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BS: The other recipe thread is too long

Related thread:
BS: Recipes - what are we eating? (2562)


Mrrzy 07 Mar 21 - 01:08 PM
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Subject: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 01:08 PM

I can't even load it enough to make a blicky to it without going away and coming back.

Blicky.

I did something different with my rabbit: when I cut it up usually I put it all in the stew, then do the take-meat-off-bones bit for the messy pieces.

This time I put all the messy pieces into a small pot with an unpeeled onion, some whole peppercorns, and some sea salt.

The plan had been to take the meat iff those bones and add it to the stew with the rest of the rabbit. Instead I stood there over the sieve and ate all that meat while the stew cooked.

And I ended up with an exact ice-cube tray-full of rabbit broth now freezing up for later cooking.

The stew involved browning the big pieces (dredged in onion powder, garlic powder and paprika, forgetting the salt, oops) in goose fat, deglazing with white wine, adding in onion and lost of garlic, put rabbit back in pot, cover with chopped cabbage, add some chicken broth, into oven. It is smelling marvelous. It will be finished with thyme and parsley.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 02:14 PM

Rabbit can take a largish amount of garlic without it being too much.

The best paté I ever had was a rabbit paté bought in a small shop near the Mont-Saint-Michel. Next time, if you can resist eating it all, you could try making paté with those fiddly bits of meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 02:23 PM

Bonzo's recipe was moved over here to make more sense than being a one-off, and in order to still let Mrrzy's post start this recipe thread I've transcribed Bonzo's chronologically earlier post and am adding it here.



Subject: How to prepare Argentine Asado!!!
From: Bonzo3legs - PM
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 03:28 AM

How to prepare Argentine Asado!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 05:43 PM

Ooh I love living alone:

When my stew was done (I totally forgot the thyme and parsley) I fished out the flanks and ate'm, fished out an arm and ate it, and then stood there and, with my fingers, ate all the cabbage off the top.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM

Yeah, Mrrzy. The things you get away with.

I, for example, just ate a Sunday dinner of smoked oysters and crackers.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM

I looked out of the bedroom window this morning at the heavy hoar on the grass and thought to meself: "pot roast."

I had a hunk of brisket weighing in at one kilo. Now I know you yanks like to cook a brisket weighing about ten pounds, but there are only two of us, and my hunk yields enough for two meals.

So I get my smaller Le Creuset, whack up the heat, melt a big knob of butter and brown the meat all round. I stick that to one side and then fry for five minutes some big hunks of carrot, celery and onion. I put the beef on top of that and insert into the pot a bouquet garni (a bunch of fresh parsley, bay leaf and lemon thyme, all tied with string), and add half a pint of beef stock from a cube, half a pint of the soaking water from a handful of dried porcini and half a pint of some home-made veg stock I happened to have lying around. Something of a variable feast, but I reckon you can use whatever liquids you happen to have. It just needs to come well above half-way up the piece of meat. A touch of seasoning, then at least four hours in a very low oven (120C, yanks go figure).

We had that with me home-grown, well-frosted parsnips, roast spuds, cauliflower and a few carrot batons. The gravy in the pot was exquisite, though I extracted enough for two and thickened it ever so slightly with flour. It was a feast to remember, and I have enough beef left for tomorrow with a very buttery jacket spud and some roasted tomatoes.

Good living!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 03:08 AM

beef stock from a cube
Steve, whose cubes do you use? I gave up on Oxo cubes and their ilk after examining the ingredients list: nowadays I use Knorr Stock Pot, which my aging taste buds find not bad.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 04:34 AM

I use the Kallo organic ones, not because I think they have the best flavour (I don't know) but because they're organic. I always make my own veg stock and I usually have enough of my own chicken stock, but I rarely get the chance to make beef stock.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 08:16 AM

I like Better Than Bouillon. Glop, not cubes. Analog rather than digital amount calibration.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM

I find all stock cubes to be too salty. By the time you've used enough cubes you've got too much salt... I used the beef cube in that recipe along with the porcini water, enabling me to use just half of the cube. And I think that Marigold bouillon powder is the spawn of the devil.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 12:22 PM

Things to do when you live alone but cooked a whole rabbit:

Take all the meat off the other arm and put it on a salad. Lettuce cukes almonds, vinaigrette.

Take all the meat off one leg and stuff a pepper.

Eat one leg cold, like cold fried chicken, outdoors in the sunshine, like a picnic.

Make an entirely different stew, curry or something, with the saddle and the liquid from the original stew.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 07:37 PM

I made the traditional Portuguese soup caldo verde tonight. I had about 150g of dolce chorizo, which I skinned. I chopped up two-thirds of it small and fried it for five minutes in some extra virgin olive oil in my big sauté pan. Then into that pan went some sliced onion and a couple of cloves of smashed garlic (squashed with the flat of a knife blade). While that was softening up I peeled about six good-sized spuds and cut them up into 3/4 inch cubes. The spuds went in the pan along with about a litre of stock (I used half-strength home-made chicken stock, but you can use just water).

After about 15 minutes the spuds were cooked. I carefully fished out about half of them, then I whizzed everything else in the pan until smooth. Then I put the reserved chunks of spud back in along with half a pound of very finely-shredded greens (I had a sweetheart organic cabbage, but anything leafy will do). While that was simmering away (do a seasoning check), I cut the rest of the sausage into thin circles and dry-fried them until quite crispy in a separate frying pan.

Once the greens were cooked I ladled the thick soup into bowls, topped it with the chorizo slices and sprinkled extra virgin olive oil on top. Delicioso!

So far, fairly authentic, though I confess to having cheated in order to make this a hearty meal and not just a big bowl of soup. In Portugal they'd have it with corn bread, but instead of that I threw in a can of cannellini beans with the cabbage. Not exactly purist but begod it did the trick.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 07:04 AM

We don't cook on Wednesdays. It's cheese night, so we have cheese (duh) with matzo crackers (me) or Bath Olivers (she). I must have a neutral crunchy vehicle for my cheese. I can't understand anyone wanting weird herby or seedy crackers which detract from the beautiful cheese. Bread would be a bit too bulky in consideration of the other stuff we eat with the cheese. We have a hunk of Montagnolo d'affine, a soft blue German cheese which is far superior to the dismal Cambozola, and some Wookey Hole cheddar. We scoff that with a selection of nuts, nocellara olives from Sicily (our favourites), caperberries and cherry tomatoes, maybe with a few thin slices of mild chorizo or salami or a sweet potato falafel or three.

But Mrs Steve has a potentially dodgy dental appointment tomorrow, so the crunchy stuff might not be apropos. I have some caldo verde left over from last night which can only improve with keeping. I'll be able to bulk that up quite easily for a bowl of comfort food if she's been under the drill/pliers. The cheese can wait until Friday night, but the wine can't (we're definite wine weekenders with just the Wednesday oasis, which is sacrosanct, a tradition I'd say).


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 07:40 AM

I always eat cheese with bread, ever since I lived in France. It has to be decent bread, of course. I can't understand anyone wanting to eat cheese with any kind of biscuit or cracker.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 08:11 AM

Well I love cheese with bread too. My abiding memory of that was one evening after a tough day's teaching in the summer of '76 (remember that one?). A mate and I toddled down to the Angel in Rotherhithe. A couple of pints, crusty bread some home-made pickle and a big slab of strong cheddar - bliss. He hardly drank anything so he was driving. You need mates like that. I slept for twelve hours that night!

We might have bread with cheese of a lunchtime, but there's too much else going on on our cheesy Wednesday night. Matzo crackers are just flour and water, very thin, no salt, no fat, light a feather, 19 calories each - I love 'em!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 02:02 PM

He who controls the Spice controls the Universe

perchance a bit of cheese caused dreams


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 02:09 PM

I wasn't suggesting that you should set fire to a feather whilst eating your cheese. The burning smell would put you off your food.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 06:24 AM

By the way:

"I can't even load it enough to make a blicky to it without going away and coming back."

