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BS: Lapsang Souchong

DigiTrad:
A PROPER CUP OF COFFEE
I'D RATHER MAKE COFFEE THAN LOVE
MAKIN' COFFEE


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Help: Percolator Song, Ever Heard of It ?? (39)
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BS: Instant Coffee (53)
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BS: Coffee (132)
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Lyr Req: Percolator Twist (Billy Joe & Checkmates) (12)
Info Request: Let's Have Another Cup of Coffee (9)
BS: The Hazards of Coffee - quote I like (57)
Tune Req: Proper Cup of Coffee (9)
Lyr Add: we're black coffee here (1)
BS: A proper cup of tea: nothing like it! (152)
BS: instant coffee (59)
BS: Lapsang Souchong, Tea part TWO (35)
Lyr Add: I'd Rather Make Coffee Than Love (18)
Leftover coffee.... (2)


sophocleese 12 Apr 00 - 04:26 PM
GUEST,guest 12 Apr 00 - 04:31 PM
sophocleese 12 Apr 00 - 04:32 PM
MMario 12 Apr 00 - 04:37 PM
GUEST,guest 12 Apr 00 - 05:08 PM
Caitrin 12 Apr 00 - 05:10 PM
Dave (the ancient mariner) 12 Apr 00 - 05:22 PM
sophocleese 12 Apr 00 - 05:34 PM
katlaughing 12 Apr 00 - 07:05 PM
Bob Bolton 12 Apr 00 - 07:25 PM
Glyph 12 Apr 00 - 07:35 PM
sophocleese 12 Apr 00 - 07:41 PM
McGrath of Harlow 12 Apr 00 - 07:41 PM
Llanfair 12 Apr 00 - 07:44 PM
sophocleese 12 Apr 00 - 07:45 PM
Quirk Malarkey 12 Apr 00 - 07:49 PM
Callie 12 Apr 00 - 07:52 PM
Mbo 12 Apr 00 - 07:54 PM
Sorcha 12 Apr 00 - 08:00 PM
Helen 12 Apr 00 - 08:03 PM
McGrath of Harlow 12 Apr 00 - 08:25 PM
Sorcha 12 Apr 00 - 08:33 PM
Hotspur 12 Apr 00 - 08:36 PM
GUEST 12 Apr 00 - 10:14 PM
Lonesome EJ 12 Apr 00 - 10:33 PM
Bob Bolton 12 Apr 00 - 11:45 PM
phil jl 13 Apr 00 - 12:26 AM
Gypsy 13 Apr 00 - 12:33 AM
JamesJim 13 Apr 00 - 12:41 AM
Sorcha 13 Apr 00 - 12:51 AM
Jon Freeman 13 Apr 00 - 12:53 AM
Llanfair 13 Apr 00 - 04:50 AM
Hyperabid 13 Apr 00 - 04:51 AM
Bob Bolton 13 Apr 00 - 06:42 AM
Bob Bolton 13 Apr 00 - 07:00 AM
McGrath of Harlow 13 Apr 00 - 08:11 AM
Jim Krause 13 Apr 00 - 04:58 PM
Bob Bolton 13 Apr 00 - 07:15 PM
GUEST 13 Apr 00 - 08:04 PM
Sorcha 13 Apr 00 - 09:02 PM
McGrath of Harlow 13 Apr 00 - 09:24 PM
sophocleese 13 Apr 00 - 09:27 PM
Jon Freeman 13 Apr 00 - 10:15 PM
JamesJim 13 Apr 00 - 11:18 PM
Gypsy 14 Apr 00 - 12:54 AM
Jon Freeman 14 Apr 00 - 02:58 AM
GUEST 14 Apr 00 - 03:04 AM
Jim Krause 14 Apr 00 - 05:36 PM
Kara 14 Apr 00 - 05:44 PM
GUEST, Mr. Tea 14 Apr 00 - 07:28 PM
GUEST,Helen, using Internet Explorer - thread prob 15 Apr 00 - 12:38 AM
Jon Freeman 15 Apr 00 - 12:58 AM
GUEST 15 Apr 00 - 02:15 AM
Bob Bolton 15 Apr 00 - 03:38 AM
Bob Bolton 15 Apr 00 - 03:40 AM
Jack The Lad 15 Apr 00 - 05:20 AM
Penny S. 15 Apr 00 - 06:49 AM
Hollowfox 15 Apr 00 - 09:54 AM
Jon Freeman 15 Apr 00 - 10:05 AM
Brendy 15 Apr 00 - 11:03 AM
sophocleese 15 Apr 00 - 12:43 PM
sophocleese 15 Apr 00 - 01:00 PM
JenEllen 15 Apr 00 - 05:28 PM
JenEllen 15 Apr 00 - 05:32 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Apr 00 - 07:13 PM
Bob Bolton 15 Apr 00 - 11:54 PM
GUEST 15 Apr 00 - 11:57 PM
Bob Bolton 16 Apr 00 - 09:42 AM
Megan L 16 Apr 00 - 12:35 PM
McGrath of Harlow 16 Apr 00 - 01:19 PM
GUEST, Threadie 16 Apr 00 - 01:27 PM
Caitrin 16 Apr 00 - 03:20 PM
Bill D 16 Apr 00 - 05:03 PM
Bob Bolton 16 Apr 00 - 11:52 PM
Lonesome EJ 17 Apr 00 - 12:11 AM
GUEST 17 Apr 00 - 05:59 AM
Bill D 17 Apr 00 - 02:25 PM
GUEST,JenEllen 18 Apr 00 - 12:25 PM
Gypsy 18 Apr 00 - 10:20 PM
SINSULL 18 Apr 00 - 10:27 PM
Helen 22 Apr 00 - 07:11 PM
Gypsy 23 Apr 00 - 12:51 AM
Helen 29 Apr 00 - 11:16 PM
sophocleese 29 Apr 00 - 11:53 PM
sophocleese 30 Jul 00 - 11:47 AM
flattop 30 Jul 00 - 11:51 AM
Roger in Sheffield 30 Jul 00 - 12:26 PM
Roger in Sheffield 30 Jul 00 - 01:13 PM
Gervase 30 Jul 00 - 03:04 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 30 Jul 00 - 03:34 PM
Helen 29 Jun 01 - 08:48 PM
Sorcha 29 Jun 01 - 08:51 PM
Mark Cohen 29 Jun 01 - 09:21 PM
Bill D 29 Jun 01 - 10:15 PM
RichM 29 Jun 01 - 11:26 PM
Bill D 29 Jun 01 - 11:54 PM
Metchosin 30 Jun 01 - 12:32 AM
roopoo 30 Jun 01 - 03:40 AM
The Walrus 30 Jun 01 - 07:36 AM
GUEST,Helen, on hubby's computer 30 May 02 - 08:03 AM
DMcG 30 May 02 - 08:16 AM
cetmst 30 May 02 - 09:54 AM
cetmst 30 May 02 - 09:58 AM
JohnInKansas 30 May 02 - 12:03 PM
EBarnacle1 30 May 02 - 04:53 PM
Helen 01 Jun 02 - 03:08 AM
GUEST,Greyeyes 01 Jun 02 - 06:40 AM
mcpiper 01 Jun 02 - 07:26 AM
Deda 01 Jun 02 - 07:13 PM
Haruo 02 Jun 02 - 02:16 AM
Terry K 02 Jun 02 - 03:04 AM
Bob Bolton 02 Jun 02 - 07:54 AM
Terry K 02 Jun 02 - 03:33 PM
Bob Bolton 02 Jun 02 - 11:36 PM
Helen 03 Jun 02 - 02:07 AM
Helen 31 Dec 02 - 07:54 PM

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Subject: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 04:26 PM

I'm not all that interested furthering or heatedly attempting to debunk stereotypes but I do like to drink tea. The three kinds of tea that I like to drink are all Twinings brand, Irish Breakfast, Earl Grey and Lapsang Souchong. What kind of tea do other Mudcatters like to drink? And how do you make it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 04:31 PM

Darjeeling every time - Earl Grey is an anathema

Yorkshire Tea is nice too


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 04:32 PM

What is Yorkshire Tea like? I've never tasted it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: MMario
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 04:37 PM

chinese green - I don't make it, I force my niece to make it for me.

