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Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières -UK Version (32)
Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres PARODY (10)
Lyr Add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start) (6) (closed)


noyng 25 Jul 97 - 01:23 AM
Frank in the swamps 25 Jul 97 - 05:27 AM
Bill in Alabama 25 Jul 97 - 07:57 AM
Andy Geliher 25 Jul 97 - 09:54 AM
Alice 25 Jul 97 - 11:02 AM
dick greenhaus 25 Jul 97 - 11:11 AM
noyng 25 Jul 97 - 11:41 PM
Dick Wisan 25 Jul 97 - 11:44 PM
Ferrara 04 Sep 98 - 07:01 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Sep 98 - 02:19 PM
gargoyle 05 Sep 98 - 03:13 PM
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dick greenhaus 06 Sep 98 - 11:15 AM
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anna 27 Apr 99 - 11:48 AM
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Subject: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: noyng
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 01:23 AM

What are the lyrics to this childrens' song; It had the words "Mademoiselle or Armenteris and parlez-vous". Then ....rinky, dinky parlez-vous. Thank you!

Click for related thread


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Frank in the swamps
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 05:27 AM

I don't recall the lyrics, but I think you're mistaken about it being a childrens song. As I recall it was popular among soldiers in the Great War as a song about a prostitute...

" Madamoiselle from Armentierres, just 16 plus some forty years, rinky dinky par les vous..."

Good hunting,

Frank.


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 07:57 AM

Indeed, this was, along with "Smile, smile, smile" and "Lili Marlene," one of the best-known songs of WWI. I had a friend who was a WWI veteran, and he sang the refrain as "hinkey dinkey parley voo." That's all I have to contribute; if you don't get some help soon, I'll check the university library.


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Andy Geliher
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 09:54 AM

The following is quoted from The Long Trail, by John Brophy/Eric Partridge
(no ISBN on my 1965 copy)

The songs in the book, originally published ~1930, were collected by ex-servicemen, from ex-servicemen.
Brophy makes no claim that his work is definitive but the text is at least contempory.

Mademoiselle from Armenteers
Air:
French Music-hall Tune

Mademoiselle from Armenteers,
Parley-vous!
Mademoiselle from Armenteers,
Parley-vous!
Mademoiselle from Armenteers,
She hasn't been ---- for forty years,
Inky-pinky parley-vous.

This song was adopted in 1918 by American troops who that year arrived in France and during the peace-time years that followed innumerable stanzas were invented and perpetuated at and for American reunions of `veterans'. The stanza given above constituted the complete version of the song as sung by British troops in 1914-18 - but three other songs, of which the third may most closely resemble the prototype, were in favour. They are set out on the following pages. In all versions the final line was sometimes begun with `Ninky' instead of `Inky'.

Madam Have You . . . ?
Air:
`Mademoiselle from Armenteers'

Madame, have you any good wine ?
Parley-vous!
Madame, have you any good wine ?
Parley-vous!
Madame, have you any good wine Fit for a soldier of the line ?
Inky-pinky parley-vous.

Oh, yes, I have some very good wine,
Fit for a Soldier of the line

Madame have you a daughter fine ?
Fit for a Soldier of the line

Oh. yes, I have a daughter fine,
Far too good for a bloke from the line.

The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Air:
`Mademoiselle from Armenteers'

The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Parley-vous!
The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Parley-vous!
The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Swinging the lead behind the line,
Inky-pinky parley-vous.
The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Swigging the beer behind the line,

The Sergeant-Major's having a time
---- the girls behind the line.

Skiboo
Air:
Variation of `Mademoiselle from Armenteers'

A German officer crossed the Rhine
Skiboo! skibboo!
A German officer crossed the Rhine
Skiboo! skibboo!
A German officer crossed the Rhine
He was on the lookout for women and wine
Skiboo, skiboo,
Ski-bumpity-bump skiboo!
Oh, landlord have you a daughter fair ?
With lily-white breasts and golden hair ?

Oh, yes, I have a daughter fair.
With lily-white breasts and golden hair ?

But my fair daughter is too young,
To be mucked about by a son of a gun.

Oh father, oh father, I'm not too young,
I've been to bed with the parson's son.

It's a hell of a song that we've just sung,
And the fellow that wrote it ought to be hung.

The origin of all these `Mademoiselle' and `Skiboo' songs may be an untraceabler parody, perhaps written for performance at `men only' smoking concerts, of a German song by the poet J.L.Uhland, `The Landlady's Daughter'.


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Alice
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:02 AM

As I recall, Jimmy Durante used to sing this in a version fit for early TV audiences... shouldn't be too hard to find lots of variations.


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:11 AM

We haven't entered this yet because of the difficulty in collecting a reasonable number of verses. Let's consider this thread a CALL FOR VERSES!

I'll put in (from the top of my head) the WWII verse: The WACs and the WAVEs will win the war, Parlez vous The WACs and the WAVEs will win the war, Parlez vous The WACS and the WACES will win the war So what the hell are we fighting for? Hinky Dinky Parlez Vous


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Subject: Thanks for Mademoiselle...help
From: noyng
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:41 PM

Thanks to all for your versions! Andy, your education was most helpful; your first version was the one I was trying to find. What a great site!


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Dick Wisan
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:44 PM

Some more verses:

The first marine went over the top
Parley-vous!
The first marine went over the top
Parley-vous!
The first marine went over the top
To buy the Captain a lollipop
Hinky-dinky parley-vous.

