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Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle

Big Dave 22 Jun 97 - 07:44 AM
Helen, also of Oz 22 Jun 97 - 07:19 AM
Frank in the swamps 22 Jun 97 - 06:23 AM
Peter Timmerman 21 Jun 97 - 02:35 PM
Joe Offer 21 Jun 97 - 03:46 AM
Alan of Australia 20 Jun 97 - 07:09 PM
rich r 20 Jun 97 - 05:59 PM
Suzanne Wilkins 20 Jun 97 - 08:52 AM
Angus McSweeney 19 Jun 97 - 10:19 PM
A;ison 19 Jun 97 - 09:06 PM
rich r 19 Jun 97 - 08:58 PM
Susan of DT 19 Jun 97 - 08:26 PM
Bert Hansell 18 Jun 97 - 03:43 PM
Mountain Dog 18 Jun 97 - 03:41 PM
Peter Timmerman 18 Jun 97 - 03:23 PM
Suzanne Wilkins 18 Jun 97 - 12:02 PM
Peter Timmerman 18 Jun 97 - 09:44 AM
Susan of California 18 Jun 97 - 01:22 AM
18 Jun 97 - 12:22 AM
ron k 17 Jun 97 - 10:29 PM
LaMarca 17 Jun 97 - 05:31 PM
Bob Landry 17 Jun 97 - 03:25 PM
mmiller1@airmail.net (Mike Miller) 17 Jun 97 - 02:20 PM
Frank in the swamps 17 Jun 97 - 03:59 AM
Bill (ssssbill@aol.com) 17 Jun 97 - 03:53 AM
OLD FOLK 17 Jun 97 - 01:00 AM
ron k 16 Jun 97 - 09:42 PM
Les Blank 16 Jun 97 - 09:35 PM
ron k 16 Jun 97 - 08:18 PM
ron k 16 Jun 97 - 08:05 PM
Bob Landry 16 Jun 97 - 07:48 PM
SSWINNEY@worldnet.att.net 16 Jun 97 - 07:15 PM
Bert Hansell 16 Jun 97 - 04:41 PM
Peter Timmerman 16 Jun 97 - 04:33 PM
Mountain Dog 16 Jun 97 - 03:49 PM
Bob Schwarer 16 Jun 97 - 03:07 PM
16 Jun 97 - 01:41 PM
dick greenhaus 16 Jun 97 - 11:03 AM
Frank in the swamps. 15 Jun 97 - 05:48 AM
Joe Offer 15 Jun 97 - 03:03 AM
Bill 15 Jun 97 - 02:54 AM
SSWINNEY@worldnet.att.net 14 Jun 97 - 10:13 PM
14 Jun 97 - 05:50 PM
Jerry Friedman, jfriedman@nnm.cc.nm.us 14 Jun 97 - 04:40 PM
Alan of Australia 14 Jun 97 - 12:26 AM
dani 13 Jun 97 - 09:39 PM
Bert Hansell 13 Jun 97 - 10:30 AM
Mountain Dog 12 Jun 97 - 09:56 PM
Angus 12 Jun 97 - 07:56 PM
Jack 12 Jun 97 - 05:59 PM
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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Big Dave
Date: 22 Jun 97 - 07:44 AM

Is it my turn again?

Because if so I'll clear the pub by doing John Tams' Pulling Down Song, unaccompanied - even I can't bellow loud enough to be heard over my melodeon!

Or if that's not enough I'll insult all the Australians with my attempt at "The Drover's Dream"

Cheers for now

Dave Smith


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Helen, also of Oz
Date: 22 Jun 97 - 07:19 AM

Because I have just posted a thread in the discussion group about these 2 songs I will offer:

Freeborn man of the Travelling People, and Goodbye to the 30 Foot Trailer

which are 2 of my all time favourite songs, and hell, I'll even learn to sing just so I can do them justice. I will be accompanying my singing on my 34 string Celtic harp - you'll have to guess which sounds better - the singing or the playing. :-)

Helen


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Frank in the swamps
Date: 22 Jun 97 - 06:23 AM

It is a recent song, written by a fellow called Jay Ungar. A magazine called "Acoustic Guitar" published a very nice arrangement by John Knowles in March/April 1993. Whatta ya mean "can it be done on the guitar???" You can do anything on the guitar, I'm particularly adept at butchering this piece! My lady fair,Lovely Jenny will play it on violin, and I'll accompany her on (what else), the ol' six string.

