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Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey / Johnnie My Man

In Mudcat MIDIs:
Farewell to Whiskey (notes from Malcolm:By Niel Gow (1727-1807); used as melody for two sets of lyrics in this thread: The Bawbee Birlin' (Rod Paterson and Michael Marra) and Gow's Farewell To Whisky (probably the poem by Mrs. Lyon of Glamis). see thread 20439)


Jon Whitney 01 Jul 97 - 04:49 PM
Bill D 01 Jul 97 - 08:09 PM
Karen P. 02 Jul 97 - 01:55 AM
Jon Whitney 02 Jul 97 - 07:28 PM
GUEST,Eric Patterson 10 Mar 05 - 03:56 AM
Malcolm Douglas 10 Mar 05 - 12:24 PM
GUEST,Chris B (Born Again Scouser) 11 Mar 05 - 06:25 AM
Zhenya 14 Mar 05 - 05:03 PM
Susanne (skw) 14 Mar 05 - 06:04 PM
SINSULL 14 Mar 05 - 11:28 PM
GUEST 17 Jul 08 - 04:36 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Jul 08 - 09:10 AM
Jim Dixon 20 Jul 08 - 11:25 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Jul 08 - 12:30 AM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Jul 08 - 12:37 AM
Barry Finn 21 Jul 08 - 03:32 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: FAREWELL TO WHISKEY (Boys of the Lough)
From: Jon Whitney
Date: 01 Jul 97 - 04:49 PM

On an early self-titled Boys of the Lough album from 1974, there's a song called FAREWELL TO WHISKEY. I'm usually pretty good at picking out lyrics, but there are a few places I just can't understand in this one. I've put down what I did get. Can anyone help me fill in the missing places where I put ????. Also, does anyone know where I can get a clean copy (LP or cassette, I don't think its on CD) of the album? I consider it one of the Boy's best.

Oh, Johnny, my man, do ye no think o' risin'
For the day is weel spent and the night's comin' on
The cellars are dim, and the doorstoop is empty
O rise up my Johnny and come awa' hame

The bairnies at hame, they are ???? and greetin'
The meal in the barrow, the ????
While you sit here drinkin', you leave us lamentin'
O rise up my Johnny, and come awa' hame.

Wha's that at the door, that is speakin' sae kindly
It's the voice of my wee wifie, Maggie by name,
Come in, my dear lassie, and sit doon beside me.
O rise up my Johnny, and come awa' hame.

O Johnny, my man, do ye no mind the courtin'?
The ale-hoose or tavern ?????
We spent lang days ???? the sweet scent of roses,
And ne'er gie a thought upon gon' awa' hame.

Oh, weel dae I mind O these times that ye speak o'
But these days they are gone and will ne'er come again
But as for the present, we will try for to mend it
So gie's your heart, Maggie, and I'll awa' hame.

Then it's Johnny arose, and he bangs the door open,
Saying cursed be the tavern, that e'er let me in
And cursed be the whiskey, that made me aye thirsty,
And fare thee well whiskey, for I'm awa' hame.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 19-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Bill D
Date: 01 Jul 97 - 08:09 PM

It's in the database under the name of "JOHNNY MY MAN"....a search on the phrase 'fare thee well, whiskey' found it....since titles are slippery, it is often best to look for some word or phrase you know MUST be in the song!

Song title converted to link. --JoeClone, 19-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Karen P.
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 01:55 AM

You can find Dick Gaughan's version on his website at: http://www.dickalba.demon.co.uk/songs/texts/whisky.htm an excellent site!


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Subject: RE: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Jon Whitney
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 07:28 PM

Thanks, that really helped.


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Subject: Lyr Add: FAREWELL TO WHISKEY
From: GUEST,Eric Patterson
Date: 10 Mar 05 - 03:56 AM

I also really like Farewell to Whiskey, but like you there were parts of the brogue I couldn't penetrate. Luckily I was able to consult with a visiting Scot & he was able to fill in with far more educated guesses than you or I could make. Here's how he heard it, with a few explanatory notes from me. Enjoy.

Oh, Johnny, my man, dae ye no think o' risin'
For the day is weel spent and the night's comin' on
The siller's a' deeved, and the gillstoop is empty (The silver's all used up & the larder is empty)
O rise up my Johnny and come awa' hame .

