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ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots

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The Sandman 03 Aug 22 - 07:58 AM
Daniel Kelly 03 Aug 22 - 08:53 AM
GUEST,groovy 03 Aug 22 - 09:25 AM
The Sandman 03 Aug 22 - 01:58 PM
Joe Offer 03 Aug 22 - 02:07 PM
The Sandman 03 Aug 22 - 02:29 PM
GUEST,Malcolm Storey 03 Aug 22 - 06:28 PM
The Sandman 04 Aug 22 - 01:34 AM
The Sandman 04 Aug 22 - 03:23 AM
GUEST,henryp 04 Aug 22 - 05:20 PM
Vic Smith 05 Aug 22 - 09:10 AM
Splott Man 05 Aug 22 - 09:23 AM
Joe Offer 05 Aug 22 - 08:36 PM
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Subject: Fred Jordans Boots
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 07:58 AM

To be sung to the tune of the long black veil.
Fred Jordans boots,
to be sung to the tune long black veil...

FRED JORDAN'S BOOTS

Some years ago, on a cold dark night
Some boots did sing, 'neath the town hall light
There were few at the scene, but they all said
That the boots that they saw, looked a lot like Freds
The voice that they heard, had a Shropshire twang
the Outlandish Knight, was the first they sang
I spoke not a word, but listened entranced
When the song did end, the Boots did a dance
They walks the hills of the long white cloud
They visits the town when the night winds howl
Nobody knows, nobody sees
Nobody knows but me
the, voice sounds good and the diction clear
the boots tap the ground and shed not a tear
But late at night, when the north wind blows
In the long white cloud they sing loud and slow
they walks these hills of the long white cloud
they visits the sea when the night winds howl
Nobody knows, nobody sees
Nobody knows but me

Freds Boots are in New Zealand the land of the long white cloud


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Subject: RE: Fred Jordans Boots
From: Daniel Kelly
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 08:53 AM

Colum Sands also wrote a great song about Fred's Boots.


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Subject: RE: Fred Jordans Boots
From: GUEST,groovy
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 09:25 AM

Jordan's!
Fred's!


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 01:58 PM

quite right, incorrect use of apostrophe, thanks


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: Joe Offer
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 02:07 PM

There are two complete albums of Fred Jordan recordings at YouTube, but nothing about his boots. Not even a picture of his boots. Somebody, tell me about his boots.

Did you write the song, Dick? Should I correct the apostrophes and add your name to the song?

-Joe-


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Subject: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots (Dick Miles)
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 02:29 PM

well the tune is the long black veil,
the words are mine, so correct apostrophes and add my name to it
but here are some improvements

FRED JORDAN'S BOOTS
(Dick Miles) - melody: Long Black Veil

Many years ago, on a cold dark night
Some boots did sing, 'neath the town hall light
There were few at the scene, but they all said
That the boots that they saw, looked a lot like Fred's

CHORUS
They walk the hills of the long white cloud
They visits the town when the night winds howl
Nobody knows, nobody sees
Nobody knows just you and me

The voice that they heard, had a Shropshire ring
the Outlandish Knight, was the first they did sing
I spoke not a word, but listened entranced
When the song did end, the Boots did a dance

They walks the hills of the long white cloud
They visits the town when the night winds howl
Nobody knows, nobody sees
Nobody knows just you n me

The voice sounds strong the vibrato clear
the boots tap the ground and shed not a tear [or fear]
But late at night, when the north wind blows
In the long white cloud they sing loud and slow

they walk these hills of the long white cloud
they visit the sea when the night winds howl
Nobody knows, nobody sees
Nobody knows just you n me


unbeknown to me there is a completely different song by Colum Sands on the same subject
his boots were farm worker's boots and they were taken to new zealand by roger giles[the long white cloud is the maori name for new zealand
FredJordan always sang in his farm workers clothes which included leggings to stop the rodents running up his trousers and boots
if i have that wrong please correct me, but that is how i remeber him


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: GUEST,Malcolm Storey
Date: 03 Aug 22 - 06:28 PM