The second marine went over the top
And landed in a barber shop

Notes:

  1. I suppose any number of marines went over the top, but I never heard of any of the others.

  2. These strike me as the kind of verses you sang to the children, which is what I was when someone sang them to me.

  3. Hope this HTML comes out right. Copied most of it from Andy Geliher's


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: Ferrara
Date: 04 Sep 98 - 07:01 PM

It's "Armentieres," pronounced (more or less) "Ar'-mun-tyeers'". Mademoiselle is pronounced (more or less) MAD -um- wa-SELLE.

Here are the words, from my father's WWII Army songbook. Note that these are only the clean verses. Verse order probably doesn't mean much. And I'm sure every outfit had their own home-made verses.

A mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-voo?
A mademoiselle from Armentieres, paylay-voo?
A mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed for forty years,
Hinky-dinky-parlay-voo.

Our top-kick there in Armentieres, ... soon broke that spell of forty years.

She might have been young for all we knew, .. . When Napoleon flopped at Waterloo.

She got the Palm and the Croix-de-Guerre (Croy dee Gair)... for washing soldiers' underwear.

She never could hold the love of a man, ... For she took her baths in a talcum can.

The mademoiselle was dressed in blue, ... The souvenir came in blue too. {Potassium permanganate?- Ferrara)

With her I flirted, I confess ... But she got revenge when she said yes.

The doughboy he had beaucoup jack ... till Mademoiselle got on his track.

My Froggie girl was true to you, ... she was true to the whole damned army too.

O Mademoiselle from gay Paree, you certainly did play hell with me.

You might forget the gas and shells, ... but you'll never forget these mademoiselles.

...That's all about the mademoiselle, but it gives more verses about army life and the was in Europe:

The French, they are a funny race, ... they fight with their feet and save their face.

The Cootie is the national bug of France, ... No matter where you hang your pants.

I didn't care what became of me, ... So I went and joined the Infantry.

The Yanks are having a hell of a time, ... wading around in the mud and slime.

The doughboy he went over the top, ... because he had no place to stop.

The medical corps they hold the line ... with C.C. pills and iodine.

The officers get all the steak, ... and all we get is a belly-ache.

Our grease-ball is a goddamn bum, he bails out swill and makes the slum.

The tin-hat, he ain't totin' a pack, We hope to Christ he breaks his back.

The General got a croix-de-guerre, ... the son of a bitch was never there. Hinky-dinky parlay-voo.

Notes from the book: "'Hinky-Dinky' was undoubtedly the real 'folk-song' of WWI. The British 'Tommies' sang it first, then the Marines picked it up, and finally the entire U.S. Army sang it, and sang it with gusto. The number of stanzas each single outfit made up for itself is legion, and most of them, alas, are completely unprintable."


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 02:19 PM

In WWII, they sang:

Tha WACs and the WAVEs will win the war.. So what the hell are we fighting for?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: gargoyle
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 03:13 PM

From http://alts.net/ns/625/quotes.html

Columbo's Concise Canadian Quotations 1976

Gits Rice, Nova Scotian sergeant in the Canadian Army sat down in a little cafe in Armentieres; a small French town near Lille, in 1915 and watched a chic barmaid serve drinks. He composed the words - then and there- and performed it a few days later before the 5th battalion Montreal - stationed in France.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: gargoyle
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 03:23 PM

A friend has some tattered mimeographed sheets with hundreds of verses. Most of them wonderfully rude, crude or ribald. I will contact him and post when they arrive. In the meantime here are a few more. The first was the one I learned as child.

Many a cootie came over from France
In an undershirt and pair of pants

Oh, landlord, have you a daughter fair
To wash a soldier's underwear?

Oh, yes, I have a daughter fair
With lily-white hands and golden hair

She never could hold the love of a man,
For she took her baths in a talcum can.

Mademoiselle from Armentieres
You'll never get the the Croix de Guerre
If you never wash your underwear

Mademoiselle from Orleans,
She made me sell my Liberty Bonds

The French, they were a funny race,
They fight with their feet and save their face.

The cootie is the national bug of France
The cootie's found all over France,
No matter where you hang your pants

Our grease-ball is a goddam dirty bum,
He bails out swill and makes the slum


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: gargoyle
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 03:31 PM

Oh, the seventy-seventh went over the top,
A sous lieutenant, a Jew and a Wop.

The medical corps, they held the line,
With C.C. pills and iodine.

The general got a Croix de Guerre,
The son-of-a-bitch was never there.

An American soldier on the Rhine,
He kissed the women and runk the wine.

The little marine fell in love with his nurse,
He's taken heer now for better or worse.

My Froggie girl was true to me,
She was true to me, she was true to you
She was true to the whole damn army, too

The Pretoria passed a ship today,
For the ship was going the other way.

Where are the girls that used to swarm,
About me in my uniform?

There's many and many a married man,
Want's to go back to France again.

Twas a hell of a war as we recall,
But still, 'twas better than none at all.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 06 Sep 98 - 11:15 AM

Good start!


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Subject: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: gmbst33+@cis.pitt.edu
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 10:12 AM

Dear folks:

I'm trying to get a song title, a book where the song appears, or the lyrics to the folling song:

This is the first verse:

The first marine went over the wall, parlez-vou, The second marine went over the wall, parles-vous, The third marine went over the wall/ God hit in the ass with a cannon ball/ Oh, Inky dinky Parlez-Vous...

