example, when I singing capstan shanty, I physically push the desk towards the wall, due to lack of capstan.
Since some times when I realized is that guitar doesn't really been an instrument used on boards of the merchant ships, so I start playing in a concertina. My mentors apart from Gibb, but this time I have contact with them are Marek Szurawski, Simon Spalding, and Jim Mageean, those three great shantymen are so kind to help me a lot on my research.

My last activity to get closer to recreate the original shanty in an authentic way is "Erie Maritime Museum and Brig Niagara Online Sail Training Course", to understand better, work on board, and also get a better understanding of vocabulary.
I hope Steve Gardham will be enough about myself but feel free to ask further questions, and of course, I will be really happy if Gibb Sahib and other mudcat members will be keen to help me achieve my ultimate goal, which is: get back to shanty to people in the way they sound on the greatest time.

NOTE! - my 'fairles' mistake was corrected by the admin, thanks really for this.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Reinhard
Date: 20 Feb 21 - 07:35 AM

It's Reeperbahn in Hamburg, Steve, with two e.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 20 Feb 21 - 01:33 PM

Hi Reinhard. Yes, I should have checked but we pronounce it 'Raperbahn' anyway. What would be the Hamborger Platt pronunciation?

You can use freely anything I post, Shogun. I presume you have a copy
of Stan's 'The Bosun's Locker' and a great companion to 'Shanties from the Seven Seas'. Gibb is also my first port of call if I want to know about chanty history.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 20 Feb 21 - 01:42 PM

"Fairy" was also late 19th century U.S. slang for a young woman.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 21 Feb 21 - 01:42 AM

>What would be the Hamborger Platt pronunciation?

"Raperbahn" as you said.

When I went there, as soon as I emerged from the underground, one of the "fairies" had grabbed my arm and was trying to pull me somewhere. They'll block your path and you literally have to push them out of the way if you want to make progress down the street. (That is, if you visit as a lone gentleman.) Then there's the one alley, with barricades at each end, that non-working women are forbidden to enter. I understood that many were Polish, incidentally. By dawn, I had figured out how to sort of stand so nonchalantly that I wasn't propositioned anymore!

I believe there was one bar, quite close, called "De Hamborger Veermaster."

I listened to a German guy tell me a LONG story in one of the bars, only nodding and smiling as I could guess it was time to nod and smile. He finally ended his spiel and asked, "Right?" I said "Sorry, I don't speak German." He was a little angry! It was an unusual experience for me because I'm used to traveling places where I look different than most of the population, but there they could assume I was local and people kept saying things to me that I could barely understand -- though Platt, like Dutch, is one of the closest languages to English.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 21 Feb 21 - 03:37 AM

Steve Gardham

Yes, I do have a copy of Stan's 'The Bosun's Locker', and thanks for permission, the description now is updated, here current description:

"This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook". The origin of this shanty has many controversies. Due to tune, form, and "Hoodah" or "Doodah" chorus, it has long been associated with Stephen Foster's "Camptown Races". C. F. Smith claims this shanty came after the minstrel ditty, it is very curious that a new set of words should have been fitted to the chorus of "Camptown Races", while it was still a new song.
The 'fairies', which is of great interest to me as I'm interested in the history of the Port of Goole where many German ships docked (still do). The local girls of the night are called locally 'dock fairies'. There is a TV program on Youtube from the 70s 'Gosling's Travels' that interviews some of the fairies on how the German seamen are much more generous than the locals (thanks to Steve Gardham from "The Mudcat Caffe" forum, for the explanation and story of the 'fairies' word).
"Fairy" was also late 19th century U.S. slang for a young woman.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 107, 108)."

Lighter

Thanks for the story, it is great to know this kind of slang bit, so it can be useful for understanding American chanteys.

Gibb Sahib

This is a great story, very intriguing to me is that you visited Germany and when it was if I can ask?
Also, you pointed out quite an intriguing point in "The Boxing Compass" about the origin of chanteys at all. Very intriguing to Me is the question, where you get access to "Atlantic Monthly"(1858), "Oberlin Students Monthly"(1858), and "Riverside Magazine"(1868)?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 23 Feb 21 - 08:14 AM

065 - Sacramento (B)

This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
Sacramento came into been aboard the great ships of those times "Sea Witch", "Flying Cloud", "Romance of the Seas", and so on, at the time of California Gold Rush (1849). At the same time was published almost exact same song Stephen Foster's "Camptown Races", which was first is hard to say. Did foster copy his song from shanty? Colcord definitely states that this shanty is "slaver minstrel' song "Camptown Races". Terry, although he doesn't say so outright, seems to think that the shanty came first.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 108).