I am sure that somewhere on Mudcat are the full details of (the late) Roger Giles involvement as young man with Fred and how he became the owner of Fred's boots after Fred died.
Perhaps someone with more time to investigate can find the relevant reference.
An obituary thread on Roger may be the place to start.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: The Sandman
Date: 04 Aug 22 - 01:34 AM

if the song reminds people of Fred, and his singing and traditional songs that he sang,IMO that is a good thing.
IMO getting people intersted in traditional songs is something i feel is worthwhile


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: The Sandman
Date: 04 Aug 22 - 03:23 AM

Fred Jordan
Farm worker who became a folk circuit favourite
Derek Schofield
Thu 8 Aug 2002 02.12 BST

Fred Jordan, who has died aged 80, was a Shropshire-born folk singer and one of the last survivors of a way of life long since disappeared. A frequent performer at folk music festivals, he was awarded the English Folk Dance and Song Society's highest honour, the gold badge, for services to folk music, in 1996.

Fred was born in Ludlow, Shropshire, the youngest of five children. He made his singing debut at the age of six on the stage of Ludlow's town hall with The Gypsy's Warning and won a pound. Always top of the class, he nevertheless left school at 14 and became a farm labourer, living in at the farms where he worked, generally looking after the horses, then still a feature of farm life in the county.

His songs were learned from his parents, fellow workers and the Gypsies who travelled up and down Corve Dale, and he was welcome in the pub sing-songs on a Saturday night. This encouraged him to learn new songs. Fred's youth and willingness to sing soon led to him being invited to Birmingham, where he sang on the BBC radio folk dance programmes in the mid-50s. An appearance at an English Folk Dance and Song Society festival in London led to further invitations from the newly emerging folk clubs in the 50s and 60s. A tour of Scotland brought him into contact with the poet Hamish Henderson in Edinburgh and he sang at concerts at Manchester's Free Trade Hall and the Royal Festival Hall in London.

When the folk festival scene took off in the 1960s, Fred was a favourite performer, especially at the legendary Keele Festival, which continues as the National Folk Music Festival. He also appeared at festivals in Cambridge, Bromyard, Sidmouth, Redcar and Whitby. By then he was working as a casual farm worker, where his jobs included fencing, hedging, ditching and harvesting. This allowed him time to travel and sing.

Fred's unaccompanied singing was first available commercially in the US on a series of albums compiled by Peter Kennedy and Alan Lomax, and released here by Topic Records in the late 1960s. It was Topic which issued two solo albums - Songs Of A Shropshire Farm Worker (1966) and When The Frost Is On The Pumpkin (1974) - and several of his songs were included on the acclaimed Voice of the People series of 20 CDs. His songs included The Banks Of The Sweet Primroses, with which he invariably started his performances, and the classic ballads The Outlandish Knight and Barbara Allan, as well as his "signature song" The Farmer's Boy.

He continued to learn songs from the singers he met in the folk clubs and festivals, and they were all sung in his distinctive style, with a slight vibrato in his voice and a subtle and skilful use of melodic ornament. In performance, he sang with a dead-pan expression and rarely talked between songs, a deliberate ploy which forced the audience to listen carefully to the words and story - he certainly saw himself as a story-teller through song.

He had little or no interest in the trappings of a materialistic society - he owned neither a television nor a radio, but he was well-informed about current affairs - although he faithfully polished his large collection of horse brasses every week. He frequently turned up for concert and festival appearances in his working clothes, including hob-nail boots and cloth cap.

In 1991, the English Folk Dance and Song Society released a new recording of his singing, In Course of Time.

· Fred Jordan, folk singer and farm worker, born January 5 1922; died July 30 2002


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: GUEST,henryp
Date: 04 Aug 22 - 05:20 PM

Thank you, Dick.

It was Whitby Folk Week and we set off for a concert at the Sailing Club. At the top of the narrow flight of stairs stood Fred Jordan. Stay there, boy! he ordered. He came down the stairs and gripped my arms tightly. Looking me in the eyes, he said, 'Tis unlucky to pass on the stairs! I thought it would be unlucky to pass Fred anywhere.

When I took my shirt off that night, there were five bruises on each arm. They were there for ten days.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: Vic Smith
Date: 05 Aug 22 - 09:10 AM

I remember the sound of those boots clumping across the floor in the room above me at the Keele Folk Festival in 1970, very early on the Saturday and Sunday mornings of that weekend. Fred was in the room above me in the student accommodation.


