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Lyr Add: Cappy's the Dog

Conrad Bladey (Peasant- Inactive) 05 Mar 00 - 08:25 PM
Jim Dixon 08 Dec 10 - 12:19 AM
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Subject: Capy's the Dog
From: Conrad Bladey (Peasant- Inactive)
Date: 05 Mar 00 - 08:25 PM

Cappy's the Dog

In a toon near Newcassel a pitman did dwell,
Wiv his wife by nyem Peg, a Tom-cat,an' hissel,
A dog they ca'd Cappy he doated upon,
Because he was left him by great Uncle Tom.

Chorus
Weel bred Cappy, famous and Cappy
Cappy's the dog--Tally ho! Tally ho!

His tail pitcher-handled, his culler jet black,
Just a foot an' a half was the length of his back;
His legs seven inches frae shouthers to paws,
An' his lugs like twee dockins hung over his jaws.

For huntin' o' varmin reet clivvor was he,
An' the hoose frae a' robbers his bark wad keep fee;
Cou'd byeth fetch and carry--co'd sit on a stuil,
Or, when frisky, wad hunt wetter rats in a puil.

As Ralphy, to market one morn did repair,
In his  hat band a pipe, an' weel kyem'd was his hair,
Owre his arm hung a basket--thus onward he speels,
An' cam' into Newcassel wi' Cap at his heels.

He haddent gyen farther than foot o' the Side
Before he fell in wi' the dog-killing tribe,
When a highwayman-fellow slipt roond in a crack,
An' wi' thump on the skull laid him flat on his back.

Doon went Cappy, &.
 

Noo Raplhy, extonish'd Cap's fate did repine,
While its eyes just like twe pyerl buttons did shine;
Then he spat on his hands, in a furry he grew,
Smash! he cried-- but awse ha'e satisfaction o' thoo,

For knockin doon Cappy &
 

Then this grim-luikin' fellow his bludgeon he rais'd
When Ralphy ey'd Cappy, an' stood sair amaz'd
But flay'd that beside him he might be laid doon,
Flang him into the basket an' bang'd oot o' toon.

Away went Cappy, &
 

He breethless gat hyem, an' when lifting the sneck,
His wife ca'd ooot, "Ralphy--thou's seun getten back."
"Getten back, " replied Ralphy, I wish I'd ne'er gyen,
I' Newcassel they're fellin' dogs, lasses, and men.

They'v knocked doon Cappy, &
 

If aw gan to Newcassel when comes wor pay-week,
Aw'll ken him agyen by the patch on his cheek;
Or if ivver he comes to wor toon wiv his stick,
We'll thump him aboot till he's black as aud Nick,

For killing auld Cappy, &.

Wi tears iv her een Peggy heard his sad tale,
An' Ralph wi' confusion an' terror grew pale,
While Cappy's misfortuns wi' grief they talk'd ower,
He crap oot o' the basket quite brisk on the floor.

Well duin Cappy, Famous and Cappy,
Cappy's the dog--Tally ho! Tally Ho!
 


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Subject: Lyr Add: CAPPY, OR THE PITMAN'S DOG (Midford)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Dec 10 - 12:19 AM

From A Collection of Songs, Comic, Satirical, and Descriptive, Chiefly in the Newcastle Dialect... by T. Thompson et al. (Newcastle upon Tyne: Printed by John Marshall, 1827), page 49:


CAPPY, OR THE PITMAN'S DOG.
William Midford.

In a town near Newcassel a Pitman did dwell,
Wiv his wife nyemed Peg, a Tom Cat, and himsel;
A Dog, called Cappy, he doated upon,
Because he was left him by great uncle Tom:
    Weel bred Cappy, famous au'd Cappy,
    Cappy's the dog, Tallio, Tallio.

His tail pitcher-handled, his colour jet black,
Just a foot and a half was the length of his back;
His legs seven inches frev shoulders to paws,
And his lugs like twee dockins hung owre his jaws:
    Weel bred Cappy, &c.

For huntin of varmin reet clever was he,
And the house frev a' robbers his bark wad keep free:
Cou'd byeth fetch and carry—could sit on a stuil;
Or, when frisky, wad hunt waiter rats in a puil.
    Weel bred Cappy, &c.

As Ralphy to market one morn did repair,
In his hat-band a pipe, and weel kyem'd was his hair,
Owre his airm hung a basket—thus onward he speels,
And enter'd Newcassel wi' Cap at his heels:
    Weel bred Cappy, &c.

He haddent got farther than foot o' the Side,
Before he fell in with the dog-killing tribe:
When a highwayman-fellow slipp'd round in a crack,
And a thump o' the skull laid him flat on his back;
    Down went Cappy, &c.

Now Ralphy, extonish'd, Cap's fate did repine,
While it's eyes like twee little pyerl buttons did shine:
He then spat on his hands, in a fury he grew,
Cries, 'Gad smash! but awse hev settisfaction o' thou,
    For knocking down Cappy,' &c.

Then this grim luikin fellow his bludgeon he rais'd,
When Ralphy eye'd Cappy, and then stood amaz'd:
But, fearin' beside him he might be laid doon,
Threw him into the basket and bang'd out o' toon;
    Away went Cappy, &c.

He breethless gat hyem, and when lifting the sneck,
His wife exclaim'd, 'Ralphy, thou's suin gettin back:'
'Gettin back!' replied Ralphy, 'I wish I'd ne'er gyen,
In Newcassel they're fellin dogs, lasses, and men;
    They've knock'd down Cappy! &c.

'If aw gan to Newcassel, when comes wor pay week,
Aw'll ken him agyen by the patch on his cheek:
Or if ever he enters wor toon wiv his stick,
We'll thump him about till he's black as au'd Nick,
    For killin au'd Cappy,' &c.

Wiv tears in her een Peggy heard his sad tale,
And Ralph wiv confusion and terrow grew pale:
While Cappy's transactions with grief they talk'd o'er,
He crap out o' the basket, quite brisk o' the floor;
    Weel duin, Cappy! &c.


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