I just click on the little d next to the number. You have to read upwards but I've got used to doing that after fifteen years...You get the most recent page quickly, no matter how long the thread is.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 08:28 AM

Back to the bread or crackers bit.

Blues or a soft ones like Brie don't usually work too well on bread for me.

I recently found that I liked the combination of Danish Blue on Ryvita but, more generally, I think the plain old cream cracker is as good as anything. I'm not a fan of the "biscuits for cheese" type boxes I sometimes see at Christmas. Most of their contents detract from the taste of the cheese.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 09:52 AM

For softer blue cheeses, I go for St Agur and Montagnolo, which in m'humble are far better than Danish Blue or Cambozola. A nice lump of Gorgonzola hits the mark too, or even Dolcellate, though that's a good one for making a creamy chicken pasta sauce. Last time I went to Gloucester Services they had a huge wheel of Gorgonzola that was so ripe that it could be scooped out with a ladle into a pot. I'm not a big fan of Stilton because it's far too variable and not always that good. A superb blue, which must be freshly cut before it starts to blacken, is Bath Blue. Then there's Stichelton, which is made near where Stilton is made and made in the same way except that unpasteurised milk is used. It's very classy and better than any Stilton I've ever tried.

I find Ryvita to be a real ordeal, like eating a dried loofah. Jacob's crackers are so-so, and you could try Bath Olivers instead (Waitrose?) - they are a bit softer, neutral in taste and uncoloured, a real treat with any cheese.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM

Mrrzy:
You've probably been on here long enough to know, but I thought I'd just comment.
If a thread is too long to load/retain, you can load just the first 50 comments by clicking on the blue 'number of messages' number opposite the title.
Better yet, clicking on the blue 'd' beside that number gives you the most recent 50 messages (in descending order).
These options were introduced to make it easier for people whose systems had problems loading long discussions.
Hope this helps, and that I'm not 'preaching to the converted'.
Cheers.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM

I have been wondering how to get back to eating cheeses, without bread or crackers to convey them...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM

Thinly slice an onion, cut a hunk of cheddar into small pieces and put that lot into a baking tray with a splash of milk. Grill for 10 min until all is sloppy and oozy. Nirvana. Failing that, eat the cheese with some cherry tomatoes and some olives and a few slices of salami. For soft cheeses just scoop some up on to a stick of celery or slices of red pepper, cut lengthways.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 10:37 AM

You could eat the cheese with a baked potato - not too hot so as not to melt the cheese rather than just softening it.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 11:46 AM

I've got some sea bass fillets. Any suggestions about what to do with them?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 12:01 PM

Hadn't included chilli in my "One-Pot Cooking" for ages but, yesterday, came home from my grocery shop with a Tesco stir-fry medley that included one - half of which I added to the pot (beginning by sautéing the mix, as usual).

Could be quite some time before I add another as, with a tingling stiff-upper-lip (waste not want not), I quietly coughed and burped my way through the pottages - barely noticing the spice mix that I usually enjoy.

In other words, I don't like chilli because I do like spices and veggies/non-chilli non-carne!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 12:24 PM

I've sometimes been tempted by those stir-fry bags but I always vow never to buy them again, as I have to pick over the contents to get rid of all the woody chunks of cabbage stalk.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 12:36 PM

...the rest of the above medley was okay, Jos - baby corn, mangetout, broccoli and salad onion.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 01:11 PM

SPB, your sea bass fillets. When we have sea bass or another tasty slab of fish we sometimes have it on a bed of lentils. Chop up an onion and some celery and fry until softened in extra virgin olive oil with some herbs (thyme and a bay leaf is good) and a clove of garlic that you've squashed with the flat of a knife blade. Add a glass of white wine and let it bubble for a minute. Stir in some green or brown lentils, a small handful of porcini mushrooms that you've soaked and chopped up, a big glug of tomato paste and some vegetable stock. Simmer it all until the lentils are done, half an hour maybe. Adjust the seasoning and add more stock if needed. When you're nearly there with that, cook the fish very simply by frying it in hot olive oil. Skin side down for about four minutes (hopefully you'll get the skin crispy) then flip it for two more minutes. Lay the fish skin side up on top of the lentils on plates. If you've got some fresh parsley, chop some up and sprinkle over the grub. Lovely job.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 01:38 PM

When it comes to food preparation I am utilitarin and cheap. It has to be instant or quick and easy like chocolate or peanut butter and fruit sandwiches. So for lunch today I noticed a nice avocado. I smashed it together with about 1/3 tangy tarter sauce and spread it on open faced pumpernickle. One slice got color and heat with a light sprinkle of spiracha and the other a mild smoked paparika. Slice into squares. Salt to taste.
I thought it was good with horse radish cheese and a can of Lemomatta.

Steve if you eat alot of fish, your carbon 14 test will indicate you are a hundred years older than you are. But why do they call it brain food?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 02:54 PM

I eat a lot of fish because I like fish. Tomorrow we are having Skrei cod, the best cod I've ever had. Our lovely fishmonger Tracey gets it in every Thursday in season (Jan to April) and she saves the thickest fillets for me if I ask her. Mrs Steve is in a delicate buccal state, having just had a somewhat complicated extraction, so it's soft food for now. But soft food does not mean bland. I'll simply fry the fish, in butter I should think, and we'll have it with fluffy mash instead of chips. Greens of some kind, not too crunchy, and I'll make some parsley sauce á la Delia Smith. I've been known, when the mood takes me, to marinade white fish for a short while in a mix of extra virgin olive oil, freshly-squeezed lemon juice, fresh thyme and a touch of fresh garlic. When the Skrei goes out of season I'll be waiting with bated breath for the red mullet to come in. We also eat mucho tuna and smoked mackerel. Hake, halibut, skate, dabs, anything. Even Alaskan pollack, which tastes great although it goes a bit off-white when baked. And salmon. Only ever wild red Pacific salmon. I will not buy any fish that has been farmed.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jack Campin
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 03:21 PM

The oldest recipes in the world


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 06:10 PM

Only a few millennia, forsooth!

No, but, fun article.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 07:38 PM

I'll pass on the carob but the chicken looks great.

Licorice and citron what a blast!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 09:56 AM

Among the few things I regret about moving from Ottawa to Stratford is the lack of a decent fishmonger anywhere in sensible driving distance. Ottawa is a big city with an airport, so ocean fish is flown in every day; here, not so much. Now, fish comes in two kinds: farmed and frozen, with the exception (in season) of lake trout and pickerel from Lake Huron. Even the mussels and oysters are farmed, raised in the coastal waters of Prince Edward Island.

It's enough to drive one to canned sprats. Almost.

A friend from the gym gave us a "paleo" cookbook a couple of years ago, but I have yet to try any of the recipes. When I flipped through it, I was discouraged by the many dishes with ingredients I would have to hunt and gather in faraway places such as Kitchener and London, Now that I'm usually feeding only myself (and the cats), such expeditions are vanishingly unlikely. I have a hard enough time moving my arse to Sobey's once a fortnight for oranges, yoghourt, milk, and frozen veg.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 07:15 PM

I remember what that self-sufficiency guru, John Seymour, said about raising free-range pigs, in as happy an environment that we could provide for them (which he did). I can't recall the exact quote, but he said that the good-life pig he'd grown for food that he was about to kill was happily munching away on roots one minute and in heaven the next. That's how we should think, I suppose, about wild ocean fish. I guess it takes them longer to die than John's pig, but it's hard to see how we could do it better. For me, it's no farmed fish, only wild, and fish only caught by sustainable methods that don't involve by-catch or wrecking the sea floor. That'll do me. Suit yourself.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 05:03 AM

Not sure if Chinese wet-markets, where fish, etc., are kept alive for freshness (photos from a Either way, for those who have never tried tofu, or not had it a second time because it was "too bland", I challenge you to try this:

Heat some vegetable oil in a frying pan before adding some soft tofu, then soy sauce. Place that mix atop some toast and, perhaps, mop up the remaining oil/sauce with another piece.