Cheers,

Frank.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 21 Jun 97 - 02:35 PM

I can't play it, and it is now a cliche, but there must be someone in the circle who can do "Ashokan Farewell". I heard it butchered the other night, and need it recovered. By the way, anyone know the history of the song? I have generally assumed it to be a recent piece. Can it be done on the guitar? Yours, Peter


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Joe Offer
Date: 21 Jun 97 - 03:46 AM

That terrific medley of I Saw the Light and I'll Fly Away has me in a gospel mood, so it's time for another beer. How about a rousing rendition of "There Is Power in the Blood"?

-Joe Offer-

Oh, there's power, power, wonder-working power

In the blood (in the blood)

Of the Lamb

Oh, there's power, power, wonder-working power

In the precious blood of the Lamb.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 20 Jun 97 - 07:09 PM

G'day,

Well, I've just had a turn I wasn't expecting (see A;ison above) but I'll have another. If it's not bad manners here I'll sing one of my songs, "The Travelling Salesman" - see the "Wraggle Taggle Gypsies" thread.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: rich r
Date: 20 Jun 97 - 05:59 PM

I have heard it said that the Phantom Stagecoach was released to try to cash in on the popularity of Ghost Riders, sort of an early day version of the sequel. And just like modern sequels, it couldn't match the original.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Suzanne Wilkins
Date: 20 Jun 97 - 08:52 AM

Bert Hansell - How could I resist such a canny request?

Okay, for a good Durham song, how about 'The Lambton Worm'? The lyrics are already up on the list, and if any folkies on the other side of the Atlantic would like a translation before they join in, just stick your E-mail address up, and I'd be happy to do so! Mind you, we'd probably be singing it at that time of night when no language is a barrier, as we're all equally incoherent, no matter what we try to sing...

(Ironically we had a three-hour band rehearsal the other night, to start getting in tune for our 4th Of July gig in a traditional 'Olde English' pub, where we'll be doing all American material (C&W, blues, you name it, with none of our usual 'local' material in earshot - so there be a tiny 51st state - pop. about 127 - keeping it burnin' in Escomb, Co. Durham, UK on Independance Day!)


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Angus McSweeney
Date: 19 Jun 97 - 10:19 PM

My computer decided to take a holiday for the last two days but I'm sure glad to be back in the circle! I'm just astounded at the depth of "musicology" that this group shows. Suzanne Wilkins, I have a group of fellows here in Minneapolis, Minnesota that does a very rousing version of "I Saw the Light" with "I'll Fly Away" stuck right in the middle. We use one 6-string, one string bass, one fiddle, and sometimes a banjo, dobro, or mandolin. It gets loud and is probably our most requested song. Please lend us your voice on that one. Peter, your version of "Ghost Rider's in the Sky" gave me chills. OK, maybe I'm getting a little too melodramatic. I just heard a very old recording of "The Phantom Stage- Coach" by the Ravens (circa 1950) and I'm wondering which came first? I'll bet you know. So I'll contribute an old song with a solid work ethic. "The Young Man Who Wouldn't Hoe Corn". Keep Singing.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: A;ison
Date: 19 Jun 97 - 09:06 PM

Hi

About time i joined in , I think.

I'll get Alan of Oz to sing "The Diamantina Drover", and I'll accompany him on my tin whistle.

Bm for those of you playing along.

Maybe I'll follow it up with some reels.

