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Help: The Centenary March tune origins

Albatross 06 Jul 00 - 10:45 AM
Skipjack K8 07 Jul 00 - 08:01 AM
IanC 07 Jul 00 - 08:24 AM
Albatross 10 Jul 00 - 03:59 AM
Albatross 10 Jul 00 - 04:04 AM
Skipjack K8 10 Jul 00 - 04:43 AM
Free Reed 10 Jul 00 - 07:41 AM
Free Reed 10 Jul 00 - 07:58 AM
Albatross 10 Jul 00 - 10:07 AM
Free Reed 10 Jul 00 - 10:51 AM
Free Reed 10 Jul 00 - 10:51 AM
GUEST,Ciarán Ó Duibhín 16 Sep 13 - 03:04 PM
GUEST,Ebor_Fiddler 16 Sep 13 - 05:50 PM
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Subject: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Albatross
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:45 AM

There's a really lively Irish polka called The Centenary March which I learnt from an excellent squeezebox player called Tony Hall from Norwich. He used to play with Nic Jones and he's the one playing on the Little Pot Stove recording. Tony tells me that the Centenary March is a Northern Irish tune. Does the word march have Orange associations? This brings me to the question are there some "orange" tunes that are avoided in some true Irish sessions? Should non-political musicians be sensitive to those tunes that should or should not be played? By the way on a more light hearted note Tony plays at two speeds: slow and dead slow!


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Skipjack K8
Date: 07 Jul 00 - 08:01 AM

I have got the Centenary March on the back of Lucy Farr's, done by the Old Hat Band. THey are both cracking tunes, but I don't know the origin of either. On speed, they seem more powerful played as a slowish march, or maybe it's just a way of jamming lots more notes in!

Skipjack


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: IanC
Date: 07 Jul 00 - 08:24 AM

Hi

I think what you're looking for is probably "The Centenary March", occasionally (and originally) known as "The TUC Centenary March, by Gilbert Vinter. It is a favourite piece for brass bands and is also played by pipe bands.

This one is not an Irish piece, though. Here's what I have (the sheet music is available in various places on the net).

"Gilbert Vinter (1909-69), Lincoln-born and trained at Kneller Hall and the Royal Academy, became conductor of the BBC Midland Light Orchestras late in the 1940s after wartime service subsequently passing on to conducting the BBC Concert Orchestra and his own concert band. Like Redman he was a prolific composer. The brass band world used as test pieces - and concert items - such works by him as Salute to Youth, Symphony of Marches, The TUC Centenary March etc. "

Hope this is useful.

Cheers!
Ian


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Albatross
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 03:59 AM

Skipjack,

Is the the Old Hat Band from Suffolk? (John on the banjo and John Kirkpatrick's sister in law!) Great band. Did they do any recordings?

Thanks to IanC

regards, Albert Ross


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Albatross
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 04:04 AM

Skipjack,

Is that the Old Hat Band from Suffolk? (John on the banjo and John Kirkpatrick's sister in law!) Great band. Did they do any recordings?

Thanks to IanC By the way where do I get the music on the net?

regards, Albert Ross


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Skipjack K8
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 04:43 AM

Albert, I'm on the case. I'm after that brother of mine to answer you, who introduced me to said tunes.

I'd keep yer head down on the orange stuff at the moment, mate, with what's going on round at Conrad Bleatey's thread, coupled with the annual stand off. But it is an interesting point about rebel/orange tunes, and I often feel the frisson (?) when playing them in strange pubs. Perhaps we'll dust it down after the umbrellas have been put away for another summer.

Off to find me brother.

Skipjack


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Free Reed
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 07:41 AM

Ref the Old Hat Band, the tune paired with Lucy Farr s March is called ‹ I think I recall correctly (some toerag has absconded with my tape so I haven t got it here to check) ‹ the CENTENNIAL March. Are we talking the same tune as the Centenary?