Imagine the most creamy scrambled egg you ever had and a chook with a sore rear...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 06:23 AM

Well I wouldn't buy fish that way, but you don't know that that's where coronavirus came from. For scrambled egg for just me, I beat up three eggs with salt and pepper. No milk. The beating is gentle only. I get a nonstick small frying pan (£3.99 Lidl) and melt a big knob of butter on high heat. In goes the egg mix, then straight away off goes the heat but leave the pan on the ring. Mush that around mercilessly with a spatula until it's underdone. Then go over to your buttered toast and slap it on. The eggs are in the pan for less than a minute. They should be soft and creamy with no runny bits. We all have our own way. I've never eaten tofu and probably never knowingly will. Make sure they didn't chop down too much rain forest to produce the soya beans.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 06:39 AM

Yes, Steve - much of the sad slash-and-burn that has destroyed large areas of rainforest in South America has been for growing soya beans...but not sure how much of the produce is for livestock vs. human feed..?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 07:08 AM

I'm doing a risotto tonight. For two of us, very generous portions, I use 300g risotto rice (I have carnaroli). I need about 700 ml stock, which will be half home-made chicken stock and half the water from boiling the veg I'm going to include. So I'll start by boiling some tenderstem, some peas and some green beans, a handful of each, in unsalted water, keeping that water and setting the cooked veg aside.

I'll dry-fry 100 g of chopped pancetta until nearly crispy in my smaller Le Creuset casserole. To that I'll add some thinly sliced onion and a bit of butter if there's not quite enough fat. I want the onion soft but not coloured. Then I'll add some fresh thyme and the rice, stirring to coat the grains with fat. Then in goes a small glass of white wine. I'll turn up the heat to get that bubbling, and then...

...And then I cheat shamelessly. I'll add 600 ml of my hot stock all at once, stir it in, get it to a simmer then put the lid on and forget it for 15 minutes.

The next step is crucial. I'll remove the lid and stir and beat the rice like a lunatic for about three minutes. This gets it nice and creamy, as though I hadn't cheated at all. It also very reliable in getting the rice perfectly al dente every time, not the easiest thing with risottos. And it means I get to sit down for 15 minutes, preferably with an aperitif (come on, it's Saturday), instead of standing over the stove adding bits of stock and stirring until my arm nearly drops off.

In goes some seasoning and the reserved veg to heat through. Then in go a big dollop of creme fraiche (butter if you like), two big handfuls of grated Parmesan and a good sprinkling of fresh parsley (or not, Maggie). If it's all a bit too stiff add a bit more hot stock.

It can sit for a few minutes while you pour out the vino, then ladle into bowls and eat it in front of the telly. Good living!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 08:20 AM

Alpro, who make soya milk as well as lots of other stuff, mostly get their soya beans from Europe or Canada. They have claimed in the past not to get them from felled rain forest areas. If I were buying tofu (unlikely, as I only eat actual food), I would be checking its source. Incidentally, I buy lots of their unsweetened oat milk but not the soya milk. On offer in Sainsbury's for a quid at the moment.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 08:29 AM

...in terms of limiting food-miles, oat milk (which I didn't like a few years ago but should probably try again) is more environmentally friendly for us in England...although, I seem to recall a Country File article looking at growing a variety of soya bean here..?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 09:07 AM

Tofu here is mostly from Twin Oaks, one of the few remaining working communes. But no, I don't eat it either.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 09:42 AM

I saw someone on the telly making Parmesan crisps the other day. I'm going to make some this evening. They look like the kind of thing I would eat 50 of in an unstoppable frenzy. I'll keep you posted...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 10:13 AM

Steve,

lentils don't appeal to me, but cooking in white wine + a medley of wild forest mushrooms does. I have two jars of dried mushrooms from a Czech forest.....


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 10:16 AM

The cooking times are important.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 11:52 AM

The biggest danger is overcooking fish because you're not confident that it's cooked through. With fish the price it is, that would be a tragedy. Total frying time for sea bass fillets would be no more than 5-6 minutes in all at medium heat. I fried two very thick cod fillets last night. Five minutes skin side, two minutes top side. It was perfect done like that.

There are lentils and lentils. I usually fall back on the little brown puy lentils, but what I really want is the Italian green Castelluccio lentils. I've had trouble finding those. The green jobs that seem to come from Canada are not a patch.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 11:53 AM

I tried the lentil recipe (adapted to suit what I had to hand) with my sea bass last night. I wasn't sure about the lentils but it was surprisingly good. Thank you Steve.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 12:08 PM

Mine were brown lentils, but I'm not sure if they were Puy ones as they were in an unlabelled jar as the previous wrapping had split.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 11:30 AM

Not sure if others have a better memory for the taste of foods than events, etc., but I just had my first (stoned!) date for what must be at least 3 decades, and the toffee-like taste was most-familiar and not unpleasant.

Got them as a change from sultanas on my shop last week - but honestly can't remember why..?!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 11:47 AM

...I remember now - it was seeing groves of date palms on cycling's UAE Tour.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 02:29 PM

I keep misreading Puny Lentils.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 04:37 PM

After a cock-up last night, I've perfected my Parmesan crisps. Heat the oven to 180C. Get a big baking tray and cover it with baking paper. Grate Parmesan finely. Put heaped tablespoons of cheese on it at regular intervals. They can be quite close together because they won't spread. Persuade each blob of cheese gently into a disc about two inches across. Don't sweat it but make the discs roughly equally thick all the way across. The cooking time is crucial. Ten minutes, too much, burnt flavour. Eight minutes, pretty good. I might try seven next time, but eight was good. Very nice with the Prosecco aperitif. In fact, we devoured them. I can just see me of a summer night by the barbie, burgers and bangers a-sizzling, quaffing the fizz with a plate of Parmesan crisps and a bowl of nocellara olives... Nirvana calling!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 04:52 PM

...not sure if that can be done with any of the vegan cheeses currently available, but I know Violife (with coconut oil) slices make a pretty good grilled cheese on toast - sometimes sprinkled with mixed herbs but always with tomato sauce, for me.

Maybe you could try a sprinkle of herbs next time, Steve..?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 05:01 PM

I'm not talking about cheese on toast. This is Parmesan on its own, made into crisps. Whatever "vegan cheese" is, and I won't be looking it up, it isn't cheese. Incidentally, Parmesan can never be vegetarian. If calf rennet isn't used, it can't be called Parmesan. I will not be consuming cheese with herbs added any time soon. The reason for this, as hundreds of my posts here will testify, is that I seek out the best cheese I can find, and I will not adulterate good cheese. Even if I have it on toast.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 12:56 PM

Mad household panic yesterday as our kitchen floor was inundated with water from an extremely inaccessible leaking pipe. Our plumber, after mucho turning of the air blue* - we're well used to him, and Mrs Steve knew him as a little lad in the primary school she taught in :-) - he managed after several hours to fix it, a few traumas on the way but without dismantling the whole kitchen.

So. I grabbed a bag of my bolognese sauce from the freezer, fried a chopped-up red pepper and some cherry toms and threw them into the sauce along with some dried ancho chilli and a dusting of hot chilli powder. A good dose of dried oregano also went in. We had that with boiled basmati rice, a blob of creme fraiche (we didn't have any soured cream or guacamole) and a sprinkling of El Paso green jalapeños from a jar.

Delicious. We'll be doing it again, panic or no panic!

Plumber quotes:

*"Oh f**k, I haven't got half the f**king kit I need to do this..."

"What the f**k have I f***ing done with that f***ing pipe bend..."

"Sh*t, I f***ing hate water...I'm a f***ing plumber and I f***ing hate f***ing water..."

"B***ocks, I can't f***ing do this b*st**d, what the f**k am I gonna f***ing do?"