The bairnies at hame, they are roarin' and greetin' (crying & whining)
Nae meal in the barrow, to fill their wee waims (bellies)
While you sit here drinkin', you leave us lamentin'
O rise up my Johnny, and come awa' hame.

Wha's that at the door, that is speakin' sae kindly
Tis the voice of my wee wifie, Maggie by name,
Come in, my dear lassie, and sit doon beside me.
O rise up my Johnny, and come awa' hame.

O Johnny, my man, do ye no mind the courtin'?
Nae ale-hoose or tavern e'er ran thru our minds
We spent lang days 'mang (amidst) the sweet scented roses,
And ne'er gie a thought upon gon' awa' hame.

Oh, weel dae I mind O these times that ye speak o'
But these days they are gone and will ne'er come again
But as for the present, we will try for to mend it
So gie's your hand, Maggie, and I'll awa' hame.

Then it's Johnny arose, and he's banged the door open,
Saying cursed be the tavern, that e'er let me in
And cursed be the whiskey, that made me aye thirsty,
And fare thee well whiskey, for I'm awa' hame.


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Subject: RE: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 10 Mar 05 - 12:24 PM

The midi link at the head of the page is to Niel Gow's tune, which has nothing whatever to do with the mis-named song in this rather old thread. Note that the word is generally spelled "whisky" in Scotland.

There are two examples of Johnny my Man in the DT; both are complete enough. See earlier link for JOHNNY MY MAN, taken from a Jean Redpath record (prior source not named). The other, with the confusing title FAREWEILL TAE WHISKY, was copied from Dick Gaughan's website (also mentioned above), I hope with his permission. I expect that the odd spelling of the first word will be why you didn't know it was there!


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Subject: RE: Farewell to Whiskey
From: GUEST,Chris B (Born Again Scouser)
Date: 11 Mar 05 - 06:25 AM

Funny, I just got the first Boys of the Lough record out yesterday and played it again for the first time in years. I'd forgotten how good it was and I've had it for over 30 years. If you can find a copy, grab it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Zhenya
Date: 14 Mar 05 - 05:03 PM

I'm familiar with the Boys of the Lough version, but I'm trying to find a full set of lyrics to another version I heard at a music festival some years ago.

It started out like this, as far as I can recall:

I went to the alehouse to look for my Jimmy
The day it is done and the night's coming on
You're sitting there drinking which leaves me lamenting
So come awa' Jimmy and come awa' hame

Does anyone have any more lyrics, or know of any recordings of this version?

Zhenya


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 14 Mar 05 - 06:04 PM

I've never come across a version where the guy was called Jimmy (nor anything but Johnny).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: SINSULL
Date: 14 Mar 05 - 11:28 PM

Nicely done by Hissyfit on their latest CD.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jul 08 - 04:36 AM

Superb version by Barbara Dickson on her 'Parcel of Rogues' album. She's been singing this since the late 60s.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Jul 08 - 09:10 AM

On the other hand you could try the superb traditional version by Jessie Murray on The 1951 Edinburgh People's Festival Ceilidh CD (entitle Thew Ale Hoose) from the Alan Lomax collection on Rounder - beats them all by a mile.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOHNNIE, MY MAN / FAREWELL TO WHISKY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Jul 08 - 11:25 PM

This version is from Vagabond Songs and Ballads of Scotland by Robert Ford, 1901, page 254. Note that it has a few more verses than the other versions posted here.

JOHNNIE, MY MAN.

"O, JOHNNIE, my man, do ye no think on risin'?
The day is far spent and the nicht's comin' on;
Ye're siller's near dune, and the stoup's toom before ye;
O, rise up, my Johnnie, and come awa' hame."

"O, wha is it that I hear speaking sae kindly?
I think it's the voice o' my ain wifie Jean;
Come in by, my dearie, and sit down beside me,
It's time enough yet to be gaun awa' hame."

"O, Johnnie, my man, when we first fell a-courting,
We had naething but love then to trouble our mind;
We spent a' our time 'mang the sweet scented roses,
And I ne'er thocht it lang then to gang awa' hame."