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SHEEPDOG SONG (from Michael Cooney)
From: rich r
Date: 19 Jun 97 - 08:58 PM

A long time ago and far away, I did THE SHEEPDOG SONG as learned from the singing of Michael Cooney. I hear him do it on a live spot on Minnesota Public Radio in the 80's. I don't know if that is actually the title, if he actually wrote it, or if he ever recorded it, but I recorded it.

Such a dreadful thing is life
She was going to be my wife
Linda was her name, I loved her sweet and true.
A week before our wedding day,
My darling gentle fiancee
Killed in such an awful way
O what's a boy to do?
O my heart is full of woe; it's more than I can bear
The honeymoon won't be the same without my Linda there.

She was going into town
To pick up her wedding gown
She was going by the church in which we were to wed.
When suddenly, I know not why
When suddenly, I do not lie
When suddenly a sheepdog fell and hit her on the head.
They say we should not question why
That God must have a plan
But sheepdogs falling from the sky
I do not understand

Now let's all sing Pretty Saro. Lots of harmony, no instruments unless somebody has a sweet fiddle.

rich r


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Susan of DT
Date: 19 Jun 97 - 08:26 PM

I'd probably do one of the versions of the False Bride.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bert Hansell
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 03:43 PM

Suzanne from County Durham,

Years ago I worked with a lot of guys from County Durham.

Sing something in broad Geordie for us, I'd love to hear that accent again.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Mountain Dog
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 03:41 PM

In honor of the 60th anniversary of her mysterious journey, how about "Amelia Earhart's Last Flight" in G? Great chorus for singing along! (It's in the DT, too.)


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 03:23 PM

Dear Susan of California, the story is mostly correct. Guthrie wrote it originally because he was fed up with Irving Berlin's God Bless America which kept being played over the radio on his travels. Yours, Peter


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Suzanne Wilkins
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 12:02 PM

Greetings from County Durham, England...

If I can extract the two fellas I sing with (including the hubby) from the beer keg we'd love to do 'I'll fly away' which tends to start pretty controlled and ends up loud enough to make your ears bleed.

(I'm meant to be hard at work at the day job here, but this whole site has got me hooked, and long may it continue! Many thanks for bringing folk and madness to the Northern wilds of the U.K!)


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 09:44 AM

Time for Stan Jones' immortal masterpiece (see thread) "Ghost Riders in the Sky" in Em. "....Across these endless skies!!!" Yours, Peter


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Susan of California
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 01:22 AM

Most of the verses I am aware of are in the database, but here's one I have heard, done 4th out of six, I think... Nobody living, can ever stop me As I go walking, down freedom's highway Nobody living can make me turn back This land was made for you and me.

I have also heard that the song was originally written as "God blessed America for me", but I haven't come across verifcation for that. Sorry it took me so long to get back to you, but summer school has started and I'm back to spending most of my time with my nose in the books!


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From:
Date: 18 Jun 97 - 12:22 AM


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: ron k
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 10:29 PM

Bob: Let's also do the Irish "Mountain Dew". We can follow it up with Bold O'Donoghue.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: LaMarca
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 05:31 PM

Since we've had some cowboy songs, how 'bout a sheep song? I'd like to do "George's Son" by John Kirkpatrick; a ballad setting of Thomas Hardy's "far From the Madding Crowd", Chapter 5. (I like them literary ballads). So as not to take up space here, I will post the lyrics for both George's Son and "The Land" (Kipling/Bellamy) on other threads. I really wish you could hear the tunes...


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bob Landry
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 03:25 PM

Les Blank: My new Guild DCE and I are honoured to play with you and your experienced F20. If you're ever inclined to visit Central Alberta, we can do it again. I enjoyed your version of the Tennessee Flat Top Box and learned a few new licks.

Dick: I looked in DT and did not see the words to Fisherman's Wharf, my first contribution. Since this thread is getting long, I've put the words and chords in a separate thread

As long as I'm up: let's mix cultures through a common theme and string together "The Moonshine Can" (Newfoundland), "The Moonshiner" (Ireland) and "Mountain Dew" (USA). As before, we need instruments, lubricated voices and feet. With our driving ryhthms, we will emulate the The Chieftains and their Nashville buddies in the CD "Another Country".