"Jesus, it's a right f**king game is this..."

etc...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 04:10 PM

Things not to want to hear, like Oops from you surgeon, during surgery.

Did a lazy thing: got a container of lobster bisque from Wegman's soup bar, and some salmon and some tuna from the sushi counter. Fried an onion in butter with some cayenne, added the fish, deglazed with a smidge of white wine, added the bisque, brought to almost-boil. Chopped the daikon radish garnish on top. Yum.

Saved the hot mustard and ginger.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 05:09 PM

...re the language, you don't mind telling me to put a plug in it, Steve!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 06:16 PM

I don't recall railing against your language...?

That's right, Mrrzy, not quite what one wants to hear, but, as I said, we're used to him, and we know it helps him to fight through and get the job done...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 07:06 PM

Yesterday I was at my discount gourmet grocery and they had some large lovely unsliced loves of some kind of French bread, wrapped two to a parcel. I bought two of these, thinking I'd keep one for myself and donate the other three loaves to the community fridge I help stock. When I got to the fridge I realized I couldn't unwrap the pair without leaving the other one looking exposed or not professionally packaged by the store. So I donated both double packages and this morning made myself a loaf of my usual whole wheat/white flour mix bread. And on this bright but cool windy day I've finally started a pot of lentil soup for myself. I've been meaning to make some for a while, but kept putting it off. It smells wonderful! I'll probably have some pollock (floured, sauteed in butter, with lemon) along with my soup and a salad and another slice of bread.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Mar 21 - 08:58 PM

Gotta keep eating the fish! We eat tons of fish, smoked mackerel from the supermarket, unsalted tuna sandwiches, tuna with pasta, that lovely sockeye wild salmon from the cold Pacific, at least one dollop per week of (usually) chunky white fish from Tracey, our lovely fishmonger half a mile away at the beach house shop... It costs us, but bejaysus, if we didn't support the local fishmonger, we'd lose her... I'll eat any fish with relish...

In the last nine months I've had two really serious bouts of cellulitis, which totally pees me off. On Monday I have to have a blood test at my doc's behest to see if I have diabetes, which I haven't got. Sheesh. I shall eat fish and eschew puddings the night before. And no booze. I have cod. I have peas to mush. I have organic spuds to chip. I feel really well. Bugger the medics, eh...? Grr...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 01:24 AM

Neat new St Paddy idea: arrange fruit on round platter into concentric arcs of colors for the rainbow, with a little pile of golden something to one side for the pot of gold.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 03:25 AM

Mustard?????


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 05:22 AM

What will you use for the blue fruit?

A rainbow salad might be easier. A bit of cold cooked red cabbage goes a lovely clear blue.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 09:18 AM

Carrot and ginger soup today. It’s spring, so the onions are sprouting in their bin — time to use them or lose them.

The beer fridge has gone to the town dump, so my cache of frozen soup stock is now in the chest freezer. When moving it, I noted two litres of ham stock. The last time I boiled up a ham bone was well before the pandemic began, so I guess I had better use that.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 10:44 AM

Blueberries.

Not sure what the little orange fruit were. Smaller than grapes, bigger than blueberries. Had a kind of dark spot at one end, like a stem scar or strawberry seed thingie.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 11:01 AM

The fish was disappointing. I tried every way I could to see the contents of the box and it just said wild-caught pollock, but I think it was treated with that sodium tri -long name stuff that holds water. It was a sodden mess once it thawed. I'm going to have to thaw on a wire rack and see if that helps the liquid drain from the fish. One of the most dishonest treatments of fillets is to soak them in water with this chemical then freeze them and get a lot more per pound for that extra water.

The soup was great. The Lebanese restaurant where I first ate it serves it with some toasted strips of pita bread that I'd like to figure out how to fix next.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 01:53 PM

Mrrzy, kumquat? They look kinda like "honey, I shrunk the oranges."


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 02:00 PM

I can't stand repeating things too much, but I'm stuck on one recipe for sea bass.
Let it sit for a while with granulated (this is dried and chopped/ground/little-ized. It IS garlic, so THERE! And fresh doesn't work when coating the fish with it) garlic and salt. Let it sit, then fry it. I melt some butter, and add lemon, and pour it over the fish, and take 30 seconds to eat it. (Really, it's longer than that.)
The problem is that's so good, I don't want to try anything else. I love the fish. It's a very non-fishy fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 03:41 PM

Bingo, Jeri!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 04:12 PM

If I'm going to bake fish in the oven uncovered, I make a marinade containing extra virgin olive oil, fresh lemon juice, sprigs of fresh lemon thyme, a tiny dash of Tabasco and a clove of garlic that I've bashed with my fist. The fish gets a garlic kiss which is just right, but you're not eating bits of actual garlic. The marinade is just for about half an hour. Just before baking I might get a piece of kitchen towel and soak some of the marinade off the top of the fish, which avoids too much liquid sitting in the fish after cooking. It doesn't matter if you're frying and flipping. I don't want salt anywhere near the fish until it's in the pan, and even then not much.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 07:44 PM

Sounds like ceviche, Steve Shaw. Yum.

I seared a steak and while it was resting put some white wine to deglaze then added the mushroom sauce I had made with some onion garlic cayenne pickles and some Dijon mustard. Served with sour cream. Strogonoffesque. Yum. Some rabbit broth cubes to add a little liquid.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 07:46 PM

Forgot ... The mushrooms were sautéed in snail butter, of course.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 08:00 PM

..and the steak was seared in duck fat..


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 08:15 PM

Ceviche? Er, did you see the bit at the beginning of my post when I said I did it before baking the fish??


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 09:47 PM

I was wondering why you baked the ceviche'd fish, but decided not to get involved. Your fish. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 10:04 PM

It was just a marinade! Anyway, as I've often said, one man's fish is another man's poisson. If the oven's on anyway, if you're doing home-made oven chips for example, open-baking a chunky piece of skin-on fish (as opposed to wrapping it in foil) is an excellent way of cooking it, and that bit of marinade adds subtle flavour and stops the top from drying out. You can even push the chips to one side (or put them on another tray), once they're nearly done, and just sit the fish on the oily tray for six or seven minutes. And come on, folks. Why are you using garlic dust on your fish when beautiful fresh garlic is so easy to obtain and use? A house without lovely, plump garlic bulbs is like a pub with no beer!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Mar 21 - 10:44 PM

Ceviche IS just a marinade. The lemon cooks the fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 05:25 AM

Ye gods...

A MARINADE FOR CHUNKY FISH (cod, hake, haddock, etc.)

Sufficient for two skin-on fillets. Mix together the juice of half a lemon, a glug of extra virgin olive oil, a sprig or two of lemon thyme (leaves picked if you can be arsed), three drops of Tabasco and a peeled clove of garlic that you've squashed but not chopped. Put this into a shallow bowl and put the fish in it for half an hour before you bake it, turning once or twice. Only season the fish, lightly, immediately before cooking.

Viola!

