Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3]


'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...

DigiTrad:
A DANDY FOR NINETEEN YEARS OLD
AFTER THE BALL (Dismantled Bride)
AMONG MY SOUVENIRS
BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL BROWN EYES
OLD MAID AND THE BURGLAR
SIDE BY SIDE
VERY UNFORTUNATE MAN


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: (Never Said a) Solitary Word???? (7)
Lyr Req: Old Maid and the Burglar (from Wizz Jones (4)
Lyr Req: Billy Connolly parody: Help me make it... (5)
Lyr Req: Shilling, wooden leg, cant change it (12)
Lyr Req: She took out her bum glass eye (4)


GUEST 23 Mar 20 - 09:55 PM
Raedwulf 31 Mar 18 - 01:56 AM
McGrath of Harlow 30 Mar 18 - 09:21 PM
GUEST,Bob S. 25 Dec 15 - 08:25 PM
GUEST 04 Dec 15 - 03:03 PM
GUEST,Daddy-o's daughter 27 Jun 15 - 07:20 AM
BigDaddy 17 May 15 - 12:59 AM
Snuffy 16 May 15 - 04:07 PM
GUEST,Noel MacDonald 16 May 15 - 01:15 PM
GUEST,Tom Hunter 09 May 15 - 12:53 AM
GUEST 05 Aug 13 - 12:44 PM
GUEST,Guest 05 Aug 13 - 08:48 AM
GUEST,Jimbo 24 Dec 12 - 04:13 PM
GUEST,Uncle Pete's nephew 17 Dec 12 - 05:35 PM
GUEST,Guest., Nancy 9/11/12 11 Sep 12 - 06:46 PM
GUEST,Bert 08 Aug 12 - 01:53 AM
GUEST,ellen 03 Aug 12 - 11:51 PM
GUEST 01 Jul 12 - 07:31 PM
GUEST 05 Apr 12 - 06:42 PM
GUEST,Sanders 26 Mar 12 - 04:49 PM
GUEST,Marianne 18 Feb 12 - 12:12 AM
GUEST,GUEST 24 Jan 12 - 08:30 PM
GUEST 08 Jan 12 - 07:01 PM
Lighter 30 Dec 11 - 04:22 PM
GUEST 27 Dec 11 - 03:05 PM
GUEST 24 Dec 11 - 07:20 PM
GUEST,amaxx1 24 Dec 11 - 01:16 PM
GUEST 24 Oct 11 - 01:48 PM
Lighter 23 Sep 11 - 12:17 PM
MGM·Lion 23 Sep 11 - 11:09 AM
Lighter 23 Sep 11 - 11:00 AM
Lighter 23 Sep 11 - 10:24 AM
Jeri 22 Sep 11 - 10:59 PM
GUEST,SuRi 22 Sep 11 - 10:54 PM
GUEST,Joi 18 Sep 11 - 04:06 PM
GUEST,Guest Genghiz.Cohen 12 May 11 - 02:43 AM
GUEST,GUEST, Stu H 05 May 11 - 12:38 AM
GUEST,Mike M 21 Feb 11 - 09:02 PM
GUEST,Rox 11 Feb 11 - 04:39 PM
GUEST,Indrani Ananda 12 Jan 11 - 04:38 PM
GUEST,Chunky off the Ramilles 12 Jan 11 - 02:21 PM
CapriUni 05 Nov 10 - 03:06 PM
Slag 05 Nov 10 - 01:54 AM
GUEST,Slater family 04 Nov 10 - 10:34 PM
GUEST,Planebill 27 Oct 10 - 08:04 PM
Leadfingers 05 Oct 10 - 01:33 AM
GUEST,Joel 04 Oct 10 - 06:24 PM
Phil Edwards 25 Sep 10 - 06:31 PM
GUEST,Nicola Perrin 25 Sep 10 - 05:06 PM
McGrath of Harlow 31 May 10 - 10:17 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Mar 20 - 09:55 PM

My grandfather had a slightly different version: Ah ha, she cried, as she lifted up her wooden leg...."


On another line mentioned in the string: "I see, he cried, as he picked up his hammer and saw!"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Raedwulf
Date: 31 Mar 18 - 01:56 AM

My only addition is that it was never "No answer..." It was always "Silence was the stern reply", which has a bit more rhythm & weight to it, to my ear.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 30 Mar 18 - 09:21 PM

I think that post still leaves the question still unanswered. But it was nice really seeing this old thread pop up again, like an old friend.