Words to The Moonshine Can were contributed earlier. I think Mountain Dew is already in DT. If the Moonshiner is not, I have the lyrics already tyoed up and will contribute them in a separate thread.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: mmiller1@airmail.net (Mike Miller)
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 02:20 PM

Hi all! Heard the music and thought I'd sit in. How about a little country/hillbilly stuff. Let's try "Rocky Top" in G (I've got the banjo covered) and then an old Johnny Cash tune called "Come In Stranger" (in A for that one since I'm back on guitar).

(This is FUN!)

Mike


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Subject: Lyr Add: BILLY VANERO
From: Frank in the swamps
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 03:59 AM

All right, Dick G. I get the hint. I took a quick look and didn't find my aforementioned ballad in the database, so here goes:

BILLY VANERO

Billy Vanero's blood ran cold when he heard the story told
Of a band of Apache Indians who were on the trail of death.
Heard them tell of murder done, three men killed at Rocky Run.
"They're in danger at the cow ranch," cried Vanero 'neath his breath.

Cow ranch forty miles away, in a little spot that lay
In a deep and shaded valley of the mighty wilderness.
Half a score of homes lay there, and in one a maiden fair
Held the heart of Billy Vanero, Billy Vanero's little Bess.

So no wonder he grew pale when he heard the cowboy's tale
Of the men that he'd seen murdered day before at Rocky Run.
"Sure as there's a God above, I will save the one I love.
By my love for little Bessie, I will see that something's done."

Not a moment he delayed, when his brave plan had been made,
And then his comrades told him as they heard the daring plan,
"You are riding straight to death;" but he answered, "Save your breath.
I may never reach the cow ranch but I'll do the best I can."

O'er the alkali flats he sped, and his thoughts flew on ahead
To the people at the cow ranch thinking not of danger near.
With his quirt's unceasing whirrs and the jingle of his spurs,
Little Chopo bore his rider o'er the far away frontier.

Lower and lower sank the sun as he drew reins at Rocky Run.
"Here men died, my little Chopo," and he stroked the glossy mane.
"There are those we've got to warn, ere the coming of the dawn.
If we fail, God bless my Bessie," and he started on again.

Sharp and clear a rifle shot awoke the echoes of the spot.
"I am wounded," cried Vanero, as he swayed from side to side.
"While there's life, there's always hope. Steady onward I will lope.
If I fail to reach the cow ranch, at least they'll know I tried.

"I will save her yet," he cried. "Bessie Lee will know I tried."
For a moment then he halted in the shadow of a hill.
From a saddlebag, he took with trembling hands a Bible book,
Tore a leaf from out its pages saying, "This will be my will."

From a limb a twig he broke, and he dipped this pen of oak
In the warm blood that was flowing from the wound beneath his heart.
"Rouse" he wrote "before too late. Apache warriors lie in wait.
Goodbye, Bess. I love you, darling." And he felt the cold tears start.

Love's first message and the last, while his thoughts were on the past,
To the saddle horn he tied it, though his lips were white with pain.
"Take this message if not me, straight to little Bessie Lee."
Leaning forward in the saddle then he clutched the sweaty mane.

Just at dusk a horse of brown, wet with sweat came panting down
The little lane at the cow ranch, and it stopped at Bessie's door;
But the cowboy was asleep, and his slumbers were so deep,
Little Bess could ne'er awake him if she'd tried forevermore.

Now you've heard the story told, by the young and by the old,
Of the battle at the cow ranch on the night the 'Paches came;
Of the short and bloody fight, how the chief fell in his flight,
And the panic-stricken warriors, when they heard Vanero's name.

Dawg, it always makes me cry...