Sacramento B

Oh, as I was walkin' down the street
   - Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah!
A charmin' gal I chanet to meet.
   - Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah day!

   - Blow, boys, blow!
   - For Californ-eye-O!
   - There's plenty o' gold so I've bin told,
   - On the banks o' the Sacramento

            *2*
The gal was fair an sweet to view,
Her hair so brown an' her eyes so blue

            *3*
I raised me hat an' said 'How do?',
Sez she, 'Quite well, no thanks to you'

            *4*
I asked her if she take a trip
A-down the docks to see my ship

            *5*
She quickly answered, 'Oh, dear, no.
I tank you but I cannot go.

            *6*
'My love is young, my love is true,
I wouldn't leave my love for you'.

            *7*
So quickly then I strode away,
I'd not another word to say

            *8*
An' as I bade this gal adieu,
I said that gals like her were few.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 25 Feb 21 - 03:00 AM

066 - Sacramento (C)

This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
This version the Cape Horn one is the most popular one. Stan Hugill thing this version was the original one, and it can be sung to either tune or to a mixture of both tunes, depending on the number of syllables in the verses.
This version I will try to recreate is capstan, and I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - „Sailing Days” (1991). Last note, this song was recorded two years ago and at the time I record it I didn't have as much knowledge about shanties as I have now so pronunciation can be not perfect.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 109).


Sacramento C

Oh around Cape Horn we are bound for to go
   - To me Hoo-dah! To me Hoo-dah!
Around Cape Horn through the sleet an' the snow,
   - To me Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah day!

   - Blow, boys, blow!
   - For Californ-eye-O!
   - There's plenty o' gold so I've bin told,
   - On the banks of the Sacramento!

             *2*
Oh around the Horn with a mainskys'l set,
Around Cape Horn an' we're all wringin' wet.

             *3*
Oh, around the Horn in the month o' May,
Oh, around the Horn is a very long way.

             *4*
Them Dago gals we do adore,
They all drink vino an' ask for more.

             *5*
Them Spanish gals ain't got no combs,
They comb their locks with tunny-fish bones.

             *6*
To the Sacramento we're bound away,
To the Sacramento's hell o' a way.

             *7*
We're the buckos for to make 'er go,
All the way to the Sacramento.

             *8*
We're the bullies for to kick her through,
Roll down the hill with a hullabaloo,

             *9*
Starvation an' ease in a Yankee ship,
We're the bullies for to make 'er rip.

             *10*
Santander Jim is a mate from hell,
With fists o' iron an' feet as well.

             *11*
Breast yer bars an' bend yer back,
Have an' make yer spare ribs crack.

             *12*
Round the Horn an' up to the Line,
We're the bullies for to make 'er shine

             *13*
We'll crack it on, on a big skiyoot,
Ol' Bully Jim is a bloody big brute.

             *14*
Oh, a bully ship wid a bully crew,
But the mate is a bastard through an' through.

             *15*
Ninety days to 'Frisco Bay,
Ninety days is damn good pay.

             *16*
Oh, them wuz the days of the good ol' times,
Back in the days of the Forty-nine.

             *17*
Sing an' have an' heave an' sing,
Heave an' make them handspikes spring.

             *18*
An' I wish to Gold I'd niver bin born,
To go a-ramblin' round Cape Horn.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 25 Feb 21 - 09:51 AM

That's some long anchor chain/cable on that last one!:-)

I don't believe I've seen any evidence that Foster took any of his material from pre-existing songs.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 25 Feb 21 - 04:09 PM