I will devour smoked mackerel, but smoked salmon in this country is invariably an inferior product made from farmed fish and I avoid it. I will not eat other forms of raw fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 06:37 AM

I'd been wondering what "snail butter" was (it sounds revolting), so I looked it up. I am relieved to discover that it neither contains nor originates from snails. It's just garlic and herb butter.
What a relief.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 07:20 AM

I can't imagine what I'd ever use that for. The only time I'll ever "mince" garlic is when I make pesto, and then only half a clove.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 07:43 AM

You should try gravadlax Steve, I make my own along with pickled herrings, the gravadlax recipe was originaly a salmon recipe but you can use it for any oily fish and it's always great I use it for sea trout and rainbow trout which I catch myself. Although I catch brown trout [ not on purpose ] I never kill them.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 12:28 PM

I can't think that I'd ever want to sully a lovely bit of wild red salmon by doing that to it. I don't buy any other kind of salmon. Can't say that I fancy it, Dave.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 04:26 PM

Jos, sorry! Yeah garlic parsley butter *for* snails. I make and freeze it in a long log, so when I want some I slice off a round. A Kerrygold butter amount usually lasts a couple of months.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 04:52 PM

Kerrygold? Grease.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 08:04 PM

I cooked a big pot of Elizabeth David's boeuf en daube today, to be consumed tomorrow evening with our bubble friend. Any stew or daube is ten times better the next day, which is the aim. That was enough cooking for one day, so we fraternised a new fish and chip outlet, Potters, in Bude tonight. Cod in beer batter, chips triple-fried in beef dripping and, of course, mushy peas. It's a restaurant which can't open right now, so they've done the enterprising thing of temporarily converting to a chippy takeout. It was superb. The daube tomorrow, probably untraditionally, will be consumed with mash and some greens. Despite the lack of liquid additions in the recipe, lots of rich gravy is always produced. The recipe is in her book French Provincial Cooking. You really must use the right beef, top rump, cut into little steaks about two or three inches square. The dish is easy, and it's a masterpiece.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 08:09 PM

You don't have to buy the book just for that. It's on the Guardian website if you google something like "Guardian Elizabeth David daube." Scroll down the rather lengthy article until you reach Rick Stein's bit!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 08:42 PM

There's a cultured butter out of Vermont I'm currently in love with. Kerrygold isn't bad, but the Vermont stuff is out of this world. (Maybe we should have a butter thread?)

The weirdest/best thing I did with salmon (it will surely offend someone) is poach it in liquid, the contents of which I don't even remember. I know there was scotch in it. Talisker 10-year old.(Iif the poaching doesn't offend, that surely will.)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 08:55 PM

I've poached cod fillets in milk many times. It's wonderful with mash, home-made parsley sauce and something green. Best thing on earth if you happen to have toothache. The only thing I ever do with salmon is fry it in butter or cut it into small chunks and add it at the last minute to a spicy arrabbiata sauce, in which it's cooked in under two minutes. I'm never going to be buying pink salmon or any farmed salmon, and I always ask.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 09:27 PM

I should stay out of these recipe threads. I'm really craving a nice piece of wild-caught salmon right now. I watch the TV show "The Last Alaskans", and they catch a massive amount of salmon to FEED THEIR SLED DOGS over the winter! Even when I was younger, I'd be crap at pulling a sled, but...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Mar 21 - 09:36 PM

It's expensive, but you don't have eat it that often.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Mar 21 - 12:54 PM

I am trying something different because my farmer's market had duck eggs.

Fried some onions in snail butter and hot peppers. Into bowl.

Fried some mushrooms in same pan, with thyme. Into same bowl.

Fried some bacon. Decided it was too sweet, set aside, wiped out pan.

Wilted spinach in the pan. Ate bacon while doing that. Into bowl.

Mixed contents of bowl, then into over-safe dish previously greased with some goose grease.

Beat 2 duck eggs in bowl, poured over veg. Used utensil to push sticking-up bits down into egg.

Grated some cheddar for the top.

Into toaster oven at 350°F.

Not sure if it is a crustless quiche or a frittata or what.

Will report back.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Mar 21 - 01:11 PM

Checked: it is pouffy but not browned yet. Smells marvy.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 20 Mar 21 - 02:38 PM

Just reminded of this whilst watching Jane McDonald cruising in Australia, and stopping for a pie topped with mashed potato, mushy peas, then gravy in a kind of well made by first pressing the ladle into the pile.

I used to work making wire ware in Adelaide, South Australia, with a chap who, every lunchtime, would follow the same routine so closely it may impress a Geiko in Kyoto practising chado/the Japanese tea ceremony:

He would neatly cut off the top of his pie, drench it with tomato sauce, before neatly placing the pastry lid back on.

(And I bet I've made your weekend with that bit of info!)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Mar 21 - 03:36 PM

It was meh. But fun to make. I think it was closer to a frittata than a crustless quiche.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 21 Mar 21 - 01:01 PM

Took a bite of the leftovers on my way to make something yummy, and it was WAY better. Go figure.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 22 Mar 21 - 11:05 AM

I know that daube, Steve. "French Provincial Cooking" was my first really good cookbook (still have it), and Elizabeth David is up there in my pantheon with Marcella Hazan.

I made a batch of carrot-and-ginger soup yesterday that will do me for lunches until maybe Friday. The kitchen was still deliciously scented with onions sauteed in butter when I got up this morning. Great way to start the day.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Mar 21 - 11:29 AM

I made a Spanish tortilla last night, more or less following Jamie Oliver. The spuds I used were all wrong, too soft and grainy. But I ate the leftovers for lunch today and it was thoroughly delicious. I haven't been and gone and figgered yet...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Mar 21 - 08:05 PM

I know this isn't a recipe, but I've just eaten a guilty late-night tablespoon of Morrison's crunchy peanut butter straight from the jar (own up: it isn't just me...). I read the label: no added salt, no added sugar, no palm oil, 100% peanuts. That'll do me, I thought. Then I read the back label: "ALLERGENS: may contain nuts..."

"May." Bwahahaha!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: keberoxu
Date: 22 Mar 21 - 09:58 PM

Boeuf en daube:

I can never see the words Boeuf en daube
without thinking of
To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf:


The boeuf en daube was a complete triumph.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Mar 21 - 11:08 PM

During the afternoon I considered the contents of the refrigerator and was planning to make pasta and put a sauce with meat and cheese over it. But then it got really stormy and rainy and I decided to keep it simple. I have homemade bread from over the weekend so I made a couple of thick slices of French toast (bread soaked in egg and fried) and bacon. Comfort food.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash
Date: 23 Mar 21 - 12:39 PM

I wanted to have a play in the kitchen so I've made Rum Babas for my good lady and have some to take to my son and his family. Complete with Chantilly Cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Mar 21 - 01:58 PM

As usual a prosaic recipe
for tuna salad;
I found that two very strong flavors sort of cancel each other out.

I mix 2 tbl spoons of strong horseradish with four cans of albacore tuna and mayo equivalent to 1/2 the mixture. I add diced and equal amounts of ; thick onion slice, colored peppers and 1/2 dill or half sour pickle equivalent to the whole mixture. I add a teaspoon of Coleman mustard or a bit more of another kind of mustard. Mix well. The taste is veggie dominant and the tuna is the smooth almost bland protein. Experiment with a seasoning like Peruvian chicken or spiracha for a kick.
Tricking the pallette is even more dynamic by eating Miracle Fruit followed by drinking lemon juice which then tastes sweet with no sourness whatsoever.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Apr 21 - 09:26 AM

Have a giant yak steak. Salted it, fried it in a cast-iron pan with a smidge of goose fat. Ran out of patience, so ate the 4 rare edges and kept the way-too-rare insides.

Today will thinly slice some of that too-rare meat and marinate it for a while, then put it on a salad for my lunch. I am thinking lime-citrus, à la ceviche, for the marinade. With hot peppers of course. Garlic.

Have not decided what to do for the next 2-3 meals. Maybe a stroganoff, and a stir-fry, and a soup. Ideas welcome...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 07 Apr 21 - 11:43 AM

About that label, Steve. Peanuts are not actually nuts. The allergen warning means that the peanut butter may contain traces of true nuts from equipment in the plant.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Apr 21 - 11:51 AM

Grrr, you'd have thought that I should have spotted that, with my botany degree an' all... :-( Although I can't help thinking that most people wouldn't know that peanuts are not really nuts...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Apr 21 - 12:34 PM

Severe food allergies are now so common that you'd have trouble finding a Canadian who can't tell you precisely how a peanut differs from a tree nut. Anyone who cooks is gonna know, likewise anyone who shops for groceries, anyone who works in a restaurant, anyone who works in food preparation of any kind, anyone who has children or routinely spends even a little time with children ... That's a lot of people.