Other then that, I will drink (in order of preference - when drinking tea) 1) any caffienated tea someone makes for me 2) any caffienated tea I have to make myself 3) coffee 4) soda 5)lemonade 6) hot water 7) cold water 8) caffiene free herbal mixes that call themselves tea


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 05:08 PM

Regarding Yorkshire Tea

Tea that "tastes like tea used to taste"

Taylors of Harrogate & Yorkshire Tea Est. 1886 "The Best Cup of Tea in England" as served by Taylors of Harrogate's award-winning Betty's Cafe Tea Rooms, winners of the British Tea Council's "Top Tea Place of the Year" award.

This traditional and refreshing tea has won the loyalty of customers throughout England. Indeed, over 5 million cups of Yorkshire Tea are enjoyed every single day. Taylors' expert tea blender uses his skill and experience to ensure that the special characteristics fo the world's finest teas - taste, strength, aroma and colour - combine to give Yorkshire Tea its rich satisfying flavour

None of the 'has someone squirted perfume in this?' Earl Grey rubbish.

No idea where you live, but any decent search engine should find you someone who distributes this fine brew.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Caitrin
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 05:10 PM

Earl Grey is my personal favorite, brewed very strong with two tsps. of sugar. I also like Darjeeling and Formosa Oolong.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Dave (the ancient mariner)
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 05:22 PM

I dont drink tea (Banished to the colonies for it) Assam tea is full bodied and an excellent cure for cold weather blues. Darjeeling has always been known as a fine tea. Yours, Aye. Dave


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 05:34 PM

Okay Guest I'll have a look for it, here in Ontario, Canada. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: katlaughing
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:05 PM

You can order Yorkshire Tea, from GoodWoods, here, in the States.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:25 PM

G'day sophocleese,

Many years back I worked in cost accounting at the Sydney factory of British Leyland. An elderly Pom (Englishman to any Yanks out there) at the next desk always made his own tea - despite the fact that this was the era when British businesses still had tea ladies - and it would be one of Twinings' "Varieties" tea bags. Thes had six different teas so he could chooose that most to his taste that day.
However, the one he could never enjoy was Lapsang Souchong and he gave me a half dozen tea bags of this. I tried it and decided it had a decided aura of road scrapings ... and threw the others into my emergency billy can in the car (a bag of rice, small jar of sugar, ditto salt ... and 5 Lapsang Souchong teabags).
Later that year I was in Queensland and stayed at a very remote Youth Hostel: Lost World (below the Lamington Plateau. The last time I stopped there it was unattended (and I had to cross a flooded creek to get there). Now it had a resident Warden, an English artist called Tony Wedd. In chatting with him, tea came up and he despaired of ever again seing his favorite ... LAPSANG SOUCHONG! I told him I had 5 tea bags of same and he was more than welcome to it.
The last I saw of the Lapsang was Tony carefully 'cutting' it back with domestic 'Bushells' to eke out the tiny supply ... so I guess it is chacun a sa gout.
(I must admit that I can become enthusiastic about Twinings' Russian Caravan - black and unsweetened as tea should be!

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Glyph
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:35 PM

I never learned to drink coffee which makes me a small minority now that I live in the US. I did most of my growing up in Canada where I learned to drink strong black tea with cream and sugar.

These days my favorites, in order, are: - Indian chai tea - bancha tea - oolong tea - green tea - spearmint tea (when I can find fresh spearmint)

By the way, I just discovered a great way to clean that sticky stuff that gets on refridgerators and is hard to clean off. As I was check my tea shelf on the spelling of oolong, I knocked over the Tabasco sause bottle which broke and splashed on the fridge. When I wiped it of, the fridge was suddenly amazingly white. Now I guess I better clean the rest of it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:41 PM

Bob Bolton, it is the decided aura of road scrapings that makes Lapsang so delicious. I class its flavour with dark beer, peaty malt whisky, salted licorice, and dark molasses, all of which I like. I'm glad your Lapsang went to someone who treasured and appreciated it.

Glyph,I guess you can't call the colour of the fridge "Cool White" anymore. Maybe I'll try it someday and stop my kids chewing their nails at the same time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:41 PM

Best tea I know is "teadirect", which as well as getting a fair price to the people who grow it (unlike most of the big tea makers) tastes delicious. And it's sold in Tesco's as well as Oxfam and Traidcraft shops.

Just to challenge stereotypes, the people who market it in England are called "cafedirect", but I don't reckon their coffee is anywhere near as good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Llanfair
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:44 PM

Earl Grey, Hot, for me. If you like a strong brew, try 2 earl grey teabags and one ordinary tea in a warmed pot. Hwyl, Bron.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:45 PM

McGrath Looks like a good place. I used to buy my coffee through Bridgehead but their tea was awful, nice to know there is a way to get good tea as well now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Quirk Malarkey
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:49 PM

i've been drinking lapsang souchoung for years. i have affectionately called it babylonian sweatsock tea for the same number of years. no one believes me when i say the second cuppa is the good one. --doodlezak


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Callie
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:52 PM

Ahhh! I've found my people! lapsang and Earl Grey are the best 'common' teas. A trip to the supermarket is never complete without lingering by the teas for a whiff.

However, coconut flavoured tea is an absolute aphrodisiac. I know - I've tried it and it's worked!

--Callie


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Mbo
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 07:54 PM

I like Crystal Light iced tea....don't drink regular tea, makes me sick to my stomach.

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Sorcha
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 08:00 PM

I'm supposed to stay far away from caffiene, but depending on the mood, I drink: Twinings Prince of Wales, Irish Breakfast, darjeeling, and after that, anything brown. (Instant, Constant Comment, etc.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 08:03 PM

Twinings Earl Gey, also their Blackcurrant - sorry, all of you purists. I cut them back to half strength with an ordinary/unflavoured tea.

I tried to be patriotic and drink the Australian tea called Narada, but it somehow creates a mild hayfever like allergic reaction in my nose. It might not be the tea, it might be something to do with the chemicals they may or may not be using. Anyway, even though their green tea was very nice I couldn't drink it and still have 2 almost full packets - one gree tea in bags, one loose leaf black tea.

I have this gripe, long running and still relatively unsatisfied: why is it that coffee shop/cafe proprietors wouldn't be seen dead serving instant tea but they have the gall to serve a "pot" of tea made on tea bags - with the tea bag string hanging out blatantly. It's almost like a contempt for tea drinkers. Sorry, but for quite a while now I have been wondering why people don't open proper tea shops as an alternative. Certainly not common in Oz, I haven't ever seen on here, although there probably are some somewhere.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 08:25 PM

Earl Grey? No way! Leave it to Captain Picard. But "chacun a son goat!".

When teabags came out first my mother thought they were a stupid idea, and made terrible tea. But then I found that she was tearing them open and tipping the contents into a teapot.

Tea leaves that you put into a pot with a spoon rather than teabags probably make better tea, but teabags are OK if you heat the pot or the cup and use boiling water. And the tea should look a bit red when it's mashed (or "brewed"). Every time I have a good cup of tea I'm amazed I ever drink coffee - but in fact being a lazy soul, in need of caffeine fixes from time to time, I drink more instant coffee than anything else. And the best song I know about anything non-alcoholic is A PROPER CUP OF COFFEE


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Sorcha
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 08:33 PM

I did kinda wonder about Post Top Forum Home Translate.......


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Hotspur
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 08:36 PM

Assam, Russian caravan, Darjeeling (of course) for black teas... I admit to liking fruit and spice teas a lot, especially black currant and orange spice. Jasmine tea is nice when you don't want anything too dark or bitter.