Any help would be appreciated. Please respond to this thread and E-Mail me if you have any answers.

Best regards,

G. Bergen


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: anna
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 11:48 AM

I can help I think. The song is called

Madamoiselle(?) from Armentieres(?) (?) = I'm not sure of the spelling.

It was an old WWI song. I've always loved it. Not that I was alive during WWI, but I've heard the song ;-)

Anna


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 02:04 PM

I guess this one isn't in our database yet, because Dick Greenhaus is still looking for verses. See above for what we have so far.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: ddw in windsor
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 09:53 PM

When I was in the service this was sometimes used as a marching song, usually with a call-response format and -- as far as I know -- verses being made up on the spot. It could get pretty ribald at times.

I had also heard it as a kids' "dirty" song that wasn't to be sung around adults for fear of a thick ear. A couple of the verses from those days are:

The first marine went over the fence, parley-vous
The second marine ....
The third marine went over the fence and milked a cow with a monkey wrench.
Hinky-dinky parley-vous

The first marine whittled the bean...
The second marine cooked the bean....
The third marine he ate the bean
And blew a hole in the submarine
Hinky-dinky .....

That's all I can remember. Maybe it's better that way....

cheers, ddw


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Subject: Lyr Add: MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIÈRES
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 06:27 AM

MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIÈRES

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed in forty years,
Hinky-dinky, parlay-vous.

WORLD WAR I
(from John & Alan Lomax, Folk Song USA, 1947)

Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed in forty years.

She never could hold the love of a man,
For she took her baths in a talcum can.

She might have been old for all we knew,
When Napoleon flopped at Waterloo.

Mademoiselle from Orleans
She made me sell my Liberty bonds.

The seventy-seventh went over the top,
A sous-lieutenant, a Jew and a Wop.

The medical corps they held the line,
With pinky pills and iodine.

The officers get all the steak,
And all we get is the bellyache.

The general got the croix-de-guerre,
And the son-of-a-gun was never there.

An American soldier on the Rhine
He kissed the woman and drank the wine.

'Twas a hell of a war as we recall,
But still 'twas better than none at all.


WORLD WAR II (Lomax)

The Waves and Wacs will win the war
So what the hell are we fighting for?

The permanent party will have to go,
The Wacs are here to run the show.

Mississippi (or whatever) is a hell of a state,
The garbage can of the forty eight.

We're the boys from Keesler Field (or whatever)
We never had a decent meal.

Once we had a decent meal,
It took the general to swing the deal.

They say this is a motorized war,
So what the hell are we marching for?

OTHER VERSES
(Jerry Silverman, Songs & Ballads of WWI, 1997)

Mademoiselle from Gay Pa-ree, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Gay Pa-ree, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Gay Pa-ree,
You certainly did play hell with me,
Hinky-dinky, parlay-vous.

Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed in forty years.

The sergeant-major from Armentieres,
He broke the spell of forty years.

Oh, landlord have you a daughter fair
To wash a soldier's underwear

Oh, yes, I have a daughter fair
With lily-white skin and golden hair.

Mademoiselle from St. Nazaire
She never heard of underwear.

Mademoiselle who comes from Brest
She's just the same as all the rest.

Mademoiselle from Orleans
She gypped me out of my Liberty bonds.

The French they have some customs rare,
they sit and drink in the public square.

The First Division went over the top,
They make the Kaiser take a flop.

The medical corps they held the line
With C.C. pills and iodine.

CANADIAN CONTRIBUTIONS
(Anthony Hopkins, Songs from the Front & Rear, 1979)

She had the form like the back of a hack,
When she cried the tears ran down her back.

She could beg a franc, a drink, a meal,
but it wasn't because of sex appeal.

She could guzzle a barrel of sour wine,
And eat a hog without peeling the rind.

The MPs think they won the war,
Standing guard at the café door…

The officers get the pie and cake
And all we get is the bellyache.

The sergeant ought to take a bath…
The sergeant ought to take a bath…
If he changes his underwear
The frogs will give him the Croix-de-Guerre…

You might forget the gas and shells…
You might forget the gas and shells…
You might forget the groans and yells
But you'll never forget the mademoiselles…

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Just blow your nose, and dry your tears,
We'll all be back in a few short years,
Hinky-dinky, parlay-vous.

JRO


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: Wotcha
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 06:37 AM

Inky Pinky Parlez-vous was (is?) a song that was sung in rugby clubs long after the Armistice of 1918. The verses are to be found in the ubiqitous 1970s "Rugby Songs" and "More Rugby Songs" paperback contributions to world kulture -- not that I play rugger anymore ... cheers, Brian


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: skw@worldmusic.de
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 08:37 PM

Thanks for this thread! I've wondered about the song ever since I came across its title in 'General Guinness' (see DT). - Susanne


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Subject: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 09:20 PM

Still more verses:
Many and many a married man...
Wants to go back to France again.

The captain he's carrying the pack...
Hope to the Lord it breaks his back.

The little marine in love with his nurse...
He's taken her now for better or worse.

Mademoiselle all dressed in white...
Mademoiselle all dressed in white...
Mademoiselle all dressed in black
'Cause her little marine, he didn't come back.
Some verses aren't so happy, are they?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 09:27 PM

There's also a labor version:
The bosses are taking it on the chin...
because the strikers won't give in.