Brit mileage may vary, but I doubt it.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Apr 21 - 01:58 PM

I am truly humbled.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Apr 21 - 08:48 AM

Knowledge tells you a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

There is likely a similar couplet about peanuts and nuts...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 08 Apr 21 - 12:13 PM

We had barbecued pork last night. Well, faux BBQ'd pork.

I'm tired a lot, and now I cook so as to save time and clean-up. So about two weeks ago I put a 9-pound pork shoulder roast in the oven at low heat and cooked it until it was flavorful, moist and exquisitely tender. Timing was mostly a matter of dumb luck - I'll have to do something about that.

The day I roasted it, I was eager to get to the Mudcat singaround, so I didn't put a single thing on the meat. I cut it in half for easier handling. No salt, no garlic, no herbs, no parsley.... I simply lined a big pan with parchment paper (for easy clean-up), put in the meat and forgot about it from 1:30 till 7 pm. It was delicious.

The DH helped cut it up, and we froze most of it. Last night I grated the peel off an an orange with my nifty microplane and added it to a bottle of BBQ sauce from a favorite restaurant. Thawed some of that pork, added the orangey sauce and roasted it at 300 F for about 2 hours. This heated the meat, melted the fat and browned the outside just enough.

Parchment paper under the meat made clean-up a lot more fun. Whole-wheat rolls from the grocery store, homemade cole slaw and avocados completed the ensemble. Only the cole slaw took an effort, but that wasn't much, so it was a delicious and easy meal.

I could have made my own BBQ sauce, but I'd already used the tomato paste to make Chicken Cacciatore in the slow cooker, another easy recipe.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 09 Apr 21 - 04:10 PM

Ok, now I am *really* hungry!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 12 Apr 21 - 12:38 AM

heh heh (chuckles evilly)


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Apr 21 - 08:39 PM

Which would you have chosen, farmed never frozen, or wild defrosted, salmon?

Put sone snail [garlic parsley] butter on tin foil, put salmon on butter and more butter on top, into tpaster oven at 350F for 12 mn. Meanwhile sautéed some pearled cauliflower in more snail butter (using up tail end) with a little salt and hot pepper. Served fish on veg with squeezes of lemon and a handful of almonds.

Glass o' kir to go with. My state liquor store had some locally-produced crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to my amazement. It doesn't taste quite *right* but is nonetheless delicious, and it has *the* most amazingly *beautiful* color I have ever seen in a drink. I mean almost a shame to drink it, it is so pretty.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Apr 21 - 08:57 PM

If you buy any farmed fish you are contributing big time to pollution of our oceans. You will also be buying inferior fish that most likely has been treated against the parasites that overcrowding causes. Defrosted frozen fish is just as good as the fresh version. I won't buy any fish that I suspect is not wild fish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Apr 21 - 04:05 PM

I am with you on that, Steve Shaw. I got the wild-caught. Curious about others' thoughts on the taste, too.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 21 Apr 21 - 02:48 PM

Serendipity strikes...

Put some oil on a tinfoil square with the edges turned up, and put a bunch of spinach on it. Put a frozen swordfish filet on top, buttered on top and bottom. A sprinkle of hot pepper on top, into toaster oven @ 350F. After 15 mn flipped the fish, after another 10 put the fish on a plate and covered it with the spinach I had expected to be wilted, like every other time I have done this.

It wasn't.

It was crisp. It was crunchy. I have never encountered *crunchy* spinach. It was marvy. What did I do and can I do it again?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 22 Apr 21 - 08:54 PM

Put the toaster oven on 450, not 350? When you think back, did the dish seem extra hot when you removed it from the toaster oven?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 Apr 21 - 11:09 PM

No, and the fish was cooked as if it was at its usual temp...

Has anyone made crispy cooked spinach?

I tried pommes anna tonight to feed to someone and have a bite of, it wasn't flippable without coming apart because I wanted to use my cocotte which was too deep, but yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 12:53 AM

Curiouser and curiouser. I just had flounder at a French restaurant, and it had crispy parsley on top. So you're not alone, Mrrzy.

Yesterday I watched Gordon Ramsey make an "authentic Italian dish" on YouTube. A sort of fritatta I guess. Onions, eggs, Italian sausage, parmesan cheese and mozzarella in a skillet.

The comments were all "oh wow!" except for mine. I wrote, "How much salt is there in this dish? There's salt in the eggs, sausage and both cheeses, then you added salt yourself."

When I cook, I don't put salt in anything. The DH doesn't like it, and he worries about his blood pressure. So I leave it out. If a diner wants salt, there's a salt shaker on the table. I may put a little on my meat, but not on the other dishes. Nobody seems to miss it, neither guests or family.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 02:50 AM

"There's salt in the eggs ..."

Do you mean he put salt in the eggs as well as adding salt himself?
Eggs re not naturally salty - unless US eggs are somehow produced differently from what English hens lay.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 09:50 AM

Well I do most of the cooking in our house. I have a low tolerance for overly salty dishes (though I'll make exceptions for bacon and salted pistachios). If I'm boiling pasta or potatoes, I taste the cooking water just before draining. If I think it's too salty I'll replace some of the water with freshly boiled water. Everyone gets served up food that's seasoned to my taste. I can't remember the last time anyone added extra salt. Manufacturers of ready meals use salt to disguise their inferior quality ingredients. If you use only good quality ingredients you don't need much salt added and it's amazing how some fresh herbs can "replace" salt. But you do need a bit of salt a lot of the time if the food's going to taste good.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 10:48 AM

I agree. A bit of salt. Of course, we need a certain amount simply to survive. I know of people who have been hospitalized because they lacked salt.

However, I don't like the typical YouTube chef's habit of picking up a tiny bowl with looks like a tablespoon of salt in it and plopping it unmeasured into a dish.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 10:52 AM

"According to the American Heart Association (AHA), the minimum physiological requirement for sodium is less than 500 mg a day — or less than the amount in one quarter of one teaspoon of table salt. For most Americans, eating this little sodium is near impossible."

The Food and Drug Administration says to limit salt to 2300 mg per day. I wonder about children though. How much is too much for them?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 11:04 AM

Another exception is parmesan crisps. In fact, I've just made a tray of them to be nibbled with our aperitif ce soir. Get a big baking tray and line it with greaseproof paper. Put little piles of grated Parmesan, heaped tablespoon-size, all over it. Big gaps not needed. Bake at 180C for seven minutes. Maybe eight. Careful - a minute too long and they burn. Very nice with a bowl of olives and an Aperol spritz.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 11:10 AM

Leeneia - you reminded of something I really dislike about some television chefs (I don't bother with YouTube chefs).

They have all their ingredients laid out ready in little dishes, and then add about four-fifths of each into whatever they are making. Why? Why not put the right amount in each dish to start with? I imagine all those left-over bits just get thrown away.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 24 Apr 21 - 04:34 PM

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/trisha-yearwood/strawberry-rhubarb-crostata-5171696
Its good with some crushed almonds or a few drops of almond extract.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia
Date: 25 Apr 21 - 02:05 PM

Jos, I agree. I've always thought the wee dishes are twee. I haven't noticed the waste. Maybe it doesn't go on all the time.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 26 Apr 21 - 08:31 AM

I agree with Jos too. And they should taste their food, too.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Apr 21 - 07:35 PM

What salt will do in older people is to stop elasticity in blood vessels of all sizes. The complications should be obvious.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 01 May 21 - 09:24 AM

Time to collect all Epicurious beef recipes, eh?