Teabags make an acceptable cup of tea but you absolutely have to put the bag in the cup first, then pour the boiling water over it. Otherwise it won't steep well.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 10:14 PM

And I thought somebody wanted to talk abou the civil rights movement in Burma!
G.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 10:33 PM

PG Tips for me, little milk and sugar. When my wife and I visit her family in Tuckton, Dorset, Lynne's Mom's first question to me is "cup o' tea, Ern?" And she brings me a big cup of PG Tips with a little too much sugar, but somehow drinking that first cup of tea in that little sitting room, surrounded by English accents, watching The Bill on tv, is always my official re-introduction to England.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 11:45 PM

G'day again'

You may talk of your whisky and talk of your beer,
There's something much nicer that's waiting me here.
It sits on the fire , beneath a gum tree:
There's nothing much nicer than a billy of tea

&c, &c, &c.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: phil jl
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 12:26 AM

Bob Bolton's posting of the first verse of Billy Of Tea reminded me of Enda Kenny's song in which he laments that he is always offered Earl Grey tea when all he wants 'is a proper cup of tea'.

Does anyone have the words ? It doesn't appear to be in the DB.

Phil


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Gypsy
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 12:33 AM

Now, Lapsang Souchong is wondermous when one is working and needs to be seriously attentive to the task at hand. Twinings, or better please. There is a wonderful persian Earl Grey, available in Berkely, that i love, and is great for the evenings when playing music. If that isn't available, twinings will do. And my personal campaigne: I live in an area where the restaurants serve gold plated coffee....and the very cheapest of teas. And charge the same price! Tea drinkers, unite! Demand a quality beverage when you dine out!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: JamesJim
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 12:41 AM

Tea? I believe I must be re-incarnate. I had to be a one of the party dressed as indians at the Boston Tea Party. I can tolerate it when I eat Chinese food, but to think of drinking it at a social gathering, or even alone, without food, makes me gag! Apologies to my English friends. Jim


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Sorcha
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 12:51 AM

OK, time to get serious here, from a dyed in the wool Yank. What is PROPER tea? other than loose leaves in the pot? How strong is strong? What is wrong with Twinings? Is it acceptable in a pinch? What really is Earl Grey? Is it Darjeeling/Oolong with bergamot flavor, or is is bergamot (herbal crap) tea? I have Bergamot growing in my garden and I love the smell/flavor of it, but alone it would be really weak. OK, give over the secret, you Pommies; What is REAL TEA, and HOW DO YOU BREW IT? (warm pot, add leaves, add BOILING water--hard, soft, bottled, etc?) After all,I am expecting bill/sables in June and I want to be able to do it right!! Tea black, or offer milk (cream)/sugar? In the pot or in the cup? and then there is LEMON!

Have pot, have loose Oolong, can get real cream,real lemon, bottled water, HELP!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 12:53 AM

I don't know much about tea and normaly settle for the cheapest tea bags I can get but my treat for myself is Assam and I make it pretty strong too.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Llanfair
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 04:50 AM

The Bergamot in Earl Grey isn't the herb we have in the garden, it's a citrus fruit that grows in hot climates.
Do the Americans really put cream in tea? No wonder they don't like it much!!!
The making of tea is a very personal ritual, everyone does it slightly differently, to their taste.
The only constant specifications are that the pot/cup should be warm, the water boiling and preferably not too contaminated with chlorine or any other stuff, and the tea left to brew.
After that , you're on your own!!!
Personally, I don't like too much milk, just a drop, and no sugar. Hwyl, Bron.


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Subject: Tea - The drink of the Gods
From: Hyperabid
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 04:51 AM

Twinings have recently introdued Lady Grey Tea. Basicly Earl Grey with Lemon Zest which is a real winner in the mornings.

They have also introduced a Jasmine green tea, (the stuff you get srved in chinese restaurants), which personally I find almsot as addictive as chinese food.

Being a strong tea person there is little to beat a pint mug filled with well-mashed Assam with a little milk and three spoons of sugar.

Before you ask I'm not entirely sure how I keep my waistline intact.

Hyp


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 06:42 AM

G'day all,

JamesJim: It would not do you much good to join the "Indians" - they were Boston smugglers of Dutch-sourced tea ditching the opposition product.

PhilJl: I have scanned in the 19th century Billy of Tea and will post it forthwith - tp the lyric req. thread.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BILLY OF TEA
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 07:00 AM

G'day again,

Since the request thread was from Wotcha, - who wasn't in this thread, I will repeat the lyric posting here:

This is the original (published) version from the 1897 Native Companion Songster - a collection of songs gathered by an author and published (a sort of 19th century DT). The lyrics (which have driftyed a little since the first stanza appeared on Dave de Hugard's Travelling Down The Castlereagh LP circa 1968) are:

THE BILLY OF TEA
Anon. (Air@'Bonnie Dundee")

You may talk of your whisky or talk of your beer,
I've something far better awaiting me here;
It stands on that fire beneath the gum-tree,
And you cannot much lick it-a billy of tea.
So fill up your tumbler as high as you can,
You'll never persuade me it's not the best plan,
To let all the beer and the spirits go free
And stick to my darling old Billy of Tea.

I wake in the morning as soon as'tis light,
And go to the nosebag to see it's all right,
That the ants on the sugar no mortgage have got,
And immediately sling my old black billy-pot,
And while it is boiling the horses I seek,
And follow them down perhaps as far as the creek;
I take off the hobbles and let them go free,
And haste to tuck into my Billy of Tea.

And at night when I camp, if the day has been warm,
I give each of the horses their tucker of corn,
From the two in the pole to the one in the lead,
And the billy for each holds a comfortable feed;
Then the fire I start and the water I get,
And the corned beef and damper in order I set,
But I don't touch the grub, though so hungry I be,
I will wait till it's ready-the Billy of Tea.

From The Native Companion Songster.

The tune, Bonnie Dundee is very effective but calls for a good range of voice. The Bushwackers dipped out and used only the first (low) part (as on Dave's short piece, a filler at the end of one side).
I'm sure you will also get the later words - or else I will get around to that version as well.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 08:11 AM

"Apologies to my English friends. Jim"

You'd better offer a bigger apology to any Irish or Australian friends. When it comes to tea drunk per head both peoples score far higher. (When it comes to Earl Grey Tea, I suspect the Americans might top the list...)

No one's got round to milk first or tea first so far. Now that's something that divides households. I was hearing John Kirkpatrick the other day say how not a day passed when he was growing up without his parents discussing their differences on this point. (I'm a tea first man myself.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jim Krause
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 04:58 PM

I'm more of a coffee man, myself. French Roast, or Mocha Java are the coffees of choice. And they gotta be freshly ground, I mean within the time span it takes to boil 24 ounces of distilled water on the range. But another comes to mind, when I out camping, I like to roast green coffee right over the fire, or camp stove, gind it right there, and brew it loose in the pot, sort of cowboy coffee. I found one of those hand crank grinders that really works.

But as for tea, Asam, or Darjeeling, loose (those tea bags are an abomination) are good with Indian curries, chutneys, etc. Jasmine or green tea, or oolong with Chinese cuisine is the only way to go. And Lapsang Souchang makes my wife barf. I guess some one fixed her a cup about an hour before she came down with a violent attack of the stomach flu. She never did get over it. Earl Grey is for desert. Tea should be brewed 1 heaping teaspoon per six ounces of water, add 1 very heaping teaspoon of sugar, and that's a pretty good "cuppa" as I've seen it referred to. As for putting milk or cream in it, why bother? Just make your tea weaker, that's alll.

As to brands, I have no loyalties. I just buy the stuff in bulk at the local independent grocery store. Who knows where it came from after it left India?


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Subject: Lyr Add: BILLY OF TEA
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 07:15 PM

G'day Again,

Phil jl:

Here are the words you requested of Enda Kenny's Song

EARL GREY
Can't stand the stuff … I like to steer clear of grey areas.