Frank.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bill (ssssbill@aol.com)
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 03:53 AM

Howdy Folks,

My apologies to Angus for taking over your place at the top of the list since you deserve the credit for this great song circle. Scott, I have absolutely no idea how I got out of line up there. Too bad since my song was such a great follow-up to yours.

As long as I'm here, I think I'll pull out the fretted dulcimer tuned in DAC for an aeolian minor mode. The song I'll share with you comes from the writing of Pete Seeger and has a traditional (probably celtic) melody. It's "The Song of the World's Last Whale" and reminds us about conservation (which most of us need some reminders about at times). Since I don't see the words anywhere on DT, I'll post them per Dick's excellent request.

Allinkausay,
Bill


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: OLD FOLK
Date: 17 Jun 97 - 01:00 AM


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: ron k
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 09:42 PM

Time to add some Canadian content. How about "Cape St. Marys"? My 30 year old Barclay knows it by itself. All I have to do is hang on for the ride.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Les Blank
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 09:35 PM

Bob Landry:

I was going to play my Ovation Balladeer but your last message

prompts me to bring another of my several. The very first guitar

I picked up (back in 1952 !!) was a Guild, an F-20 flattop

to be specific. It still sounds pretty good even after four

facelifts !! I'd sure like to have it meet your new one !!

Les (by the way, while I'm here, let me enthrall you with

the old Johnny Cash tune, Tennessee Flattop Box.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: ron k
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 08:18 PM

Well I've had a few beer now and I feel pretty good about joining in. How about "City Of New Orleans" by Steve Goodman, in C. Watch out for that B flat chord in the chorus.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: ron k
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 08:05 PM

Well I've had a few beer now and I feel pretty good about joining in. How about "City Of New Orleans" by Steve Goodman, in C. Watch out for that B flat chord in the chorus.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bob Landry
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 07:48 PM

I'll lead everybody in a rousing version of "The Mermaid" (it is in DT - I looked). So far, I've lined up a banjo player (I didn't show him the jokes from the other thread - yet) and a fiddle player. Everybody else: grab your instruments, lubricate your throats, put on your dancing shoes and let 'er rip.

Scott: From virtual to tape to reunion CD - the way this thread is growing, how about a boxed set. To answer your earlier question, my new 6-string is a Guild DCE, natural finish, with cut out, Fishman electronics and the best case I could find - Love it !!

Bob


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: SSWINNEY@worldnet.att.net
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 07:15 PM

While we're waiting for that Scotsman I just have to say: Hey Bill, thanks for the help on Hobo's Lullaby, but you were posted at the very beginning of the list. I almost didn't see you. How did you do that? OK, how about "Wild Mountain Thyme"? I'll check the data base, but I'm sure you have this one, Dick. And I do agree, lyrics to some of these songs would be great (I just can't wait for the reunion CD). Peter, great story!


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bert Hansell
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 04:41 PM

While we are in the mood do we have a scotsman that can lead us with Manura Manya?
Bert


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 04:33 PM

It is late around the campfire, and time for an old Indian legend. This was told to me as a true story by a Dene, many years ago, as we sat around watching the aurora borealis crackle in the Northwest Territories of Canada.

In the olden time, before the white man took over the seas, there was a great deal of travel between the lands of the red people, the yellow people, and the brown people. There was trade in precious objects and magic medicines. In that time, a curse came over the peoples of our tribe, from some evil spirit, or because someone had done something wrong offending the gods. The women of the tribe became unable to bear children. They would swell up as if they were pregnant, and then nothing would happen. The wife of the chief, herself concerned that she had no children, went to her husband, and asked him to go to the shaman and get some powerful medicine. The chief went to the old shaman, who said that it was mysterious, but that there were two prophecies that he had once heard, of which the first was that only by giving birth on the skins of beasts from the yellow people, the red people, and the brown people, could the false pregnancies be turned into true births.