The scabs are having a heck of a time...
trying to cross the picket line.

The boss is shaking at the knees...
He's shaking in his B.V.D.'s

We're going to win the union shop...
We'll clean the floor wiht a union mop.

We're staying on the picket line...
until we get the boss to sign

(source: Songs of Work and Protest, Edith Fowke & Joe Glazer, 1960)
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: THREE GERMAN OFFICERS
From: Snuffy
Date: 17 May 00 - 10:10 AM

In the British Army in the 60s, the 3 German Officers was a separate (though related) song, which we sang to the tune of When Johnny Comes Marching Home.

3 German Officers crossed the Rhine
Taboo, Taboo
3 German Officers crossed the Rhine
Taboo, Taboo
3 German Officers crossed the Rhine
To f**k the women and drink the wine
Taboo, Ta-bye, Ta-bollicky-eye
Ta-bollicky-eye, Taboo

They came upon a wayside inn
Smashed the door and barged right in

The landlord had a daughter fair
Lily-white tits and golden hair

They tied her to a feather bed
F**ked her until she was dead

They took her down a shady lane
F**ked her back to life again

Add more verses here ad lib

3 German Officers went to Hell
F**ked the devil's wife as well

'Twas on the Resurrection morn
3 German Officers still had the horn

Wassail! V


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Abby Sale
Date: 17 May 00 - 08:46 PM

Now, you know this is a bawdy song in its home grounds - the army.  Not just "off color" or suggestive.

A. From Legman/Randolph, an example typical of of verses improvised by soldiers on the march.  It's collected in Arkansas in 1953.  He says it was the most popular song for both British & American troops in WW I.  I'd note that this is a "dynamic" song - it's nature includes the creative spontaneity as well as known standard verses.

            Oh, the French they are a funny race,
                    Parlay-voo?
             The French they are a funny race,
                    Parlay-voo?
             The French they are a funny race,
             They fight with their feet
             And fuck with their face ---
                    Hinky-dinky, parlay-voo?!

(He points out these French marital and martial arts (cunnininctus & savate) were both quite unfamiliar to most Yankee doughboys.  I think this upgrades the song in cleverness beyond the usual.)
 

B.  From a 1929 set version learned by children from returning soldiers.  (Compare with Silverman, above.)

            The First Division went over the top,
                    Parlay-voo?
            The Second Division went over the top,
                    Parlay-voo?
            The Third Division went over the top,
            To circumsize the Kaiser's cock --
                    Hinky-dinky, parlay-voo?!

       From two 11-year-old girls from the northwest coast, 1929 - what he calls a classic version:

            Mademoiselle from Armenteers, (3 times)
            She hasn't been fucked for forty years,

            She was true to me and true to you, (3)
            And true to the whole damn Army too.

            The first three months and all was well,
            The second three months she began to swell,
            The third three months and she gave a grunt
            And a little Marine jumped out of her cunt!

He refers to and agrees wit the comments in Brophy above but calls the text "sadly expurgated."  Gordon's Inferno collection has some good verses, too.  I'll have a look there tomorrow.


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: GUEST,Matt
Date: 17 May 00 - 09:06 PM

There was a book published in Canada in the 1970's called 'Songs from the Front and Rear' that had this piece and many other WW I and II soliders songs. I do not know if it is still in print, but it should be listed on one of the on-line book sellers (like www.chapters.ca).


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Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: GUEST,Gerald Bergen
Date: 19 Jun 00 - 10:25 PM

Well, here's another line for the discussion...hope this verse gets included.

The first Marine went over the wall,p-v,/ The second Marine went over the wall,p-v/ The third Marine went over the wall/ Got hit in the ass with a cannon ball/ Oh, inky-dinky-parles vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 13 Feb 04 - 01:19 PM

It's taken me a while, but I've "collected" over 100 versions of this song and its obsolete relative, "Snapoo," most of them fragmentary, mostly from printed references. If it's in a song book, in Mudcat, or on the Net, I've almost certainly found it. (That includes the song about "The Fart," which BTW I haven't been able to date before the 1960s; also have the rugby song about "Yo-ho, yo ho!" to tune of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home.")

Does anybody know any texts or verses not already in the 'Cat learned from oral tradition? That includes anything with a refrain ike "hinky-dinky parlee voo," "inky-pinky," etc., or "snapoo," "skiboo," or similar.

Somebody's grandfather must have passed something on from World War I, no? PM me if you'd prefer.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Snuffy
Date: 13 Feb 04 - 04:32 PM

Lighter,

That version of The Fart that I posted in the other thread was what I learned at the latest in the 1954/55 school year, before we moved out of the Manchester conurbation into Pennine solitude.

WassaiL! V


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 13 Feb 04 - 05:09 PM

Snuffy: Outstanding. Many thanks.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Uke
Date: 14 Feb 04 - 07:12 PM

Just an aside to this discussion that you might be interested in Lighter, considering your large collection of versions.

An Australian, Cecil Harry Winter (1883-1969), who later settled in New Zealand, claimed authorship of the original words of 'Mademoiselle from Armentieres' in a series of letters and articles in the newspaper Sydney Bulletin, some time after WWII.

