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Lyr Req: Andrew Lammie

DigiTrad:
MILL O' TIFTY'S ANNIE
TRUMPETER OF FYVIE


Related threads:
Chord Req: Mill o' Tifty's Annie (15)
Ghosts of Andrew Lammie & Annie (1)


VOYAGES_GINDRAT@msn.com 01 Jul 97 - 01:41 PM
01 Jul 97 - 01:45 PM
LaMarca 01 Jul 97 - 04:19 PM
jdwhitney@wpmail.code3.com 01 Jul 97 - 04:24 PM
GUEST 30 Jan 10 - 02:39 PM
GUEST,Auldtimer 30 Jan 10 - 04:41 PM
Jim Dixon 01 Feb 10 - 12:27 AM
BobKnight 01 Feb 10 - 05:53 AM
Jim Carroll 01 Feb 10 - 07:46 AM
Jim Dixon 01 Feb 10 - 08:04 AM
Gallus Moll 01 Feb 10 - 04:10 PM
Tattie Bogle 01 Feb 10 - 09:32 PM
Matt Seattle 02 Feb 10 - 05:53 AM
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Subject: Andrew Lammie
From: VOYAGES_GINDRAT@msn.com
Date: 01 Jul 97 - 01:41 PM


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Subject: RE: Andrew Lammie
From:
Date: 01 Jul 97 - 01:45 PM

Has anyone got the words of a song called Andrew Lammie. It was sung by dick Gaughan in one of the first recordings of the Boys of the Lough, about 1974. Thanks a lot. Domi Gindrat


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Subject: RE: Andrew Lammie
From: LaMarca
Date: 01 Jul 97 - 04:19 PM

Hi, Domi, Andrew Lammie is a variant on the "Cruel Brother" theme in balladry, but got its own Child entry, number 233. A version is in the DT database by the name "MILL O' TIFTY'S ANNIE". A search on "Tifty's" should bring it right up... I heard Sheila Stewart sing an emotionally wrenching version of it at a festival years ago, but don't know if she recorded it.


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Subject: RE: Andrew Lammie
From: jdwhitney@wpmail.code3.com
Date: 01 Jul 97 - 04:24 PM

I transcribed this version from the album you mentioned. I'm not quite sure about the place name Mill o' Tirsty, but I think I got it from another version that was on the internet somewhere - probably right here at Digital Tradition. Or maybe a Celtic music site. I believe I read a commentary about this and similar songs that were from the border countries of Scotland, which were engulfed in continuous warfare for generations, which helps explain the domestic violence. Maybe Annie's brother and Andrew were on opposing sides.
^^^
At the mill o' Tirsty (?) there lived a man, in the neighborhood o' Fyvie
And he had a lovely daughter fair, and her name was bonnie Annie.

Lord Fyvie he had a trumpeter, and his name was Andrew Lammie,
And he had the art to win the heart o' mill o' Tirsty's Annie.

Her mother calls her to the door, "Come here to me, my Annie,"
"Did e'er ye see a fairer man, than the trumpeter o' Fyvie?"

But at night when all were tae their bed, they slept full sound but Annie,
For love oppressed her tender breast, thinking o' Andrew Lammie.

For it's love comes in at my bedside, and love lies down beside me,
Love has oppressed my tender breast, and love will waste my body.

Well it's up and down then Tirsty's glen, where the burn runs clear and bonny,
I've often gane tae meet my love, my ane dear Andrew Lammie.

For he hieghten tae the hills sae high, tae the hilltop high o' Fyvie,
And he blew his trumpet full loud and shrill, was heard at mill o' Tirsty.

But her father, he struck her wondrous sore, and also did her mother,
Her sisters, they did sae as well, but wae be tae her brother.

For her brother he struck her wondrous sore, with cruel strokes and many,
He broke her back against the door, for her 'n' Andrew Lammie.

Oh mother dear, go make my bed, and lay my face to Fyvie,
There I will lie, and it's there I'll die, for the sake o' Andrew Lammie.


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Subject: RE: Andrew Lammie
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jan 10 - 02:39 PM

Has anyone got the TAB to Dick Gaughans intro to this song on the Boys of the Loiugh album?


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Subject: RE: Andrew Lammie
From: GUEST,Auldtimer
Date: 30 Jan 10 - 04:41 PM

Mill O' Tifty


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Subject: Lyr Add: TIFTY'S NANNY (from Jamieson, 1806)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Feb 10 - 12:27 AM

From Popular Ballads and Songs by Robert Jamieson (Edinburgh: Archibald Constable and Co., 1806), page 382:

^^
TIFTY'S NANNY.
From a Stall Copy, procured from Scotland.

"There springs a rose in Fyvie's yard,
And O but it springs bonny;
There's a daisy in the middle of it,
Its name is Andrew Lammie.
I wish the rose were in my breast,
For the love I bear the daisy;
So blyth and merry as I would be,
And kiss my Andrew Lammie.

