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BS: The other recipe thread is too long

Related thread:
BS: Recipes - what are we eating? (2562)


Mrrzy 07 Mar 21 - 01:08 PM
Jos 07 Mar 21 - 02:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Mar 21 - 02:23 PM
Mrrzy 07 Mar 21 - 05:43 PM
Charmion 07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM
BobL 08 Mar 21 - 03:08 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Mar 21 - 04:34 AM
Mrrzy 08 Mar 21 - 08:16 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM
Mrrzy 08 Mar 21 - 12:22 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Mar 21 - 07:37 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Mar 21 - 07:04 AM
Jos 09 Mar 21 - 07:40 AM
Steve Shaw 09 Mar 21 - 08:11 AM
Donuel 09 Mar 21 - 02:02 PM
Steve Shaw 09 Mar 21 - 02:09 PM
Steve Shaw 10 Mar 21 - 06:24 AM
Jon Freeman 10 Mar 21 - 08:28 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Mar 21 - 09:52 AM
Nigel Parsons 10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM
Mrrzy 10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM
Jos 10 Mar 21 - 10:37 AM
SPB-Cooperator 10 Mar 21 - 11:46 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 10 Mar 21 - 12:01 PM
Jos 10 Mar 21 - 12:24 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 10 Mar 21 - 12:36 PM
Steve Shaw 10 Mar 21 - 01:11 PM
Donuel 11 Mar 21 - 01:38 PM
Steve Shaw 11 Mar 21 - 02:54 PM
Jack Campin 11 Mar 21 - 03:21 PM
Mrrzy 11 Mar 21 - 06:10 PM
Donuel 11 Mar 21 - 07:38 PM
Charmion 12 Mar 21 - 09:56 AM
Steve Shaw 12 Mar 21 - 07:15 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 13 Mar 21 - 05:03 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Mar 21 - 06:23 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 13 Mar 21 - 06:39 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Mar 21 - 07:08 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Mar 21 - 08:20 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 13 Mar 21 - 08:29 AM
Mrrzy 13 Mar 21 - 09:07 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Mar 21 - 09:42 AM
SPB-Cooperator 13 Mar 21 - 10:13 AM
SPB-Cooperator 13 Mar 21 - 10:16 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Mar 21 - 11:52 AM
Jos 13 Mar 21 - 11:53 AM
Jos 13 Mar 21 - 12:08 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Mar 21 - 11:30 AM

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Subject: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 01:08 PM

I can't even load it enough to make a blicky to it without going away and coming back.

Blicky.

I did something different with my rabbit: when I cut it up usually I put it all in the stew, then do the take-meat-off-bones bit for the messy pieces.

This time I put all the messy pieces into a small pot with an unpeeled onion, some whole peppercorns, and some sea salt.

The plan had been to take the meat iff those bones and add it to the stew with the rest of the rabbit. Instead I stood there over the sieve and ate all that meat while the stew cooked.

And I ended up with an exact ice-cube tray-full of rabbit broth now freezing up for later cooking.

The stew involved browning the big pieces (dredged in onion powder, garlic powder and paprika, forgetting the salt, oops) in goose fat, deglazing with white wine, adding in onion and lost of garlic, put rabbit back in pot, cover with chopped cabbage, add some chicken broth, into oven. It is smelling marvelous. It will be finished with thyme and parsley.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 02:14 PM

Rabbit can take a largish amount of garlic without it being too much.

The best paté I ever had was a rabbit paté bought in a small shop near the Mont-Saint-Michel. Next time, if you can resist eating it all, you could try making paté with those fiddly bits of meat.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 02:23 PM

Bonzo's recipe was moved over here to make more sense than being a one-off, and in order to still let Mrrzy's post start this recipe thread I've transcribed Bonzo's chronologically earlier post and am adding it here.



