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Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan

paddyc 24 Feb 00 - 09:03 PM
paddyc 25 Feb 00 - 07:30 PM
fulurum 25 Feb 00 - 11:37 PM
Bob Bolton 26 Feb 00 - 04:04 AM
paddyc 26 Feb 00 - 05:31 PM
Percustard 23 Jun 02 - 08:48 PM
Malcolm Douglas 23 Jun 02 - 10:48 PM
GUEST,The Tulip 24 Jun 02 - 09:00 AM
Bob Bolton 24 Jun 02 - 09:17 AM
GUEST,Joerg 24 Jun 02 - 10:09 PM
Bob Bolton 24 Jun 02 - 11:26 PM
Percustard 24 Jun 02 - 11:56 PM
GUEST,Joerg 25 Jun 02 - 09:54 PM
Bob Bolton 25 Jun 02 - 11:25 PM
MMario 26 Jun 02 - 04:31 PM
Bob Bolton 26 Jun 02 - 08:36 PM
GUEST 11 Aug 09 - 02:46 PM
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Subject: Jack Dolan
From: paddyc
Date: 24 Feb 00 - 09:03 PM

Does anyone have the chords for Jack Dolan by Clancy, O'COnnell and Clancy? I think Robbie O'connell recorded it solo too. Any help would be great!

Slainte! Willie Brennan.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: paddyc
Date: 25 Feb 00 - 07:30 PM

Please anybody?


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: fulurum
Date: 25 Feb 00 - 11:37 PM

have you tried playing around with the chords from the wild colonial boy.since jack dolan is a variant of this song. or you could go to robbie oconnell website,and e-mail him , maybe he will help you. www.robbieoconnell.com i've searched all over and couldn't find anything. hope this helps


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 26 Feb 00 - 04:04 AM

G'day brennanonthemoor,

I have been keeping out of this thread in case we are talking about something different / more recent than the Jack Dolan/ ~Doolan/ ~Donahue/ ~Donahoe/ ~O'Donoghue/ &c variants of The Wild Colonial Boy. If it is indeed The Wild Colonial Boy, then the question (answer only known to those who have heard Clancy, O'COnnell and Clancy do their version) is what tune? (...which tune?).

At least here in Australia, where it started off (poem written by "Frank the Poet" around 1832) it has been found with about 36 different tunes. The oldest traceable was that of Wearing of the Green and it used to be thought that this was the original, however this now seems unlikely, unless it was pinched from its Scottish original before Dion Boucicault pinched it for his song, which appeared in the play Arragh Na Pogue, in 1848.

It was thought that all the other tunes arose because Wearing of the Green became classed as a "Treason Song" for which the singer could be arrested and charged. (This was during the latter part of the 19th century in Australia ... and, I have heard, up to 1960 in New Zealand!).

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: paddyc
Date: 26 Feb 00 - 05:31 PM

I e-mailed Robbie O'Connell, so if I do get them I'll post them up here.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Percustard
Date: 23 Jun 02 - 08:48 PM

Hi Bob and all,

Just a request for clarification on the origins of "Wearin' o the Green".

Did you say the "Wearin'..." had Scottish origins?

Who was Dion Boucicault and what was "Arragh Na Pogue" all about (and how do you make your song titles come out in italics?)?

Mark


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 23 Jun 02 - 10:48 PM

&grabThe Wearing of the Green (and, indeed, at least one English Morris tune) is directly descended from the Scottish tune The Tulip, composed by James Oswald and first published in c.1747, if the experts are to be believed (I don't see why not). More information at Andrew Kuntz's The Fiddler's Companion:

The Tulip (search results)

In answer to your question in another thread, it would seem unlikely that there were any old Gaelic lyrics set to this tune, but there may well be modern ones.

Arrah Na Pogue was a stage show written by Dion Boucicault and E.H. House. You can see sheet music of 1865 for Boucicault's Wearing of the Green at the Lester Levy Sheet Music Collection:

Wearing of the Green.

Italics are made in html by typing this:<i>(title)</i>

which will show up as (title)

See the FAQ for full details.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: GUEST,The Tulip
Date: 24 Jun 02 - 09:00 AM

http://www.pads.ahds.ac.uk:81/smicOswaldTulipImageAltCluster


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 24 Jun 02 - 09:17 AM

G'day<

Malcolm Douglas: As ever, a mine of worthwhile information! You answered all of Mark's questions better than I would have.

Mark/Percustard: There was a facsimile of the 1865 music sheet in one of the books you had to whiz past in your quick visit to Da Capo, last Saturday ... If you had been 10 minutes later, I might have pointed it out ... but it is "Irish" songs - and mostly American printings.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: JACK DOLAN
From: GUEST,Joerg
Date: 24 Jun 02 - 10:09 PM

Maybe I can help a little.