"The first time I and my love met,
Was in the wood of Fyvie;
He kissed and he dawted me,
Call'd me his bonny Annie;
Wi' apples sweet he did me treat,
Which stole my heart so canny;
And ay sinsyne himself was kind,
My bonny Andrew Lammie.

"But I am going to Edinburgh;
My love, I'm going to leave thee"—
She sigh'd full sore, and said no more,
"I wish I were but wi' you."
"I will buy thee a wedding gown;
My love, I'll buy it bonny."—
"But I'll be dead or ye come back,
My bonny Andrew Lammie."

"I will buy you brave bridal shoes;
My love, I'll buy them bonny."—
"But I'll be dead or ye come back,
My bonny Andrew Lammie."
"If you'll be true and trusty too,
As I am Andrew Lammie,
That you will ne'er kiss lad nor lown,
Till I return to Fyvie."—

"I shall be true and trusty too,
As my name's Tifty's Nanny,
That I'll kiss neither lad nor lown,
Till you return to Fyvie.
Love pines awa', love dwines awa',
Love pines awa' my body;
And love's crept in at my bed foot,
And ta'en possession o' me.

"My father drags me by the hair,
My mother sore does scold me;
And they would give one hundred merks
To any one to wed me.
My sister stands at her bower door.
And she full sore does mock me;
And when she hears the trumpet sound,
'Your cow is lowing, Nanny!'

"O be still, my sister Jane,
And leave off all your folly;
For I'd rather hear that cow low,
Than all the kye in Fyvie.
My father locks the door at night,
Lays up the keys fu' canny;
And when he hears the trumpet sound,
'Your cow is lowing, Nannie!'

"O, hold your tongue, my father dear,
And let be a' your folly;
For I would rather hear that cow,
Than all the kye in Fyvie."
* * * * *
"If you ding me, I will greet,
And gentlemen will hear me;
Laird Fyvie will be coming by,
And he'll come in and see me."

"Yea, I will ding you though ye greet,
And gentlemen should hear you;
Though Laird Fyvie were coming by,
And did come in and see you."
So, they dang her, and she grat,
And gentlemen did hear her;
And Fyvie he was coming by,
And did come in to see her.

"Mill of Tifty, give consent,
And let your daughter marry.—
If she were full of as high blood,
As she is full of beauty,
I would take her to myself,
And make her my own lady."

"Fyvie lands ly broad and wide,
And O but they ly bonny!
But I would not give my own true love
For all the lands in Fyvie.
But make my bed, and lay me down,
And turn my face to Fyvie;
That I may see before I die,
My bonny Andrew Lammie."

They made her bed, and laid her down,
And turn'd her face to Fyvie;
She gave a groan, and died or morn,
So ne'er saw Andrew Lammie.
Her father sorely did lament
The loss of his dear Nannie,
And wish'd that he had gi'en consent
To wed with Andrew Lammie.

But ah! alas! it was too late;
For he could not recall her;
Through time unhappy is his fate,
Because he did controul her.
You parents grave, who children have,
In crushing them be canny,
Lest for their part they break their heart,
As did young Tifty's Nanny.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Lammie
From: BobKnight
Date: 01 Feb 10 - 05:53 AM

What Auldtimer said + Fyvie is nowhere near the borders of Scotland and England. It's about 25 miles north-west of Aberdeen, almost 200 miles from the borders.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Lammie
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 01 Feb 10 - 07:46 AM

This is Sheila Stewart's wonderful version.
^^^
TIFTIES ANNIE
At the mill of Tifties lived a man
By the neighbourhood of Fyvie
And he had a lovely daughter fair
And they ca'd her Bonnie Annie.

Lord Fyvie had a trumpeter,
Whase name was Andrew Lammie
And he had the airt to win the hairt
O' Tifties Bonnie Annie.

Lord Fyvie he rode by the door
Where lived Bonnie Annie
And his trumpeter rode him before
Even this name Andrew Lammie.

Her mother cried her to the door
Said come here to me my Annie
Did ever you see a bonnier man
Than the trumpeter of Fyvie.

Oh, naething she said but sighing sore
Twas alas for bonnie Annie.
For she durst not own that her hairt was won
By the trumpeter of Fyvie.

Now at night when all went to their beds,
All sleeping sound but Annie.
Love so oppressed her tender breast
And love will waste her body.

The first time me and my love met
It was in the woods at Fyvie.
He ca'd me mistress; I said no
I'm just Tifties bonnie Annie.

Now Tifties penned a long letter
And sent it off to Fyvie
To say his daughter was bewitched
By the servant Andrew Lammie.

My love I'm going to Edinburgh town
And for a while must leave you.
Ah, but I'll be dead and in my grave
Ere you come back and see me.