The chief called a meeting of the tribe, and said that he was going to the distant trading centre where he had heard of skins being available from the exotic lands of the yellow people and the brown people. He had himself prepared a skin of the finest elkhide for the birthings, to be the skin of the beast of the red people; and he asked for contributions to buy the other two skins from the traders. The tribe gave him all they could and he set off. After many trials and tribulations, the chief was able to reach the trading centre, where after much negotiation, he was able to buy a great furry brown skin of an animal called the yak from the yellow people, and a tough grey skin of an animal known as the river horse or hippopotamus from the brown people. He returned home. During his long absence, his wife and two other of the village women had showed more and more signs of pregnancy, and on the day of his return, it was clear that birthing was imminent. The chief now spread out the beautiful skins, the elkhide for one woman, the furry yak skin for another, and for his own wife, he laid out the great grey skin from the river horse. The shaman danced a ritual dance, and the birthing began. And lo and behold, each of the three women gave birth, one to a daughter, and one to a son, and the wife of the chief gave birth to twins, a daughter and a son. There was great rejoicing, and then at last the shaman spoke up: “Thus is the second dark prophecy fulfilled, that the squaw on the hippopotamus is equal to the sum of the squaws on the other two hides.”

He told this story with great sincerity, and with high drama, looking heavenward for inspiration throughout until the end. His arms traced out the travels of the great chief, and the travails of the womenfolk. It went on about three times as long as I have rendered it.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Mountain Dog
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 03:49 PM

I'll follow up Bob's wet pigs with another tip o'the tam to Bryan Bowers, this time with an a capella version of "The Scotsman". (I'm pretty sure it's in the DT - look for the title or try keyword "bawdy".)


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bob Schwarer
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 03:07 PM

When my turn comes around I think I'll do "Four Wet Pigs". Nice and short and not too deep.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From:
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 01:41 PM

I have been playing a tape my father-in-law brought back from Ireland. It's a "Pub Sing-along" kind of thing which is great since I know all the words EXCEPT one titled simply Pocheen (sic). I'll sing this one later but right now I'm out in the kitchen with a walkman trying my darnedest to figure out all the words. I'll post what I come up with separately. And, no, it's not the Humours of Whiskey.

Frank Phillips


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 16 Jun 97 - 11:03 AM

This might be a wee bit less fantastical if people would send in the lyrics of whichever of their favorites aren't in the database as yet. (hint, hint)


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Frank in the swamps.
Date: 15 Jun 97 - 05:48 AM

Well, I've just finished my beer, now if I can get a fiddler to join me, I'll play guitar on "Give the fiddler a dram."

Hic,

Frank.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Jun 97 - 03:03 AM

I think we should all take a beer break and let Jerry recite Kipling's "The Land." I hadn't known of that poem, but I looked it up when Jerry mentioned it. It's a good one. Nothing wrong with a little poetry for variety.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bill
Date: 15 Jun 97 - 02:54 AM

Howdy Folks,

I might take the lead on one of those verses of Hobo's Lullaby. Then I'd get serious for a little bit t remind us about what sometimes happened with those folks using Old Buddy Goodnight from the writing of Bruce (U. Utah) Phillips.

Allinkausay,
Bill


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: SSWINNEY@worldnet.att.net
Date: 14 Jun 97 - 10:13 PM

About five years ago a friend talked me into going to a Kingston Trio concert. I wasn't very excited about going, and the concert was about as you'd expect until two members of the Trio broke guitar strings at the same time. This left Nick Reynolds on the stage by himself with nothing planned. So he pulled out an old Goebel Reeves song that he now sang to his granddaughter to put her to sleep at night. It's the same lullaby that I sang to my children when they were little. Kind of convenient...it makes them sleepy and also possibly lays the seeds of a social awareness. Everyone knows "Hobo's Lullaby", so lets get some good harmonies on the chorus and maybe pass the verses around a little. If we do well enough maybe we can get the folks out in the kitchen to come back in and join the circle. Key of G.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From:
Date: 14 Jun 97 - 05:50 PM

Jerry...Peter Bellamy was an amazing musician...I have that record with "The Land" on it....and no matter how many times I listen to it, I cannot come NEAR reproducing it!...(glad LaMarca is doing it!)......but as long as I'm here, how about another of Bellamy's Kipling pieces? I can do "Soldier, Soldier" acapella...an anti-war song with a difference.....