Meanwhile anyone have a new idea for pork chops?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 May 21 - 10:16 AM

Delia Smith's way with pork chops is hard to beat. You need thick-cut chops with most of the fatty rind removed. Get a big frying pan and brown the chops all round in butter. Put the chops on a big piece of tinfoil on a baking tray and season. Add a sprig of fresh thyme (fresh, d'you hear?). I use two layers of foil. Fry some chopped mushrooms in the chop pan, adding a bit more butter. After five minutes throw in a tablespoon of plain flour and the juice of 3/4 of a lemon. Stir into a sticky mess and cook the flour for a minute. Put the mix on top of the chops then pour about 120 ml double cream over them. Wrap the chops in the foil very securely but not too tightly. Make a sort of tent. Bake for one hour in an oven set to 160C. You don't get much juice but what you do get is big flavour. Goes very well with a buttery jacket spud and some greens. We think of it as winter food. My amounts are for two nice big chops, one each.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 01 May 21 - 11:05 AM

Instead of removing the fat, I would render it by propping the chops up, vertically with the fat lying in the pan, until it is browned and the pan has a layer of runny fat in which to cook the chops, instead of butter. Or cut the fat off, if you must, and render it in the pan before cooking the chops in it.
Then proceed following Steve's/Delia's instructions.
Don't worry about your fat consumption - you are going to cook the mushrooms in butter anyway, and then add cream.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 01 May 21 - 12:16 PM

I do mise en place with wee dishes for ingredients in small quantities and bowls and jugs for large quantities. My galley kitchen does not have room for two kinds of work -- and two lots of mess -- under way at the same time.

I made nearly four litres of rather good ham and bean soup yesterday. Three-quarters of the batch is now in the freezer for future reference.

* One smoked ham hock
* Two to three litres of chicken stock (Canadian recipe -- both metric & Imperial measures in use!)
* A little olive oil
* Six cloves of garlic, chopped
* One large onion, chopped
* Three stalks of celery, chopped
* Black pepper ad lib
* Two or three bay leaves
* A goodly amount of dried oregano
* One pound of dried white beans (navy or Great Northern)
* Half a cup or so of split dried peas or lentils
* One teaspoon ground cumin
* A pinch or two of crushed dried chilis
* Salt (only at the end, and only if necessary)

Put the ham hock in an Instant Pot or similar programmable pressure-cooker. Add enough chicken stock to more or less immerse the hock, usually about two litres. Close the lid and set the controls for 15 minutes at high pressure. Let the pressure release naturally, then set the hock on a plate to cool. Pour the pot liquor into a large jug or bowl.

Turn the Pot to its Saute setting and let it heat to its max. Then add the olive oil, the garlic and onion, and cook and stir until the onion is light brown and translucent;don't let the garlic scorch. Add the celery and continue cooking and stirring until it begins to show signs of browning. Grind rather a lot of black pepper into the Pot, then add the beans and peas, the bay leaves, and the oregano, cumin and crushed chilis. Pour in the stock in which you cooked the ham hock. Clamp on the lid, close the vent, and set the controls for 30 minutes at high pressure.

While the beans are cooking, take the meat off the ham hock and dice it fairly small.

Allow the Pot to release its pressure naturally, then open the lid and add the diced ham. Stir well and taste. Then, and only then, decide if it needs salt. It probably won't.

Serve with whole-wheat toast and maybe some nippy cheese.

NB: When made in an Instant Pot, this takes about half the afternoon, with only about 45 minutes of actual chopping and stirring. It can be made in an ordinary soup kettle on the stove, but that way takes hours and hours, and you have to remember to set the beans to soak the night before.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 May 21 - 02:33 PM

I've tried that, Jos, and found it to be an added faff. I don't waste the rinds. I put them in the freezer and use them to add savour to my boeuf en daube, Elizabeth David style.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 02 May 21 - 09:10 AM

Recipes are a choice but you don't have a choice when it comes to plastic and micro plastics. You eat the equivilent of one plastic credit card per week. So do I.
The health hazards are as yet unknown*.
Apples had one of the highest microplastic counts in fruit, with an average of 195,500 plastic particles per gram, while pears averaged around 189,500 plastic particles per gram. Broccoli and carrots were shown to be the most contaminated vegetables, averaging more than 100,000 plastic particles per gram.Jul 21, 2020
Then there is water, sea salt, shellfish, beer, carrots, broccoli and virually everything else in the alnd and sea.
You see micro plastics are consumed by the smallest organisims and we eat them be they nemotodes or others.
Don't drink the water and don't breathe the air. 8^/


*There seems to be an abundant number of GI conditions lately but who knows.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 02 May 21 - 09:52 AM

Donuel, the most important cause of the rising incidence of irritable bowel syndrome is the abundance of antibiotics we all consume. Acidophilus capsules help with that. Stomach and bowel cancers kill so many people because most of us fortunate residents of the developed world live long enough to develop them. So have your colonoscopy already.

Is plastic in the food supply your latest bugbear?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 May 21 - 12:33 PM

I like to think that this is a recipe and food enjoyment thread. I'm doing a risotto tonight. It will feature broad beans, French beans, peas and pancetta. It will contain the usual suspects such as chicken stock, onions, Parmesan and butter (for the initial frying), but for the mantecura step I'm using creme fraiche instead of butter. I'll use the veg cooking water to contribute to the stock. I'll finish it with fresh parsley.

Last night I did Yotam's baked cauliflower. You put all the ingredients except for one into a big bowl, mix them well with your bare hands and put them on a big baking tray lined with greaseproof paper. Into a hot oven (200C) for half an hour, stirred half way through. The ingredients for two of us are one big cauliflower cut into florets, 30g pumpkin seeds, 30g chopped green olives, one 150g chorizo peeled and cut into 1cm rings (dolce or piccante, you decide), two teaspoons of sweet smoked paprika, a roughly-chopped onion, three cloves of garlic smashed with your fist or a knife, salt and pepper and several big glugs of extra virgin olive oil. It's all on one tray and you can clear up while it's cooking. When it's done, stir in some fresh chopped parsley. You can eat it off your knee in front of the telly and the only washing up is your two bowls and two forks.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 02 May 21 - 01:48 PM

Charmion's tiny bugbear


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 02 May 21 - 05:00 PM

Risotto. I miss risotto.

Now that I cook only for myself, risotto is a restaurant thing. And all the restaurants have been closed since Christmas and will stay that way for at least another two weeks.

I miss risotto. With a nice glass of Soave, and a clever little green salad to follow ...

Sigh.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 May 21 - 06:07 PM

My risotto was very good. It followed a day which started with my bad back playing me up summat rotten and Mrs Steve suffering side effects from her second jab. Every year we do the bluebell walk in the woods at Brownsham, between Hartland and Clovelly. It was a lovely day but it started badly, with parking near the start of the walk a massive problem (we've done this walk every year for 34 years and we still haven't learned to avoid bank holidays). I eventually parked hard by a roadside hedge and scratched my leg on a protruding blackthorn twig that I hadn't spotted.

However.

My new Black Diamond Trail hiking poles were a total revelation. I've tried cheap ones before and they put me off the whole idea. But these were a miracle. I did the whole strenuous walk without back pain and the poles were absolutely superb. The sun was out, the bluebells were wonderful, the sea sparkled, God was in his heaven and all truths were universal. Who'd have thought it, on a day that started so fretfully, and we came home and I did a great risotto. The Prosecco and Argentine Malbec were great too...!

Then you watch the news about India...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 May 21 - 06:17 PM

Charmion, cook your risotto for two, eat half of it and use the leftovers to make arancini the next day. Mrs Steve, foolish woman, won't let me have a deep fat fryer, so I can't follow my own advice...She thinks I want to just make chips...

By the way, my amount for two, which is generous (you piggie, Steve...), is a sparse 300ml (yep, measured in a jug) of risotto rice. I always use carnarolo, by the way. That needs about 700ml stock, with a bit to spare in case it thickens up too much. Life is good!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 03 May 21 - 08:21 AM

Steve how do the hiking poles help? Does it take weight of knees and hips? I had a friend who used those amputee curved springs on hiking poles for extra propulsion.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 May 21 - 09:36 AM

Those chops sound yummy. Thinking of stuffed cabbage, too.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 03 May 21 - 10:15 AM

Not down by Bluebell Grove where wild flowers grow then Steve, (I guess you know Nancy Spain)...

