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Irish Songs for female singers

M 25 Apr 00 - 11:24 AM
Gary T 25 Apr 00 - 11:28 AM
SINSULL 25 Apr 00 - 11:40 AM
Wotcha 25 Apr 00 - 11:46 AM
M 25 Apr 00 - 02:19 PM
keltcgrasshoppper 25 Apr 00 - 08:10 PM
Mbo 25 Apr 00 - 09:17 PM
GUEST,Antóin 25 Apr 00 - 09:30 PM
GUEST,Edel 25 Apr 00 - 10:29 PM
Áine 25 Apr 00 - 10:54 PM
Áine 25 Apr 00 - 10:57 PM
Malcolm Douglas 26 Apr 00 - 12:48 AM
Stewie 26 Apr 00 - 03:31 AM
GUEST,Bobby Rogerson 26 Apr 00 - 05:03 AM
GUEST,Bobby Rogerson 26 Apr 00 - 05:12 AM
Áine 26 Apr 00 - 09:33 AM
BuskerBard 26 Apr 00 - 09:53 AM
Peg 26 Apr 00 - 10:05 AM
MartinRyan 26 Apr 00 - 10:54 AM
Alice 26 Apr 00 - 12:34 PM
GUEST,Brigid in the mountains 26 Apr 00 - 03:00 PM
M 26 Apr 00 - 06:05 PM
skarpi 26 Apr 00 - 06:25 PM
vindelis 26 Apr 00 - 07:23 PM
Kara 26 Apr 00 - 07:57 PM
tremodt 26 Apr 00 - 09:09 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 26 Apr 00 - 09:48 PM
GUEST,Mulligan 26 Apr 00 - 10:05 PM
GUEST,guest, leeneia 26 Apr 00 - 10:37 PM
GUEST,Brigid in the mountains 27 Apr 00 - 08:34 AM
GUEST,Ella 27 Apr 00 - 09:36 AM
skarpi 27 Apr 00 - 07:44 PM
GUEST 27 Apr 00 - 07:50 PM
GUEST 27 Apr 00 - 07:50 PM
GUEST,Brigid in the moountains 28 Apr 00 - 06:09 PM
M 28 Apr 00 - 07:00 PM
GUEST,Brigid in the mountains 28 Apr 00 - 07:05 PM
Irish sergeant 28 Apr 00 - 09:34 PM
Susanne (skw) 30 Apr 00 - 10:00 PM
M 01 May 00 - 02:01 PM
GUEST,Aoife 01 May 00 - 03:56 PM
Kim C 01 May 00 - 04:43 PM
Irish sergeant 01 May 00 - 10:29 PM
GUEST,walrus 02 May 00 - 03:02 PM
AoifeO 03 May 00 - 01:30 PM
Alice 03 May 00 - 03:19 PM
Susan-Marie 03 May 00 - 04:37 PM
GUEST,Sue Quick/Paul Burke 03 May 00 - 06:25 PM
Susan-Marie 04 May 00 - 09:17 AM
Alice 04 May 00 - 09:59 AM
phil h 04 May 00 - 05:05 PM
GUEST,brigid in the mountains 05 May 00 - 10:13 AM
GUEST,Brigid in the mountains 05 May 00 - 10:20 AM
Alice 05 May 00 - 11:09 AM
GUEST,John Leeder in Calgary 05 May 00 - 11:19 AM
GUEST,Brigid in the mountains 05 May 00 - 12:08 PM
keltcgrasshoppper 06 May 00 - 10:21 AM
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Subject: Irish Songs for female singers
From: M
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 11:24 AM

WANTED: Irish songs for female singers.

Specifically, two singers, one an alto and the other a (low) sorpano. (I still don't believe her. I'm not a soprano, but her voice is lower.) Margaret also plays the guitar. We're looking for songs to sing at a local session (NY), that is predominately musicians--last week there were four accordians! Most of the songs sung there are typical, sing-along stuff, like "Black Velvet Band" and "Wild Irish Rover." We're looking for songs that are (possibly) traditional, older, not as well known, more stand alone type stuff. (There's a singer who does "Shoals of Herring"--what a great song!) Anybody have suggestions? Things we can get ahold of words and music for? Any and all will be much appreciated. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Gary T
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 11:28 AM

"Come by the Hills" might be a nice one.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: SINSULL
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 11:40 AM

Four Green Fields. Danny Boy More later.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Wotcha
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 11:46 AM

M,
Some suggestions:

Sally Gardens
Fields of Athenry
Quare Bungle Rye
Three Score and Ten
Gals of Dublin Town
Somewhere Along the Road (See thread with lyrics from BAZ)
Song for Ireland
Dicey Reilly

Let us know how it worked out!
Maybe we'll get our own Irish Society here in Kuwait to follow suit

Cheers,
Allahamdalla
Brian


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: M
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 02:19 PM

Thanks for the suggestions so far...

Brian--"Gals of Dublin" is not in the database, so can you give me a little more info on it? The SuperSearch is disabled so I cannot search for the thread on "Somewhere Along the Road."

Like I said, all the typical ones are already sung--Danny Boy, I'll Take You Home Kathleen, Athenry, Black Velvet Band, Sally Gardens, etc. I'm looking for slightly more "exotic" songs. Margaret knows Lowlands of Holland, Annake Gordon (sp?), and some songs by Delores Keegan (?). We really want to showcase the vocals to kinda balance things out. Thanks again.