Subject: How to prepare Argentine Asado!!!
From: Bonzo3legs - PM
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 03:28 AM

How to prepare Argentine Asado!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 05:43 PM

Ooh I love living alone:

When my stew was done (I totally forgot the thyme and parsley) I fished out the flanks and ate'm, fished out an arm and ate it, and then stood there and, with my fingers, ate all the cabbage off the top.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM

Yeah, Mrrzy. The things you get away with.

I, for example, just ate a Sunday dinner of smoked oysters and crackers.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM

I looked out of the bedroom window this morning at the heavy hoar on the grass and thought to meself: "pot roast."

I had a hunk of brisket weighing in at one kilo. Now I know you yanks like to cook a brisket weighing about ten pounds, but there are only two of us, and my hunk yields enough for two meals.

So I get my smaller Le Creuset, whack up the heat, melt a big knob of butter and brown the meat all round. I stick that to one side and then fry for five minutes some big hunks of carrot, celery and onion. I put the beef on top of that and insert into the pot a bouquet garni (a bunch of fresh parsley, bay leaf and lemon thyme, all tied with string), and add half a pint of beef stock from a cube, half a pint of the soaking water from a handful of dried porcini and half a pint of some home-made veg stock I happened to have lying around. Something of a variable feast, but I reckon you can use whatever liquids you happen to have. It just needs to come well above half-way up the piece of meat. A touch of seasoning, then at least four hours in a very low oven (120C, yanks go figure).

We had that with me home-grown, well-frosted parsnips, roast spuds, cauliflower and a few carrot batons. The gravy in the pot was exquisite, though I extracted enough for two and thickened it ever so slightly with flour. It was a feast to remember, and I have enough beef left for tomorrow with a very buttery jacket spud and some roasted tomatoes.

Good living!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 03:08 AM

beef stock from a cube
Steve, whose cubes do you use? I gave up on Oxo cubes and their ilk after examining the ingredients list: nowadays I use Knorr Stock Pot, which my aging taste buds find not bad.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 04:34 AM

I use the Kallo organic ones, not because I think they have the best flavour (I don't know) but because they're organic. I always make my own veg stock and I usually have enough of my own chicken stock, but I rarely get the chance to make beef stock.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 08:16 AM

I like Better Than Bouillon. Glop, not cubes. Analog rather than digital amount calibration.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM

I find all stock cubes to be too salty. By the time you've used enough cubes you've got too much salt... I used the beef cube in that recipe along with the porcini water, enabling me to use just half of the cube. And I think that Marigold bouillon powder is the spawn of the devil.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 12:22 PM

Things to do when you live alone but cooked a whole rabbit:

Take all the meat off the other arm and put it on a salad. Lettuce cukes almonds, vinaigrette.

Take all the meat off one leg and stuff a pepper.

Eat one leg cold, like cold fried chicken, outdoors in the sunshine, like a picnic.

Make an entirely different stew, curry or something, with the saddle and the liquid from the original stew.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Mar 21 - 07:37 PM

I made the traditional Portuguese soup caldo verde tonight. I had about 150g of dolce chorizo, which I skinned. I chopped up two-thirds of it small and fried it for five minutes in some extra virgin olive oil in my big sauté pan. Then into that pan went some sliced onion and a couple of cloves of smashed garlic (squashed with the flat of a knife blade). While that was softening up I peeled about six good-sized spuds and cut them up into 3/4 inch cubes. The spuds went in the pan along with about a litre of stock (I used half-strength home-made chicken stock, but you can use just water).

After about 15 minutes the spuds were cooked. I carefully fished out about half of them, then I whizzed everything else in the pan until smooth. Then I put the reserved chunks of spud back in along with half a pound of very finely-shredded greens (I had a sweetheart organic cabbage, but anything leafy will do). While that was simmering away (do a seasoning check), I cut the rest of the sausage into thin circles and dry-fried them until quite crispy in a separate frying pan.

Once the greens were cooked I ladled the thick soup into bowls, topped it with the chorizo slices and sprinkled extra virgin olive oil on top. Delicioso!