Steve Gardham

18 verses for anchor heave is not much, to be honest, I talk with some experienced people, about the matter of heaving anchor. So Jim Mageean, Marek Szurawski, and Simon Spalding, and the conclusion were, the standard heave on a merchant ship was between 30 minutes up to one hour. This conclusion is kind of confirmed by Stan Hugill in his book, on page 94 first edition of "Shanties From the Seven Seas", in the description of the: "Opsang For Brasiliefareren, Bryggen Preciosa" capstan shanty, which have 54 verses, and I been proud to sing this shanty in full. Stan Hugill says: "In Opsang can be found the other forty-three verses he wrote - quite enough to finish a long heave!".
To sang this shanty, it took me around 33 minutes. But I'm not sure if the tempo wasn't too fast.
And in yesterday's conversation with Simon Spalding, reveal another not discussed never fact about the tempo of the shanties, especially anchor-capstan ones. Namely, I'm talking about, the people in nowadays try to do presentations on traditional sailing ships, but I think they do not take as a factor much much smaller crews, also much much bigger ships. Just imagine the difference to heave anchor on Joseph Conrad (Mystic Seaport Museum) with 20 people of the crew, and compare it to heave on Sedov or Krusenstern, with not sure much probably fewer people. In this case, the tempo drops drastically, also we have to add for example fact that half of the crew was "Shanghaied", others have a hangover from last night's Sailor Town parties.

What he really needs help with is whether anyone in our forum knows is that exists some books contain information such as the number of crew, officers, and so on, in certain merchant ships. I dug only one value from a book about german ships, and was informed about the crew on Flying P-Liner "Preussen" has 17-23 crew members.

About evidence of the Foster materials, well, I do not know more about him than Stan Hugill gives to us.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 25 Feb 21 - 05:02 PM

Villiers' books contain a lot of that type of information but they are referring to post 1900.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 03:02 AM

This might be clear already, but this "Cape Horn version" doesn't represent a song that was ever sung as such. Hugill has, I think, just thrown together miscellaneous verses, some that seem to pertain to a "Cape Horn - Gold Rush" theme and others that are floaters. Hugill may have heard someone sing several of these verses together in a single performance, but it's most likely he has created a composite based on verses he heard (or READ) from various sources. He may even have put some of his own verses in at the very time of writing.

It only appears as a "version" because of how he has grouped it within other phenomena. On one side: Evidently he noticed that more than one (we hope) person who sang "Sacramento" started off with the "As I was walking down the strand..." idea (Davis and Tozer was one source for this), and then would continue that bawdy theme in a narrative fashion. On the other side: He notes that some people basically sang the words to "De Camptown Ladies." In between these is just "Sacramento," a chanty that has no set lyrics (aside from the chorus) and which can include ideas from wherever. Hugill decided, I think, that since the California Gold Rush was contemporary, he'd "file" verses on that theme under the heading of a "version." I'm really skeptical of calling any thing a "version" in chanties.

The verses offered in various sources tend to be common or nondescript lines or floaters, e.g.

Oh the Shanghai race is ten miles long
The Shanghai race is ten miles long

In the Black Ball Line I served my time, ?
In the Black Ball Line I served my time,

We're bound for California I heard the old man say;
We're bound for California this very good day.

New York City is on fire
New York City is on fire

A bully ship and a bully crew,
A bully mate, and a captain, too,

Went to the river and I couldn't get across

As I was a walking down Liverpool street

As I was out upon the road one day,
Says I, “Old man, your horse is lame,” (floater from "Poor Old Man")

Oh, heave, my lads, oh heave and sing,
Oh, heave and make them oak sticks spring,

My inclination would just be to say "This is what Hugill said," rather than to use what Hugill said to state something definitive about the songs.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 10:39 AM

'I'm really skeptical of calling any thing a "version" in chanties.'
???? Me too


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 11:13 AM

Gibb Sahib

I'm very interested in, what evidence you used to create a theory about Stan Hugill's "Cape Horn" version of Sacramento. I do not know any evidence to prove is that this version of "Sacramento" is fake. Even more than this, he explicitly says: "The most popular version was the Cape Horn one. It was probably the original one..."

"He may even have put some of his own verses" - Well, I don't want to use argument what you mentioned in your book "If Hugill says is good enough to me", but Stan Hugill was a shantyman in a real shanty environment, and if he sang extra verse or two, they became a shanty verse. So now is the question is, isn't this way shanty been created? So yes, this is the advantage of Stan Hugill, namely if He invents some verse or shanty, as a shantyman, it automatically becomes shanty as soon as first time been used for work.

Of course, we can dispute about did he do this compilation of the verses after, when he did not sail already, but this is pointless unless we have evidence.

But now we have an additional question, is that the "Cape Horn" theme, been unusual for this shanty? I did research on My library, and I get interesting findings. What I found is that the "Cape Horn" theme appears only in American Collectors: Colcord, Harlow, and Doerflinger, in English Collectors: Ferris and Tozer, Smith, Sharp and in their books theme not exist, exception is Stan Hugill.