M


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: keltcgrasshoppper
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 08:10 PM

Dirty old town!!!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Mbo
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 09:17 PM

Oooh I was just going to suggest Anachie Gordon...I love that song. Try some of these:
I Live Not Where I Love--Mary Black

Clohinne Winds--Niamh Parsons (and the Loose Connections)
Shades of Gloria--Maura O'Connell
Paddy's Lamentation (By The Hush)--Mary Black
Shamrock Shore--Karan Casey
The Stolem Child--Loreena McKennitt
I Know My Love--The Corrs & Chieftains
The World Turned Upside Down--Karan Casey
Bright Blue Rose--Mary Black
The Tinkerman's Daughter--Niamh Parsons

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Antóin
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 09:30 PM

I'm sorry if I'm coming in on a very negative thread; I'm reacting to the responses more than to your original query. This appears to be more an Irish-American song circle than native Irish, not that I would wish to create any artificial distinctions. "The Shoals of Herring" is, as you say, a great song, however it is not Irish, it is about the traditional English herring fishing industry. "Three Score and Ten", another lovely song mentioned, is again a song about an English fishing disaster. "Dirty old Town" is a song about a run down English industrial city. It has powerful imagery which could apply to a similar situation In Ireland or the U.S.A., however it is not an Irish song. "Danny Boy" has been adopted as the quintessential Irish song by people of Irish descent but as has been discussed in detail in previous correspondence on this forum, the lyrics were written by an Englishman. Some of the above songs were popularised by the "Clancy Brothers" and so people have come to think of them as being typically Irish songs. You mention the "Wild Irish Rover"; I don't know any song of that name, but if you mean the "Wild Rover" please don't sing that song if you come to Ireland as the only place you'll here it is in tourist traps. I cannot be objective about that song, I don't know if it's Irish or not but it's definately the number one in the top ten of the more tacky side of the Irish tourist "industry". You mentioned Delores Keegen, I think that should be Dolores Keane; she is a terrific singer and has some really beautiful songs on her many recordings. Try and source some out. I apologise if I'm not more constructive in my suggestions, there is a huge selection of really strong Irish songs to select from but they are not to be found in the compilation albums "Favourite Irish Songs" etc. found in the tourist shops.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Edel
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 10:29 PM

By that standard any song not in Gaelic(Irish) is not really Irish. Give it up. The Irish musical tradition is very inclusive.

How about:

I'll tell my Ma Star of the County Down The Lakes of Ponchetrain (Ok so it's not irish- shoot me) The Water is Wide The Briar and The Rose (Tom Waits but sounds very Irish)

The book "Rise up Singing" Edited by Peter Blood and Annie Patterson has most of these songs. It's a great reference that includes many traditions.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Áine
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 10:54 PM

Dear M,

Sounds like what you're looking for are English translations of songs originally written in Irish. Here are a few suggestions:

The Dawning of the Day
The Snowy Breasted Pearl
Mairín de Barra
The Brink of the White Rock
Have You Been to Carrick?
The Coolin
My Fair-Haired Girl

And here are some other suggestions:

Sorry The Day That I Was Married
The Wee Article
Still I Love Him
The Bantry Girl's Lament
When I Was A Fair Maid
Biddy Mulligan
The High Hills of Derry

As for "exotic" songs -- I really don't know where you're going with that. As for "showcasing the vocals", your voices are going to have to do that for you, not the song. Singing acapella would be 'showcasing' yourselves, surely. My advice is to pick some good material, put it in a proper (and comfortable) key for the two of you, then practice, practice, practice. Even if you pick an often heard song, a well formed, arranged and practiced performance will do you in good stead.

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Áine
Date: 25 Apr 00 - 10:57 PM

And Edel,

You said . . . any song not in Gaelic(Irish) is not really Irish in your post above. I know plenty of people who would say that very thing -- and they'd say it in Irish.

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 12:48 AM

"We're looking for songs that are (possibly) traditional, older, not as well known, more stand alone type stuff."

That's what M originally asked for.  Nearly everybody who has since replied has made well-meant assumptions about what she was asking for, without actually paying much attention to her question; mostly they have suggested songs which are over-familiar from popular recordings by Irish performers, a good few of which are either English or Scottish songs (borrowed and sometimes not acknowledged) or American "fake Irish" commercial products.  Antóin made that point, and got an immediate, and entirely unjustified, put-down from Edel.  Áine's suggestions are, as ever, intelligent and well-informed, though obviously I'd disagree with the apparant suggestion that songs in the English language are not really Irish songs unless translated from Gaelic originals, as would a good many respected Irish traditional singers.  To Áine's recommendations I might just tentatively add, as possibilities among many others, Ned of the Hill, The Green Fields of America and As I Roved Out; all easily found on the DT, and, while relatively well-known, nevertheless of a shape which would permit interesting interpretation in the format M describes.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Stewie
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 03:31 AM

'Donal Og'.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Bobby Rogerson
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 05:03 AM

Some argy-bargy about what constitutes an "Irish" song!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Bobby Rogerson
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 05:12 AM

A gremlin stepped in and posted the above incomplete script--- Most of those objecting to the description of some mentioned songs as "Irish" were correct in their statements, but maybe just a wee bit over-fussy ?;-) Good music is good music, and the Irish folk artistes tend to take it to their hearts no matter where it hails from. [For the record---I can't resist my own wee dig---the "Londonderry Air" has its origins in Perthshire, Scotland; and the lyrics of "Come by the Hills"are from the pen of a Scottish employee of Scottish Television----]

Many good suggestions are put forward---how about "Step it out Mary", or "the Lambs on the Green Hills"


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Áine
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 09:33 AM

I really didn't mean to start any 'argy-bargy' -- I don't mind listening to songs sung in English by Irish performers. Heck, I listen to Luka Bloom, fer chrissakes! Some of my favorite Irish authors write in English, too. So, I'm not really as "hard core" as my comment above would suggest.

However, I do like singers who, if they're going to be performing works from a tradition not their own, at least have enough respect for that tradition to do their homework and find out a bit about it first. Everyone's heard that old saying, "Write what you know" -- Well, I'm just one of those folks who say, "Sing what you know".

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: BuskerBard
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 09:53 AM

"Red Is the Rose" is one of my all-time favorites...