Is it perfume? Is it tea?
Whatever it is it does nothing for me
Should I drink it? Or dab it on?
Can I swap it for a coffee or has all the water gone?

It is hot it is wet.
It is eau de toilette
Is it from the House of Lipton or Chanel?
I only want a cup of tea not this stuff you've given me
If you think I'm going to drink it go to

Help me
Someone call a doctor, call a nurse!
Call an ambulance I'm poisoned
And I think it's getting worse
I only wanted a cup of tea
But I fear that my last mouthful will be the death of me

It is hot it is wet
It is eau de toilette
To my mind it is more toilette than eau
If you want to spoil your day
Add the oil of Earl Grey
I'm reliably informed it's bergamot....

What a mouthful !
Is it perfume? Is it wee?
Whatever it's supposed to be it doesn't taste like tea
Should I drink it or dab it on?
Can I swap it for a coffee or has all the water gone?

It is hot it is wet
It is eau de toilette
Is it Twinings? Is it Tetley? Let me see
Go ahead make my day
But please don't make me drink Earl Grey
All I want is a proper cup of tea


While I am at it, here are the more 'modern' words to Billy of Tea (as sung by the Bushwackers, early 1970s.

BILLY OF TEA

Chorus:
You can talk of your whisky, talk of your beer,
There's something much nicer that's waiting us here,
It sits on the fire beneath the gum tree,
There's nothing much nicer than a billy of tea.

So fill up your tumbler as high as you can
And don't you dare tell me it's not the best plan,
You can let all your beer and your spirits go free
I'll stick to my darling old billy of tea.

I rise in the morning as soon as it's light
And go to the nose bag to see it's alright,
That the ants on the sugar no mortgage have got
And straight away sling my old black billy-pot.

And while it is boiling the horses I seek
And follow them down,, as far as the creek,)
I take off their hobbles and let them run free
Then haste to tuck into my billy of tea.

And at night when I camp if the day has been warm
I give to my horses their tucker of corn,
From the two in the pole to the one in the lead
A billy for each holds a comfortable feed.

Then the fire I make and the water I get
And corned beef and damper, in order.) I set,
But I don't touch the grub though so hungry I be –
I wait till it's ready-the billy of tea.

Their tune is a flattened out version of the first half of Bonnie Dundee, the original collected tune (from back when the 'folk' could still sing!).

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 08:04 PM

Sorcha

One important point in making a good cup of tea, never use water from the hot water tap, always use the cold tap. Something (and this is a subject of discussion and disagreement among tea drinkers - is it the copper pipes, is it because the air has already been boiled out of the water once before you boil it, etc?) in the hot water makes the tea taste terrible. It's not discernible in coffee as far as I know. I've never heard a coffee drinker complain, but try making a pot of tea for a real tea drinker using the hot water tap and watch them screw their face up in disgust.

My sister kept complaining because her hubby complained about the tea she made him and said it was because of this. She didn't believe him until she made a pot for him once making sure he didn't see which tap the water came from. He knew straight away and as far as I know she has never made it again on hot water.

Twinings is better than the cheaper brands, especially for Earl Gray. Don't try cheap Earl Gray or you'll end up agreeing with Enda Kenny.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Sorcha
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 09:02 PM

Ah, we're getting there. I did know about hot tap water, and warm pots.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 09:24 PM

Hot tap water for anything except washing is a culinary abomination. It's probably a serious health hazard as well.

Aren't there any Japanese Mudcatters? I mean they take the tea ceremony even more seriously. (I gather you don't even need to drink it, it's the preparation ritual that's important. Like the fella I knew who'd go to enormous pains getting his guitar into absolutely perfect tune at te start of a session. Then he'd put it down, poick up his drink - not tea - and wouldn't touch it again for the rest of the evening.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 09:27 PM

Not just hot tap water. Water that has been boiled once or twice already will have lost a lot of its original oxygen bubbles and they are what help bring the flavour out when you're steeping tea. Fresh cool water which you bring to the boil once and then pour over the leaves in a warm pot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 10:15 PM

Well McGrath, you mentioned it - it is milk last for me and yes it does cause dissagreement in the family as my mother is under the misguided impression that it should be the other way round ;-)

Bob, loved the Earl Grey song - it quite accurately describes my feelings towards the stuff.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: JamesJim
Date: 13 Apr 00 - 11:18 PM

Okay, McG of H! My apologies to all tea lovers, no matter your nationality. You know what really turns me off about tea? Just the thought of adding milk or cream to it. I suppose that is supposed to make it more palatable/tasty, but I find it quite unappealing (hope I haven't offended another whole group of friends). Of course, we all have acquired tastes. Mine are more akin to Kentucky Bourbon and Derby Pie (we're getting ready to celebrate the 126th running of the Kentucky Derby in a few weeks). Cheers to all and please enjoy your tea! Jim


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Gypsy
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 12:54 AM

Yuck! The only place that milk or cream have in a caffinated beverage is if that is a Chai, or some version of a latte, which is a creature unto itself, and bears no semblance to its ancestors. I prefer tea, will drink GOOD coffee on occasion, but with no additions.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 02:58 AM

Wow Gypsy, you are sounding as bad as I am with whisky. I like my additions in tea and coffee but to pollute say a Lagavulin with other other substances (although a drop of water, not ice, is acceptable) is sacrilidge.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 03:04 AM

Also, in addition to sophocleese's instructions: use the boiling water to swill around in the pot to heat it up, then tip that lot out, add the tea leaves and then make sure the water is still boiling or bring it back to the boil briefly so that it is at its hottest when you pour it into the pot. An old saying is to bring the pot to the kettle and not the kettle to the pot - to make sure you get it at its hottest.

After you have poured the water in, leave it to brew for a few minutes and then pour into the cups. I have started a habit of warming the cup too especially in winter, but I like it really hot.

Milk and sugar are a matter of preference, and everyone has a definition of the perfect cuppa - mine is hot, a little milk, no sugar, and not too strong, not too weak. I can't imagine putting cream in tea - coffee, yes, because it has a sort of oily base in the bean, similar to chocolate, but not tea.

Speaking of chocolate, who told me recently - was it at the 'Cat? - that the world's chocolate supplies have the potential to dry up with the increasing loss of arable chocolate farming land in the right climates? gods spare us from that calamity.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jim Krause
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 05:36 PM

Bob Bolton, By any chance is Billy of Tea sung to the melody of The Mountains of Mourne? You know, it does work.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Kara
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 05:44 PM

I gave up tea when I gave up smoking pot.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST, Mr. Tea
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 07:28 PM

Me ma always put the milk in first. She said the cup didn't get brown with the tannin as quick. Apart from that reason, I see no other advantage in it. I drink it out of a pint mug, three sugars, and milk. Eight or nine times a day
I'm drinking it now!
While we speak!
It tastes better, of course, with the cream of the milk.
Straight from the cow.
None of that oul' 'pastuerised' rubbish!
After a good fry with beef sausages, thick rashers of green bacon, two fried eggs on a fried soda farl, fried mushrooms, fried tomatoes, a bit of black pudding.
And a pint of sweet tea with the skin just about to form on the top.

I like Lyon's, but any old leaf will do, as long as you can run a mouse over the top of it, it's good enough for me.
The BEST thirst quencher known to man.
Even better than the Real Thing!
Love the stuff!

Mr. Tea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST,Helen, using Internet Explorer - thread prob
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 12:38 AM

Well, Mr Tea, now that you mention food which goes well with tea: hot buttered toast, or there is a biscuit (cookie to you U.S. 'Catters) in Oz called Nice (pronounced "neece", made by Arnott's) which is a plain biscuit, no cream, with a sprinkle of sugar. They are wonderful dipped in tea. Another great tea-dipping biscuit is Arnott's Scotch Finger biscuit.