If anyone wants to analyze those "Cape Horn" theme mentioned collectors, here I retyped them down:




"Cape Horn" related versions of Sacramento:

1. J. C. Colcord "Songs of American Sailormen" (1938)

A bully ship and a bully crew,
   - Doo-da, Doo-da!
A bully mate and a captain too,
   - Doo-da, Doo-da-day!

   - Then blow, ye winds, Hi-oh,
   - For Californy O!
   - There's plenty of gold, so I've been told,
   - on the banks of Sacramento!

        *2*
Round Cape Horn in the month of May,
Round Cape Horn in the month of May

        *3*
We came to a land where the cocktail flows,
We came to a land where the cocktail flows

        *4*
Came to a river and I couldn't get across,
Jumped on a slaver* and I thought he was hoss





2. J. C. Colcord "Roll And Go" (1924)

   - same as in "Songs of American Sailormen"





3. F. P. Harlow "The Making Of A Sailor" (1928)

Oh, New York's race course is nine miles long.
   - To me hoodah! To me hoodah!
Oh, New York's race course is nine miles long.
   - To me hoodah! hoodah day!

   - Then it's blow, my buly boys, blow,
   - for Californio,
   - There's plenty of gold so I've been told
   - on the banks of Sacramento.

        *2*
A bully ship and a bully crew,
A bully mate and a skipper too.

        *3*
Oh, New York's race track, where we stood,
We bet on all they said was good.

        *4*
Our watch, our shoes and every rag,
But lost our money on a bob-tail nag.

        *5*
Our money all gone we shipped to go
Around Cape Horn, where strong wids blow.

        *6*
We're bound for Californi-o;
For gold and banks of sacramento.





4. F. P. Harlow "Chanteying aboard American Ships" (1962)

   - same as in "The Making Of A Sailor"






5. W. M. Doerflinger "Shantymen and Shantyboys! (1951)

It Was in the year eighteen hundred and forty nine,
   - With me hoodah, and me hoodah,
It Was in the year eighteen hundred and forty nine,
   - A with me hoodah, hoodah ay!

   - Blow, boys, blow,
   - for Californi-aj! Ah,
   - there is lots of gold, oh, so I've been told,
   - Upon the banks of the Sacramento

        *2*
Were Going around the Horn and home again!
Were Going around the Horn and home again!

        *3*
We sailed away one day in May,
And when we came out into the Bay,

        *4*
We got into Bay and then did sail!
We got into Bay and then did sail!

        *5*
Into (Oh, into) the Forties soon we (a-we) did sail
Into (Oh, into) the Forties soon we (a-we) did sail

        *6*
Now we came to the hedge of the Trades and there did sail,
We came to the hedge of the Trades and there did sail,

        *7*
We set our stuns'ls on a quartering waind,
We set our stuns'ls on a quartering waind

        *8*
Now, when our sail were full on every stay,
With our old sails and every stay,

        *9*
She (Oh, she) strained her bustle and she dipped her nose!
She (Oh, she) strained her bustle and she dipped her nose!

        *10*
Now, our royals one day we took them in,
Our royals one day we took them in

        *11*
Oh, the doldrums came, and came so very slow,
Oh, the doldrums came, and came so very slow

        *12*
We climbed for days and we climbed for a week!
We climbed for days and we climbed for a week!


About the use word "Version", well is just a word that represents a description of the singular unit, which Stan Hugill decides to mention as something that existed stand alone. I don't want to change it, but if you want, I can use the word: variation, option. Stan Hugill uses the word "Version", and I try to recreate songs from his book, so sensible to me is use it.

About: "My inclination would just be to say "This is what Hugill said," rather than to use what Hugill said to state something definitive about the songs."
I used the phrase: "Stan Hugill thing, this version was the original one" so I think is, neutral enough. In all descriptions of my recreations, I try to put as much as possible of Stan Hugill and none myself as much as possible.




Steve Gardham

"'I'm really skeptical of calling anything a "version" in chanties.'
???? Me too"

I do understand this point of view. I think you cannot say it was a freeze "version" of the particular shanty, and nobody never added or took off from it because is prohibited. I think shanty have in their nature the flexibility to be changed by the shantymen, length of verses, add some unique verse, about the ship, He sails currently, and so on.