So far, fairly authentic, though I confess to having cheated in order to make this a hearty meal and not just a big bowl of soup. In Portugal they'd have it with corn bread, but instead of that I threw in a can of cannellini beans with the cabbage. Not exactly purist but begod it did the trick.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 07:04 AM

We don't cook on Wednesdays. It's cheese night, so we have cheese (duh) with matzo crackers (me) or Bath Olivers (she). I must have a neutral crunchy vehicle for my cheese. I can't understand anyone wanting weird herby or seedy crackers which detract from the beautiful cheese. Bread would be a bit too bulky in consideration of the other stuff we eat with the cheese. We have a hunk of Montagnolo d'affine, a soft blue German cheese which is far superior to the dismal Cambozola, and some Wookey Hole cheddar. We scoff that with a selection of nuts, nocellara olives from Sicily (our favourites), caperberries and cherry tomatoes, maybe with a few thin slices of mild chorizo or salami or a sweet potato falafel or three.

But Mrs Steve has a potentially dodgy dental appointment tomorrow, so the crunchy stuff might not be apropos. I have some caldo verde left over from last night which can only improve with keeping. I'll be able to bulk that up quite easily for a bowl of comfort food if she's been under the drill/pliers. The cheese can wait until Friday night, but the wine can't (we're definite wine weekenders with just the Wednesday oasis, which is sacrosanct, a tradition I'd say).


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 07:40 AM

I always eat cheese with bread, ever since I lived in France. It has to be decent bread, of course. I can't understand anyone wanting to eat cheese with any kind of biscuit or cracker.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 08:11 AM

Well I love cheese with bread too. My abiding memory of that was one evening after a tough day's teaching in the summer of '76 (remember that one?). A mate and I toddled down to the Angel in Rotherhithe. A couple of pints, crusty bread some home-made pickle and a big slab of strong cheddar - bliss. He hardly drank anything so he was driving. You need mates like that. I slept for twelve hours that night!

We might have bread with cheese of a lunchtime, but there's too much else going on on our cheesy Wednesday night. Matzo crackers are just flour and water, very thin, no salt, no fat, light a feather, 19 calories each - I love 'em!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 02:02 PM

He who controls the Spice controls the Universe

perchance a bit of cheese caused dreams


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 09 Mar 21 - 02:09 PM

I wasn't suggesting that you should set fire to a feather whilst eating your cheese. The burning smell would put you off your food.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 06:24 AM

By the way:

"I can't even load it enough to make a blicky to it without going away and coming back."

I just click on the little d next to the number. You have to read upwards but I've got used to doing that after fifteen years...You get the most recent page quickly, no matter how long the thread is.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 08:28 AM

Back to the bread or crackers bit.

Blues or a soft ones like Brie don't usually work too well on bread for me.

I recently found that I liked the combination of Danish Blue on Ryvita but, more generally, I think the plain old cream cracker is as good as anything. I'm not a fan of the "biscuits for cheese" type boxes I sometimes see at Christmas. Most of their contents detract from the taste of the cheese.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 09:52 AM

For softer blue cheeses, I go for St Agur and Montagnolo, which in m'humble are far better than Danish Blue or Cambozola. A nice lump of Gorgonzola hits the mark too, or even Dolcellate, though that's a good one for making a creamy chicken pasta sauce. Last time I went to Gloucester Services they had a huge wheel of Gorgonzola that was so ripe that it could be scooped out with a ladle into a pot. I'm not a big fan of Stilton because it's far too variable and not always that good. A superb blue, which must be freshly cut before it starts to blacken, is Bath Blue. Then there's Stichelton, which is made near where Stilton is made and made in the same way except that unpasteurised milk is used. It's very classy and better than any Stilton I've ever tried.