He reckoned he'd composed them during WWI, though I'd know whether this was ever proved, either way. Being something of a balladeer, whose poems, usually published in newspaper under the name 'Riverina', it's possible. A few of these apparently entered the oral tradition in the Australiasian area. He was also a short-story writer on the side, so had a familiarity with 'fictionalising'...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 15 Feb 04 - 01:34 PM

Thanks, Uke. Winter is new to me as a claimant. There have been many.

There were a number of polite versions specially written for the stage. You can hear a recording of one sung by Jack Charman, purportedly in 1915 (a very early date if accurate) at

http://firstworldwar.com/audio/1915/htm


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: The O'Meara
Date: 16 Feb 04 - 08:21 AM

I learned a sanitized version from my father, and later the "real" words in the U.S. Army in the early 60s. Most of the verses are posted here - One from me old man:

The Scotch brigade went over the top
They thought they heard a nickle drop

Chorus was Hinky - dinkey parlay - voo

Timeless folk music, by God!

O'Meara


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 16 Feb 04 - 12:34 PM

Thanks much, O'Meara. Do you remember when and where you heard the "real words" and what the social situation was?

Yours is the latest reported singing of the song in the U.S. Army. It was a big hit in France in 1918, but wasn't much sung in WW II.

I assume that your version was less than the epic strings of bland verses reported (with a straight face) in so many songbooks.

Mainly the Canadians, Brits, and Australians have kept it going in various forms, esp. as a rugby song.

If I ever publish on this topic, any 'Catter who helped out gets an acknowledgment (real name or alias, your choice) and a free PAPER COPY! Wotta deal!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,razzoo
Date: 17 Feb 04 - 06:08 AM

I recall it from junior high days in the 50's, a good song for building a lad's vocabulary.

Updated "bring them on" version from somewhere in bama:

First Marine, over the wall, parlez vous,
Second Marine, over the wall, parlez vous,
National Guard, stay behind,
F**k the women and drink the wine,
Rinky Dinky parlez vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: The O'Meara
Date: 17 Feb 04 - 08:25 AM

Lighter;
I recall it quite well. During U.S. Army basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood MO, in Jan. of 1964 a bunch of us recruits were sitting around after some exercise or other and the subject of relatives in the military came up. My grandfather had been in the 69th New York (an Irish outfit) during WWI, and he had told a story about a famous newspaper photo showing the 69th marching to France, caption said they were watched over by a priest and were singing onward christian soldiers. He said no way, if they sang that protestant song the priest would have cursed them. They were actually singing a very bawdy tune called "Bangin' Away on Lulu!" I had overheard my father singing a couple verses of that tune, and I sang them. Several of the other guys knew the tune and had their own verses, and then the subject changed to bawdy old songs and the Madamoiselle and same thing - verses contributed by various guys - pretty rank stuff, although funny. I had no idea how bawdy it was a until then.

O'Meara


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: semi-submersible
Date: 17 Feb 04 - 04:56 PM

Timeless...

Isaac Asimov (top-flight sci-fi writer) in _The Caves of Steel_, has Earth citizens, some lifetimes hence, chant protest songs with "Dirty spacer, do you hear?" replacing an original "nonsense chorus of 'Hinky-dinky parley-voo.'"

Who knows which songs will survive in any given generation?

Maureen


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:44 AM

A quick note of thanks to The O'Meara, Guest razzoo and semi-submersible. Every little bit counts.

Two very similar stanzas, authentically from the U.S. army in World War I:

               The S.O.S. they stayed behind,
               F****** the women and drinking the wine.

               The Y.M.C.A. went over the top,
               They thought they heard a nickel drop.


The "S.O.S." (Service of Supply) was the WWI name for the Quartermaster Corps.

With no USO in WWI, the YMCA set up numerous "canteens" behind the lines where off-duty soldiers could get coffee and doughnuts, cigarettes, etc. The American girls who workd there were also an attraction. Combat troops and others were understandably irked to find that the Y *charged* for refreshments.

Next to "Hinky Dinky / Mademoiselle" in the army's hit parade was "Lulu," with similarly ad lib stanzas. First DT version is pretty close to best-known WWI stanzas.

More later. Keep those posts a-comin'.


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: GUEST,coxcomputing@bellsouth.net
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 10:48 AM

I wonder why someone has not made the association of the French word "indiquez" ("Indicate" in English) with "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous"? Literally they are asking the Madameoselle to indicate that she understands.

Est-ce que je me demande pourquoi quelqu'un n'a pas fait l'association du "indiquez" du mot français ("Indicate" en anglais) avec Parlez-Vous "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous?" Littéralement ils demandent que le Madameoselle indique qu'elle comprend.


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 12:11 PM

Literal translation aside, I don't think that's what they were asking of the Madamoselle.


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: pavane
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 12:21 PM

Looking for verses? There must be hundreds, mostly bawdy.
Tried Llewtrah's site?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 01:29 PM

I wonder why someone has not made the association of the French word "indiquez" ("Indicate" in English) with "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous"? Literally they are asking the Madameoselle to indicate that she understands.

Est-ce que je me demande pourquoi quelqu'un n'a pas fait l'association du "indiquez" du mot français ("Indicate" en anglais) avec Parlez-Vous "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous?" Littéralement ils demandent que le Madameoselle indique qu'elle comprend.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 02:28 PM

Doubtful - earlier British & Aussie versions uniformly have "Inky Pinky." The American chorus may have been influenced by awareness of the nickname of prominent Chicago politician "Hinky-Dink" McKenna.