Her father struck her wond'rous sore
So also did her mother.
Her sister all they took their score
But woe be to her brother.

Her brother struck her wondrous sore
Wi' cruel strokes and many
And he broke her back ower the temple stane,
Aye, the temple stane o' Fyvie.

Oh, mother dear, please mak my bed
And lay my face to Fyvie
For I will lie and I will die,
For the love o' Andrew Lammie.

Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: ANDREW LAMMIE (from Motherwell, 1827)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Feb 10 - 08:04 AM

From Minstrelsy: Ancient and Modern by William Motherwell (Glasgow: John Wylie, 1827), page 239:


ANDREW LAMMIE.

1. At Mill o' Tifty liv'd a man,
In the neighbourhood of Fyvie;
He had a lovely daughter fair,
Was called bonny Annie.

2. Her bloom was like the springing flower,
That salutes the rosy morning;
With innocence, and graceful mein,
Her beauteous form adorning.

3. Lord Fyvie had a Trumpeter,
Whose name was Andrew Lammie;
He had the art to gain the heart,
Of Mill o' Tiftie's Annie.

4. Proper he was, both young and gay,
His like was not in Fyvie;
No one was there that could compare,
With this same Andrew Lammie.

5. Lord Fyvie he rode by the door,
Where lived Tiftie's Annie;
His Trumpeter rode him before,
Even this same Andrew Lammie.

6. Her mother call'd her to the door,
"Come here to me my Annie;
Did you ever see a prettier man, -
Than this Trumpeter of Fyvie?"

7. She sighed sore but said no more,
Alas! for bonny Annie;
She durst not own her heart was won,
By the Trumpeter of Fyvie.

8. At night when they went to their beds,
All slept full sound but Annie;
Love so opprest her tender breast,
Thinking on Andrew Lammie.

9. "Love comes in at my bed side,
And love lies down beyond me;
Love has possess'd my tender breast,
And love will waste my body.

10. "The first time I and my love met,
Was in the woods of Fyvie;
His lovely form and speech so sweet,
Soon gain'd the heart of Annie.

11. "He call'd me mistress, I said, No,
I'm Tiftie's bonny Annie;
With apples sweet, he did me treat,
And kisses soft and many.

12. "It's up and down in Tiftie's den,
Where the burn runs clear and bonny,
I've often gone to meet my love,
My bonny Andrew Lammie."

13. But now, alas! her father heard,
That the Trumpeter of Fyvie,
Had had the art to gain the heart,
Of Tiftie's bonny Annie.

14. Her father soon a letter wrote,
And sent it on to Fyvie,
To tell his daughter was bewitch'd,
By his servant Andrew Lammie.

15. When Lord Fyvie had this letter read,
O dear! but he was sorry;
The bonniest Lass in Fyvie's land,
Is bewitched by Andrew Lammie.

16. Then up the stair his Trumpeter,
He called soon and shortly;
"Pray tell me soon, What's this you've done.
To Tiftie's bonny Annie?"

17. "In wicked art I, had no part,
Nor therein am I canny;
True love alone the heart has won,
Of Tiftie's bonny Annie.

18. "Woe betide Mill o' Tiftie's pride,
For it has ruin'd many;
He'll no ha'e't said that she should wed,
The Trumpeter of Fyvie.

19. "Where will I find a boy so kind,
That'll carry a letter canny,
Who will run on to Tiftie's town,
Give it to my love Annie?"

20. "Here you shall find a boy so kind,
Who'll carry a letter canny;
Who will run on to Tiftie's town,
And gi'e't to thy love Annie."

21. "It's Tiftie he has daughters three,
Who all are wondrous bonny;
But ye'll ken her o'er a' the lave,
Gi'e that to bonny Annie."

22. "It's up and down in Tiftie's den,
Where the burn runs clear and bonny;
There wilt thou come and meet thy love,
Thy bonny Andrew Lammie.

23. "When wilt thou come, and I'll attend,
My love I long to see thee?"
"Thou may'st come to the Bridge of Sleugh,
And there I'll come and meet thee.

24. "My love, I go to Edinbro',
And for a while must leave thee;"
She sighed sore, and said no more,
"But I wish that I were wi' thee."

25. "I'll buy to thee a bridal gown,
My love I'll buy it bonny;"
But I'll be dead ere ye come back,
To see your bonnie Annie.

26. "If you'll be true and constant too,
As my name's Andrew Lammie;
I shall thee wed when I come back
To see the lands of Fyvie."

27. "I will be true and constant too,
To thee my Andrew Lammie,
But my bridal bed will ere then be made,
In the green church yard of Fyvie."

28. "Our time is gone and now comes on,
My dear, that I must leave thee;
If longer here I should appear,
Mill o' Tiftie he would see me."