I'm tempted to bodge up some passage of verse or prose supplying a source for the quote, and then ensure it gets discovered, maybe in a handwritten note that turns up in some forgotten volume...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Bob S.
Date: 25 Dec 15 - 08:25 PM

My mother who was born in Wilkes-Barre PA in the last part of the 19th cent.

Used to declaim:

"Who is the father of my child?, she cried in accents wild, as she shook her wooden leg and staggered down the stairs."

I have been trying for years to find out the source.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Dec 15 - 03:03 PM

Mother born in 1928 in Pennsylvania of German family always said when it was very cold... Boo whoo she cried and winked her glass eye and wrapped her wooden leg around the bed post.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Daddy-o's daughter
Date: 27 Jun 15 - 07:20 AM

My Dad always said it as, "And silence was her answer, as she waved her wooden leg." To me, the dance card reference makes the most sense, as a variation on "too late." He was born in upstate Vermont in 1922. He would say it when there was no response, or an unsatisfactory response, to a question asked. I find it interesting that in all these responses, I have not seen the "silence" variation.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: BigDaddy
Date: 17 May 15 - 12:59 AM

In my family it was: "Aha," she cried as she wrapped her wooden leg around the bedpost! This seemed to go along with, "I see," said the blind man to his deaf and dumb daughter.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Snuffy
Date: 16 May 15 - 04:07 PM

Noel, thanks for letting us know she would be pleased - I'm sorry it took six years before anybody responded to Marg's query, but since then we have managed to come up with enough theories to satisfy most tastes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Noel MacDonald
Date: 16 May 15 - 01:15 PM

My wife, Marg Meikle, started this thread back in 1997. A year later she was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease and struggled with that til her death in Dec. 2013.
I'm finally getting around to the interment of her ashes this weekend.
She can truly rest in peace now that her final question has been answered.
Thank you all.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Tom Hunter
Date: 09 May 15 - 12:53 AM

The variation my father (born 1915, service in WWII) used during my childhood in the 70's was thus:
Oh yes, I see it all, she cried, as she waved her wooden leg"

He used this as a humorous expression of wry surprise whenever he'd figured out some particularly annoying problem or uncovered a clue to a mystery.

It would seem that things are becoming circular as this URL - http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/84554/origin-of-i-see-said-the-blind-man-as-he-waved-his-wooden-leg - deals with the origins of the first part of my dad's version, and there is a comment on that thread - http://english.stackexchange.com/posts/84562/revisions - which refers back to a comment by McGrath of Harlow in 2006 on this one.

So, a Wellerism of some old song, bent and twisted through the age across the English speaking world in the early part of last century. Perhaps a mystery we can only approach but not solve. Good enough for me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Aug 13 - 12:44 PM

Interesting that pythonesque/goon show humour has a long history into victorian music hall.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 05 Aug 13 - 08:48 AM

My Mother used this phrase often. ( Aha!, she cried as she threw her wooden leg aloft") Most often when she trumped someone's trick in Bridge. She was born in Canada in 1890. Her parents were of Irish origin, born I
in England and migrated to Canada, Guess that fits the profile.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Jimbo
Date: 24 Dec 12 - 04:13 PM

My Iowa-born (1912) mother always used the phrase following anytime she or anyone in her presence cried "Aha." Mom would always follow it with "she cried and waved her wooden leg aloft."

Today I was in another room and heard my wife say "Aha" as she was watching TV. So I said "...she cried and waved her wooden leg aloft."
Then I wondered what that meant, if anything, and where in the world it came from.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Uncle Pete's nephew
Date: 17 Dec 12 - 05:35 PM

My uncle Pete returned from WWII with a German bride and a few sayings. One of them was "We're off she cried as she shook her wooden leg." Somewhere along the way we learned that during his time in London there was a play with the line "We're off she cried as she shook her wooden leg and died." Another favorite was "Killer (fill in the blank) he was known as in those days; those were the days." I suspect there was a bit of gallows humor in this since Pete was dropped by parachute into the rear of the German coastal defenses during the invasion.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Guest., Nancy 9/11/12
Date: 11 Sep 12 - 06:46 PM

My grandmother, born in 1902 in Wisconsin used to say 'Hooray, she cried in accents wild as she waved her wooden leg aloft' when something wonderful happened! She was of Irish heritage and I've not heard it directly as written anywhere.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Bert
Date: 08 Aug 12 - 01:53 AM

I have used a variation of this since I first heard it from a friend at school when I was about fifteen (~1959). He usually offered it as a response when someone said 'Thank you' and that is how I use it now. I have no idea where he got it from. So what you would get is a person saying "Thank you" and this is responded to by "kind sir, she said, waving her wooden leg gaily in the air". It sort of suggests a parody on poor writing e.g "It was a dark and stormy night..."

