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Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar

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DUMIAMA DINGIAMA DUMIAMA DAY


Related threads:
Line wanted, Doomeammer song Tawney (14)
Lyr/Chords Req: Do-Me-Ama (14)
(origins) Origins: Lloyd's 'Do Me Ama' (54)
Lyr Req: Squire and the Lady (from Wild Geese) (8)
Lyr Req: Jack the Jolly Tar (Ewan MacColl) (3)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Jack The Jolly Tar (from The Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs)


Alan of Australia 19 Feb 00 - 09:28 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 20 Feb 00 - 02:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Sep 03 - 08:39 PM
Charley Noble 11 Sep 03 - 08:54 PM
Malcolm Douglas 11 Sep 03 - 10:46 PM
curmudgeon 12 Sep 03 - 07:16 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 12 Sep 03 - 03:22 PM
Roberto 13 Sep 03 - 01:31 PM
Charley Noble 14 Sep 03 - 09:19 AM
curmudgeon 14 Sep 03 - 09:35 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Sep 03 - 12:16 PM
curmudgeon 14 Sep 03 - 12:29 PM
Malcolm Douglas 14 Sep 03 - 01:19 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 26 Mar 05 - 01:59 PM
GUEST,Dan 02 Jun 09 - 06:52 PM
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Subject: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar ^^
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 19 Feb 00 - 09:28 PM

G'day,
From the Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs, Ed Pellow's rendition of the tune of Jack The Jolly Tar can be found here.

JACK THE JOLLY TAR
Sung by Mrs Hooper, Hambridge, Somerset (C.J.S. 1904)

Oh, I am Jack and a jolly tar, O.
I'm just returned from the sea so far, O.
Oh, I am Jack and a jolly tar,
I'm just returned from the sea so far.
Hey diddley dingo,
Hey diddley ding.

As Jack was walking through London city,
He heard a squire talking to a lady.
And Jack he heard the squire say:
'Tonight with you, love, I mean to stay.

'You must tie a string all around your finger
With the other end hanging out the window,
And I'll slip by and pull the string
And you must come down and let me in.'

'Damn me,' says Jack, 'if I don't venture
For to pull that string hanging out the window.'
So he slipped by and he pulled the string,
And the lady came down and let him in.

The squire came by all in a passion,
Saying: 'Curse the women throughout the nation!
For here I am, no string I've found,
Behold my hopes all gone aground!'

Early in the morning, the sun was gleaming,
The lady woke up and started screaming,
For there's old Jack in his tarry shirt,
And behold his face all streaked with dirt.

'Oh what is this, you tarry sailor?
Have you broken in for to steal my treasure?'
'Oh no,' says Jack, 'I just pulled the string,
And you came down, ma'am, and let me in.'

'Oh,' then says Jack, 'won't you please forgive me?
I'll steal away so no-one shall see me.'
'Oh no,' says she, 'don't stray too far,
For I never will part from my jolly Jack Tar.'
Hey diddley dingo,
Hey diddley ding.

Previous song: I Wish, I Wish.
Next Song: John Barleycorn.

Penguin Index provided by Joe Offer


Cheers,
Alan ^^


Traditional Ballad Index Entry:

Jack the Jolly Tar (I) (Tarry Sailor) [Laws K40]

DESCRIPTION: Jack overhears a girl tell her lover that she will lower a string from her window to let him find her. Jack comes to her window early and enjoys the girl's charms until morning when she realizes the truth. Having had his romp, he returns gaily to his ship
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1904
KEYWORDS: sailor love trick sex bawdy humorous
FOUND IN: Canada(Mar,Newf)
REFERENCES (6 citations):
Laws K40, "Jack the Jolly Tar (I)"
Greenleaf/Mansfield 50, "Tarry Sailor" (1 text, 1 tune)
Vaughan Williams/Lloyd, pp. 54-55, "Jack the Jolly Tar" (1 text, 1 tune)
Copper-SoBreeze, pp. 260-261, "The Squire's Lost Lady" (1 text, 1 tune)
Darling-NAS, pp. 101-102, "Jack the Jolly Tar" (1 text)
DT 416, DUMIAMA*