"I remember richt weel, Jean, the time that ye speak o',
And weel I remember the sweet flowery glen;
But thae days are a' past, and will never return, love,
Sae sit down beside me, nor think o' gaun hame."

"O, Johnnie, my man, our bairns are a' greetin',
Nae meal in the barrel to fill their wee wames;
While sittin' here drinking, ye leave me lamentin';
O, rise up, my Johnnie, and come awa' hame."

Then Johnnie he rase, and he bang'd the door open,
Saying, "Curs'd be the tavern that ere let me in;
And curs'd be the whisky that's made me sae frisky;
O fare-ye-weel whisky, for I'll awa' hame.

"And Jeannie, my dear, your advice will be taken,
I'll leave aff the auld deeds and follow thee hame;
Live sober and wisely, and aye be respected;
Nae mair in the ale-house I'll sit, but at hame."

Noo Johnnie gaes out ilka fine summer even,
Wi' his wife and his bairns fu' trig and fu' bein,
Though a wee while sin' syne, in rags they were rinnin',
While Johnnie sat fou' in the ale-house at e'en.

Contented and crouse he sits by his ain fireside,
And Jeannie, a happier wife there is nane;
Nae mair to the tavern at nicht does he wander,
But's happy wi' Jean and his bairnies at hame.

"Forty and more years ago, this was a common street song in various parts of Scotland, and found ready sale always in penny-sheet form, chiefly among those who required most its pointed moral lesson."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Jul 08 - 12:30 AM

Volume II, 1901, presumably. Another book that Google, in its wisdom, makes freely available to users in the USA while denying access to those in the country in which it was written and published more than a century ago. Never mind; we can still buy copies over here with money (usually the revised edition of 1904, in which this song is on pp 327-8); at least until the American economic crisis collapses Europe's economies as well.

For broadside editions, see Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads:

Johnnie My Man


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Jul 08 - 12:37 AM

In my eagerness to moan about cultural and economic imperialism, I neglected to test the Bodleian link. I had inadvertently edited out a vital '?' from the string. Let's get it right this time.

Johnnie My Man


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Farewell to Whiskey
From: Barry Finn
Date: 21 Jul 08 - 03:32 AM

Norman Kennedy recorded this on his "Ballads & Songs of Scotland" sung by Norman Kennedy on Folk-Legacy 1968. I first heard this sung by Norman in the 70's along with quite a few other songs that I also proceeded to learn from his singing. In his sleeve notes (he calls it "Johnny, My Man, Dae Ye Nae Think O' Rising") he says;
"This is a song which owes it's considerable popularity to circulation as a broadside. Ford notesit's popularity a hundred yrs ago & that the customers for the penny sheets on which it was printed were "chiefly among those who required most it's pointed moral lesson". Ord prints a version in his Bothy Ballads, as does Gavin Greig in Folk-Song Of The North-East. Norman has his version from Lizzy Higgins, daughter of the famous Jeannie Robertson, who is a fine ballad singer in her own right.

Johnny, My Man, Dae Ye Nae Think O' Rising

Johnny, My Man, Dae Ye Nae Think O' Rising?
The day is far spent an' the night's comin' on
Your siller's a' done an' your stoup's teem afore ye
Rise up my man Johnny an' come awa' hame

"Who is that I hear speakin' sae kindly?
I ken it's the voice o' my ain wifie Jean
Come in by me dearie, an' sit doon aside me
There's room in this tavern for mair for by's me"

"Johnny, my man, our bairns is a' greetin'
Nae meal in the barrel tae fill their wee wains
While ye sit here drinkin', ye leave me lamentin
Rise up, my man Johnny, an' come awa' hame"

"Dae ye nae remeber the 1st days we courted?
On a bed o' priroses we baithdid set doon
A' pickin' the flowers in each other's company
Ye ne'er thocht it lang, then, nor sought tae gae hame"

"Weel dae I mind on the days that ye mention
But those times they are past an' they'll ne'er come again
Just think on the present, an' try tae amend it
Rise up my man, Johnny, an' come awa' hame"

Johnny rase up & he flung the door open
"My curse on the tavern that 1st let me in
My curse on the whiskey that mak's me aye frisky
Sae fare thee wee', whiskey, an' I'm awa' hame.

great song

Barry


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