Less frequent US refrains are "Inky Dinky" and "Rinky-Dinky."

Unpublished stanzas and info always welcome.


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Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 02:41 PM

Yes. Of the dozens of stanzas that have been printed, most are insipid rather than bawdy. Rugby song collections are an exception, but they appear late and, when the song appears, it usu. seems to stem from the text in "Rugby Songs" ("The [Three] German Officers"), in 1967.


Roy Palmer has a slightly different set in his collection "What a Lovely War" in the early '80s. Gordon Hall, Palmer's source, sings something a little different still on the matching casette from Veteran Tapes.

A privately printed US collection dated 1930 and 1935 has some bawdy stanzas collected from WW I veterans - but they're arranged without regard to popularity. I'm almost ready to say something more discursive about the song and its relatives, but want to glean some more stanzas and opinions first. Texts from children & grandchildren of WW I veterans anywhere would be most welcome, regardless of contents.

And Joe: could the several "Mlle." threads be combined for simplicity's sake?
    I combined the three threads into two. and left only this thread open. That should help some.
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:14 PM

It's obviously important to you, as you've resurrected some very elderly threads in order to add the same message to each; but I should imagine that it was seen at the time either as self-evident and not worth mentioning; or irrelevant; or perhaps both.

Sad to say, I recall a parody of the parody that I picked up in childhood, probably via the Scouts.

There was an old woman of ninety-two
Parlez-vous
There was an old woman of ninety-two
Parlez-vous
There was an old woman of ninety-two
She knit some socks and away they flew
Inky Pinky Parlez-vous

The socks went flying down the street
Knocked a policeman off his beat

The socks went flying on to Rome
Found the King of Rome at home

The King of Rome was drinking gin
He opened his mouth and the socks flew in

The King of Rome is dead and gone
But still the socks go flying on.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: cobber
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:26 PM

Growing up in post war England, I only knew the bawdy version for years before I realised there was actually a clean set of words. We would hear ex-soldiers singing these songs when they'd had a few and the women weren't around and of course they did the rounds at school. The words we sang as horrible little pre-pubescent youths were as follows, with some censorship that you can fill in yourself. Forgive my sensitivity.
Three German soldiers crossed the Rhine
They f***d the girls and drank the wine

They came upon a wayside inn
They pissed on the door and kicked it in

The innkeeper had a daughter fair
With little white tits and golden hair

They tied her to a rusty bed
And F***d her till she was nearly dead

They took her down a leafy lane
And f***d her back to life again

It's not exactly Shakespear, but if I can remember it forty years on, I must have heard it a lot.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:27 PM

Thank you, Malcolm. I am familiar with this (British only?) song in its scatological form only. The "socks" version is, so far as I know, previously unrecorded.

By way of reasserting my sanity, I resurrected this thread only. The others reappeared as though they had minds of their own.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:38 PM

Many thanks, Cobber, for both text and context. The only stanza I knew growing up was the familiar one about "hasn't been kissed in forty years."

Somehow no less than *three* "Mlle." / "Parley-Voo" threads are now in play. To keep the 'Cat tidy,I recommend any reader of these lines to direct further posts to "LYR REQ: Mademoiselle from Armentieres."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 08:01 PM

They have a way of doing that. When I said "you", I was addressing "GUESTcoxcomputing" (etc), and should have made that clear; your (Lighter's) revival of this thread is worthwhile and interesting.

There ought to be other people who remember the "socks" parody, but they may not make the Armentiers connection, perhaps. This was the mid 1960s, I think, and it would certainly be older than that. I should add that the "King of Rome is dead and gone" lines were generally sung very slowly, and in the minor key, returning to the major and a brisk pace for the final line.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 09:10 PM

Brilliant, Malcolm! Bsck in the '30s, R. W. Gordon observed the melodic (and formal)relationship between "Mlle."-type songs (in the major)and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (in the minor). A number of post-WW II texts of the former are reported as having been sung to the latter - but yours is the first in which *both* tunes are used in the same song!

It's also worth mentioning in regard to tunes that the usual U.S. "parley-voo" tune is rather plainer and more like a march than variants commonly sung elsewhere.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 11:09 PM

Is the song pre-WW1? Comments in "Sound Off" point to an earlier British version. Some verses with the word 'skiboo' have appeared in Geliher posting). I apologise if I am re-doing an older post which I skipped over.

Quoting Dolph- "The tune and verse structure of "Hinky Dinky" are based on a song that had been known in the British Army for many years. Major Thomas P. Gordon (deceased), Philippine Scouts, who as a young man had served in the British Army under Kitchener in the Sudan, once told me that in those days the British soldiers used to sing a song of similar tune and verse structure. He quoted this stanza, which is almost identical with one in "Hinky Dinky.":

Oh, landlord, have you a daughter fair,
Skiboo, skiboo,
Oh, landlord have you a daughter fair,
Skiboo, skiboo,
Oh, landlord have you a daughter fair
With lily-white arms and golden hair?
Skiboo, skiboo, skiboodley-boo, skidam, dam, dam.

"Furthermore, in a little booklet called "Tommy's Tunes," published by a British Lieutenant during the war, this same stanza is included with the statement that it is from an "heirloom of the British Army which contains over forty stanzas" and is the forerunner of the "Ma'm'selle from Armentières.""
Dolph, "Sound Off," Soldier Songs," p. 82ff.