Roud #511
RECORDINGS:
George Maynard, "Jack the Jolly Tar-O" (on Maynard1)
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Glasgerion" [Child 67] (theme)
ALTERNATE TITLES:
Do Me Ama
Dumiama
Notes: In several versions, including [the Penguin text and the Copper text], the story ends: Jack offers to steal away quietly; the lady tells him not to stray too far for "I never will part from my jolly Jack Tar." - PJS
The first instance of this motif in English-language folklore appears to go back to none other than Shakespeare: according to a story in the diary of John Manningham, it came during a performance of Richard III.
A lady in the audience sent a note to Richard Burbage, who played Richard, inviting him to her bed. Shakespeare got wind of it, and he, rather than Burbage, enjoyed her charms. When Burbage arrived, Shakespeare allegedly said, "William the Conqueror was before Richard III."
Hey, I didn't say I believed it. - RBW
File: LK40

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2004 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 20 Feb 00 - 02:27 PM

The tune (in A major) was published by Cecil Sharp in JFSS 6, p. 39, 1905, but he noted there that Mrs Hooper could only remember the words of one verse. He also there gave a text (not that above) with tune from William Nott, and another tune with one verse from Captain Lewis, all collected in 1904.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Sep 03 - 08:39 PM

Olson's website has a tune called "Come Ashore, Jolly Tar," 18th century. Does anyone have the lyrics?
Probably not, but any relationship to this song? Or to "Saucy Sailor Boy," in the DT, a song with several titles and variants?


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Charley Noble
Date: 11 Sep 03 - 08:54 PM

Q-

There's a similar song entitled "Do Me Ama" which I've known for years from the singing of Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd now again available on their re-released CD BLOW BOYS BLOW. In their notes they say this song "derives from the old chapbook tale of The Squire And The Farm Servant." The title comes from the chorus of this version of the song.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 11 Sep 03 - 10:46 PM

Lloyd put together the "Penguin" text from what he described as "versions in common oral currency among seamen". It is impossible in the circumstances even to attempt to identify those sources. Louie Hooper's verse was as follows:

I'm blowed, said Jack, if I don't venture,
I'll pull the string hanging out of her winder.
Jack came there without a shirt
And on his head a lump of dirt.
Hey diddley dingo,
Hey diddley ding.

Lloyd's set of Do Me Ama appears in the DT as  DUMIAMA DINGIAMA DUMIAMA DAY. Come Ashore, Jolly Tar is not related so far as I know.

I'm not familiar with The Squire And The Farm Servant, but an early form of the song occurs as The merchant's courtship to the brazier's daughter, and our song here appeared quite widely on broadsides as (The) Jolly Jack Tar. A similar story, though without the string, appears as The sailor and nobleman. Examples of these can be seen at the Bodleian Library site.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: curmudgeon
Date: 12 Sep 03 - 07:16 AM

I learned "The Farm Servant" many years ago from Lloyd's recording, English Drinking Songs. Its similarity to the above mentioned songs lies in its plot of the servant, as the sailor, bettering his "better" by bedding the squire's wife.

The "Farm Servant" does not seem to be in the DT, but I can post the text if anyone wants. Its tune and form is much like the "Chandler's Boy." -- Tom


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Sep 03 - 03:22 PM

Several posts mention "The Squire and the Farm Servant" or The Farm Servant.
Please post it.

My request for lyrics to Olson's "Come Ashore Jolly Tar" was not with regard to this or other stories about the 'string,' such as Doreama and Sailor's Frolic, but a search for older versions of that other 'Tar" song often known as "The Saucy Sailor (Boy)," Jolly Sailor, Tarry Sailor, Jack Tar, etc., etc. all concerned with a tarry sailor who comes ashore with money and gets refused at first by a girl until she learns about the money. (Which may be related to the Green Bed songs or Liverpool Landlady songs in which the gal has a mother (bawd) who becomes greedy for the money).

The titles overlap and are hard to keep straight.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Roberto
Date: 13 Sep 03 - 01:31 PM

Three recordings, two "Do Me Ama", the first sung by A. L. Lloyd and the second by Martin Carthy. The third, Jacky Tar, is sung by Eliza Carthy. I've just found another beautiful recording of this song, by Ewan MacColl, on the Argo Lp "Ye Mariners All". When I get the text, I'll post it. Roberto


a) Do Me Ama
A. L. Lloyd, in Ewan MacColl & A. L. Lloyd, Blow, Boys, Blow, Tradition TCD 1024 (original LP release: Tradition TLP 1026), 196?

