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Lyr: Here I am from Donegal/Do Me Justice

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Lyr Req: Do Me Justice (6)


Wolfgang Hell 22 Jul 97 - 09:51 AM
dick greenhaus 22 Jul 97 - 10:55 AM
Martin Ryan 22 Jul 97 - 11:28 AM
dick greenhaus 22 Jul 97 - 05:47 PM
Wolfgang 23 Jul 97 - 03:41 AM
Martin Ryan 23 Jul 97 - 05:50 AM
Martin Ryan 29 Jul 97 - 04:54 AM
Wolfgang 06 Aug 97 - 11:25 AM
GUEST,Jenny Fitzgibbon 03 May 01 - 02:18 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 03 May 01 - 04:01 AM
Frank McGrath 03 May 01 - 07:39 PM
Frank McGrath 03 May 01 - 07:55 PM
Frank McGrath 07 May 01 - 05:00 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 08 May 01 - 05:07 AM
MartinRyan 11 Mar 12 - 05:47 PM
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Subject: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Wolfgang Hell
Date: 22 Jul 97 - 09:51 AM

I'm looking for the lyrics of this song. Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 22 Jul 97 - 10:55 AM

TRy Bold O'Donahue.


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 22 Jul 97 - 11:28 AM

"Here I am from DOnegal, I feel quite discontented To see the way that we're put down, not fairly represented ...."

That the one?

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 22 Jul 97 - 05:47 PM

Martin- Whether it is or not, I'd like to see that one.


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Wolfgang
Date: 23 Jul 97 - 03:41 AM

Yes, Martin, that's the one. I know this fine song from the singing of Mick Moloney, but do not understand all lines. The chorus in my version goes like that:

Give me justice, treat me fair,
and I'll be not discontented,
and I'll be not laughed at anywhere,
but highly represented.

Yours Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 23 Jul 97 - 05:50 AM

It's usually called "Do me Justice". While it smacks a little of a national inferiority complex, its a fine song!

I'll post it over the next few days, if I get a chance.

Regards

p.s. Dick I'm sending you music for most of the Apr97 batch of songs this/next week - promise!


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Subject: Lyr Add: DO ME JUSTICE
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 29 Jul 97 - 04:54 AM

DO ME JUSTICE

Oh, here I am from Donegal. I feel quite discontented
To hear the way that we're run down, not fairly represented.
For they say it is a general rule, to make poor Pat a knave or fool,
But never mind, we'll play it cool and speak up for Old Ireland.

CHORUS: Do me justice, treat me fair and I won't be discontented.
Nor I won't be laughed at anywhere, but fairly represented.

There's Mister Punch with his literature; he tries to hurt us sadly.
Whene'er he draws our caricature, he depicts us rather badly.
With crooked limbs and villainous face he represents the Irish race.
I'm sure it is a great disgrace, we think so in old Ireland. CHORUS

When on the stage I do appear with a thundering great shillelagh,
With tattered hat and ragged coat, you think I'd step out gaily,
With not a word of common sense. They don't know when they give offence.
But carry on at Pat's expense—just let them come to Ireland. CHORUS

They say we're lazy and dirty got, but what's the use to grumble?
For when they enter our Irish cot, they're welcome, though it's humble.
In public works the country around, or where hard work is to be found,
In a railway tunnel underground, you'll find the boys from Ireland. CHORUS

It's very true I like a glass. It makes my heart feel frisky.
And I'm very fond of an Irish lass and partial to the whiskey.
I'm very quiet when left alone. I do what I like with what's my own,
But woe betide the foes, Ochone, who dare run down old Ireland. CHORUS

Taken from a recording by Len Graham, who got it from Eddie Butcher. Nineteenth century, obviously - though the "play it cool" phrase looks like an anachronism!

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 7-Mar-02.


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Wolfgang
Date: 06 Aug 97 - 11:25 AM

It is so nice coming back after a short vacation and finding a lyrics request fulfilled. What a great start for the first day at work!