But I think is not a good idea to go to extreme relativism, and say melody same so this is the same song. I thig the moment when we can say this is a different "version", is when theme and motive are simply different, for example, the "Milkmaid" version and "Camptown Race", version. With all respect to Gibb Sahib who was right to say, there are exist some "generic" verses.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 11:52 AM

67 - Sacramento (D)

This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
This is the "Camptown Races" version.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 110, 111).



Sacramento D

Camptown ladies sing this song,
   - Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah!
Camptown race-track's five miles long.
   - Hoo-dah! Hoo-dah day!

   - Blow, boys, blow!
   - For Californ-eye-O!
   - There's plenty o' gold so I've bin told,
   - On the banks o' the Sacramento

          *2*
Go down dar wid me hat caved in,
Come back home with me pockets full o' tin.

          *3*
De long-tailed filly an' de big black hoss,
Dey fly de track an' dey both cut ac ross.

          *4*
De blind hoss stickin' in a big mud hole,
Can't touch bottom wid a ten-foot pole.

          *5*
Ol' muley cow come out on de track,
De bob he fling her ober his back.

          *6*
Den fly along like a raiload car,
Runnin' a race wid a shootin' star.

          *7*
De sorrel hoss he's got a cough,
An' his rider's drunk in de ol' hay-loft.

          *8*
Dere's fourteen hosses in dis race,
Ah'm snug in de saddle an' got a good brace.

          *9*
De bobtail hoss she cain't be beat,
Runnin' around in a two-mile heat.

          *10*
Ah put me money on de bob-tail nag,
Somebody bet on de one-eyed lag.

          *11*
I win me money on de bobtail nag,
An' carry it home in de ol' tow-bag.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 12:18 PM

Hi Shogun
Sacramento D. This is absolutely the pseudo lingo of the Minstrels, not African-American as such, although I would like an African American to pronounce on that. Why would a chantyman be singing in this sort of stage language is a question we need to ask, even latter-day around the capstan.

Another point to notice is that the verses are in Minstrel lingo but the chorus isn't..no 'On de banks ob de Sacramento'.

Yes, at one point Stan was a latter-day chantyman, but he was also a writer, performer, historian, collector, lecturer, etc. He was also around at the time of Bert Lloyd when rewriting history was the norm.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 02:39 PM

Steve Gardham

This is a very fair point, and of course, again something that I will even never notice, I will never notice differences and catches this Pseudo Minstrels, not African-American. Maybe we can find somebody who knows more about it, this is so intriguing.

About rewrite history, well this probably happens as well, but if there is no evidence, what we can do?

And lastly, my aim is to get to the recreation of authentic shanties, as close to original as possible to me, so really the nice will be, to have representant of each language and dialect, what possible in songs are written in "Shanties From the Seven Seas". And I am so happy to have You and Gibb and hope other members dive into the case as deep as I can.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 03:49 PM

Steve, if that's how they sang it, it's because that's Stephen Foster wrote it!

https://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/collection/067/015


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 04:20 PM

Figures! Doesn't alter the anomally. Interesting that one line ended up in chanties 'Long-tailed filly and the big black oss'.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 26 Feb 21 - 10:26 PM

"Cape Horn theme" is a construct of Hugill's mind that he's bringing to the table, as he evidently felt it was a neat and/or compelling way to organize.

1. J. C. Colcord "Songs of American Sailormen" (1938)

A bully ship and a bully crew,
   - Doo-da, Doo-da!
A bully mate and a captain too,
   - Doo-da, Doo-da-day!

[THIS IS A GENERIC VERSE]

       *2*
Round Cape Horn in the month of May,
Round Cape Horn in the month of May

[THIS IS CAPE HORN]

       *3*
We came to a land where the cocktail flows,
We came to a land where the cocktail flows

[GENERIC]

       *4*
Came to a river and I couldn't get across,
Jumped on a slaver* and I thought he was hoss

[THIS IS FROM "POOR OLD MAN," A MINSTREL VERSE]


3. F. P. Harlow "The Making Of A Sailor" (1928)

Oh, New York's race course is nine miles long.
   - To me hoodah! To me hoodah!
Oh, New York's race course is nine miles long.
   - To me hoodah! hoodah day!

[THIS IS "DE CAMPTOWN LADIES"]

       *2*
A bully ship and a bully crew,
A bully mate and a skipper too.

[GENERIC]

       *3*
Oh, New York's race track, where we stood,
We bet on all they said was good.

[DE CAMPTOWN LADIES (RACE TRACK)]

       *4*
Our watch, our shoes and every rag,
But lost our money on a bob-tail nag.