29. "I now for ever bid adieu,
To thee my Andrew Lammie;
Ere ye come back, I will be laid,
In the green church yard of Fyvie."

30. He hied him to the head of the house,
To the house top of Fyvie;
He blew his trumpet loud and schill,
'Twas heard at Mill o' Tiftie.

31. Her father lock'd the door at night,
Laid by the keys fu' canny;
And when he heard the trumpet sound,
Said, "Your cow is lowing, Annie."

32. "My father dear, I pray forbear,
And reproach no more your Annie;
For I'd rather hear that cow to low,
Than ha'e a' the kine in Fyvie.

33. "I would not for my braw new gown,
And a' your gifts sae many;
That it were told in Fyvie's land,
How cruel you are to Annie.

34. "But if ye strike me I will cry,
And gentlemen will hear me;
Lord Fyvie will be riding by,
And he'll come in and see me."

35. At the same time, the Lord came in,
He said, "What ails thee Annie?"
"'Tis all for love now I must die,
For bonny Andrew Lammie."

36. "Pray Mill o' Tifty gi'e consent,
And let your daughter marry."
"It will be with some higher match,
Than the Trumpeter of Fyvie."

37. "If she were come of as high a kind,
As she's adorned with beauty;
I would take her unto myself,
And make her mine own lady."

38. "Its Fyvie's lands are fair and wide,
And they are rich and bonny;
I would not leave my own true love,
For all the lands of Fyvie."

39. Her father struck her wondrous sore,
As also did her mother;
Her sisters always did her scorn;
But woe be to her brother.

40. Her brother struck her wondrous sore,
With cruel strokes and many;
He brake her back in the hall door,
For liking Andrew Lammie.

41. "Alas! my father and mother dear,
Why so cruel to your Annie?
My heart was broken first by love,
My brother has broken my body."

42. "O mother dear, make ye my bed,
And lay my face to Fyvie;
Thus will I ly, and thus will die,
For my love Andrew Lammie!

43. "Ye neighbours hear both far and near,
Ye pity Tiftie's Annie;
Who dies for love of one poor lad,
For bonny Andrew Lammie.

44. "No kind of vice e'er stain'd my life,
Nor hurt my virgin honour;
My youthful heart was won by love,
But death will me exoner."

45. Her mother then she made her bed,
And laid her face to Fyvie;
Her tender heart it soon did break,
And ne'er saw Andrew Lammie.

46. But the word soon went up and down,
Through all the lands of Fyvie;
That she was dead and buried,
Even Tiftie's bonny Annie.

47. Lord Fyvie he did wring his hands,
Said, "Alas! for Tiftie's Annie,
The fairest Flower's cut down by love,
That e'er sprung up in Fyvie.

48. "O woe betide Mill o' Tiftie's pride,
He might have let them marry;
I should have giv'n them both to live,
Into the lands of Fyvie."

49. Her father sorely now laments,
The loss of his dear Annie;
And wishes he had gi'en consent,
To wed with Andrew Lammie.

50. Her mother grieves both air and late,
Her sister's cause they scorn'd her;
Surely her brother doth mourn and grieve,
For the cruel usage he'd giv'n her.

51. But now, alas! it was too late,
For they could not recal her;
Through life, unhappy is their fate,
Because they did controul her.

52. When Andrew hame from Edinburgh came,
With meikle grief and sorrow;
"My love has died for me to-day,
I'll die for her to-morrow.

53. "Now I will on to Tiftie's den,
Where the burn runs clear and bonny;
With tears I'll view the bridge of Sleugh,
Where I parted last with Annie.

54. "Then will I speed to the churchyard,
To the green churchyard of Fyvie;
With tears I'll water my love's grave,
Till I follow Tiftie's Annie."

55. Ye parents grave, who children have,
In crushing them be canny;
Lest when too late you do repent,
Remember Tiftie's Annie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Lammie
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 01 Feb 10 - 04:10 PM

I believe that the ballad Mill o Tifty's Annie is based on a true story, and that Annie's gravestone can still be seen in the local churchyard (at / near Fyvie?)- can anyone confirm this?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Lammie
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 01 Feb 10 - 09:32 PM

Yes, in Fyvie churchyard, Annie being Agnes Smith. More info in the footnote here:
http://www.scotsindependent.org/features/singasang/tifty.htm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Lammie
From: Matt Seattle
Date: 02 Feb 10 - 05:53 AM

Re it being a Border ballad -

1/ If Duncan Williamson can claim Thomas the Rhymer for Aberdeenshire (which he did) then the Borders can have Tiftie's Annie.

2/ It's in my Penguin Border Ballads (ed. Beattie 1952)

3/ I read recently (forget where.. it may have a note by Leyden) that it has long been sung in the Borders

But yes I know Fyvie is not in the Borders any more than Earlston is in Aberdeenshire


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