Thanks a lot, Martin

Cheers Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: GUEST,Jenny Fitzgibbon
Date: 03 May 01 - 02:18 AM

And here's a few verses I added after a visit to Ireland (where I heard Roisin White do this song at the Goilin and LOVED it and her) and even though I am Irish, my Australian accent meant I experiencd all the Aussie jokes ... I had been trying to find out from whence came the original and there it was from the geniuses on the Mudcat! Thanks all Jenny F

But then the Irish turn about and say your average Australian Is a horrid Fosters-wielding lout to whom good taste is alien the dusty bush is his home turf, he'll never work if he can surf With all the IQ of a smurf says the media in Ireland

The images they spread about are of Bruce's who look rugged and Sheila's who through sun and drought look overworked and bu--tired We always call each other Mate, the damned Olympics came too late to change the represented state of DownUnder in old Ireland.


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 03 May 01 - 04:01 AM

Jenny

Hope you enjoyed the Golín!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Frank McGrath
Date: 03 May 01 - 07:39 PM

Magic Song,

I love to hear Frank Harte singing it as well as and Roisin.

"Ye lovers all both great and small
Who dwell in Ireland.
I hope you pay attention whilst i my pen command"

That's another one they have in common.

They are both great singers and characters with wonderful songs. Thanks for posting the lyrics Martin.

Regarding, "we'll play it cool", it does sound very modern but there are many examples of the word used in Irish/English vernacular (old and new) much as it would be used in modern American speech.

My own usage of the word 'cool' in the context of 'relaxed' would own much to the influence of speech I heard as a child. Conversations between adults who would have had little or no knowledge or exposure of modern American slang were (are) laced with examples such as;
Cool as a cucumber
Cool as a breeze
He was 'cool out'
Cool it down
keep it cool
AND … play it cool

Checking out 'English as we speak it in Ireland' (by W.P Joyce, published 1910, reprinted 1979 and 1988, ISBN 0-86327-122-7, Wolfhound Press) gives the following account;

" Cool
"hurlers and football players always put one of their best players to mind cool or stand cool, i.e. t stand at their own goal if the opponents should attempt to drive it through. Universal in Munster. Irish cul, the back. The full word is cool-baur-ya where 'baur-ya' is the goal or gap. The man standing cool is often called 'the man in the gap'".

A further reference from he same book states, "… for the man who courageously and successfully defends any cause or any position, either by actual fighting or by speeches or written articles, is 'man in the gap'."

I wasn't 100% confident that my own usage of the word 'cool' was not coloured by American slang so I went to the old text books for reassurance. I have often used the 'man in the gap' phrase and was aware of it's origins but never consciously associated it with the 'Irish use' of the word 'cool' until I checked. And having checked, my memories of being harangued (and doing the odd bit of haranguing myself) on the hurling field came flooding back. The phrases just came naturally having been exposed to them constantly.

So, to cut a long story to a conclusion, "we'll play it cool", is a term which would be used in 19th Century Ireland. Within the context of the song, it could be interpreted as 'we'll be self controlled' - CONVERSELY it could be interpreted in terms of 'the man in the gap' i.e. "the man who courageously and successfully defends any cause or any position".

Which interpretation would you plump for?

Frank McGrath


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Frank McGrath
Date: 03 May 01 - 07:55 PM

Summarising the long winded drivel.

In 19th century Irish vernacular use of the English language, "we'll play it cool " can mean, "we'll defend our position strongly".

Taking the line of the song "we'll play it cool and speak up for Old Ireland", this would translate to;
"we'll defend our position strongly and speak up for Old Ireland".

Regards
Frank McGrath


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: Frank McGrath
Date: 07 May 01 - 05:00 PM

PS.
Dropping 'it' from the line "we'll play it cool " translates directly into a much used hurling phrase of old "play cool ", ie. guard the goal area.

Frank McGrath


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Subject: RE: Lyr? Here I am from Donegal
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 08 May 01 - 05:07 AM

Just picked up a copy of one of James N Healy's books from the late sixties/early seventies. He gives a version of this which, from the title style, is from a broadsheet. It uses the phrase in the form "take it cool" rather than "play". Jars a little less?

Frank: Yeah - the cúl/goal idea sounds plausible alright - it may well have started life as "I'll take the cúl and speak.."

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr: Here I am from Donegal/Do Me Justice
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 Mar 12 - 05:47 PM

To hear Frank Harte's version:

Click here

Regards


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