If so, then the following may be of significance.

Old Hat s late box player, Mel Dean, was a neighbour of mine and he used to sit in with our band sometimes. It may be relevant that Mel would only play English music, in fact the OHB still only does English so far as I know. So, since the Centennial is doubled up with Lucy Farr s (which I know to be English) on their first album, I d guess we are talking English ‹ or maybe an anglo version (you know how tunes migrate, get modified and then get claimed!)

If anyone knows Katie Howson of the OHB (lives somewhere in Suffolk) well enough to ask her, then she might be able to shed some light on the matter.

Sadly I cannot ask Mel because he died tragically a couple of years back. But I still think of him fondly whenever we do Babes in the Wood, a tune he taught me, as well as Lucy Farr s and the Centennial. Mel was a brilliant player on both English and anglo concertinas, and an ace melodeoniste too. He was also a great bloke to have alongside at a gig; very funny and, ironically, always so cheerful. There s a lot of people miss Mel.

Anyway, I hope the above is of some help or interest in the search for the origins of the Centenary.

FreeReed


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Free Reed
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 07:58 AM

PS - I don¹t think the Old Hat tape I have (or had until some collector made off with it) is still available. Yes, very much a collector's item now! Again, if anyone knows Katie H of Old Hat Music, she may yet be able to provide a copy.

FreeReed


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Albatross
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 10:07 AM

Hi Free Reed, (Is it Neil Wayne?) Thanks for the info. I'll try and track down the Howson's somehow. I remember back in 1979 listening to the Old Hat Band at a festival in Kings Lynn.

They played some lovely old east anglian tunes with the late Billy Bennington and the late Oscar Woods and Reg Reeder on hammer dulcimer.

I think I saw John Howson on a website somewhere and I understand he is still researching east anglian music. Which is strange when you consider that the EFDSS way back in the early 1920's said they were not going to invest in collecting any more folk songs or music because there weren't any left!


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Free Reed
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 10:51 AM

Greetings Albatross

Sorry, Neil Wayne it isn't! You might try www.oldhat or somesuch to get a lead to John and Katie H. I know they have a site, and I'm pretty sure old hat comes into the name somewhere.

There's a pretty jig we play called Oscar Woods' Jig, paired up with a morris tune called Upton-on-Severn Stick Dance. So the name of the great Oscar Woods lives on in the eastern counties at least.

I haven't seen Tony Hall for a while, but he plays down our way fairly regularly. Though I don't personally like his rather fullsome style of playing, I'm absolutely in awe of his technique.

FreeReed


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: Free Reed
Date: 10 Jul 00 - 10:51 AM

Greetings Albatross

Sorry, Neil Wayne it isn't! You might try www.oldhat or somesuch to get a lead to John and Katie H. I know they have a site, and I'm pretty sure old hat comes into the name somewhere.

There's a pretty jig we play called Oscar Woods' Jig, paired up with a morris tune called Upton-on-Severn Stick Dance. So the name of the great Oscar Woods lives on in the eastern counties at least.

I haven't seen Tony Hall for a while, but he plays down our way fairly regularly. Though I don't personally like his rather fullsome style of playing, I'm absolutely in awe of his technique.

FreeReed


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: GUEST,Ciarán Ó Duibhín
Date: 16 Sep 13 - 03:04 PM

The Irish "Centenary March" was composed by Arthur Kearney of Omagh for the centenary of the foundation of the Christian Brothers' school in the town, which came up in 1961. I've got a tape of Arthur talking about it and playing the tune on the fiddle.


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Subject: RE: Help: The Centenary March tune origins
From: GUEST,Ebor_Fiddler
Date: 16 Sep 13 - 05:50 PM

If the OP is still interested, both Katie and John are still very much in action. The Old Hatters are on http://www.veteran.co.uk/ - I think from memory, that this is run by the Howsons. I am certain however that Katie at least is on Faceache.
Good luck with your search!


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