I find Ryvita to be a real ordeal, like eating a dried loofah. Jacob's crackers are so-so, and you could try Bath Olivers instead (Waitrose?) - they are a bit softer, neutral in taste and uncoloured, a real treat with any cheese.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM

Mrrzy:
You've probably been on here long enough to know, but I thought I'd just comment.
If a thread is too long to load/retain, you can load just the first 50 comments by clicking on the blue 'number of messages' number opposite the title.
Better yet, clicking on the blue 'd' beside that number gives you the most recent 50 messages (in descending order).
These options were introduced to make it easier for people whose systems had problems loading long discussions.
Hope this helps, and that I'm not 'preaching to the converted'.
Cheers.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM

I have been wondering how to get back to eating cheeses, without bread or crackers to convey them...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM

Thinly slice an onion, cut a hunk of cheddar into small pieces and put that lot into a baking tray with a splash of milk. Grill for 10 min until all is sloppy and oozy. Nirvana. Failing that, eat the cheese with some cherry tomatoes and some olives and a few slices of salami. For soft cheeses just scoop some up on to a stick of celery or slices of red pepper, cut lengthways.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 10:37 AM

You could eat the cheese with a baked potato - not too hot so as not to melt the cheese rather than just softening it.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 11:46 AM

I've got some sea bass fillets. Any suggestions about what to do with them?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 12:01 PM

Hadn't included chilli in my "One-Pot Cooking" for ages but, yesterday, came home from my grocery shop with a Tesco stir-fry medley that included one - half of which I added to the pot (beginning by sautéing the mix, as usual).

Could be quite some time before I add another as, with a tingling stiff-upper-lip (waste not want not), I quietly coughed and burped my way through the pottages - barely noticing the spice mix that I usually enjoy.

In other words, I don't like chilli because I do like spices and veggies/non-chilli non-carne!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 12:24 PM

I've sometimes been tempted by those stir-fry bags but I always vow never to buy them again, as I have to pick over the contents to get rid of all the woody chunks of cabbage stalk.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 12:36 PM

...the rest of the above medley was okay, Jos - baby corn, mangetout, broccoli and salad onion.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Mar 21 - 01:11 PM

SPB, your sea bass fillets. When we have sea bass or another tasty slab of fish we sometimes have it on a bed of lentils. Chop up an onion and some celery and fry until softened in extra virgin olive oil with some herbs (thyme and a bay leaf is good) and a clove of garlic that you've squashed with the flat of a knife blade. Add a glass of white wine and let it bubble for a minute. Stir in some green or brown lentils, a small handful of porcini mushrooms that you've soaked and chopped up, a big glug of tomato paste and some vegetable stock. Simmer it all until the lentils are done, half an hour maybe. Adjust the seasoning and add more stock if needed. When you're nearly there with that, cook the fish very simply by frying it in hot olive oil. Skin side down for about four minutes (hopefully you'll get the skin crispy) then flip it for two more minutes. Lay the fish skin side up on top of the lentils on plates. If you've got some fresh parsley, chop some up and sprinkle over the grub. Lovely job.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 01:38 PM

When it comes to food preparation I am utilitarin and cheap. It has to be instant or quick and easy like chocolate or peanut butter and fruit sandwiches. So for lunch today I noticed a nice avocado. I smashed it together with about 1/3 tangy tarter sauce and spread it on open faced pumpernickle. One slice got color and heat with a light sprinkle of spiracha and the other a mild smoked paparika. Slice into squares. Salt to taste.
I thought it was good with horse radish cheese and a can of Lemomatta.