[DE CAMPTOWN LADIES]

       *5*
Our money all gone we shipped to go
Around Cape Horn, where strong wids blow.

[CAPE HORN]

       *6*
We're bound for Californi-o;
For gold and banks of sacramento.
[GOLD RUSH - COULD RELATE TO CAPE HORN]


5. W. M. Doerflinger "Shantymen and Shantyboys! (1951)

It Was in the year eighteen hundred and forty nine,
   - With me hoodah, and me hoodah,
It Was in the year eighteen hundred and forty nine,
   - A with me hoodah, hoodah ay!

[GOLD RUSH]

       *2*
Were Going around the Horn and home again!
Were Going around the Horn and home again!
[CAPE HORN]

We sailed away one day in May,
And when we came out into the Bay,
[GOLD RUSH, MAYBE CAPE HORN]

       *4*
We got into Bay and then did sail!
We got into Bay and then did sail!
[REMAINING VERSES COULD BE CAPE HORN, BUT ALSO GENERIC]

So the only one of these that arguably sticks to "Cape Horn" related stuff is the last one.

Hugill sorted the verses into "versions" by presenting each as if they were exclusively devoted to a single theme. As someone who has sung chanties many times, and never sings them the same way twice, I find this hard to believe. It's just not how the brain works, of an improvising musician. You're thinking of "Sacremento" from the chorus, so maybe you singing about Frisco Bay. Then you're thinking of "De Camptown Ladies" (the original melody) so you steal a line from that. Then the minstrel quality of "De Camptown Ladies" sets your mind on other minstrel-style verses, so you go into "Poor Old Man." Then you fill time with a generic verse like "Was you every down Mobile Bay." Then, "Bay" puts your mind on another rhyme you've heard, "90 days is damn good pay"..."I thought I heard my captain say"..."A dollar a day won't pay my way", and on and on.
That's why, myself, I didn't feel it was necessary to sing every solo verse Hugill put down on the page. I consider them as the broader "language of chanties" and a pool from which to draw. Which verses I come up with don't change the chanty to one version or another. I see the true variations in terms of melodies and chorus lyrics.

I think it's worth learning/studying the verses of Hugill to acquire that "language." But I discard Hugill's analysis because I don't think he was equipped to analyze and I'm frustrated by how he clouded his life experiences and his reading and presented that as research. I also cloud my experiences with what I've read for performing. "Anything goes" when singing. Research is different :)


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Lighter
Date: 27 Feb 21 - 09:19 AM

One reason chanteys may have been ignored for so long is that they were typically inconclusive and incoherent, often with lines "plagiarized" from popular songs or improvised on the spur of the moment. Rhyme was desirable but mot required.

That may be one reason for the lubberly "chant" pronunciation and the spelling "chanties." They struck the average person more as odd chants than as songs anyone would sing for pleasure (and of course they weren't normally sing for pleasure, even by chanteymen.)

More structured, narrative chanteys, like some versions of "Blow the Man Down" and even "A-Roving," leant themselves to more stable rhymes and less extensive improvisation.

I suspect that sometimes a chanteyman felt he was "singing a song" (repeating, more or less accurately, a set of lyrics) and other times just singing rhymes.

Of course, Gibb has more experience singing chanteys in a determinedly trad, improvisatorial manner than just about anyone.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 27 Feb 21 - 09:55 AM

I think there are also massive differences beyond the obvious between hauling and heaving chanties. They almost cover overlapping different eras and have obvious structural differences. This is only an opinion but I think the heaving chanties had more stable texts despite the leader having longer to think up the next line. The fact that some hauling chanties appear to have a stable narrative or catalogue structure is more down to the published edited versions than what was actually sung and improvised. I'm thinking of Boney, Whiskey, Reuben Ranzo and perhaps a few others. On the other hand chanties like Sally Brown which are amongst the oldest have had a much longer period to evolve some stable stock verses.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Feb 21 - 11:19 AM

There are a lot of issues, why shanties been forgotten in the first place at the end of the XIX, century. The revival in Grand Halls just confirmed misunderstanding shanties and forebitters.
Probably the biggest issue from mentioned time till now is that people still think music in terms of correction of notes is the really important thing in shanties. I think these things: music (i.e. melody or notes correction), and lyrics as well, are really think what nobody much cares about it, on the ship. Shantymen and shanties had a completely different role, the rough catching melody, and chorus were enough to do the role, namely, gives much better team effort in work.

