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Penguin: The Man Of Burningham Town

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The Man of Burningham Town (from The Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs)


Alan of Australia 19 Mar 00 - 01:36 AM
Joe Offer 12 Feb 04 - 03:24 PM
GUEST 29 Oct 13 - 12:14 PM
Dave Hanson 29 Oct 13 - 12:54 PM
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Subject: Penguin: The Man Of Burningham Town ^^
From: Alan of Australia
Date: 19 Mar 00 - 01:36 AM

G'day,
From the Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs, Ed Pellow's rendition of the tune of The Man Of Burningham Town can be found here.

THE MAN OF BURNINGHAM TOWN

It's of a man of Burningham town,
He had a handsome wife,
And she did love bad company
As dear as she loved her life, boys, life,
As dear as she loved her life.

Now this poor man would go to sea,
His living for to get.
Where he made one penny, she spent two.
It was all for want of wit, boys, wit,
It was all for want of wit.

Now this poor man came home from sea,
It being all late in the night,
He enquired after his own dear wife,
His joy and his heart's delight, boys, light,
His joy and his heart's delight.

Oh, the servant girl she made this reply,
With a voice so wonderful strong:
'She's gone unto the neighbour's house,
And I think she may tarry there long, boys, long,
And I think she may tarry there long.

'Oh, shall I go and fetch her home?'
The poor man begun for to think.
'Oh no,' says he, 'I'll go there myself,
For I think I could do with a drink, boys, drink,
For I think I could do with a drink.'

Now, as he was a-going along of the road,
He heard such a wonderful noise.
And who should it be but his own dear wife,
Along with the Burningham boys, brave boys,
Along with the Burningham boys.

He heard her say: 'Fetch us another full glass,
And I will sit down on your knee,
And we'll fairly well make this old tavern to roar
While our husbands are on the sea, boys, sea,
While our husbands are on the sea.'

This poor man he stood at the door in a maze;
His heart it was very nigh broke,
Then he went back home and he sent out the maid,
While he prepared a rope, boys, rope,
While he prepared a rope.

Then she came a-jumping and skipping in,
Gave him such a joyful kiss,
Saying: 'You're welcome home, my kind husband so dear.
Long time you have been missed, boys, missed,
Long time you have been missed.'

He beat her once, he beat her twice,
Till she was wonderful sore;
And she cries out: 'Oh, my husband dear,
I'll never do the likes any more, boys, more,
I'll never do the likes any more.'

So come all you girls of Burningham town,
A warning take by me;
And don't you spend your money to waste,
While your husband is on the sea, the sea,
While your husband is on the sea.

For if you do they'll make you rue,
And curse the hour you were born,
For the cuckolding of your husband dear,
They'll make you wear the horn, boys, horn,
They'll make you wear the horn.

Sung by Mr Locke, Rollesby, Norfolk (R.V.W. 1908)

Previous song: The Manchester 'Angel'.
Next song: The Mermaid.


Cheers,
Alan ^^


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Subject: RE: Penguin: The Man Of Burningham Town
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Feb 04 - 03:24 PM

Here are the notes from Penguin:
    The Man of Burningham Town
    (FSJ IV 84)
    Another homilectic ballad that, like "The Daughter of Peggy" and "On Monday Morning," treats of a drastic cure for errant wives. Among H. E. D. Hammond's manuscripts is a version of this song (called The Man of Dover) collected in Dorset in 1905. E. J. Moeran published a Norfolk version (FSJ VII 8). Our words are filled out from these two sets. The singer sang 'Burningham', apparently meaning Burnham (on Crouch), not Birmingham.

And from the Traditional Ballad Index:

Man of Burningham Town, The

DESCRIPTION: A man of (Burningham) goes to sea; his wife spends her time carousing. He returns to see her out on the town; he sneaks home and sends the maid to announce his arrival. She proclaims her delight, but he beats her with a rope. She promises to reform.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1904 (Sharp MS)
KEYWORDS: infidelity marriage warning return abuse humorous sailor
FOUND IN: Britain(England(South,Lond))
REFERENCES (2 citations):
Vaughan Williams/Lloyd, pp. 68-69, "The Man of Burningham Town" (1 text, 1 tune)
Kennedy 195, "The Birmingham Boys" (1 text, 1 tune)

Roud #665
RECORDINGS:
Harry Cox, "The Birmingham Man" (on HCox01)
ALTERNATE TITLES:
The Man of Burnham Town
In Burnham Town
The Man of Dover
File: VWL068

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2004 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: The Man Of dover
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Oct 13 - 12:14 PM


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Subject: RE: Penguin: The Man Of Burningham Town
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 29 Oct 13 - 12:54 PM

Guest waited 9 years to say nothing, well done.

Dave H


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