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Lyr Add: The Roamer (Cisco Houston)

GUEST,Mrr 05 Jun 00 - 11:13 AM
Abby Sale 05 Jun 00 - 02:24 PM
GUEST,Mrr 05 Jun 00 - 02:30 PM
Abby Sale 05 Jun 00 - 06:05 PM
Abby Sale 26 Jul 15 - 03:03 PM
Louie Roy 27 Jul 15 - 10:42 AM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 15 - 12:40 PM
Jim Dixon 28 Jul 15 - 01:43 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: THE ROAMER (Cisco Houston)
From: GUEST,Mrr
Date: 05 Jun 00 - 11:13 AM

THE ROAMER

'Way out on the windswept desert, where Nature favors no man,
A buffalo found his brother at rest on the sun-baked sand.
Now, the buffalo said to his brother: "What sickness got you this way?"
But his brother never said, for his brother was dead, been dead since away last May.

'Way out on the windswept desert, I heard a big Indian moan,
And I left my tent, for I knew what it meant, and swore I'd never more roam.
It was early in the mornin' when I stopped a-runnin'; my legs were tired and sore.
I'd lost fifty pound on the hot desert ground and I'd lose that many more.


I have this by, I think, Cisco Houston, but it might be Ed McCurdy. I always liked it, no idea why.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: 'Way Out On The Wind-Swept Desert
From: Abby Sale
Date: 05 Jun 00 - 02:24 PM

You absolutely have this by Cisco Houston. I know this because you've mixed to the title (easy to do in this case) with another on the same record, the fine 10-inch 900 Miles and other R.R. Songs. You've posted "The Roamer." Houston got it from Jimmie Rodgers who called it "Desert Blues." My copy of Rogers' version gives Rogers as the writer.

I can also tell you why you like it. It's a great song. Rogers' version is fine even though the words are weird and the arrangement corny as hell. Houston's version eliminates the dopey orchestra & it's done in his simple brilliant style. Something is definately said, even if we're not quite sure what.

"The Rambler" begins 'Come and gather all around me, / And listen to my tale of woe." Also a great song. That one's by one Carson Robinson (whom I don't otherwise know). Both (C) 1929.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RAILROAD BOOMER / THE RAMBLER
From: GUEST,Mrr
Date: 05 Jun 00 - 02:30 PM

Thanks! Rambling, roaming, all the same to me...so, here are the lyrics to the other one:


Come and gather all around me. listen to my tale of woe.
Got some good advice to give you, a lot of things you ought to know.
Take a tip from one who's traveled, and never stopped from ramblin' 'round,
'Cause once you get the roaming fever, you never want to settle down.
You never want to settle down.

I met a little gal in Frisco, asked her to be my wife.
Told her I was tired of roaming, gonna settle down for life.
Then I heard the whistle blowing, and I knew it was a red-ball train,
And I left that gal beside the railroad and I never saw that gal again.
I never saw that gal again.

Well, I've traveled all over the country. I've traveled everywhere.
Been on every branch-line railroad and I never paid a nickel's fare.
I been from Maine to Californee, and from Canada to Mexico,
And I never tried to save no money, and now I got to place to go,
And now I got no place to go.

Come listed to a boomer's story. pay attention to what I say,
'Cause I hear another train a-coming, and I guess I'll be on my way.
If you want to do me a favor, when I lay me down and die,
Just dig my grave beside the railroad so I can hear the trains roll by,
So I can hear the trains roll by.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: 'Way Out On The Wind-Swept Desert
From: Abby Sale
Date: 05 Jun 00 - 06:05 PM

I notice I have a note I sent "The Roamer" & its tune up to the data base May 30, 1994. It may be in there somewhere...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Way Out on the Wind-Swept Desert (Houston
From: Abby Sale
Date: 26 Jul 15 - 03:03 PM

Just come up on something what surprised me.
The version in The Hobo's Hornbook, George Milburn, 1930, Pp 242-3 is called "Boomer's Blues."

Essentially the same as Cisco Houston but for bits of hobo slang.

In the first two lines of the verse two above:

Met a little broad in 'Frisco,
Ast her to be my storm and strife



No reason it's impossible but I never Cockney rhyming slang in a USian folksong before.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Way Out on the Wind-Swept Desert (Houston
From: Louie Roy
Date: 27 Jul 15 - 10:42 AM

This is Jimmie Rodgers song and he wrote and recorded this in 1928 or early 1929 and it was called the Desert Blues and there is one more verse that the person who is trying to say it is his song failed to add to his post I learned it in 1930


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Subject: Lyr Add: DESERT BLUES (Jimmie Rodgers)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 15 - 12:40 PM

DESERT BLUES
As recorded by Jimmie Rodgers, 1929.

'Way out on the windswept desert, where nature favors no man,
The buffalo found his brother at rest on the sun-baked sand.
He said: "My brother, what ails you? Has sickness got you this way?"
But his brother never said, for his brother was dead, been dead since 'way last May.
[Yodel]

Here's to Chief Big Buffalo Nickel, a mighty man in his day,
Never once used a sickle to clear the bushes away.
He would go round from tent to tent, eat ev'rything in sight.
He loved a squaw, ev'ry one he saw; he loved a new one ev'ry night.
[Yodel]

Last night
on the windswept desert, I heard a big Indian moan.
I left my tent; I knew what it meant, and I swore I'd never more roam.
It was dawn when I reached safety; my legs were certainly sore.
I must have lost fifty pounds on the hot desert ground and I'd lose that many more.
[Yodel]


[Cliff Carlisle recorded almost identical lyrics in 1931.]


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RAILROAD BOOMER (Carson Robison)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 28 Jul 15 - 01:43 PM

This is very similar to the version posted by Mrr above; however, I carefully checked these words against a recording. This version trims a lot of unnecessary syllables, which, if included, would mess up the bouncy rhythm, in my opinion.


THE RAILROAD BOOMER
Written by Carson Robison
As recorded by Carson Robison & Frank Luther, 1929.

Come and gather all around me; listen to my tale of woe.
Got some good advice to give you, lot o' things you oughta know.
Take a tip from one who's traveled, never stopped a-ramblin' 'round.
You're li'ble to get the wandrin' fever; you'll never want to settle down.
Met a little gal in Frisco; asked her if she'd be my wife.
Told her I was tired of roamin'; said I'd settle down for life.
Then I heard a whistle blowin'; knew it was a red-ball train.
Left her standin' by the railroad; never seen that gal again.
Never seen that gal again.

Wandered all around this country; yes, I traveled ev'rywhere.
Been on every branch-line railroad; never paid a nickel fare.
Been from Maine to California, Canada to Mexico.
Never tried to save no money; now I got to place to go.
Listen to a boomer's story; don't forget the things I say.
I hear another train a-comin', and I'll soon be on my way.
If you want to do a favor, when I lay me down and die,
Dig my grave beside a railroad so I can hear the trains go by,
So I can hear the trains roll by.


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