The Tim Tam discussion in another thread, whose name escapes me at present, has little relevance to tea drinking. Tim Tams work with coffee but not so well with tea. (Two biscuites sandwiched together with biscuit cream, bite each of the ends off and then suck coffee through the cream in the centre. Some people make a habit of it. I can't say I have tried it but the chocolate biscuit & cream probaby go better with coffee.)

Also, I asked Praise about the recipe for Iced Tea which she mentioned. she can't getinto this thread at the moment because it's stuck using Netscape but it works with IE. She replied:

"No, no recipe... the sweet tea of the south is a mystery to me and the home iced tea is just any old tea, iced.

"Thai coffee, now, I almost have figured out!"

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 12:58 AM

Helen, as somebody who has tried dunking several types of biscuits including Nice (don't know the make but we get them in the UK) in my tea, I must say that IMO nothing compares with digestives and I love the bits that sort of half disintegrate into the tea.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 02:15 AM

Jon,

I don't know what digestive biscuits are, although I have heard of them. Can you describe them please? I just did an Internet search but I am not really any wiser. What are Graham crackers, because they are said to be similar to digestive biscuits?

Also, in my search I found this site about tea shops in San Diego. The glowing reports of tea drinking might convert even the most convinced coffee drinkers.

http://sandiego.citysearch.com/E/F/SANCA/0000/02/47/


SignOn San Diego: A Time for Tea

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 03:38 AM

G'day again

Soddy: I have not heard the tune Mountains of Mourne used for Billy of Tea, but I have no doubt the words fit. As I said above, the collected tune was Bonny Dundee, a sprightly Scots tune and the tune commonly used today is a rather flattened-out version of the "A" part of the same tune.

I think I would find Mountains of Mourne a bit on the slow and dreary side by comparison, but chacun a sa gout! I am not sure that the Mountains of Mourne was around when Billy of Tea was "composed". It was published as an 'anon,' ballad in 1897, but would have been in oral circulation for many years before. I presume that the Mountains of Mourne comes from the late 1880s/'90s "music hall Irish" period. Bonny Dundee commemorates a battle between the Scots and the English, some centuries earlier, and was a popular tune here, in the latter part of the 18th century, as several song use the tune.

Regards,

Bob Bolton Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 03:40 AM

G'day yet again,

Sorry about the double posting - I am on the cusp of operating systems and the fingers wots not how many times to press!

Regard(les)s, (but pressing ONCE!)

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jack The Lad
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 05:20 AM

Lipton's Yellow Label seems to be available the world over- though one teabag often doesn't make it strong enough for me. When I was in Poland once, the hotel prepared a large pot- for 12 cups- with ONE tea bag! Jack The Lad


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Penny S.
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 06:49 AM

There are teapots with systems for stopping the infusion once the tea has reached the desired flavour.

I remember long and heated correspondence somewhere about the milk first controversy, which produced various reasons for each practice. There is, as there would be in England, a class thing embedded in it. Upper tends to tea first, and sneers at the other party, as being ignorant, as if drinking something the way you like drinking it was wrong. What happens is this. If you put in tea first, the milk is scalded as it is added. This changes the flavour - if you like UHT milk, you will like the scalded flavour. This may be to do with the Raj, where scalding the milk was a good hygienic idea. It also allows the guest to select the amount of milk to add, as in coffee, so avoiding discussions of the "'ow dark do you like it, ducks?" variety. Milk first raises the temperature of the milk slowly, so gives a different flavour. It also protects the cup from thermal shock as the very hot tea is poured in, but I don't know how vital this was. Although I can drink tea unmilked, I do like the way the milk rounds off the bite of the tannin. And I think that people who sneer about pouring cow juice into delicate oriental infusions (an American columnist advertising a British airline) should consider diversity a good thing, not a bad.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Hollowfox
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 09:54 AM

I always thought that milk-and-sugar into the tea was the only way to drink it. That's the way my grandmother taught me. Late in her life she told me that she wouldn't drink milk as a child, so the family doctor recommended the tea as a way of getting the milk into her diet. When I visited relatives in Canada, I waited through all of supper for the milk to appear for the tea. when it didn't, I drank it sort of as a cup of iced tea. Later, someone remarked that dthey'd all gotten into the habit of drinking their tea "clear" during World War II, and thus began another tradition. BTW, if anybody likes a Strong cup of tea (orange pekoe genre, not smoky flavors like lapsang souchong), get hold of some Turkish tea. Even when not "properly" done up in a samovar, it's delicious. And it could probably raise a pulse in a corpse.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 10:05 AM

I am stuck Helen. They are also knonw as wholmeal biscuits. I have tried to search the web as I seem to be incapable of describing them. Here is one bit I found:

"The Digestive biscuit was first introduced in Britain in 1892 by McVitie's, and were reportedly intended to aid digestion (hence the highly cunning name). They are circular, brown biscuits with a slightly crumbly texture."

According to my dictionary (Chambers 20th Century): digestive bisciut is "A round, semi-sweet biscuit, the basic ingredient of which is meal."

I don't know a Graham Cracker but they are descirbed as being similar and it seems that one can be substituted for the other in recipies. My dictionary says that Ghram Crackers are made from Graham flour which is "a type of wheat flour similar to whole wheat flour" It's name comes from S Graham (1794-1851) who was a US dietician.

Jon


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Brendy
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 11:03 AM

I was chuffed to see Mr. Tea make such a song and dance about the 'tea ritual'. I too drink copious quantities in a pint mug

I was particularly interested in your enjoyment of what is known as 'The Ulster Fry'. You have eaten, and imbibed, well in your time it would seem.!!

I have to register my appreciation for such a 'love' induced outburst, only adding that although I can't buy buttermilk here where I live ( I make it myself), I DO have a griddle, and I make the BEST Soda farls this side of Portadown.

B.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 12:43 PM

As somebody who has eaten both I can definitely say that Graham crackers and digestive biscuits are not the same at all. Graham crackers are less crumbly and have a stronger honey flavour to them. Digestive biscuits are more substantial and taste excellent with old white cheddar.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 01:00 PM

There is a recipe for digestive biscuits at this address. I have never tried it so I don't know how exactly they will taste but you might want to try it.

http://cookierecipe.com/az/DigestiveBiscuits.asp


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: JenEllen
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 05:28 PM

Have to side with Gypsy on the coffee wars. Try living in the Northwest US....one word, Starbucks......Going anywhere sans latte is frowned upon. Going to a CoffeeHut/Starbucks and ordering TEA is liable to get you shot. Then when your tea arrives, it is liable to be crap Lipton or something equally nauseating.

Lifesaver? In many commercial herbal teas, they have promotional gifts of tins. I carry one in my purse with bags of my fave tea. It's MUCH easier to just get the hot water.

Boil the water from the cold tap. Run a cup or so in the teapot to warm it, add the loose leaves to the teapot. Add boiling water to the pot. Throw a cozy over the pot to steep. Gather the mish-mash of friends, mugs, and biscuits. (I take a shot of fat-free milk and a touch of sugar-artificial sweetners disgust me) And MMario is right, a cup of tea made FOR you is that much sweeter.

~Elle


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: JenEllen
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 05:32 PM

Forgot the Faves!

Assam
Darjeeling
Irish/English Breakfast
Lifeboat
Earl Grey
Lemon

All brewed strong enough to take the plating off the sugar spoon.

~Elle


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 07:13 PM

"Bonny Dundee commemorates a battle between the Scots and the English, some centuries earlier" - the fighting was between Scots on both sides. Like it is most times... Like it is in Ireland most times. It's called "Divide and Rule".


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 11:54 PM

G'day Again,

McGrath of Harlow: I knew I should have looked that one up before posting! You can usually count on the Scots fighting the Poms ... but, if not, there's always other Scots.

(I have this problem with my ISP disconnecting if I don't post anything for 5 minutes, so I have to keep postings brief. I found somewhere to reset it but, in the anal-retentive way of all the latest programs, it reset to default next time I logged on.)