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Peg
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 10:05 AM

well I don't know how these women are learning these songs but if you are anything like me a few good recordings are very helpful...it is hard to learn a melody from some of the the books out there. I would like to recommend some of the singers whose work I have learned a lot from, whether I sing something in their arrangement, or get the basic song from them and use another version of lyrics or slightly different melody I have heard elsewhere, etc. My specialty seems to be doing sad, obscure ballads a cappella, so hopefully this will be useful since that sounds like what you are looking for...

Mairead ni Dhomnail (No Dowry, or Traveller's Prayer where she sings with The Voice Squad)
June Tabor (Airs) Child Ballads (often you get several versions right in a row! Not often the most lyrical singing but lots of good sean nos style)
Karan Casey (with Solas or without)
Capercaille (Karen Matheson sings lots of Scots Gaelic songs)
Triona ni Dhomnail (sings with the Donal Lunny Band now, I think)
Loreena McKennitt (early stuff is more traditional, has nice harp accompaniment)
Altan
Anam
Niamh Parsons

hope this helps...

peg


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 10:54 AM

Peg

That's a few good suggestions alright!

M

Listen to a few of the great female interpreters of the general kind of songs you think you might like to try. (The O'Domhnaill sisters sing a lot together and might provide some useful ideas for harmony)Apply your own standards of taste and risk-taking to them - don't be afraid to challenge your audience now and then. Slowly build up a repertoire that allows you to pick a suitable song for varying circumstances. Yes, you need a couple of easy-listening songs for when you're expected to sing even though you know the audience aren't likely to pay much attention to something more demanding. After a while, you can sneak 'em up on them!

Try that and I suspect Antóin's worst fears will never happen!

Regards

p.s. Even the dreaded "Wild Rover" has its charms if you use one of the earlier, quieter, rather rueful English versions!

p.p.s. You might also try a capella unison - there's a tradition of it in Irish singing and it can soouind beautiful.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Alice
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 12:34 PM

M, If you want to sing traditionally, do it solo a capella. Each of you learn a song or songs in your own range, then if you want to join in, do it on the chorus, as in Red Is The Rose. Get Joe Heaney's tapes to hear how the sean nós style sounds. If you want to hear a good female Irish singer that is not over-played in the US, get Mary O'Hara's recordings. More suggested titles, Jackets Green, Kitty of Coleraine, Carraig Donn. All have been discussed in the forum even if they are not in the DT. American audiences are not used to hearing solo a capella singing, but if you want to be more traditional, I'd say learn to perform that way, even if it is in English.

Alice Flynn in Montana


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Brigid in the mountains
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 03:00 PM

Good on you!!!!!!! myself and an amazingly voiced Swiss girlfriend sing in a little band and it is great craic! i am always on the look out for new material too. One that we do (very well too) I deep and she High, is a song called Johnny lovely Johnny.Dolores Keane is the inspirational voice behind our version. Another one is Raglan Road as sung by Sinead O'connor. I can gladly give you the words and if you give me about a week i will write out the score music for you.!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: M
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 06:05 PM

Whew!! That's alot. Thank you everyone for the help and suggestions.

Malcolm, you had it right. And I guess I should hve been even MORE clear; we are not singing in Irish. This is a REALLY small, local session. All the attendees (audience and musicians) are Irish-American, if that. Only a couple really old men, who rarely show up, sing in the sean nos style. Most people are not concerned with authenticity. The audience pays attention to almost every song, but this is NOT a concert--no one is mic'd, no one is a star, quite a few are beginners. It's real loose. What my friend and I would like to do is inject a bit of the opposite--a little authenticity, a little more emphasis on the vocals, a little estrogen (whatever that means). Just a teensy bit more earnest. English songs are fine, as long as they aren't announced as such. So are Scottish songs. Singing a capella only works if you WARN the musicians NOT to play along--it's only been done once, when I sang Foggy Dew last week, but it dampens the mood. My friend accompanies herself on guitar, but she has a beautiful and different style than the other players. I guess what I'm saying is that there are few rules at this session.

Yes, Peg and Martin, we ideally want to learn from recordings, but you only know what you know. That was the impetus for the orignal query. Ainé, I certainly respect the tradition. If it seems otherwise, because of my inaccuracies, it's just that my brain is a sieve. My friend Margaret is the musician, and the archiver of all the stuff, not me. Believe me, we do our homework. Brigid, sure, send on the words!

Thanks again everybody.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: skarpi
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 06:25 PM

Hallo all , How about - Mhairi´s wedding - Song for the Mira - Mo Ghile Mear - When I was a Fair maid- The wee lass on the Brae - Rose of Allendale.

I have many more songs, there are so many more songs for womans voice.

Well thats all for now, hope you can use some of this All the best skarpi Iceland.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: vindelis
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 07:23 PM

Just a few more to add: Raglan Road. Blackwater side. I'll tell me ma. Tai wathy? (not sure about the spelling - what I have given is phonetic, and it is a whaling song, it is a beautiful song to sing anyway).


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Kara
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 07:57 PM

Do you love an apple. is a lovely song to sing. Irish ways ans Irish laws. can be made into a good round with a bit of worK


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: tremodt
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 09:09 PM

Teddy O Neil


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 09:48 PM

Skarpi, Mairi's Wedding is Scottish, Song for the Mira is Cape Breton. So, unfortunately the way I understand the original question they don't fit.

One question, Lament of the Irish Emigrant was written by a woman, but is from the point of view of the man, and I've only ever heard it sung by women. Does anyone know of a recording where a man sings it?

Another song which is popular among women singers is Kilkelly, Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Mulligan
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 10:05 PM

I think that Antoine made a rather good point. I don't see anywhere in there where he suggested that only songs written in native Irish should be considered "Irish Songs." That was a leap of illogic that someone else made later.

It is this sort of thing that muddies up the historical record. I can't tell you how many times I have seen "Amazing Grace" listed as "Celtic." (It is of course a an American song set to the Virginian tune "Loving Lambs.")



For the record: "Water Is Wide" is also American, set to the tune "Waly,Waly." It is one of my favorite songs.
I am kind of partial to "Biddy Mulligan" too.