As a sailor was walking one fine summer day
The squire and the lady were making their way
And Jackie heard the squire say
"Tonight with you, love, I mean to lay"

With me do me ama dee me ama do me ama day

"You must tie a string all around your finger
With the other end of the string hanging out the window
And I'll step by and I'll pull the string
And you must come down,love,and let me in"

Says Jack to himself, "I've a mind to try
To see if a poor sailor, he can win that prize."
So he slipped by and he pulled the string
And the lady come down and she let ol' Jack in...

When the squire come by, he was humming this song
Thinkin' to himself how it wouldn't be long
But when he got there no string he found
And behold his hopes all dashed aground

Early next morning, it was just getting light
The lady jumped up in bed in a terrible fright
But there lay Jack in his stripy shirt
His hands all covered with tar and dirt...

"Oh what do you want, you dirty sailor
Breakin' in a lady's bedroom to steal her treasure!"
"Oh no", says Jack, "I've just pulled the string
And you did come down, ma'am, and let me in..."

Says Jack to the lady, "Oh, forgive me I pray!
I'll steal away very quiet at the dawn of the day."
"Oh no", says the lady, "Don't stray too far
For I never will part from my jolly Jack Tar!"

With me do me ama dee me ama do me ama day


b) Domeama
Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick, Byker Hill, Topic TSCD341 (1991), previously released as Topic 12TS341 (LP, 1977); first lp release, Fontana STL 5434 Fontana STL 5434 (LP, 1967)

As Jack went out walking all on a fine day
A squire and his lady came a-walking that way
Jack heard him to the lady say
Tonight with you love I mean to lay
With me doomeama deemeama doomeama day

Just tie the string all around your finger
And let the other end dangle down from your window
And I'll come by and I'll pull the string
And you come down love and let me in
With me doomeama deemeama doomeama day

Jack says to himself, I've a mind for to try
And see if a poor sailor he can't win that prize
So Jack walked by and he pulled the string
And she come down and she let old Jack in
With his doomeama deemeama doomeama day

Now the squire he came a-riding he was singing a song
He was thinking to himself how it wouldn't be long
But when he got to the window no string he found
And behold his hopes was all dashed to the ground
And his doomeama deemeama doomeama day

It was early next morning it was just getting light
The lady sat up with a terrible fright
For there lay Jack in his tarry old shirt
An' Behold his face was all covered in dirt
And his doomeama deemeama doomeama day

Oh what do you want, Oh you tarry sailor
A-stealing in a lady's chamber to steal her treasure!
Oh no, says Jack, I just pulled your string
And you come down love and let me in
With me doomeama deemeama doomeama day

Jack says to the lady, Your pardon I pray
And I'll steal away very quiet at the break of the day
Oh no, she says, don't you go too far
For I never will part from me jolly Jack Tar
And his doomeama deemeama doomeama day


c) Jacky Tar
Eliza Carthy, Heat Light & Sound, Topic TSCD 482, 1996

Well, a young Jacky Tar out one day a-walking,
He heard a squire and the lady talking.
Jack heard him to the lady say
"Tonight with you, love, I mean to lay"
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

"Just tie a string all around your finger
Let the other end dangle down from your window,
And I'll come by, pull on the string
You come down and you'll let me in,
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

"Damn me", says Jack, "Oh, why don't I fetch her,
See if a poor sailor can't win this treasure."
So he went by, pulled on the string
She came down and she let him in
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

The squire came by, he whistling a song-a,
Thinking to himself how it wouldn't be long-a,
But when he got there, no string he found
Behold, his hopes were all dashed to the ground
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

Jack lay in her arms all the livelong night-a
And she woke up in a terrible fright-a!
For there lay Jack in his tarry shirt
Behold, his face was all covered with dirt
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

"Why what d'ya want, oh you nasty sailor
Stealing in my chamber to steal my treasure?"
"Oh no," he says, "I pulled on the string
You came down and you let me in"
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

And then, says Jack, "Why I beg your pardon
But I'll steal off quiet first thing in the morning."
"Oh no!" she says, "Don't you go far
For I never will part from my little Jack Tar
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.