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Apr 00 - 11:57 PM

JenEllen,

Thanks for mentioning the tea cosy - an essential part of tea making eequipment.

Ok, Jon, now I know what they compare with in Oz, probably what is called a Wheatmeal biscuit here. For some reason I always imagined that they would be a fine white flour. We also have one called a Granita which is similar to the wheatmeal but a little bit sweeter.

sophocleese, thanks for the recipe link, I'll look it up. In one recipe I saw on the net it said to use Graham flour, which wasn't very helpful at all since I had no idea what sort of flour that is. Kind of a circular argument, like There's a Hole in the Bucket, trying to find the answer to the conundrum of digestive biscuits. It's the simplest things which are often the hardest to find out.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 09:42 AM

G'day Helen,

Of course the whole raison d'etre of the digestive biscuit was originally the 19th century, Victorian obsession with fine white flour from the new-fangled steam mill. Beautiful fine flour, air-light sponges. light bright bread ... no fibre ... and endemic constipation!

When you read Victorian publications, they are full of advertisements for what prove to be a bunch of laxatives and purgatives. Dr Graham and his colleaugues had realised that the real answer was a bit of roughage - and decided that the best way to administer it was in biscuit form. Some of the wheatmeal biscuits I have encountered make it clear that they thought of it as roughage ... not merely fibre!

Are you going to make it to the National Festival Helen?

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Megan L
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 12:35 PM

Twinings peasents all if you want quality tea regardless of type one has to get it from Thomsons of Glasgow.

I still stock up when I get the chance to get back.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 01:19 PM

"I have this problem with my ISP disconnecting if I don't post anything for 5 minutes" - I reckon Bob, you're not the only person with that problem on the Mudcat at times...


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST, Threadie
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 01:27 PM

Check yer 'disconnect if idle for more than...' in the advanced properties section of your Dial up connection. Or Un-check it as the case may be.

See does that do anything


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Caitrin
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 03:20 PM

Iced tea is just tea with ice. No fancy flavoring or any such stuff. It can be consumed sweetened or unsweetened. (Almost always sweet in the south, usually unsweetened in the north. Another N/S difference is that it's served year round here, but only seasonally up north. Makes sense, because I can't imagine drinking anything cold during a New York winter.) With good iced tea, the tea is brewed normally, and the sugar and ice are added at the end. Only heathens like Mbo drink the premade Nestea stuff. : )


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bill D
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 05:03 PM

regarding Lapsang Souchong...many years ago I worked at a 'coffee house'...and I was in charge of the tea...and we did it right--loose tea, boiling water..etc...(even before Twinings..remember "Ming" teas in the gold cans?)..anyway, one night a black man came in..(you think you've seen black? this man was BLACK!)...turns out he was from Madascar, and when he saw Laspang on the menu he became very agitated..."Please make me a pot", he said in this wonderful accent.."this is what we drink in my country, and I have not had it in years"...so I did, and he smiled. But in a bit he came up to the counter and asked, "I would like another pot,...but please make it twice as strong!"....so I did, and he BEAMED! He was positively thriving on double strength Lapsang Souchong...it was very nice to be able to help him recapture a bit of his homeland. (Seems he was related to the out-of-power ruling family, and was NOT welcome in the country at the time)

I can drink Lapsang and Earl Grey, though usually only as a blend with other good teas..(in addition to the usual ones mentioned, Szchewan, Yunnan, ChingWo...etc.)The one 'flavored' tea I really liked was a Lychee tea I found at an oriental grocery. I used to be able to but good loose teas in bulk here..(Wash DC area)but it is getting harder as Starbucks plugs coffee on every corner.

In defense, I have also learned to drink 'good' coffee, meaning fresh ground and exotic types of high quality whenever I can afford it.

(oh, as resident traditionalist curmudgeon, I also object to calling herbal infusions "tea"...*grin*)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 16 Apr 00 - 11:52 PM

G'day Threadie:

I will do as you suggest - I did find the settings once before, but they seem to sneak back to default when I'm not looking (my home machine, not this one).

Who knows: This might be the cure for prolixity (McGrath of Harlow).

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 17 Apr 00 - 12:11 AM

We had a wonderful sunny day here in Colorado today, and I took advantage of the solar power to make "Sun Tea." This is an American form of Sun worship. We take a glass gallon container, fill with ice-cold water, drop in several bags of tea (I used one Tetleys and 2 PG Tips), then set it in a very sunny place. The tea is brewed not by heat, but by the rays of the Sun. The tea produced is very smooth and full-bodied without being sharp or tannic. Makes a terrific iced tea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Apr 00 - 05:59 AM

Bob,

I won't be able to go to the National this year - other commitments. I had hoped but sadly 'tis not to be.

I'm hoping to get to the St Albans on 12th May but there is another commitment whcichmight stop me, unfortunately. I'm fighting it, though.

LEJ, I like the idea of the Sun Tea. I'll have to try that out.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bill D
Date: 17 Apr 00 - 02:25 PM

I was explaining how to make "Sun Tea" to some friends one day, and going on about how it works really well , but that you need sunny weather, whereas, on a cloudy day.....and one guy interrupted with perfect timing..."you can Tea forever!"..

maybe you hadda be there....


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST,JenEllen
Date: 18 Apr 00 - 12:25 PM

Thanks Leej....the cold winter almost drove the thought of sun-tea out of my mind forever. Have to go find that ol'gallon jug.
~Elle


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Gypsy
Date: 18 Apr 00 - 10:20 PM

Amazingly enough, you CAN do solar tea on a cloudy day...living in the northwest nowhere/US you learn to work with fog...just takes longer. But, a sunny day, and leaving the jug on the stainless table outside works really fast!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: SINSULL
Date: 18 Apr 00 - 10:27 PM

OOLONG and PEPPERMINT From my English/Scottish mother: "Pot to the kettle, never kettle to the pot."


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 22 Apr 00 - 07:11 PM

I just wanted to refresh this thread. Since we talked about tea, and how to make a good pot of tea I am enjoying my cups of tea even more, and when I make it and drink it I think of this discussion and the Mudcatters here on this thread. So, in a way it's like having tea with you all in cyberspace.

Also, I don't know what happened about the Mudcat Cookbook but it's obvious to me that we have to include a section on tea making: proper methods, what not to do, fun methods e.g. SunTea, recommended or not recommended varieties and brands including the love-it-or-hate it type like Earl Grey, recipes like Iced Tea, Sweet Tea, etc.

And another thought has struck me (ducking quickly for cover): coffee drinkers at work seem to drag themselves to the coffee pot for another fix, as if it were an addiction which drags their health in a downward direction, but tea drinkers seem to want tea because it is refreshing.

How's that for a controversial statement? I could be way off here and I am open to discussion. Any thoughts?

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Gypsy
Date: 23 Apr 00 - 12:51 AM

Oh aye, you're right. Perhaps because you can get the finest tea for half the cost of the finest coffee. Maybe that is part of the reason that tea drinkers are happy. Now, the burning question: Thompsons of Glasgow, Megan? Is it available in the states, or do you really have to swim for it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 29 Apr 00 - 11:16 PM

I read an article in our local paper yesterday about an Australian company which does mail orders on teas, mostly from China. Read the evocative descriptions of the types of teas - it's just like reading wine bottle labels


http://www.gray-seddon-tea.com/

[Disclaimer: absolutely no connection to this company or website]

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 29 Apr 00 - 11:53 PM

Helen, thanks fo rthe link, it is fun to read. I start to wonder when I hear wine tasters etc. speaking about notes of chocolate, apricot whatever how they would describe those flavours. A lovely apricot with a faint after taste of good chardonnay.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: sophocleese
Date: 30 Jul 00 - 11:47 AM

GUEST,guest. I finally found a place where I could purchase Yorkshire Tea and you're right, it is a good cup of tea. Thanks for letting me know about it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: flattop
Date: 30 Jul 00 - 11:51 AM

I hope that it smells better than that Lapdog Shoestring tea.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Roger in Sheffield
Date: 30 Jul 00 - 12:26 PM

thanks for making me laugh so much
Bobs Earl grey song mainly but also the bizarre thought that people are doing internet searches for Digestive Biscuits (...Brain the size of a Planet and they want me to find Digestive Biscuits....)
And I love the thought of someone giving up Pot rather than warming one !!