Mulligan


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,guest, leeneia
Date: 26 Apr 00 - 10:37 PM

See if you can find an old Triona Ni Dhomnail (sp?) album named "Triona." It has a wonderful duet on it called "The Wee Lass on the Brae." It's different.

Also, good old "Molly Malone" is a good song. It feels so good in the mouth. Look for the version in O'Neill's Music of Ireland, which has an interesting variation in the refrain. In Ireland, they sing "she died of a fever, and none could relieve her," which gets rid of the awkward fever/save her rhyme we have here. ("Fever" used to be pronounced "faver.")

As for the remark that a song isn't Irish unless it's in Gaelic, I say the heck with that kind of factionalism. The Irish have a done great things with the English tongue, and no one should take that achievement away from them.


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHNNY LOVELY JOHNNY^^
From: GUEST,Brigid in the mountains
Date: 27 Apr 00 - 08:34 AM

RAGLAN ROAD^^^

On Raglan Road, on an Autumn day, i saw her first and knew
That her dark hair would weave a snare, that I might on day rue
I saw the danger, yet i passed, along the enchanted way
And i said let grief be a fallen leaf, at the dawning of the day.

On Grafton Street in November, we tripped lightly along the ledge
Of a deep ravine where can be seen, the worth of passions pledge
The queen of hearts still making tarts, and I'm not making hay
For I've loved too much and by such, by such, is happiness blown away.

I gave her gifts of the mind, I gave her the secret sign that's known
To the artists who have known the truth, the Gods of sound and stone
A nd word and tint, I did not stint I gave her poems to say
With her own name there, and long black hair llike clouds over fields in may.

On a quiet street where old ghosts meet, I see her walking now
Away from me, so hurriedly, my reason must allow
That I had wooed not as I should, a creature made of clay
When the angel wooes the clay, he'll lose his wings at the dawn of day.

JOHNNY LOVELY JOHNNY^^

The high walls of Derry look so dismal and grey
And so does lovely johnny he is now going away
He is going to bonny Scothland some sweetheart to see
May the high powers above send him safe home to me.

Oh Johnny lovely Johnny, do you mind the day
When you came to my window to steal me away
You promised you would marry me up above female kind
Oh Johnny lovely Johnny what has altered your mind.

Oh Annie lovely Annie it was all but in jest
For I never intended to make you my best
I never intended to make you my wife
Oh Annie lovley Annie all the days of my life.

The first time I met you tis well I do own
?twas in my fathers garden in the county Tyrone
with my white apron round us, to shield out the wind
oh Johnny lovely Johnny what has altered your mind.

A bunch of blue ribbons I will tie up and wear
And a wreath of forget-me -nots I will twine round my hair
And if ever he returns again, I will greet him with joy
And I will kiss the lips of my own Johnny boy

Hi there M. hope you get some use out of these songs. As I said if you give me some time I could get round to sending you the music score. Raglan Road we did in D, and Johnny we did in F, with the seconds doing high. Enjoy.......Brigid


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Ella
Date: 27 Apr 00 - 09:36 AM

I sing A Stor Mo Chroi which is a nice song to sing on your own without any backing as the lyrics are quiet thoughtful. About someone left in Ireland as their friends and family have left to seek their fortune in far off lands, and the person is lamenting and singing for them to come back. Roughly translated it means oh love of my heart. (very roughly)

Or Shule Aroon

Or: Welcoming Paddy Home

Or: Peggy Gordon

or: Sam Hall

Or: The Rare Old times

and there's loads you could list on and on. It just takes hearing one you like personally to want to sing it. You have to like the song yourself to want to sing it well.

Regards

Ella


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: skarpi
Date: 27 Apr 00 - 07:44 PM

Hall all, George I know about that one is Scottish and the other is from Cape Breton, but Song for the Mira is still the most greatest song I ever heard , the woman In the Highland Heights Norma McDonald sing this song so great her voice fits for this song. George I might meat you in Oktober in Novia Scotia. All the best skarpi Iceland.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Apr 00 - 07:50 PM

she moves through thr fair is a very nice song


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST
Date: 27 Apr 00 - 07:50 PM

She moves through the fair is a very nice song


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Brigid in the moountains
Date: 28 Apr 00 - 06:09 PM

to Skarpi could you possibly write upthe lyrics of that special song.I like the title, maybe you could figure outthe score music too??(song for the MirA) What is it about anyway? Brigid


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: M
Date: 28 Apr 00 - 07:00 PM

Brigid, thanks a ton!! Margaret was asking about Johnny Lovely Johnny. The music, when you get a chance, would be greatly appreciated, too.

Thanks, Skarpi. Yes, Scottish and Cape Breton songs are fine with us. Ella, this wonderful singer forn Galway, Ray, sings Peggy Gordon and The Rare Old Times, He's amazing!! This is what we aspire to. Thanks for the other songs.

Sorry, we won't do Kilkelly, Ireland--Margaret says she could not get through it without crying. Beautiful song.

Again, thanks EVERYBODY for all the great suggestions! Time for us to get to work.

M


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Brigid in the mountains
Date: 28 Apr 00 - 07:05 PM

Hi M, maybe you could zapp me the song "Kilkelly". Never heard of it, but if it is oone that makes one cry, it can't be too bad!!!! Will send you the music shortly.Brigid


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 28 Apr 00 - 09:34 PM

Dear ladies: You have so many good selections and suggestions already! Allow me to offer a few that in my humble opinion will do nicely. The Bonny Light Horseman (Delores Keane & John Faulkner) Johnny has Gone for a Soldier (Various) Cragie Hills (Keane & Faulkner again) Willie McBride (June Tabor) Susannah Martin (Triona Ni Donmhail with Relativity) The Highwayman (Loreena McKennitt) O.K., Susannah MArtin is written about the salem Witchcraft trials and technically isn't an Irish song. Still, it's a great song well suites for a woman's voice or as a duet and it tells a graet story. Best of luck and knock 'em dead, Neil


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 30 Apr 00 - 10:00 PM

Proposal and Acceptance!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: M
Date: 01 May 00 - 02:01 PM

Brigid, check out the DigiTrad (you can access it at the top of the page)--the lyrics to "Kilkelly" are there. In my limited experience, I've only heard the rendition on "Music at Matt Molloy's," which is stark and beautiful. Also, Margaret is quite curious about your harmony to Johnny Lovely Johnny, so if its not too much, can you please send that along? Thanks.