So I list here those things, that can help understand the case, from my point of view:

1. Lyrics - important somehow for shantyman to carry over singing during the job. Sometimes it was hours, maybe days, depend on for example how leaky the ship it was, so to have tones of different "versions" of one song could help, especially when the crew doesn't know many melodies, this kind of using "versions" gives us great robustness. But lyrics were completely not important for the gang, of course, bawdy verses can cheer up devastated crew, theme or "version", can involve more sailor mentally into, so he can forget sometimes about his rough life which was good for him. But nobody cares about, unified version, which is significant or valuable from any research or academic point of view.

2. Tempo - the most important factor of any shanty, tempo gives preset for readiness for work, work pulses were the only way to move work forward better, and save power as well for next work. Here the center of shanty sense of existence happens. To singing shanty really authentically mean how close we can be to recreate those work pulses. If to achieve this ultimate goal we have to sacrifice melody, music notes, that's fine.

3. Melody - or music notes, important only to moment when sailors and shantyman can remember the rough pattern of melody. If the note goes up or down, or they sometimes not in point, or brother of Stan Hugill type it not exact? It doesn't matter, in the list of priorities they even not on the list of most important things.

4. Work - in this point I want to state is that in my opinion, shanty wasn't the most important thing to do jobs on the ship. Shanty it was just a helper, the significant helper but only helper. The shanties helped not only physically, I think help mentally as well.

5. Pronunciation or dialect - I think, all shanties in foreign Languages are especially exposed to extinction. My tryouts and also Gibb Sahib tryouts, to recreate those versions are really important, and mistakes in pronunciation are don't matter much, as long as we try to do everything to be close as possible for us, to the original pronunciation.

6. Recreation - This is my ultimate aim, to recreate all songs from Stan Hugill's "Shanties From the Seven Seas", and because it is His book, and his story, I take his approach versions, comments, and point of view. I do not judge him, I do not glorifying him or underestimate him. The process of my work is to: take a song, write lyrics for learning, write music notes from books, make audio file, if I have recorded version(only if the song is recorded by himself), it takes precedence over notes from the book. And after this, I try to understand as much as possible about work on what shanty is used. And after I put together all those things together, and I'm confident enough, I make a record and put it on YouTube with descriptions, and lyrics.

7. Personal opinions - I do everything to not involve my opinions in the recreation process, I do not judge which songs, verses, or versions should be sing, and which one I can omit. The general approach is, every version that is mention, I try to recreate, with a small addition from my site, namely: when Stan Hugill gives only one verse from the different collector, I try to find mentioned version and sing it in full, example, the beautiful full song 060 - A Long Time Ago (Gordon Hitchcock version). Same thing I will do on time when I will try to recreate songs from the next books (Colcord, Doerflinger...).


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Feb 21 - 11:23 AM

Steve Gardham

Fully agree with you, this is the reason, why I try do not to omit any of them, and the only way to bring them back is to understand work where was used. If we want to keep the legacy of shanties, we have to sing them as it is, without any interpretations or twicks.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 02 Mar 21 - 03:15 AM

068 - Banks Of Sacramento (Patterson Capstan version)

EN
This song was sung as a capstan anchor shanty, especially when raising the "mud-hook".
Patterson's version is like Patterson's shanties, unusual. The first difficulty is that Patterson in his book doesn't give us music. In almost every his shanty he inserts short refrains where usually no refrain existed. Stan Hugill says that Patterson called his shanty 'hauling song', and gives us one stanza, but is not entirely true, because Patterson (J. E. Patterson "The Sea's Anthology" 1913) labeled this song as 'Capstan.' and give three verses, and after these three verses, he gives another 4 verses under the label "The same: as a hauling chanty'". So this song will be 'Capstan.' Hauling version I will sing separately.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 112).



Banks Of Sacramento (Patterson Capstain version)


Now, my lads, get your beds and lie down
   - To me hoodah! To me hoodah!
Now, my lads, get your beds and lie down
   - To me hoodah, hoodah, O!

   - Blow, my bully-boys, blow,
   - For Californi-O !
   - There's plenty of gold,
   - So I've been told,
   - On the banks of Sacramento!

               *2*
In the Black Ball Line I served my time
In the Black Ball Line I served my time!

               *3*
O that was the line for cracking it on
O that was the line for cracking it on


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