Jack Dolan is NOT the Wild Colonial Boy, I think it's a re-write usíng the lyrics - the melody is completely different and there's arefrein added. And to me it isn't half as boring as The Wild Colonial Boy.

What keeps me from doing this song myself is that I never understood the refrain (I'm german) and never found the correct lyrics anywhere. So please forgive me if the following lyrics aren't correct (they are from memory) and incomplete. The chords should be ok.

There [G]was a wild co[D]lonial boy Jack [C]Dolan was his [D]name

From [C]poor but [D]honest [C]parents he was [G]born in [D]Castle[G]maine

He [G]was his father's [D]only son, his [C]mother's pride and [D]joy

And [C]dearly [D]did his [C]parents love their [G]wild co[D]lonial [G]boy.

(repeat chords for second half of verse)

Chorus:

So [G]come on [D]all you [C]????[G]???? (harties, hearties - what's that?) we'll [G]roam the [D]mountains [C]high

To[C or G]gether [D]we will [C]plunder and to[G]gether [D]we will [G]die

We'll [G]wander [D]all the [C]val[G]leys, we'll [G]gallop [D]o'er the [C]plains

We'll [C or G] scorn to [D]live in [C]slavery bound [G]down in [D]iron and [G]chains

So as for the verses - just look at those many versions of The Wild Colonial Boy and sing the words you like best. And as for the chorus - anybody knowing english out there? - I would appreciate your help myself.

Have fun.

Joerg


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 24 Jun 02 - 11:26 PM

G'day Joerg,

You a pretty well right on the chorus:

Hearties = Hearty fellows ... good, sturdy friends

and the last line ends: ... bound down in iron chains.

As you comment, there are "many versions". I tend to see them all as descendants of the original (c. 1833) poem by "Frank the Poet", writing about John (Jack) Donahoe, who was shot dead by troopers in 1829.

However, the song's various versions have spread back across the English-speaking world and attached to all sorts of local heros, villains and outright myths. (And, thus, been claimed by all sorts of secondary re-writers!)

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Percustard
Date: 24 Jun 02 - 11:56 PM

Pity I missed you Bob.

Next time perhaps.

Thanks for your info nonetheless.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: GUEST,Joerg
Date: 25 Jun 02 - 09:54 PM

Servus Bob,

Thanks a million. Believe it or not, with this you have given a whole new song to me.

Maybe I'm exaggerating but what if someone who really understands the words asks me what "hearties" are? I couldn't tell a dictionary that even mentions this word just to prove that it really exists. I love to sing for people who listen to lyrics so I should also be able to explain things if asked - correctly.

In comparison - "iron and chains" vs. "iron chains" is far from worrying me. Much too difficult to even hear the difference.

Cheers

Joerg

(P.S. "Servus" is the bavarian expression for "G'day" :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 25 Jun 02 - 11:25 PM

G'day Joerg,

I'm glad it helps understand the lyrics. Maybe I need to add Hearties to he Australian glossary that has been sitting around on my computer far too long ... I should have passed it back to Pene Azul ... months ago!

Interestingly, "Hearties" (as a plural) does appear in my Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary meaning: "Fellows, esp. fellow sailors". There are a lot of "sea terms" that slipped into 19th century Australian parlance - as nearly everyone of the settlers had arrived by way of a long sea voyage ... and many of them where sailors who settled ... or else 'jumped ship' during the Gold rush era, as did my great, great grandfather Jan van Kampen ... a Dutch sailor.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: MMario
Date: 26 Jun 02 - 04:31 PM

it's in Merriem-Webster.


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 26 Jun 02 - 08:36 PM

G'day MMario,

I'm sure the sailors' usage would be found in any comprehensive dictionary of English. I was just musing that it's migration from 'sea' use to Australian outback usage (not uncommon, by the way) ought to be noted.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Lyr/Chords Req: Jack Dolan
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 02:46 PM

When I was around two or three years old, which would be 1950 I apparently sang the Wild Colonial Boy in the Gaelic. At this time my father was a keeper on the Mull Of Kintyre lighthouse in Scotland. I was told I was taught it by another keeper who spoke the language as his native tongue and English as his second.
Strange because i was born in Liverpool and can't remember a word of it.
Point being that the song was sung in the gaelic. Okay, modern gaelic it may have been but it was.
    Please note that anonymous posting is no longer allowed at Mudcat. Use a consistent name [in the 'from' box] when you post, or your messages risk being deleted.
    Thanks.
    -Joe Offer-


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