Not sure what any of this has to do with cooking but for a different flower, a local church has a snowdrop day where that flower grows abundantly in the grounds. Not a long walk in this case but a nice sight.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 03 May 21 - 11:43 AM

Well there were plenty of trees in grove-like assemblages and bluebells and wild flowers, and (odd that you should mention it...) I did happen to be singing along to Christy's Nancy Spain in the car yesterday!

The hiking poles work out your upper body, especially arms and shoulders. They help to maintain a good, upright posture,good for the back, and they take the strain off your knees and hips, especially when walking downhill. They give you stability and confidence on uneven terrain. I'm a novice and I'm still researching good technique, but one thing I have learned is that cheap poles are a complete waste of money which will have you thinking that poles are useless. Also, you don't need poles with built-in shock absorbers, any more than you need a springy mattress saddle on a bike.

On the food front I'm starting to try to shed a stone. It'll be Mondays and Thursdays on very frugal rations. I'll be aware of, but not counting, calories and the only thing I'll be cutting out is snacking. In the long term I'm expecting portion control to be the key to keeping it off. And those hiking poles. I did this before, but over the years I've put about a third of my lost weight back on.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 May 21 - 04:52 PM

Why are my meatballs always *tough* (I can't think of a better way to describe them)?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 May 21 - 05:01 PM

I've added some more pics to my poem "My Diet" recently - e.g., a full (vegan) English using slices of tempeh; sweet and savoury avocado sandwiches; and a vegan cheese platter.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 May 21 - 05:08 PM

Ok details: I have made meatballs in the oven, pan-fried them, cooked them from the start in broth, and browned them and cooked them the rest of the way in broth. Tonight's were made from ground lamb with grated onion, parsley, berbere spice, cumin, cinnamon, smidge of salt, and garlic powder, browned in lamb bacon grease, then cooked in a broth of beef stock with a bit of tomato paste and fresh thyme. The broth is droolworthy-good, as is the *flavor* of the meatballs.

I don't put breadcrumbs in. Is that the problem? Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 May 21 - 06:01 PM

You may be overcooking them. Make them smaller and cook for less time. Another possibility is that you're squeezing the bejaysus out of them when you make them, for fear of their falling to bits. Roll them in your hands without pressure and employ an ever-so-gentle touch. And blimey, all those herbs and spices. Don't you trust your meat? My way is to make them small, fry them in oil just to brown them, maybe for five or six minutes, not cook them through, then let your chosen sauce finish the cooking, maybe for ten or fifteen minutes. For me, it would be a spicy tomato sauce made with extra virgin olive oil. By spicy, I mean with chopped garlic, no onion and some chilli flakes to taste. I always tear in some fresh basil leaves at the very end. That goes really well with crusty bread, or some home-made oven chips. I'm not a fan of spaghetti meatballs...

And leave the breadcrumbs in the store cupboard. I've tried meatballs made with a mix of minced steak and crumbled black pudding, or a mixture of minced steak and minced free-range pork. A touch of chilli always goes well. One I got from Gino d'Acampo is beef mince with a bit of caramelised onion chutney mixed in. It sounds like it shouldn't work, but they are delicious. I usually find that you need a tad more salt in the seasoning than you might expect. Small is beautiful.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 05 May 21 - 12:00 PM

Definitely pressing too hard. Definitely cooking too long. Aha.

And not a *lot* of any spice. A shake or so of each. The cinnamon makes everything savory taste north African.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 May 21 - 01:13 PM

I like most herbs and spices in small doses (though the possession of dried basil should be an arrestable offence), but I'm not a fan of cinnamon and if the recipe has it I leave it out. Mrs Steve demurs, but then we never have coriander/cilantro because she says it tastes like washing up liquid. So we're evens.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 May 21 - 01:21 PM

I like cinnamon on toast or porridge.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 May 21 - 02:43 PM

A repeat but, just now on the Beeb, the Hairy Bikers on their Med Adventure were cooking Spanish meatballs or albondigas, with - more to my taste - patatas bravas.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 May 21 - 05:23 PM

I missed that, probably because I was watching Chelsea triumph over Real Madrid. I'll be catching up with that one. The Hairy Bikers are not to be ignored!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 May 21 - 05:55 PM

Agreed - I think they actually met while working behind the camera, but have gone on to do a lot of good stuff in front of it.

We get the gist of the area they are in, some good humour, and the food they prepare certainly looks good.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 05 May 21 - 06:20 PM

Agreed!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 06 May 21 - 08:54 AM

Details on albondigas?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 May 21 - 12:03 PM

Without going to google, definitely paprika/pimenton as the key Spanish spice, Mrrzy; but, once Steve looks into it, I'm sure he can give the culinary details better than I...

Mostly vegan, in 2018, I enjoyed patatas bravas, with a glass of sangria, at one of many nice tapas bars in Barcelona. Fried chunky potato chips (I recall the Hairy Bikers boiled them first), again with paprika.

The other dish I enjoyed on that trip was vegetable paella - it always seemed to be second down on restaurant lists, after the seafood option.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 06 May 21 - 12:22 PM

I googled and found this:

Hairy Bikers Moorish lamb meatballs

Is that the one?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 May 21 - 12:28 PM

If I were making Spanish tapas-style albondigas I'd use a mixture of beef and pork mince and make them small. I don't use eggs (though a yolk in the mix is unobjectionable) and I definitely wouldn't use breadcrumbs. I'd be inclined to make them quite spicy so I might add a bit of smoked paprika and a pinch of dried chipotle chilli flakes, to taste, as well as salt and pepper to the meat mix. Smoky is good. Make them into small balls as mentioned earlier and brown them for four or five minutes only in hot oil. Set the meatballs aside, leaving the oil in the pan. For the tomato sauce I'd use good-quality canned plum tomatoes (don't buy ones with salt added). Slice a couple of cloves of garlic and sauté them in the meatball pan. Add more oil if needed, which it probably will be. No cheap oil please. To be authentic, use a Spanish extra virgin olive oil. Get the garlic sizzling but don't let it go brown. You could add some chilli flakes too, bearing in mind that you've already spiced up the meatballs. A pinch of dried oregano make evverthang super. Add the tomatoes and some salt and a scant teaspoon of sugar. Break up the tomatoes a bit and let it simmer without the lid on for half an hour or until you see the oil wanting to float. After the first fifteen minutes or so, throw in the meatballs. For a tapas table you could have the meatballs, padron peppers fried in hot oil (I do them outdoors as they spit and smell) then sprinkled with sea salt, some strong blue cabrales cheese and, to start with, a little bowl each of well-chilled salmorejo with some cold crumbled hard-boiled egg yolk and some little slivers of jamon iberico on top. Maybe a bowl of olives and some crusty bread for the cheese. Get your guests in the mood with a bottle of Cava and have a nice Rioja to hand as things get going. Good living is that!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 May 21 - 12:30 PM

Oh yes, and some of those big chunky spicy wedges...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 May 21 - 12:39 PM

Certainly the one, Jos, as there is also the patatas bravas on the plate; as ever, Steve's option also seems good and thorough.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 May 21 - 12:45 PM

also, if you'll pardon the pun, I find sangria, along with sherry, can at times be a bit too moorish!!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 06 May 21 - 02:56 PM

Thanks for the meatball advice.

Had some leftover salmon so I made some bacon to go with my omelette, flaked the fish into some spinach wilting in the bacon grease, and added a duck egg in the middle. Ate the bacon while the rest was cooking. I am bad at keeping bacon around.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 May 21 - 09:02 AM

Did not finish my salmon thing. Next day did not finish a big salad. Breakfast *next* day was leftover salad with leftover omelet which was somehow better than either dish had been, and both had been yummy...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 09 May 21 - 05:19 PM

I find that left-over omelette makes a tasty sandwich.
(I have taken to making my omelettes far too big, just so as to have some left over.)


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