Dolph has two pages of WW1 verses, and a page of post-war stanzas, some of which I don't believe have appeared here yet.

Has anyone seen the booklet, "Tommy's Tunes"?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 11:53 PM

Sure have. Will post lyrics tomorrow.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Feb 04 - 10:09 AM

From "Tommy's Tunes," 1918:

                              SKIBOO

             Two German officers crossed the Rhine,
                                        Skiboo, skiboo,
             Two German officers crossed the Rhine,
                                        Skiboo, skiboo,
             These German officers crossed the Rhine
             To love the women and taste the wine,
             Skiboo skiboo skiboodley boo ski dam dam dam.


             They came to an inn at the top of a rise...
             A famous French inn of stupendous size....
             They saw a maiden all dimples and sighs....
             The two together said "Damn her eyes!"...

             "Oh, landlord you've a daughter fair.... [3 times]
             With lily-white arms and golden hair. . . .

             "Nein, nein, mein Herr, she's far too young....
             "Nein, nein, mein Herr, she's far too young...."
             "Mais non, mon pere, I'm not so young,
             I've often been kissed by the farmer's son!"...

This is the earliest printing of this song, so far as I have discovered.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Feb 04 - 10:12 AM

Was about to add, before the computer curt me off, that the bowdlerizations will be obvious to anyone familiar with franker texts.
But stanza 2, presumably genuine in essence, is not quite paralleled elsewhere.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Feb 04 - 01:48 PM

Probably not new to Lighter, but I hadn't seen these posted here before:
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, Parlez vous (2x)
She's the hardest working girl in town,
But she makes her living upside down!
Hinky dinky parlez vous.

--
The cooties rambled through her hair,
She whispered sweetly "C'est la Guerre."

Doughboy Music

Robokopp says the early WW1 lyrics have been attributed to Edward Rowland, 1915, and the melody attr. to Glitz Rice, 1915.
"...many sources credit it to the British Army of India under the name "Skiboo.""

Nine months later she gave a grunt,parlez vous (2x)
Nine months later she gave a grunt,
And a fat little Prussian popped out her cunt.

The fat little Prussian he grew and grew, p. v.,
The fat little Prussian he grew and grew,
He fucked the cat and the donkey too.

The fat little Prussian he went to hell, p.v.,
The fat little Prussian he went to hell,
He fucked the devil and his wife as well.

Made a Mam'selle
(Couldn't resist the Made Mam'selle." Just remembered that from singing in camp.


? Could the name "Skiboo" have come from the Farmer Skiboo stories or the legendary strong man of the docks? The name appears in several connotations in the British Isles.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Feb 04 - 04:43 PM

Robokopp's version is Gordon Hall's via Roy Palmer.

"Mlle. from Armentieres" has been attributed to Rowland & Rice, but no proof in the form of early sheet music has been forthcoming.

I do not know the composer/lyricist of the song sung by Jack Charman that I pointed out on Feb. 15, above: Rowland & Rice? It seems related to the more familiar song only by title, "parlez-vous," and the tune of the chorus.

At the risk of embarrassing myself - who is Farmer Skiboo? Who is the legendary strong man? What other connotations are there?

All I know about the word "Skiboo" is that "Skibo" is a village in Ireland. Or is it?

At least one collected version of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again" (or "Johnny Fill Up the Bowl" in some renditions) has the refrain "skiball, skiball" in it. Another has "skeugaugh, skeugaugh."

What's goin' on here???


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,CoxComputing
Date: 23 Feb 04 - 11:07 PM

I am not a language expert, but I feel sometimes that I can associate "sound alike" words that show the development(or bastardization)of languages.
An example of this is that many people who arrived in the United States from Europe had their names inadvertantly changed because the interviewing immigration officers simply wrote down the name they "heard".
The phrase "Inky Pinky Parlez-vous" or "Inky Dinky Parlez-vous" could have developed because of misinterpretation. Variations in spelling are explained by the fact that many letters of the alphabet sound alike to the listener. Additionally, I doubt that the name of Chicago politician "Hinky-Dink" McKenna had any influence on the lyrics of this song.
The typical Mademoiselle from Armentières song is constructed of a series of "Parlez-vous" after each stanza, then "Inky Dinky Parlez-vous".
It is "understand", "understand", "understand", followed by "indicate you understand", the "indicate" being a mispronunciation of the French word "indiquez" ("Indicate" in English).
Why not consider this interpretation of the meaning of "Inky Dinky Parlez-vous" ? I haven't seen any other good explanation of it's origin.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Mar 04 - 03:31 AM

My version is the same as Wassail! V's except at the end of every verse thing
ex:'Twas on the Resurrection morn
Taboo, Taboo
'Twas on the Resurrection morn
Taboo, Taboo
'Twas on the Resurrection morn
3 German Officers still had the horn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 04 Mar 04 - 07:11 AM

Thanks, Guest. Am I right that yours is a non-US version?

British / Canadian / ANZAC versions are almost universally concerened with the German / Prussian officer(s) and the innkeeper's daughter.
US versions continue the adventures of the daughter's illegitimate son (a "little Marine") and generally add satirical topical stanzas.

Topical stanzas were still used for marching at Fort Benning, Georgia, as late as the Korean War.