Steve if you eat alot of fish, your carbon 14 test will indicate you are a hundred years older than you are. But why do they call it brain food?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 02:54 PM

I eat a lot of fish because I like fish. Tomorrow we are having Skrei cod, the best cod I've ever had. Our lovely fishmonger Tracey gets it in every Thursday in season (Jan to April) and she saves the thickest fillets for me if I ask her. Mrs Steve is in a delicate buccal state, having just had a somewhat complicated extraction, so it's soft food for now. But soft food does not mean bland. I'll simply fry the fish, in butter I should think, and we'll have it with fluffy mash instead of chips. Greens of some kind, not too crunchy, and I'll make some parsley sauce á la Delia Smith. I've been known, when the mood takes me, to marinade white fish for a short while in a mix of extra virgin olive oil, freshly-squeezed lemon juice, fresh thyme and a touch of fresh garlic. When the Skrei goes out of season I'll be waiting with bated breath for the red mullet to come in. We also eat mucho tuna and smoked mackerel. Hake, halibut, skate, dabs, anything. Even Alaskan pollack, which tastes great although it goes a bit off-white when baked. And salmon. Only ever wild red Pacific salmon. I will not buy any fish that has been farmed.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jack Campin
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 03:21 PM

The oldest recipes in the world


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 06:10 PM

Only a few millennia, forsooth!

No, but, fun article.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel
Date: 11 Mar 21 - 07:38 PM

I'll pass on the carob but the chicken looks great.

Licorice and citron what a blast!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 09:56 AM

Among the few things I regret about moving from Ottawa to Stratford is the lack of a decent fishmonger anywhere in sensible driving distance. Ottawa is a big city with an airport, so ocean fish is flown in every day; here, not so much. Now, fish comes in two kinds: farmed and frozen, with the exception (in season) of lake trout and pickerel from Lake Huron. Even the mussels and oysters are farmed, raised in the coastal waters of Prince Edward Island.

It's enough to drive one to canned sprats. Almost.

A friend from the gym gave us a "paleo" cookbook a couple of years ago, but I have yet to try any of the recipes. When I flipped through it, I was discouraged by the many dishes with ingredients I would have to hunt and gather in faraway places such as Kitchener and London, Now that I'm usually feeding only myself (and the cats), such expeditions are vanishingly unlikely. I have a hard enough time moving my arse to Sobey's once a fortnight for oranges, yoghourt, milk, and frozen veg.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Mar 21 - 07:15 PM

I remember what that self-sufficiency guru, John Seymour, said about raising free-range pigs, in as happy an environment that we could provide for them (which he did). I can't recall the exact quote, but he said that the good-life pig he'd grown for food that he was about to kill was happily munching away on roots one minute and in heaven the next. That's how we should think, I suppose, about wild ocean fish. I guess it takes them longer to die than John's pig, but it's hard to see how we could do it better. For me, it's no farmed fish, only wild, and fish only caught by sustainable methods that don't involve by-catch or wrecking the sea floor. That'll do me. Suit yourself.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 05:03 AM

Not sure if Chinese wet-markets, where fish, etc., are kept alive for freshness (photos from a Either way, for those who have never tried tofu, or not had it a second time because it was "too bland", I challenge you to try this:

Heat some vegetable oil in a frying pan before adding some soft tofu, then soy sauce. Place that mix atop some toast and, perhaps, mop up the remaining oil/sauce with another piece.

Imagine the most creamy scrambled egg you ever had and a chook with a sore rear...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 06:23 AM

Well I wouldn't buy fish that way, but you don't know that that's where coronavirus came from. For scrambled egg for just me, I beat up three eggs with salt and pepper. No milk. The beating is gentle only. I get a nonstick small frying pan (£3.99 Lidl) and melt a big knob of butter on high heat. In goes the egg mix, then straight away off goes the heat but leave the pan on the ring. Mush that around mercilessly with a spatula until it's underdone. Then go over to your buttered toast and slap it on. The eggs are in the pan for less than a minute. They should be soft and creamy with no runny bits. We all have our own way. I've never eaten tofu and probably never knowingly will. Make sure they didn't chop down too much rain forest to produce the soya beans.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 06:39 AM

Yes, Steve - much of the sad slash-and-burn that has destroyed large areas of rainforest in South America has been for growing soya beans...but not sure how much of the produce is for livestock vs. human feed..?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 07:08 AM

I'm doing a risotto tonight. For two of us, very generous portions, I use 300g risotto rice (I have carnaroli). I need about 700 ml stock, which will be half home-made chicken stock and half the water from boiling the veg I'm going to include. So I'll start by boiling some tenderstem, some peas and some green beans, a handful of each, in unsalted water, keeping that water and setting the cooked veg aside.