Neil, you must have read our minds--Margaret learned Bonny Light Horseman last month and is teaching me a harmony. I suggested Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier to her, and just yesterday she commented that she didn't think she could do Willie McBride 'cause it was too emotional. Some people at the session just plow right through that and Waltzing Matilda without batting an eye. Thanks for the sugestions.

M


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Aoife
Date: 01 May 00 - 03:56 PM

There is a wonderful young singer called Kate Rusby who recorded an album in 1995 with Kathryn Roberts. All of these songs save two are traditional for two part voices, some a cappella, some with guitar. Donal Og is another wonderful song, although not on this album. Or "My johnny was a shoemaker," in a quick lively arrangement for 2 part voices- good luck


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Kim C
Date: 01 May 00 - 04:43 PM

Siul a Run - we usually do it with the verses in English and the chorusin Gaelic.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 01 May 00 - 10:29 PM

Ladies: Glad I could help. The Bonny Light Horseman is one of my favorietes. (I'm trying to learn to play it on guitar) I sing Johnny has Gone for a Soldier at Civil War reenactments and everyone seems to like it. AGain best of luck, Neil


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,walrus
Date: 02 May 00 - 03:02 PM

Two that I didn't see mentioned which may be of use:

"Hand me down my petticoat" - not old, Boer War vintage (although which Boer War?) or one of the Versions of "Plains of Waterloo" (the "Come all you loyal lovers...." one).

Good luck.

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: AoifeO
Date: 03 May 00 - 01:30 PM

The Plains of waterloo is on the kate Rusby album- everyone should get it!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Alice
Date: 03 May 00 - 03:19 PM

I posted more songs to this thread yesterday, but my message got lost in cyberspace. Just have a minute to write, so here's a suggestion. Type @Irish in the DT search box, then look at the many that come up - choose some new ones to learn that have lyrics appealing to you. Also, around St. Patrick's Day, many of us posted lists of songs we would be singing. Lots of choices there.

Alice


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 03 May 00 - 04:37 PM

For two women, a version of the Two Sisters can be fun if you re-write it to end with the sisters pushing the young man in the water. Let Him Go, Let Him Tarry is also fun.

Since you said Scots was OK, how about Culloden's Harvest. The tune is in the DT midi book. It's a beautiful tune and a heartbreaking story - maybe good for later on in the session when people are getting melancholy!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Sue Quick/Paul Burke
Date: 03 May 00 - 06:25 PM

What was that Oisin song?

As I come down the market place What d'you think I seen But a fine young piper laddie Come linkin over the green

singin hey daughter, ho daughter doorum doorum day...

Can't remember the rest, can't find it on Digitrad.

Sing in harmony, should sound stunning.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LOVE AND FREEDOM^^
From: Susan-Marie
Date: 04 May 00 - 09:17 AM

Posted by Ewan McVicar in another thread:

HEY DONAL', HO DONAL'
By Mary Brooksbank

As I cam by Strathmartine Mains
What dae ye think I see
But a braw young piper laddie come
A linkin' ower the green

Singin' Hey Donal', Ho Donal'
Dirrum a doo a day

He played a reel, an' he played a jig
An' he played a sweet strathspey
He roosed ma hairt till its beat kept time
Tae the tappin' o' my tae

Oh I've nae gowd tae offer ye
For I've gaithered little gear
But we'll hae love an' freedom
Gin ye'll follow me my dear

There's gowd in the broom o' the Sidlaw Hills
Honey frae the heather sweet
There's a speckled trout in the purlin' tarn
A velvet carpet neath oor feet

Syne he blew up his chanter
An' sic a spring he plays
That I chose love an' freedom
Now I wander a' my days

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 2-Sep-02.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Alice
Date: 04 May 00 - 09:59 AM

The Magpie's Nest

The Fanaid Grove

The Gartan Mother's Lullaby

For Scottish songs, Tam Glen
Charlie Is My Darling
Country Lassie (these three are Burns).

Alice Flynn


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: phil h
Date: 04 May 00 - 05:05 PM

You might also try listening to the CD 'Adieu to lovely garrison'by Rosie Stewart from Fermanagh for some excellent unaccompanied female vocals of traditional material (in English). Phil


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,brigid in the mountains
Date: 05 May 00 - 10:13 AM

can someone please tell me how I can post a music score onto this page from Cakewalk


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Brigid in the mountains
Date: 05 May 00 - 10:20 AM

Dear M. I have done my best and not for the life of me can I find anything to do with Kilkelly in the the Digitrad bit!!!! help!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Alice
Date: 05 May 00 - 11:09 AM

Brigid, click here - KILKELLY


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,John Leeder in Calgary
Date: 05 May 00 - 11:19 AM

Just yesterday I picked up a nice compilation CD of Celtic songs sung by female singers, from Shanachie Records. Some are in Gaelic, most in English. It might be a good starting point for branching out into other areas. It would also give you an overview of singers, and you could choose ones whose work you'd like to investigate further. (I'm sending message this from work, and the CD is at home, and I'm afraid I don't actually remember the title.)

When I say "Celtic", I don't mean "Gaelic", but that much-abused term "Celtic" which includes Irish and Scottish traditional songs, plus modern songs and songs from other traditions (especially English and American) which have been adopted by people who like the Irish and Scottish songs.