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Jerry Friedman, jfriedman@nnm.cc.nm.us
Date: 14 Jun 97 - 04:40 PM

I had no idea someone had set Kipling's "The Land"! "When Julius Fabricius, sub-prefect of the Weald..." Oh, sorry, we're supposed to be singing, not reciting (and anyway I don't know most of it). So if I could sing in a key, I'd sing "Look Sharp", or whatever it's called, and I wouldn't even tell you it's from _1776_. And even if I could play an instrument, I don't think I'd accompany myself on that song.


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 14 Jun 97 - 12:26 AM

Good one dani.

Having watched this thread with interest I'll finally draw up a chair and join in.

I'll do Dancing at Whitsun (written by John Austin Marshall) and Staines Morris. I think these two go together very well with the common link of the maypole.

Cheers,
Alan


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: dani
Date: 13 Jun 97 - 09:39 PM

Since we've already invited the Shakers.... "How can I keep from singing?"


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Bert Hansell
Date: 13 Jun 97 - 10:30 AM

All together now!!

Beer, Beer, Glorious Beer
Fill yourselves right up to here...........


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Mountain Dog
Date: 12 Jun 97 - 09:56 PM

Angus,

Whilst you're off to get a beer, I'll tune me 6-string to G and beller forth a rousing rendition of "The Jug of Punch" a la the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. (Depending on your reaction, you can join in on the chorus...or make it a double at the bar!)


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Subject: RE: Tune up: Fantasy Folk Circle
From: Angus
Date: 12 Jun 97 - 07:56 PM

I'm going to go have a beer. Be back in a few minutes.


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Subject: Lyr Add: OLD PECULIER
From: Jack
Date: 12 Jun 97 - 05:59 PM

All these songs are great.

We should have a drinking song

I suggest the anthem to Theakston's Old Peculier Ale.
(I finally got the lyrics from Dick Swain who says he can't remember the author - anybody know this?)

Some men take cider in the spring to make the sap rise frisky,
And when the autumn mists arise, some drive them out with whiskey.
Some say that naught but English Ale in summer's heat'll cool you,
But I've one drink all seasons 'round -- a pint of Old Peculier.
A pint of Old, a pint of Old, a pint of Old Peculier.
But I've one drink all seasons 'round -- a pint of Old Peculier.

For ague, gout, some men take rum. For fever, some take brandy.
Some keep the Hollands standing near. Some keep the porter handy.
Forsake such physics all, I say; let no such doctors rule you.
The one true cure, the nostrum sure -- a pint of Old Peculier.
A pint of Old, a pint of Old, a pint of Old Peculier.
The one true cure, the nostrum sure -- a pint of Old Peculier.

My youthful days I spent with maids, tasting their delights, sir.
Though greatly I enjoyed the days, I much preferred the nights, sir.
I lost my heart to Kate and Jane, and sold my soul for Julia;
But now the ranting days are done, I'm left with Old Peculier.
I'm left with Old, I'm left with Old, I'm left with Old Peculier.
But now the ranting days are done, I'm left with Old Peculier.

If wife should scold or children nag or trusted friend betrayed you,
With the magic potion in your hand, such slights will not dismay you.
If peevish master with new whim or foolish ways should school you,
Just come and drown your sorrows with a pint of Old Peculier.
A pint of Old, a pint of Old, a pint of Old Peculier.
Just come and drown your sorrows with a pint of Old Peculier.

And when your days are drawing down, and time begins to slip, sir.
Forget the ones who said they might; recall the ones who did, sir.
Let foolish fact be lost in time. Let kinder memories rule you,
And take some consolation in a pint of Old Peculier.
A pint of Old, a pint of Old, a pint of Old Peculier.
And take some consolation in a pint of Old Peculier.


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