Roger


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Roger in Sheffield
Date: 30 Jul 00 - 01:13 PM

thats enough refreshments for one day !


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Gervase
Date: 30 Jul 00 - 03:04 PM

But has anyone ever found out where the heck in Yorkshire they grow the bloody tea?
Two other good names to look out for in tea are Jacksons (speciality teas in a distinctive cube caddy with very plain labels - they do a very good jasmine and all the oolongs and pekoes you could want) and the Irish Bewley's label, which gives a dark red and really refreshing cup, especially when brewed extra strong with loads of sugar (put in first, so the tea pouring down onto it dissolves it all and avoids the need for a spoon) and uncastrated milk (put in last so you can guage the colour of the resulting pint mugful to the right shade of mahogany).
Sorry, this is worse than pornography - I'm going to have to go and brew a cup of tea...


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 30 Jul 00 - 03:34 PM

Helen, even if you added potato bread to Mr Tea's disgusting feast, it's still not an Ulster Fry unless the tea is Nambarrie - assembled from parts in Belfast, and the best you can get, among the tea-bag varieties. It's even creeping on to Tesco shelves in GB now.

In the states I could find any flavour of tea I wanted, but the hardest to find was tea tea. Bit like trying to find natural non-lowfat yoghourt. Or non-lowfat anything for that matter.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 29 Jun 01 - 08:48 PM

Refresh....ing, isn't it, drinking this lovely cup of tea.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Sorcha
Date: 29 Jun 01 - 08:51 PM

No, please, no. Not Road Tar again......please help me. I've been kidnapped by a macadam crew.........send Yorkshire soon!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 29 Jun 01 - 09:21 PM

Here's another song about a nonalcoholic beverage....I suppose it could be reworked: Makin' Earl Grey?

Makin' Coffee

By the way, if anyone knows who wrote this, I'd be interested in knowing. I learned it from Redmond O'Connell in San Francisco.

Aloha,
Mark

Oh, and I love Lapsang Souchong! But I also like Guinness and dark bread and Kona coffee.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bill D
Date: 29 Jun 01 - 10:15 PM

Tea simply requires a bit more attention to detail to do it 'right' than coffee, not really harder, but you can't cheat and cut corners as easily, as the taste difference between well made tea and cheap, carlessly done stuff is more noticable. You CANNOT let the water boil for 5-6 minutes and have decent tea, the oxygen is gone, and it is flat & insipid. You control strength by adjusting the quantity, not by length of steeping time...(some latitude here, but not a lot).

ahh....but when you get it JUST right!......

(and, I'm sorry, my friends, but some tea (Oolong for example)you NEVER, NEVER put milk in!...I use NO milk, but I suppose for some teas at some times....*sigh*)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: RichM
Date: 29 Jun 01 - 11:26 PM

If you like Lapsang Souchong, you might like the peaty taste of Laphroaig Scotch whisky.
I was introduced to this at a performance, while I was waiting for the prior act to finish. It was a fiddler I was supposed to accompany, but whose sense of rythmn was so highly individual, that I couldn't play along with it.
So while waiting,I had several glasses of Laphroaig, then went on and performed the sailing song John Kanakanaka. This I prefaced with a ten minute florid and highly original introduction--or so my band mates told me!...
I don't remember much about it, unfortunately...
But I did like the Laphroaig!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bill D
Date: 29 Jun 01 - 11:54 PM

hmmm...I like Lapsang often, but prefer my Scotch mostly NOT heavily peated...(I do like Talisker, which has an explosive flavor, but not much peat...prefer MacAllan's and Highland Park and several others)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Metchosin
Date: 30 Jun 01 - 12:32 AM

Great choice Bill! Highland Park is one of the grande dames of the world of scotch and less suited to coating piers and pilings than Laphroaig or Lagavulin.(ducking and running)

However, to do coffee right, one should take as much care or more than tea for a superb cup, and like some teas, coffee left to sit beyond five minutes is an abomination. Unfortunately a lot of people have never had any exposure to a really good cup of coffee.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: roopoo
Date: 30 Jun 01 - 03:40 AM

When we had my dad's funeral party, I went to make another pot of tea, and was happily slinging bags into the pot when my mum informed me it was Darjeeling, and it brewed strong. Couldn't really taste any difference, but it was nice.

I like Rooibos, which is a South African tea, but it is somewhat relaxing, and sometimes I want to just curl up and sleep! I like Earl Grey, green tea (especially jasmine). Ian is now working in China and I have lots of different green teas. The trouble is, I can't read the packets. i always have green tea with Chinese food. One of my college friends from Singapore said it was always drunk with a meal to counteract the greasiness of the frying.

Andrea


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: The Walrus
Date: 30 Jun 01 - 07:36 AM

I must have missed this thread the first time around.

Lapsand Souchong, I can't stand it, I think it tastes rather like tea made with the water used to boil some inferior smoked fish, disgusting muck.

I'll go along with the Assam, Darjeeling point of view, with Earl Grey (black and unsweetened) getting an honourable mention if I'm in the mood, however, the BEST tea in the world (at the right time) is "gunfire", a standard market tea (like PG etc) served hot, strong and slightly stewed, with milk (condensed milk works, but I find it too sweet) and a large tot of dark rum in it. It may sound apalling to some, but in the middle of a field in the pre-dawn chill when you're trying to wake up, it's pure nectar.

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST,Helen, on hubby's computer
Date: 30 May 02 - 08:03 AM

Sorry, I just had to revive this thread. I've just been sitting here for about half an hour re-reading it.

Something I learned and I have been testing out, about how to make coffee taste better: scald the milk a bit first.

Penny S (15-Apr-00 - 06:49 AM ) discussed this in relation to changing the taste of tea for the worse, but it seems to change the taste of coffee to the better.

The other thing I learned from Mudcat, on a thread about drinking hot chocolate - heat a bit of water with cocoa powder and stir it around a bit to release the chocolate flavour. Cocoa powder is actually greasy and if it isn't heated up a bit the cocoa remains gritty and the flavour is much less satisfying.

As a techno-Philistine, I have to confess that I use the microwave for both scalding the milk and heating up the cocoa/water mix. I'm also experimenting with scalding the milk for the hot chocolate too. It's not such an obvious difference as the coffee experiment, but I think that it does improve the taste a bit. (I have cut down my milk consumption radically over the last few years so I make cocoa with a cup of hot water and add a little milk, but now I make sure that the milk is scalded or heated.)

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: DMcG
Date: 30 May 02 - 08:16 AM

My flatmate used to refer to Lapsang Souchong as 'Smoky Bacon Flavour'. If you haven't tasted it yet, its not a bad description.

I normally have a small collection of teas to choose from - yes, Taylors Yorkshire is a good one - but we usually end up drinking industrial waste tea as my wife normally drinks four pots per day (each of up to six cups depending who is in the house that day)


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: cetmst
Date: 30 May 02 - 09:54 AM

I drink my coffee black and unsweetened; Laphroaig is my Scotch and the only tea I drink is Lapsang Souchong, all may be symptoms of my taste buds becoming elderly. Iced tea, the regional drink of the American south I do without. My favorite iced tea story concerns a meal in an Italian restaurant, no less, in San Antonio where I decided to top off a meal with a glass of Asti. As our table conversation progressed I became aware that the waitress had put at my elbow a glass of - you guessed it - Texans speak a different language.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: cetmst
Date: 30 May 02 - 09:58 AM

One of the characters in James Michener's "Centennial" holes up in a cave in Colorado for the winter, carefully rationing his little bag of Lapsang Souchong. I'm sure it's what got him through.


