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Lyr Req: Braes o' Strathblane / Strawblane

Susan A-R 21 Jan 00 - 11:29 PM
GUEST 22 Jan 00 - 12:20 AM
Susan A-R 22 Jan 00 - 01:18 PM
GUEST,Peter F from TLT 22 Jan 00 - 03:37 PM
John Moulden 22 Jan 00 - 03:49 PM
Susanne (skw) 22 Jan 00 - 05:37 PM
GUEST,Philippa 22 Jan 00 - 08:59 PM
GUEST,Philippa 22 Jan 00 - 09:03 PM
Malcolm Douglas 22 Jan 00 - 09:21 PM
GUEST,Philippa 22 Jan 00 - 10:44 PM
Susan A-R 22 Jan 00 - 11:26 PM
John Moulden 23 Jan 00 - 06:10 AM
GUEST 03 Feb 13 - 11:18 AM
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Subject: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: Susan A-R
Date: 21 Jan 00 - 11:29 PM

I learned this song years ago from a bootleged radio tape, and have never heard or seen it since.

As I went out walkin one morning in May Down by the green meadows I chanced for to stray It's there that I met with a noung maid alain A bleachin' her claiths by the Brays O' Strath Blaine.

I got quite excited when I found a song on the DT about a bleacher lass, but it isn't the same one. In the song I am remembering, he courts her. She plays coy, she finally caves and he changes his mind. The melody was a lovely inor one. Any info on this?


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 12:20 AM

"Braes o' Strathdon/ Strathblane", 'The Greig-Duncan Fols Song Collection', Vol. 6, #1132, 1995.


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: Susan A-R
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 01:18 PM

Thanks. Any idea as to who recorded the thing? It's a nice one with an interesting story line.


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: GUEST,Peter F from TLT
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 03:37 PM

The only recording of the Braes o' Strathblane that I know of was by Ian Manuel on Topic 12TS220. This is a fairly well known song, attempted even by myself. cheers.


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: John Moulden
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 03:49 PM

Or the Braes of Strabane if you're in Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 05:37 PM

It's definitely the 'Braes of Strathblane' and Ossian recorded it on their 'St Kilda's Wedding' (1978). I think their back catalogue is available as CDs but can't remember the publisher. - Susanne


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BRAES O' STRATHBLANE
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 08:59 PM

Braes o' Strathblane

Celtic audial includes a sample of Ossian

album notes from Ossian "St Kilda's Wedding" (Iona Records, Glasgow)
"Several versions of this song are found throughout Scotland but its origins are uncertain. In the Hebrides it is known as Stra' Bàn where the words are almost the direct Gaelic equivalent of those sung her. Similarly Gavin Greig collected a version of the song in the North East called 'The Braes of Strathdon' but commented "further south the song is known as 'The Braes of Strathblane' and I think there is little doubt that it belongs originally to Stirlingshire and that it has been localised in the North East simply by changing the name of the Strath". (Greig XVII.)

"The words here were first published in Mavers Collection (1866) and are recorded as those heard in Kintyre. The song has an unusually unhappy ending for this 'boy meets girl in the month of May' type."

Christine Primrose sings "Strath Bàn" in Gaelic on "Aite Mo Ghaoil" (Temple Records).

Hugh Shields' Shamrock, Rose and Thistle, Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 1981 has a version of 'The Braes of Strathblane' taken down from Annie Sweeny of Magilligan, Co Derry (N Ireland). According to the notes, the song has also been found in America under the titles of 'The beach of Strablane', 'The bleaches so green'[not as odd a name as may appear; linens were treated on a 'bleaching green'] and even 'The Chippewa Girl' Shields also quotes from Robert Ford, ed Vagabond Songs and ballads of Scotland(1899)Paisley & London, 1904: 'Doggerel' as familiar in the Blane valley, north of Glasgow, as 'the lines of the 23rd psalm'

Two American versions can be found in GM Laws' Native American Balladry (1950) revised, Philadelphia 1957. He calls it 'The Chippewa Girl'. Maud Karpeles collected 'The bleaches so green' in Newfoundland.

also in Frank Kidson Traditional Tunes Oxford, 1891; John Ord The Bothy Songs and Ballads of Aberdeen, Banff and Moray, Angus and the Mearns; Edinburgh 1930s [I suspect he may have the placename as 'Strathdon']

Annie Sweeny's version:

THE BRAES OF STRATHBLANE

Near the town of brave Athrillicks one evening in June
To the woods I know (sic) daisies and the meadows in bloom
I spied a wee lassie at the butt of the lane,
She was bleaching her linens on the braes of Strathblane.

I stepped up to her, I made my address,
-Are you bleaching your lilnens, my charming wee lass?
It's twelve months and better I had it in mind
That we would get married if you were so inclined.