At the risk of throwing a dash of cold water on the discussion, I'm afraid there are lots of bandwagon-jumpers out there (especially in North America) who think of themselves as "Celtic" singers who in fact have never heard traditional Celtic music and wouldn't like it if they heard it. I hope the women who intitiated this discussion don't fall into that category. But the fact that they're not familiar with so many of the very well-known songs that have been suggested gives an impression that they're pretty new to the genre. I say, hang onto your enthusiasm, but keep aware of where you're coming from.

And I say, yes, sing what you like, and sing it the way you like, but don't represent yourselves as "Celtic" singers unless you're really stuck into that tradition. Meanwhile, listen to lots of the music to see what it's like on its home ground -- maybe you'll become "Celtic" singers after all.

If I'm wrong about you, forgive me; but I think these comments still apply to the generality.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Brigid in the mountains
Date: 05 May 00 - 12:08 PM

Thanks alice, do you happen to know the air too? Can you send me the notation?


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: keltcgrasshoppper
Date: 06 May 00 - 10:21 AM

I know that its not a "TRADITIONAL" Irish song.. But I just love the Nancy Griffith tune.. " trouble in the fields".. It reminds me of the famine.. as well as the dustbowl in our country...KGH


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,AStar15@hotmail.com
Date: 06 May 00 - 01:29 PM

Hey, I'm looking for a specific song. I am not sure of the name but here are some of the words. Maybe somone here know it.

Oh Wild wind won't you blow, and carry me to my love, no not where it goes, I'll spread my wings, on your windy back I'll ride, oh wild wind, won't you blow.

those are just some of the words. Its a really pretty song and I am wanting to sing it for my junior night next year. So if anyone has any information on this song, please let me know. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Amergin
Date: 06 May 00 - 05:42 PM

Vindelis, that would be Farewell to Tarwathie. Has Sailor Boy been mentioned?

Amergin


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Mikey joe
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 08:04 AM

bantry girls lament


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,iains
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 07:53 PM

Dublin in my tears the voyage Connemara cradle song Ride on


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 05:10 PM

You were asking for seldom-sung old songs. Assuming you're not talking about the sean-nós tradition, what about songs seldom sung nowadays like two Wexford favourites, Come to the Bower and The Streams of Bunclody? I'm sure someone will have the words.

Songs that are always sung at any Irish séisiún are The Parting Glass (which is usually the finisher), Éamonn an Chnuic, I Know My Love, I Know Where I'm Going, If My Love Leaves Me...oh, it goes on and on. Email me at jt.thompson.source@indigo.ie (but take out the .source, it's just an anti-bots device) and I'll find you the words.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: celticblues5
Date: 03 Aug 00 - 12:44 PM

The song that the two Sues refer to is also called "Love & Freedom" by some. I thought it was "hey, daughter, ho, daughter too!" ;-) Ah, Mondegreens!

The one verse I've also heard as -

I have naught to offer you/this young man said to me/but you'll gain love & freedom/if you'll come away with me

small variations, but avoids the ookiness of "my dear," (which I don't like except in parody - just a personal thing).

I *think* that 'Farewell to Tarwathie' is in the Judy Collins songbook.

Connie Dover of Scartaglen does a beautiful song called "Somebody" which technically doesn't come under this heading because it is a Jacobite lyric, but I think it could be lovely if harmnonized.

Another haunting song, though composed & not traditional (though becoming somewhat so) is 'There Were Roses.'


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Magpie
Date: 12 May 03 - 03:59 PM

I always wonder about the chorus:

"Dirrum a doo a day" - does it mean something in Gaelic?

or "dire ma do a day"
or "doir e ma du a de"
...
whatever...


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: PoppaGator
Date: 12 May 03 - 06:22 PM

celticblues5's mention of Judy Collins jogged my memory a bit; one of her late-60s albums included a sung rendition of the W.B. Yeats poem "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" (or, at least, an excerpt therefrom). I think the song may have been titled "Golden Apples of the Sun."

It's certainly not traditional, and probably not even folk music but rather "art song." While English rather than Irish/Gaelic, the words are from an undeniably Irish lyricist, unless you're so hard-assed as to exclude the Anglo-Irish. Yeats may have been born into the Ascendancy, but he was certainly a great moving force in the Irish cultural revolution of the 1880s, a necessary percursor to political independence. No one can claim to love Ireland more than did William Butler Yeats.

The melody's origins are probably inauthentic in some sense, but quite lovely. The guitar part alone is beautiful enough, even without the poetry. I would think that a performance of this piece would be entirely appropriate for an Irish-American meeting of New Yorkers. (That is, it's a good bit more authentic, and more aesthetically pleasing, than "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling.")

I wish I could be there to hear you ladies, whatever you decide to sing.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Keith A o Hertford
Date: 13 May 03 - 03:08 AM

The Bantry Girl's Lament is lovely and little heard.
Keith.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Mac Tattie
Date: 13 May 03 - 05:48 PM

Guest Magpie, the Dirrum a doo in "Dirrum a doo a day" is a simple vocal attempt at recreating the sound of the bagpipes. There is, however, a more complex song "language" used amoung pipers to learn and rember pipe tunes known as Canntaireachd (canter-ach-t). There have been verry fiew songs sugested here that I would recomend and many to avoid. I would recomend that the singers looking for songs should listen to as much material from as many sources as possible and let the songs find them. The 5000 or so in the didgital tradition are only a fiew amoung many.
               Cheers


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: winniemih
Date: 14 May 03 - 09:16 AM

I would like to recommend several songs by a somewhat obscure female group from the Washington D.C. area, Connemara. I don't know if they're still together, but have several of their C.D.s from a few years back.   They do a mix of instrumentals and vocals; good arrangements and harmonies. I particularly like their vocal of The Scholar, which takes its melody from the traditional tune, slows it down a little and gives the tune a nice spin with the somewhat contemporary words. I think this one would fit well into a session such as you have described.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Alice
Date: 14 May 03 - 11:02 AM

New link for

The Gartan Mother's Lullaby.