Anyway, I still use it a lot.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,ellen
Date: 03 Aug 12 - 11:51 PM

The phrase we heard all our lives from our dad when he would give us a positive remark was '"Thank you, kind sir," she said with a smile, joyfully waving her wooden leg with the arm that she lost in the war!' I have never been able to find its source, and my dad is long gone. He was born in 1915.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Jul 12 - 07:31 PM

My family always says "Aha! She cried as she raised her wooden leg aloft". We have no idea where it came from either. The other one is "What have you got in the bag?" The answer is "Ears". Everyone in our family are readers and most do crossword puzzles too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Apr 12 - 06:42 PM

***** Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From:GUEST,Marnie
Date: 11 Jan 10 - 07:44 PM

My mother-in-law, who was born in 1914 in Coventry England, would say
"Oh well, said Nell, waving her wooden leg" whenever things didn't turn out as she planned. *****

Hi I am from coventry too and my family have said "oh well, said nell" for years. I know this isnt what this thread is about but i really want to find out where this saying comes from and who the bloody hell was nell.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Sanders
Date: 26 Mar 12 - 04:49 PM

My mother (born in 1924) used to say it a bit differently: "Thank you kindly sir, said she, and waved her wooden leg at me". She would use it at moments when "Thank you" was appropriate, and as for others who have commented, it turned into a catch phrase in the family and the kids would chime in with the second part. I always presumed there was some source (music hall or other) that would make sense of the combination of thanks and wooden leg, but have never been able to find anything online. The fiendish glee version certainly sounds more likely in that respect.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Marianne
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 12:12 AM

I add another 'fiendish' variant, used many times by my mother (born in the US in 1917--both parents born in Germany). My father (also born in 1917, also born of German immigrant parents) served in the US Navy during WWII. Both my parents grew up in German-speaking communities in the Chicago area.

'"Oho!" she cried in fiendish glee and wildly waved her wooden leg.'

Could this be a naval variant, with a similar origin to that of the GUEST's 1/8/12 posting, that caught my mother's fancy? The scansion certainly supports an origin from a popular dance-hall song or poem...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,GUEST
Date: 24 Jan 12 - 08:30 PM

My grandmother (born in 1869 in Wisconsin; lived in Montana in the 1910s and in California from the late 1910s until she died in 1959) used to use another variant: "Aha! she cried, And waved her wooden leg ON HIGH."
Like several of the other phrases she used, it seemed to me as a child and teenager to have no discernable meaning; but she'd cock her head, roll her eyes a bit sideways, and grin wickedly as if I were (or ought to be) in on the joke, and I'd smile obediently....
For years I've assumed it was from some widely-known music hall script; but inquiring amongst people in a retirement home where I volunteered to lead crossword puzzles in the late 90s-early 2000s produced no recognition.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 07:01 PM

My grandfather used to say 'Aha she cried in fiendish glee and waved her wooden leg at me." Sounds like its from the same source. He was in the navy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Lighter
Date: 30 Dec 11 - 04:22 PM

"The maiden stood on the fiery deck...."

This stanza is part of the American bawdy song "Christopher Colombo," which goes back more than a century.

In GUEST's version, though, an element has been added from Felicia Hemans's poem "Casabianca" (1826), which famously begins, "The boy stood on the burning deck,/ Whence all but he had fled."

That too has been parodied extensively.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Dec 11 - 03:05 PM

My mother (born 1924) used "aha she cried and waved her wooden leg" and so do I! I have no idea where it came from but her Father, my Grandpa, used to trot out plenty of London music hall catch phrases "What does Horrie say Winnie" and so forth so I would not be at all surprised if that was the origin of the wooden leg quote.

Cheers, Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Dec 11 - 07:20 PM

The maiden stood on the firey deck,
The villian he pursured her,
The white of an egg ran down her leg,
The son of a bitch had screwed her.

This was the rhyme sung around the small town in Missouri where I was raised. If your parents heard you singing it you got a real butt whippin' with whatever they could find. Paddle, razor strop, belt, switches, etc. We only sang it when no grownups were around. I didn't know it had quite a history behind it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,amaxx1
Date: 24 Dec 11 - 01:16 PM

As a ten year old, a close family friend, out of the clear blue would say, Aha she cried in accents wild, as the white of an egg ran down her leg and the villain still pursued her.It would perplex and then crack me up. When I asked what this meant, my question was received with a sly smile. Whenever he said it we'd both crack up. I Googled this and got to this site.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Oct 11 - 01:48 PM

Our family's version via my grandmother who was from Alabama was "'Aha!' she cried as she shook her wooden leg and slowly walked away..." I'm amazed at how many variations there are here!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Lighter
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 12:17 PM

I can't deny the similarity, M.