-To marry, to marry, kind sir, I am too young,
Besides, all you young men has a flattering tongue;
My mammy and daddy quite angry would be
If I would go marry a rover like thee

-Consent, you weee lassie, and do not say no.
You don't know the pain, love, that I undergo.
The clouds they look weighty, I fear we'll have rain
And I'll court some other on the braes of Strathblane.

Come all you wee lassies, take a warning from me,
Don't slight your wee laddie or his father dear;
for the slighting of my love I fear I'll get none
and I'll court some other on the braes of Strathblane.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BRAES OF STRAWBLANE
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 09:03 PM

There is a version sung on Topic recording "John Reilly, The Bonny Green Tree, songs of an Irish Traveller"

THE BRAES OF STRAWBLANE (Laws H 10)

For the old town of Tralee one evening in June
Through the woodbine, mound daisies an' meadows in bloom
I espied a wee lassie at the end of a lane
An' she bleaching her linen by the braes of Strawblane

For I stepped up unto her an' I made my address:
"Are you bleachin' your linen my charnin' wee lass,
For twelve months an' better since I had deep in my mind
Oh, that we would get married, love, if you were inclined."

"Well, to marry, to marry, kind sir, I'm too young
An' besides all ye young men has a platterin' fine tongue
Sayin; my Daddy an' Mammy, oh quite angry would be
That's if I would go marry a rover like thee."

"You consent my wee lassie and do not say no
Sayin' you don't know the pain love, oh that I undergo
for the clouds they look weary, I'm afraid we'll have rain
Oh, but I'll go my way, love, round the braes of Strawblane."

"Consented, consented it is all of the time
Since the last words you have spoken I have now changed my mind
The clouds they look weary I'm afraid we'll have rain
Oh but I'll court some other round the braes of Strawblane."


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BRAES O' STRATHBLANE
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 09:21 PM

And here is the song as recorded by Ossian (Iona Records; IRCD001.)  Any mistakes in the transcription are mine.

The Braes O' Strathblane

As I was a-walking one morning in May
Down by yon green meadows I careless did stray;
I spied a young lass, she was standing alane
A-bleaching her claes on the braes o' Strathblane.

I steppèd up tae her as I seemed tae pass:
"Ye're bleaching yer claes here, my bonny young lass;
It's twelve months and mair since I've had in my mind
And its a' tae be married if you are inclined."

"Tae marry, tae marry, I'm sure I'm too young
And all ye young lads hae a flattering tongue;
My faither and mother displeasèd would be
Gin I were tae wed wi' a rover like thee."

"But lassie, oh lassie, how can ye say so
For ye ken all the pain which I undergo;
Consent, my dear lassie, tae be a' my ain
And happy we'll live here on the braes o' Strathblane."

But, "Tempt me nae longer", this lassie did say
For ye'll dae yersel' better to gang on your way;
Far better for me tae bide here alane
Than wi' you spend my days here on the braes o' Strathblane.

So I turnèd around then wi' a tear in my ee
Saying, "I wish ye a guid man, whaure'er he may be;
I wish ye a guid man as we're here alane
And I'll court wi' another on the braes o' Strathblane."

"But wait", cried this lassie, "for ye've fair won my hairt;
Here is my hand, and we never shall pairt.
We never shall part till the day that we dee
And may a' good attend us whaure'er we may be."

"But noo ye've consented, oh it's fair out o' time;
Ilka word that you've spoken, I've changèd my mind
For the clouds they look heavy, I'm afeared we'll have rain."
And we shook hands and parted on the Braes o' Strathblane.

Malcolm


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Subject: Aodann Strath Bhàin
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 10:44 PM

thanks, Malcolm. I was working on a transcription but you beat me. Mine is very slightly different.

Aodann Strath Bhàin (a Gaelic version) is also on Capercaillie album Delerium

For the lyrics and translation see:
aodann strath bhàin
and/or
Delerium lyrics


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: Susan A-R
Date: 22 Jan 00 - 11:26 PM

Malcolm, that's the one. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Brays O' Strath Blaine?
From: John Moulden
Date: 23 Jan 00 - 06:10 AM

It may originally have been "The braes of Strathblane" but in some places in Ireland, it's definitely the Braes of Strabane. Strabane being on the river Mourne in Co Tyrone. (Sam Henry manuscripts.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Braes o' Strathblane / Strawblane
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Feb 13 - 11:18 AM

I have heard this song several times by various singers, including the late Willie Clark who performed at many Bothy Ballad Festivals throughout the N.E. corner of Scotland. My own father used to sing it from time to time and he always believed i to refer to the bleaching fields associated with the Calloco Print Works situated alongside the Blane Water (R. Blane) in Strathblane, Stirlingshire, Scotland. For further info I suggest www.strathblanefield.org or google Braes of Strathblane. I am familiar with the Braes of Strathblane, where I played as a laddie, although the print works was demolished before I was born. However, several of my school pals lived in the workers houses, which were not pulled down until well after the coronation.


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