Alice


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,caraiosa
Date: 29 Oct 03 - 06:40 AM


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,C
Date: 29 Oct 03 - 07:24 AM

I've read through the majority of this thread, and to be honest all I've heard is a lot of song names repeated and repeated one that springs to mind and i don't mean to critisise this song in any way but raglan Road:It's a song for a male performer! it was written by a man! also included is Kilkelly Ireland while it has beautiful lyrics narrates the letters a father writes to his son.I no these are just technicalities but they matter. i stumbled onto this site looking for a different song to sing for a competion that is held here in Ireland called scor and when i saw the heading Irish songs for female singers i thought well this is graet i'll have found a song in no time.i'm replying to a thread that was started over three years ago and well i'm sorry to say that i haven't found anything out of the ordinary.if you want to truly perform an irish song to the best of your ability you must first find a song that suits your voice and that you believe in this is different for everybody, for example when i'm asked to sing my father always asks me to sing "only a river runs free" but for some reason i was never comfortable singing it until about two weeks ago when i heard a version of it playing in my dads car i guess something just made sense a song sang in a different way than your used to can be quite powerfull. I'm only 15 years old and i won't pretend i know every thing there is to know about it but i've been singing since as long as i can remember i think my first song that i claimed to be my own was "nobody's child!"If you want to hear a really good irish singer the one name that springs to mind would have to be Sinead O' Conner although some of her compositions are are quite new her version of "she move through the fair"( featured on the michael collins film)is abslootly fantastic plus "scorn not his simplicity" even though is was written by Phil Coulter these two names are probably the greatest song writers/performers ireland has produced well in the last while anyway.
I've nothing much else to say except i hope someone finds some use in all of this!


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Diana
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 03:41 AM

You can find two more Yeats poems set to music and an 8-piece set of Irish folk songs at www.valkyriepub.com. The songs are arranged for the harp but most of them include guitar chords as well, and the set includes She moved Thro' the Fair, Must I Go Bound, Oro, 'sE Do Bheatha Abhaile (sorry, I can't make the sine fada in this text box), Oro Mo Bhaidin, Eamon an Chnoic, Baidin Fheidhlimidh, The Castle of Dromore, and Caoineadh na dTri Muire.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,eileen
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 06:22 AM

"Golden Apples of The Sun" is actually a poem by Yeats called "The Tale of Wandering Angus". Karen Casey (sp?) does a great version of this on one of her albums...


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Guest, Anne
Date: 24 Mar 04 - 02:50 PM

Hi,
There are some great American - Irish songs, quite recent,
that you could try. From Tom Russell's album The Man From God Knows Where : "When Irish Girls Grow Up" and "Mary Clare Malloy", and both are sung on this album by guest artist Dolores Keane.
Also The Mollies number   " On We Go" - it's a catchy bouncy tune, even if the topic is a bit violent - old woman drowns her pain of a husband on the way home from the pub.
Steve Earle's "Galway Girl" is a favourite American-Irish number at our folk club when we sing bouncy numbers.
Another tune you might like is "Step It Out Mary." - Irish tune, 1955.
None of these numbers are for delicate voices, they are more robust tunes.
Anne


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Apr 04 - 05:57 PM

translate Mary Black's "Prayer for Love"
V krayu dalyokum, chuzhie ne nuzhny.

O tyubvi malyum otchayanno        Say it on your knees,


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: matai
Date: 24 Apr 04 - 11:06 PM

This may have been mentioned but Sinead O'Connor's version of 'Peggy Gordon' is hard to beat and what's the problem with a new take on a well known song?
If you want something more up to date check out the songs of Jimmy McCarthy. They are many and wonderful.

Matai


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Diana
Date: 22 Sep 04 - 03:05 PM

"O Light of the Morning" (A Sholais na Maidine) is a Christian song with the first verse in Irish (Gaelic) and 5 verses in English, for two female voices, an alto and a low soprano. It can be found at www.valkyriepub.com. Valkyrie Publications also has two more Irish traditional songs now, "Be Thou My Vision" and "The Gartan Mother's Lullaby." Beautiful, quite easy harp arrangements of both, which could also be played on the piano, and chords for guitar. (See my earlier post about Irish traditional and W.B. Yeats songs on this website.)


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,songsmith
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 10:29 AM

May Morning Dew
The Banks of the Lee
The Plains of Waterloo

cheers   songsmith


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 11:11 AM

You could try both these..whichever is most use.
http://www.cs.hut.fi/~zaphod/irish/
http://www.cs.hut.fi/~zaphod/irish/all_titles.html
Just copy and paste into your address bar an away you go! Best wishes.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Kathleen Egan
Date: 02 Dec 04 - 07:31 AM

I am looking for an English translation of a song called "Kousket" that is sung by Triona and Mairead Ni Domnhaill (spelling?). The song is on the Celtic Christmas VI silver anniversary CD. Thanks for any help.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Kaleea
Date: 03 Dec 04 - 03:35 AM

Dark Haired Jimmy Owen is one of my favs. & what about the Connemarra Cradle Song? I just did that on my latest harp CD.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Kathy Egan
Date: 23 Dec 04 - 03:28 PM

Does anyone know where to find the English lyrics to "Kousket," from the Celtic Christmas Silver Anniversary CD? It is performed by Maighread and Triona Ni Domnhaill. Also, are there any lyrics for "On a Winter's Day" sung by Karan Casey? Thanks for any help and Merry Christmas.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Jan 05 - 05:32 AM

you often write stuff about score music..........
where do I get these files on the internet?
I'm looking e.g desperately for sheet/score music for step it out mary and read something here in the forum . but I couldn't find the sheet/score music

please help me


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Com Seangan
Date: 21 Jan 05 - 11:22 AM

For female singers - that's what the lady wants. Some of the fine songs mentioned like " Mo Ghile Mear" are a bit macho. But a real, real strong and moving song for the female voice is "Dónal Óg". The strongest love song that I know in any language. I think there is an English translation but I don't have it.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Com Seangan
Date: 21 Jan 05 - 11:38 AM