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Subject: RE: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots
From: Splott Man
Date: 05 Aug 22 - 09:23 AM

When Dame Pattie and I visited Roger Giles and Hilary a few years ago, the boots were under the bed in the guest bedroom. They were brought out and ceremoniously placed on the grate in the living room for the duration of our stay.
Colum Sands told us that he was given the same hospitality and was subsequently inspired to write his song of the same name.

Splott Man


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Subject: ADD: Fred Jordan's Boots (Colum Sands)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Aug 22 - 08:36 PM

FRED JORDAN'S BOOTS
(Colum Sands)

There are monuments raised to men of the sword
Who conquered on many's a shore
But to read of their deeds and the flags they have planted
I don't stop to look anymore
For no roots grow on flagpoles nor flowers upon flags
And they all fade away before long
So I'm singing tonight for a labouring man
Who planted a garden of song
    CHORUS
    And it's one step and two we're following you
    Down by the banks where the primroses grew
    One step and two we're following you
    The songs you once carried now carrying you

It's a right step from Auckland to Fred Jordan's house
Ten thousand miles, maybe more
But here as we sip by the volcano's lip
The memories pour in by the score
There's a black-and-white photograph up on the wall
Says Roger, "I’ll show you some more"
And back in he comes with the heart of this song
The boots that Fred Jordan wore.

CHORUS

These boots they were made for a labouring man
A man who could carry a song
From the fields around Ludlow to many's the stage
These boots carried Fred Jordan on
And when time overtook him he sensed the last verse
But his song wasn't ready to end
And Roger, he knew as he gave them to you
Saying kick out these boots, my old friend.

CHORUS

And here in this house where the volcanoes sleep
There are places and spaces to dream
A song for the morning, a drink for the night
And stories for times in between
There's food on the table a fire on the hearth
And a welcome for those on the roam
In Takarunga this night I know in my heart
That Fred Jordan's boots are at home




FRED JORDAN'S BOOTS
(Colum Sands)

There are (C)monuments (G)raised to (G7)men of the (Am)sword
Who (C)conquered on many's a (G)shore
But to (C)read of their (G)deeds and the (G7)flags they have (Am)planted
I (C)don't stop to (G)look any(C)more
For no (Gm)roots grow on flagpoles nor (F)flowers upon flags
And they (C)all fade away before (G)long
So I'm (C)singing to(G)night for a (C)labouring (F)man
Who (C)planted a (G)garden of (C)song

CHORUS
And it's (C)one step and (G)two we're (G7)following (Am)you
(C)Down by the banks where the (F)primroses (G)grew
(C)One step and (G)two we're (G7)following (Am)you - Am
The (C)songs you once (G)carried now (G7)carrying (C)you -C-G-G7-C

It's a (C)right step from (G)Auckland to (G7)Fred Jordan's (Am)house
(C)Ten thousand miles, maybe (G)more
But (C)here as we (G)sip by the (G7)volcano's (Am)lip
The (C)memories (G)pour in by the (C)score
There's a (Gm)black-and-white photograph (F)up on the wall
Says (C)Roger, "I’ll show you some (G)more"
And (C)back in he (G)comes with the (C)heart of this (F)song
The (C)boots that (G)Fred Jordan (C)wore.

CHORUS

These (C)boots they were (G)made for a (G7)labouring (Am)man
A (C)man who could carry a (G)song
From the (C)fields around (G)Ludlow to (G7)many's the (Am)stage
These (C)boots carried (G)Fred Jordan (C)on
And when (Gm)time overtook him he (F)sensed the last verse
But his (C)song wasn't ready to (G)end
And (C)Roger, he (G)knew as he (C)gave them to (F)you
Saying (C)kick out these (G)boots, my old (C)friend.

CHORUS

And (C)here in this (G)house where the (G7)volcanoes (Am)sleep
There are p(C)laces and spaces to (G)dream
A (C)song for the (G)morning, a (G7)drink for the (Am)night
And (C)stories for (G)times in bet(C)ween
There's (Gm)food on the table a (F)fire on the hearth
And a (C)welcome for those on the (G)roam
In Taka(C)runga this (G)night I (C)know in my (F)heart
That (C)Fred Jordan's (G)boots are at (C)home

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0QMUx6Quis


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