Well, a young Jacky Tar out one day a-walking,
He heard a squire and the lady talking.
Jack heard him to the lady say
"Tonight with you, love, I mean to lay."
Fol la la doo, right falero, right fol lol a doo.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Charley Noble
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 09:19 AM

Nicely transcribed!

Charley Noble


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE FARM SERVANT
From: curmudgeon
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 09:35 AM

Per request, here is "The Farm Servant," not nesessarily the way I first learned it, but rather the way I currently find myself singing it. The tune is a variant of Lincolnshire Poacher/Chandler's Boy/ The Thing. I don't know how to do the ABCs for it, but maybe we can entice Jeri to come to our aid.

When I was a farmer's servant, I liked me bit of fun.
I always minded me business, as servants always done.
Whenever me master he'd go out to view the fields so gay,
I'd be round the back door with me X X X (knocks or raps)
With never a word to say, no, never a word to say.

Twas on a Thursdaay afternoon, me master to market did go.
He told me to mind his business as servants always do.
As soon as me master he was gone, I blundered out of that barn,
And was round the back door with me X X X,
And never a thought of harm, no, never a thought of harm.

Me mistress met me at the door and asked me to come in.
When I complained of a belly ache, she give to me some gin.
She give to me some gin me boys, with never a word to say.
Well, there I was with me X X X,
And a-courtin we went straight way, me boys, a-courtin we went staight way.

We hadn't been a-courtin, not half an hour or more.
Me mistress took so well to the sport, I thought she'd never give o'er.
"You've won me heart forever, me love, your master no more for me.
"For he can't manage that X X X,
"Not half so well as thee, me love, not half so well as thee."

Now when me master he come home, he asked me how I'd got on.
I told him I'd minded his business, as servants always done.
He give to me best ale me boys, but little did he know
That I'd been there with me X X X.
If he had, he'd never done so, I'm sure, if he had he'd never done so.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 12:16 PM

Thanks, I like your makeover.
It is not the same story as saucy sailor-tarry sailor, etc, etc., however (or the 'string' songs).


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: curmudgeon
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 12:29 PM

I also did not really see the connection between this song and Do Me Ama (which I've been singing for nearly as long) but comments by Malcolm and Charley and you led me to offer it up -- Tom


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 14 Sep 03 - 01:19 PM

No connection at all, I'd say, on the face of it; but perhaps the chapbook song was rather different. It hadn't occurred to me that this might be the song referred to.


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 26 Mar 05 - 01:59 PM

A slightly different version of the song in Penguin is on a broadside at the Bodleian Library.
"Sailor's Frolic," Ballads Catalogue, Harding B26 (585), J. Moore, Printer, Belfast, between 1846-1852.

(Not to be confused with "Sailors Frolic, or Life in the East," one of the songs about Ratcliffe Hwy).


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Subject: RE: Penguin: Jack The Jolly Tar
From: GUEST,Dan
Date: 02 Jun 09 - 06:52 PM

There is another version of this song published in Maud Karpeles' "Folk Songs from Newfoundland" entitled "Jack in London City."

The lyrics are:

Jack arrived in London city,
The people say: Jack you ain't witty
Jack thought he heard the people say
That he in the street that night should lay

Refrain: Fol the dol diddle I-do
         Right fall laddle O dee

To lie in the street was not Jack's fancy
Squire walked along with lovely Nancy
Jack thought he heard lovely Nancy say
The squire in her arms that night should lay

Refrain

Well, says Jack, I'm sure to venture
I'll pull that string that hangs from the window
And Jack went there and pulled the string
And the lady by mistake came down, let him in

Refrain

Jack got into his heart's desire
The lady thought Jack was the squire
The squire come there and looking for the string
And Jack was after pulling of it in

Refrain

Early in the morning the fair one woken
She felt like one that was heart-broken
To see Jack's tarry pants and shirt
And his face and his hands all smeared with dirt

Refrain

What brought you hear, you naughty fellow
To rob me of my virgin pillow?
Well, says Jack, I pulled the string
And you come dowm and let me in

Refrain

I'll give you gold or I'll give you money
If you don't mention to anybody
Well, says Jack, if I gets gold
I'll never mention to any soul

Refrain

Jack got married to lovely Nancy
She dressed him up quite to her fancy
Where he treats his shipmates to rum and gin
Saying: Damn you eyes, go pull the string

Refrain


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