That was Donal Og - the accents don't come out when I submit.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 21 Jan 05 - 04:58 PM

Do you love an Apple?- The Bothy Band (Triona Ni Domhnaill(sp)


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Irish Girl
Date: 26 Jun 09 - 03:38 PM

Down by the sally gardens
As she moves through the fair
The Swallow
All good sean nos songs


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE AUGHAGALLON ROAD (J Creaney)
From: ard mhacha
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 01:18 PM

A lovely little ditty from Aidan Crossey`s paythereckoning Site, written by the late Jimmy Creaney from Lurgan Co Armagh,


THE AUGHAGALLON ROAD

One evening as I strolled down the Aghagallon Road
I met a girl whose name was Jane Falloon
Well we had a pleasant talk and she asked me for a walk
By the bright silvery light of the moon

How I cursed my bloody lot as I cuddled this oul' bat
For my ass it turned a lovely shade of blue
As I lay in the dust and the dirt nothing on but a wee short shirt
By the bright silvery light of the moon

Now she was no beauty queen for her teeth were turning green
She had a pimple on her nose like a big balloon
And by her breath 'twas plain to see she had scallions for her tea
By the bright silvery light of the moon

Oh says she I've got no charm but I own a nice wee farm
And you could be its owner very soon
Now if only you'll decide to make me your sweet bride
By the bright silvery light of the moon

Oh says I my darling Jane you make this plea in vain
And although that I make look a silly loon
I'd rather die a pauper's death than catch the smell of your oul' breath
By the bright silvery light of the moon'


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: ard mhacha
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 05:57 AM

Alternatively go to You Tube and be spoiled for choice by visiting, clarebannerman, machree01, or lorgain2, all of these Sites contain all you need and more.


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 06:41 AM

Flower of Magherally


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 12:40 PM

I am not sure where this song comes from..Canada??? Ireland??

Anyway, Lost Jimmy WHalen...beautiful tune..Whalen is an Irish name (my ggmother was Bridget Whalen). mg


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: smpc
Date: 06 Sep 09 - 02:13 PM

emmmmmmmmmmmmm . . . . . . . . . . . . . .there are a good few songs that don't actually declare what gender is meant to sing it ! ! ! !i.e. p stands for paddy down by blackwaterside theres a dear little isle erin gradh mo chroi . . . . . .do i need to continue? ? ?however i do have songs for female singers too i.e. johnny lovely johnny o reilly the fisherman low low lands of holland. . . . .thats presently all i can think of anyway its not the song its how you sing it! !! ! !! !


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity
Date: 07 Sep 09 - 03:51 AM

I suppose, if is an Irish, or Celtic song, written by an Celtic composer, and sung by a female Celtic singer, about an Irish lass, who is staying behind, in Ireland, while her love goes and makes a way for her, in the new world, well, I guess that qualifies it as an Irish tune..right? It may not be older, but certainly deals with everything that classic songs are made of..right???

Try this one, sung by Lisa Kelly....and you musicians, who write, should love this one!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EemvDk4Kmw


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Mar 10 - 04:22 AM

I agree that Donal Og is a beautiful song. If you want a version of it I actually recorded it on my CD 'A moment in time" which can be heard on itunes.
KATE DELANEY


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,Cassie Boyle
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 06:08 PM

Well it all depends on how rebellious you want to be and how many people you want to get on the wrong side of because there are some excellent Irish rebel songs such as Come out you Black & Tans and The Easter Rising. I think maybe something by Cara Dillon like Garden Valley, There were Roses or Cragie Hill would be good and if you seriously want to touch a nerve there's a song by an American artist that the people of Ulster have sort of adopted and that's Broken Things.

If you are in the mood log in to you tube and search for TheGhostofCasper you should find a few good/unusual Irish folk songs on there

Slainte

cass


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: KatyBob
Date: 30 Jul 12 - 08:57 PM

So I came to this thread, foolish mortal what I am, hoping to find Irish songs and stuff to be sung by WOMEN from a WOMAN'S perspective. At least, I thought that was what the question was. Silly Katy. Most of the song suggestion would be perfect for a dyke to sing, and, being bi, I might be able to get away with it, but come on fellas, read the words in the question before you put on your ethno-musicologist hat and tell me how to build a watch when I am asking for the time. Anyway, I got a couple of good ideas out of the whole thread, so thanks to those brave souls who GOT IT. Yeesh...


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Subject: Lyr Add: ALL THE LIES THAT YOU TOLD ME (F Black)
From: GUEST
Date: 31 Jul 12 - 03:45 PM

ALL THE LIES THAT YOU TOLD ME, by Frances Black.

All the lies that you told me, all the tears that I've cried
All the loving you gave me, it was a lie
I could never imagine, when I felt so high
That there could be somebody new
Better than you in my life

When I woke up this morning, with tears in my eyes
I never felt more like saying goodbye
I could never imagine, when I felt so high
That there could be somebody new
Better than you in my life

Chorus
Am I just fooling myself?
Could there be somebody else?
Could there be somebody new, waiting around the corner?
Yes there is, waiting for you, waiting for someone like you

All the nights that you told me, all your loving was mine
And I wanted to listen, to all of your lies
I could never imagine, when I felt so high
That there could be somebody new
Better than you in my life

Chorus

All the nights that you told me, all your loving was mine
Now there could be somebody new
Better than you in my lfe


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 01 Aug 12 - 03:20 PM

Hi, Katy Bob. See if you like this one. (I do.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joflMTTPE3s


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Subject: RE: Irish Songs for female singers
From: Genie
Date: 09 Mar 13 - 09:00 AM

I know it's English, but I think it works as "Irish" as well, because it's about a man who was apprenticed in London and could well have been from Ireland (as in Mountains O' Mourne):
Blow The Candles Out


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