The parodist must have been a fairly literate person, in that case.

From Charles J. Finger's "Frontier Ballads" (1927):

"When sailors sang sea-songs, they refused to sing the song as it was written if there was the slightest chance to distort it. Take 'Nancy Lee,' which ran in part:

See how she stands upon the quay
And waves her hands to me.

"It was always rendered:

See how she stands upon her hands
And waves her legs to me."

Finger was on shipboard in the 1890s.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 11:09 AM

Agreed, Lighter. But I would urge my suggestion that a line from Chaucer's The Miller's Tale might have had an influence too ~

"Teehee!" quod she, and clapte the window to" 09 Aug 09 - 01:49 PM

~M~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Lighter
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 11:00 AM

Actually it's five out of eight, if you don't count the shift in tense. And five out of eight is plenty, particularly since "Adieu" and "Aha" are so similar in form.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Lighter
Date: 23 Sep 11 - 10:24 AM

After reviewing the entire thread, and several giant databases, I feel certain that McGrath of Harlow had the right idea back in 2006. He said that the simplest form of the saying was a parody of the final lines of "Sweet William's Farewell to Black-Eyed Susan," written by John Gay around 1715:


The boatswain gave the dreadful word,
The sails their swelling bosom spread,
No longer must she stay aboard;
They kiss'd, she sigh'd, he hung his head.
Her lessening boat unwilling rows to land;
'Adieu!' she cries; and waved her lily hand.


The form, the scansion, and six of the eight words are identical. What's more, "leg" pretty much rhymes with "spread" and "head."

"Black-Eyed Susan" was a popular song for 150 years. Captain Whall even includes it in his book of sea songs and shanties as having been sung in the 1860s.

The parody words don't seem to be reported until around 1900, but the large number of variants suggest that it's rather older than that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Jeri
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 10:59 PM

It's definitely not in the Bumper Book. I can't think of what children's book it might have been in.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,SuRi
Date: 22 Sep 11 - 10:54 PM

Mom (80-something) just asked me to go online and find the poem with "Aha! she cried in fiendish glee as she woggled her wooden leg at me!" She says she learned it in one of her books when she was little, or when she read to my sister in the late '50s. Maybe from the Bumper Book? (She grew up in rural Illinois, mostly English ancestry).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Joi
Date: 18 Sep 11 - 04:06 PM

My father used to say, "'Aha!' she cried, as she shook her wooden leg." After awhile, he start the phrase and we would both say, "as she shook her wooden leg." He was born in 1919 and did not know the origin. His parents were born in Indiana and moved to Washington State. The economy was not good, so they moved to Hermiston, Oregon (Eastern Oregon) and raised their kids. Dad was in the Navy in WWII, so he could have picked it up on the ship. I always thought that Dad's family couldhave gotten it from a Radio Play or from a High School Play; but, perhaps he picked it up on the ship.

After reading all of the threads, I do remember something about an eyeball rolling off or down something, but cannot remember whether or not it came from the "wooden leg" phrase.

At least I know that I am not the only person in the world who is perplexed by this phrase! Can any new person to this thread put us out of our misery by telling us the origin?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Guest Genghiz.Cohen
Date: 12 May 11 - 02:43 AM

The variants of these various phrases that I am familiar with are -
'... she said, gaily waving her wooden leg in the air' usually in reference to possible double meaning in something said just before - along the lines of '... as the Bishop said to the Actress.'
'I see, said the blind man' in response to some revelation.
Both phrases were picked up from my grandmother, born in the latter part of Victoria's reign.
'Ooh, it's agony, Ivy' was a radio catch phrase (often used around my Auntie Ivy.)
"Teehee!" quod she, and clapte the window to" deserves to be used more often!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,GUEST, Stu H
Date: 05 May 11 - 12:38 AM

My Dad was born in Iowa in 1895. When he was working on a project and something went well he would often say, "Aha she cried and waved her wooden leg." He would also whistle 'La Paloma' as he worked. My wife, of Hungarian extraction, born in the late 1920's & from Ohio,introduced me to, "You're a liar said the Dummy as the Blind man picked up his hammer and saw."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Mike M
Date: 21 Feb 11 - 09:02 PM

Whenever we left on a family car trip, as we pulled out of the driveway my father would say:

"We're off!" she cried,
and waved aloft her wooden leg
and died. And the wind
whistled through the knot hole.