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Subject: Lyr ADD: The Billy of Tea
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 30 May 02 - 12:03 PM

To tag as LyrAdd for the DT harvestors:

In this thread, Bob Bolton posts "the original" THE BILLY OF TEA identifying the tune as Bonny Dundee

Later post, also by Bob Bolton, of the 1970s version by The Bushwackers of THE BILLY OF TEA -1970s
. This post also includes Lyr for "Enda Kenny's Song EARL GREY."
Comment on tune variants at BILLY OF TEA - Alt Tune may be useful for annotation.

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: EBarnacle1
Date: 30 May 02 - 04:53 PM

Tea is wonderful stuff. Are there any onthers out there who believe that washing the cup with soap injures the taste?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 03:08 AM

EBarnacle,

I haven't heard about washing the cup with soap, although I never wash the teapot with soap.

I could mention the belief that washing beer glasses with soap ruins the fizz but then we'd have serious thread creep.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: GUEST,Greyeyes
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 06:40 AM

Darjeeling is known as the champagne of teas. I often start the day with a brew of 2 parts Darjeeling and 1 part Lapsang Souchong. In days of yore when the tea caddy was one of the most important items in rich houses, with the key held only by the housekeeper, the caddy often had 2 compartments; one for china tea, one for indian. Guests were offered either, or a blend of the 2.

The debate about milk first or tea first has covered most ideas I've heard; one theory about pouring the tea in first was that posh people did it to show off how good the quality of their fine bone china was. Although thin enough to see through, if you could pour boiling tea straight into it without the cup cracking it proved your crockery was highly superior. People who put the milk in first were almost admitting that their cups were cheap. The flavour of the scalded milk seems a good reason to put the milk in first now people are not so bothered about showing off the quality of their cups. As Helen comments it definitely does affect the flavour. I too sometimes scald the milk before adding very strong coffee, about 1/2 & 1/2. It comes out like a cappuccino without the froth (although I usually take it black).

As to water, I live in a very hard water area and it makes disgusting tea. Until I moved to Devon for a couple of years and was able to drink the nectar that resulted from brewing tea with soft Dartmoor water I don't think I had ever tasted a decent cuppa. I now use a filter jug and only ever boil a kettle with filtered water. Not only does this mean I can make great tea, but the kettle no longer furs up with limescale. The aforementioned Taylors of Harrogate, makers of Yorkshire tea, now produce a hard water tea, I was given a box recently but haven't tried it; I'm reluctant to risk the limescale build up that results from even a couple of pots boiled with tap water.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: mcpiper
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 07:26 AM

Ahhh tea. Is there a more perfect drink known to mankind. I never knew how much of a love affair I had with tea until I couldn't get any. I was in Romania a couple of years ago, doing a wee bit of business at a place called Roman up near the Ukraine border. Asked for tea, they didn't have any at the hotel. Tried to get some at a couple of little shop things, no luck. I was gutted. Had to settle for blackberry tea or some other herb tea, coffee, NEVER.
I have tea no milk no sugar, however it comes hot or not so hot as long as it's tea. Favourite, however has to be Assam, a bit hard to get, but a real treat. My father used to have his tea no milk, two sugars, never coffee. He reckoned coffe to be the devils brew. His neighbour was diagnosed with cancer, and went the alternative way for reatment. One of the things was coffee enemas. Dad reckoned they found a use for the bloody stuff at last.
Is there a tea site where we can give the stuff it's due reverence?

Great thread, great topic, and I agree with everyone so far.
Cheers, mcpiper.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Deda
Date: 01 Jun 02 - 07:13 PM

I adore teas of all kinds. I'm overly sensitive to caffeine so I have to ration myself, but in my cupboard I have the following: Lapsang suchong, loose leaf; "pitta tea" bags (an ayervedic tea, no caffeine); peppermint, both home-grown loose and in bags; jasmine (caffeinated, quite lovely); KavaKava (helps get sleepy); Sleepytime (chamomile, mostly); licorice tea; ginger tea; generic decaf black tea; "Goodtime" tea, which is a poor imitation of Chai; English Breakfast loose leaf -- and about 20 or 30 others. I got hooked on teas when, after living mostly on coffee and cigarettes throughout my 20s and into my 30s, my gut just gave up and couldn't take the abuse anymore. I love and miss coffee but it goes through me like Drain-O. Teas have wonderful properties and can be very healing; they can stimulate or relax or comfort or enliven, heat one up or cool one down. Thanks, 'catters. What a great group!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Haruo
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 02:16 AM

I just saw this thread for the first time, and haven't read it all yet, but must say I do like lapsang souchong. I also like sassafras root tea (though I've been told it's carcinogenic or something), and generally ocha is the only thing I'll drink when eating sushi (which is my absolute favorite thing to eat) though I used to put away a lot of saké in that context.

My maternal grandmother was a dedicated imbiber of Red Rose teabag tea. Wouldn't touch Lipton's (which was most of the tea available in Seattle in those days). I remember when Constant Comment became all the rage. Dates me, enit? When I was in high school I used to drink glass after glass of Lipton's powdered iced tea mix with saccharin added. I have pretty much recovered from that addiction.

My coffee of choice is Bargreen's Kenya Select, or if I'm flush Caffè Appasionato's Celebes varietal. I used to really like Ethiopian Yergacheff, but haven't seen it for awhile.

I also love spruce beer, anent which mayhap I should start a new thread.

Liland


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Terry K
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 03:04 AM

As a quintessential Englishman, I am not afflicted by the love of all things Irish that seems to personify the average folkie, but I have recently discovered "Irish Morning" tea and it is just the most refreshing tea I have ever drunk.

It's by Jackson's of Piccadilly (which might invoke images of a quaint tea-shop in London's West End, but is probably produced in a chemical plant in Doncaster) and Tesco have it.

Cheers, Terry


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 07:54 AM

G'day Terry K,

A good strong brew of "Irish Breakfast Tea" (Twinings is very nice ... but so are a number at half the price!) is just the thing to get the 'significant other' moving these cooling mornings of (very early) Antipodean winter. English Breakfast comes in a close second ... and was favourite morning brew of Patricia's (SO's) grandmother, who lived to be Australia's person, before her death a few days short of 108!

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Terry K
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 03:33 PM

G'day Bob.

I go to Oz every year - how come I didn't bump into you, it's not a very big place is it? I guess you must be in the southern third if the mornings are cooling already!

cheers, Terry


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 02 Jun 02 - 11:36 PM

G'day Terry,

They aren't that cool by anyone else's standards ... it's Patricia - too long removed from her native Tasmania that is feeling the cold. I walk 6 km home from work, in the centre of Sydney ... and breeze into the house with shirtsleeves rolled up, shirt unbuttoned ... and hanging out of the trousers - and Patricia is sitting by the heater with 2 layers of jumpers! (OK - I do cool down rapidly when I stop walking ...)

Anyway, since I live in Sydney, so you do have 3,999,999 others to confuse with me (but not at the average folk venue). Do you get to any folk music when you make these annual Antipodean arivals? There are a fair few Sydney region 'Catters ... 6 or 7 that come to mind without straining the grey matter.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 03 Jun 02 - 02:07 AM

Lapsang Souchong, Tea Part TWO

This thread is now over 110 posts long, so it's time for a new one. I waited until I could gauge whether there was enough interest to keep going.

Please post to the new thread. I've provided a blicky there to refer back to this one.

Helen


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Subject: RE: BS: Lapsang Souchong
From: Helen
Date: 31 Dec 02 - 07:54 PM

refresh - but please post to part 2 (see blue clicky in my previous post)


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This Thread Is Closed.


Mudcat time: 4 June 1:51 PM EDT

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