I'll dry-fry 100 g of chopped pancetta until nearly crispy in my smaller Le Creuset casserole. To that I'll add some thinly sliced onion and a bit of butter if there's not quite enough fat. I want the onion soft but not coloured. Then I'll add some fresh thyme and the rice, stirring to coat the grains with fat. Then in goes a small glass of white wine. I'll turn up the heat to get that bubbling, and then...

...And then I cheat shamelessly. I'll add 600 ml of my hot stock all at once, stir it in, get it to a simmer then put the lid on and forget it for 15 minutes.

The next step is crucial. I'll remove the lid and stir and beat the rice like a lunatic for about three minutes. This gets it nice and creamy, as though I hadn't cheated at all. It also very reliable in getting the rice perfectly al dente every time, not the easiest thing with risottos. And it means I get to sit down for 15 minutes, preferably with an aperitif (come on, it's Saturday), instead of standing over the stove adding bits of stock and stirring until my arm nearly drops off.

In goes some seasoning and the reserved veg to heat through. Then in go a big dollop of creme fraiche (butter if you like), two big handfuls of grated Parmesan and a good sprinkling of fresh parsley (or not, Maggie). If it's all a bit too stiff add a bit more hot stock.

It can sit for a few minutes while you pour out the vino, then ladle into bowls and eat it in front of the telly. Good living!


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 08:20 AM

Alpro, who make soya milk as well as lots of other stuff, mostly get their soya beans from Europe or Canada. They have claimed in the past not to get them from felled rain forest areas. If I were buying tofu (unlikely, as I only eat actual food), I would be checking its source. Incidentally, I buy lots of their unsweetened oat milk but not the soya milk. On offer in Sainsbury's for a quid at the moment.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 08:29 AM

...in terms of limiting food-miles, oat milk (which I didn't like a few years ago but should probably try again) is more environmentally friendly for us in England...although, I seem to recall a Country File article looking at growing a variety of soya bean here..?


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 09:07 AM

Tofu here is mostly from Twin Oaks, one of the few remaining working communes. But no, I don't eat it either.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 09:42 AM

I saw someone on the telly making Parmesan crisps the other day. I'm going to make some this evening. They look like the kind of thing I would eat 50 of in an unstoppable frenzy. I'll keep you posted...


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 10:13 AM

Steve,

lentils don't appeal to me, but cooking in white wine + a medley of wild forest mushrooms does. I have two jars of dried mushrooms from a Czech forest.....


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 10:16 AM

The cooking times are important.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 11:52 AM

The biggest danger is overcooking fish because you're not confident that it's cooked through. With fish the price it is, that would be a tragedy. Total frying time for sea bass fillets would be no more than 5-6 minutes in all at medium heat. I fried two very thick cod fillets last night. Five minutes skin side, two minutes top side. It was perfect done like that.

There are lentils and lentils. I usually fall back on the little brown puy lentils, but what I really want is the Italian green Castelluccio lentils. I've had trouble finding those. The green jobs that seem to come from Canada are not a patch.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 11:53 AM

I tried the lentil recipe (adapted to suit what I had to hand) with my sea bass last night. I wasn't sure about the lentils but it was surprisingly good. Thank you Steve.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos
Date: 13 Mar 21 - 12:08 PM

Mine were brown lentils, but I'm not sure if they were Puy ones as they were in an unlabelled jar as the previous wrapping had split.


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Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Mar 21 - 11:30 AM

Not sure if others have a better memory for the taste of foods than events, etc., but I just had my first (stoned!) date for what must be at least 3 decades, and the toffee-like taste was most-familiar and not unpleasant.

Got them as a change from sultanas on my shop last week - but honestly can't remember why..?!


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