He was obviously quoting from something, but I have a feeling he'd composed the last sentence himself. He didn't always add it, but it was understood, and sometimes I'd say it. To this day I quote these lines myself (or sometimes just "'We're off!' she cried") when leaving on a car trip.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Rox
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 04:39 PM

Did you ever get the lyrics of that song? My grandpa used to sing it to our great delight but, I was a young child and only remember bits and pieces.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Indrani Ananda
Date: 12 Jan 11 - 04:38 PM

As soon as I saw this I remembered it, but not as 'Aha' being the first word. After much memory-searching that first word eluded me. So I scrolled down all the messages and there it was: "I see," said the blind man, and waved his wooden leg! My gran was always coming out with this saying as it usually inferred that I hadn't properly understood something she'd said, ie pretending to see something you had not seen at all. "Agony Ivy " and "It's sky blue pink with a yellow border" were other little gems one heard from time to time.   

                                           Indrani.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Chunky off the Ramilles
Date: 12 Jan 11 - 02:21 PM

My dad was in the British Royal navy 1939-46 and often used the phrase "the man who fought the monkey in the dustbin and came out without a scratch." He also referred to a "Chunky off the Ramilles." The Ramilles was a navy ship.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: CapriUni
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 03:06 PM

I was just scanning through the forum, and saw this thread had been refreshed.

And a brief thought passed through my brain: Is it time to update this -- "Aha!" she cried, and waved her titanium leg?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Slag
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 01:54 AM

Just vague memories but I usually heard the "Aha! she cried" in connection with "I see said the blind man as he picked up his hammer and saw."

Unrelated but in a similar vein is "'They're off!' the monkey cried as he jumped o'er the barbed wire fence."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Slater family
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 10:34 PM

My Mother always said:

Aha, she cried and in the rain she warpped her wooden leg. Don't know what it means or whre it came from.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Planebill
Date: 27 Oct 10 - 08:04 PM

I googled for an answer and found a mystery! My grandfather who was born in 1898 (in WVa.) and used to always say "Thank you said the kind old lady as she shook her wooden leg" when picking up passed cards during a game of hearts. When I asked him what it meant he said " I'll tell you when you get older Billy" but he passed away before I got old enough. I assumed it was the punch line to something off color. It looks it will ever remain a mystery now!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Leadfingers
Date: 05 Oct 10 - 01:33 AM

100


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Joel
Date: 04 Oct 10 - 06:24 PM

My Grandma (born 1920) always used the variation "'Too late!', she cried, as she gaily waved her wooden leg". As she and her family have always lived in the UK, this seems to make her a little unusual, as most of the people reporting the "too late" version seem to be from the Southern Hemisphere.

I asked her about it once, probably in the mid to late 90s, and she told me it was something she'd come up with herself. I'd always beleived her, having never heard it elsewhere until I randomly came across this discussion. Still, I'm sure it wasn't deliberate, most likely something she'd picked up in her youth and long since forgotten the origin of, as everyone else seems to.

It's odd to think how sayings and catchphrases like this could seemingly rapidly make their way round pop culture even before the advent of mass media. Mackay's Extraordinary Popular Delusions has a whole chapter about similar phrases that enjoyed mass popularity in Victorian London, many of them having inscrutable origins.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 25 Sep 10 - 06:31 PM

"'No answer' came the bold reply" was one of my father's. I think a lot of these go back to a time when children were expected to recite and memorise long passages of poetry - so everyone would know chunks of "Horatius" and "Lord Ullin's Daughter" and "Casabianca" (The boy stood on the burning deck/Whence all but he had fled...), and riffing on those strange sentence structures and archaic turns of phrase would come fairly naturally.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: GUEST,Nicola Perrin
Date: 25 Sep 10 - 05:06 PM

My Mom's version ~

"Thank you Kindly Sir she said and waved her wooden leg aloft, meanwhile knitting her eyebrows into a handkerchief. "
I still use it frequently when thanking someone and it never fails to baffle the recipient.
Undoubtedly came from my Mom's mom who was of Irish descent.   
I do hope the tradition continues.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg...
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 31 May 10 - 10:17 AM

"It was agony Ivy" - that was a catch phrase in a BBC Radio show called "Ray's a Laugh", the Ray being comedian Ted Ray.

"'Aha' She Cried and Waved Her Wooden Leg", and its variants, always sounds like it might have been a catch phrase in a radio show, or perhaps in Music Hall. But if it had been I am sure that someone would have come up with a provenance by now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 9 April 2:10 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.