Still looking for more texts and comments.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Mar 04 - 03:14 PM

Lighter, Canadian versions that I have heard, and those verses printed in the Canadian "Songs From the Front and Rear" don't mention the German officers, but some verses mention the foibles and privileges of Canadian officers and non-coms (see version posted by Joe Offer early in this thread).

It seems that the earliest versions mention Skiboo or Taboo but not Hinky (is Inky a product of rugby fans and children?).

There are several Skiboos. Anyone know anything about the Northern Ireland mythical shipyard worker?- the only one that seems likely unless the farmer Skiboo tales are older than the current children's book.
1. Children's stories about Farmer Skiboo. Waddell and Fletcher. These seem to be current. Oxford Press. 2. Mythical shipyard worker in Northern Ireland. See Sam Hanna Bell, "Erin's Orange Lily," a book on Northern Ireland Culture. 3. Skibo Castle in Sutherland. From Schytherbole, Celtic for a place of peace. Once owned by Andrew Carnegie. Not worth considering are 4. Name for a group of skin diseases. 5. Computer programs, etc.

And the verse from "Jones' Ale"-

Chorus:
Wnen the landlord's daughter, she came in,
And we kissed those rosy cheeks again;
We all sat down and then we'd sing:
When Jones' Ale was new, me boys,
When Jones' Ale was new.

Supposedly based on the old (1815 thereabouts) German song, "The Landlord's Daughter," which I cannot find. The author, Uhland, was a German romantic. This song is mentioned in a thread here somewhere, without lyrics or information. It is mentioned as a possible precursor of the "Mademoiselle..."

Maybe Wolfgang can find the german song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 04 Mar 04 - 08:59 PM

The "plot" of "Frau Wirtin" ("The Innkeeper's Wife") by Uhland bears just enough resemblance to the "Skiboo/Snapoo/Taboo/Parlez-Vous" song
to suggest that the latter is a cynical, bawdy parody of it, but it is rash to claim that there "must" be a direct connection.

Will post an English translation shortly unless someone beats me to it. The assertion that "Skiboo," etc., stems from the Napoleonic Wars
has no factual basis, though it was apparently known, in some form, as early as the 1870's.

Q, thanks for the leads on "Skibo."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Mar 04 - 12:06 AM

The later version of "Frau Wirtin," the many verses, some bawdy, of "Es steht ein Wirtshaus an der Lahn," could have been the inspiration for "Mademoiselle..." but, as you say, a sure connection cannot be claimed. The verses about the maid, the major with syphilis, the general, the Miss, etc., develop similar ideas. A couple of verses:

Frau Wirtin hat auch eine Magd
Die sitzt im garten und pflücht Salat.
Sie kann es kaum erwarten
Bis dass das Glöckchen zwölfe schlagt,
Da kommen die Soldaten.

Frau Wirtin also had a maid (servant)
Who sits in the garden and picks salad (lettuce)
She can hardly wait
Until the little bell strikes twelve,
Then the soldiers come.

Frau Wirtins Tochter Röschen hiess
Und sich von jedem küssen liess.
Offiziere un Studenten,
Die zahlen jährlich fünfzehn Mark
Und wurden Abonnenten.

A good long version, linked by Wolfgang in thread 61938, is at ingeb.org: Wirthaus an der Lahn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Mar 04 - 12:08 AM

The melody for "Es steht...." is much better than the tune for "Mademoiselle...."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Flash Company
Date: 05 Mar 04 - 10:49 AM

Flanagan & Allen had a song which they recorded in 1940 during the so-called phoney war:-
If a grey haired lady says 'How's your father'
That will be Mademoiselle,
If she smiles and says 'How's your father'
That will be Mademoiselle,
If she says 'Parlez vous, tout sweet tell me do
How is he after all these years?'
If the grey haired lady says 'Don't tell your mother'
That's mademoiselle from Armentieres!

FC


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 05 Mar 04 - 12:53 PM

Thanks, Flash Company. New stuff.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 05 Mar 04 - 05:25 PM

As a footnote to the above, Flanagan & Allen may be heard performing "If a Grey-Haired Lady Says 'How's Yer Father?'" on the CD Flanagan & Allen: Let's Be Buddies" (Empress RAJCD832, track 18.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Mar 04 - 09:55 PM

Here's the German poem by Ludwig Uhland which "Three German Officers" is said to parody. Uhland seems to have written it around 1810.

                     DER WIRTINS TOECHTERLEIN

          Es zogen drei Bursche wohl ueber den Rhein,
          Bei einer Frau Wirtin da kehrten sie ein.

          <           Wo hat Sie ihr schoenes Toechterlein?>>

          <           Mein Toechterlein liegt auf den Totenbahr'.>>

          Und als sie traten zur Kammer hinein,
          Da lag sie in einem schwarzen Schrein.

          Der erste, der schlug den Schleier zurueck,
          Und schaute sie an mit traurigem Blick:

          <           Ich wuerde dich lieben von dieser Zeit!>>

          Der zweite deckte den Schleier zu,
          Und kehrte sich ab und weinte dazu:

          <           Ich hab' dich geliebt so manches Jahr.>>

          Der dritte hub ihn wieder sogleich,
          Und kuesste sie an den Mund so bleich.

          <           Und werde dich lieben in Ewigkeit!>>

In English:

                   THE LANDLADY'S LITTLE DAUGHTER

          Three students came wandering over the Rhine,
          And called at a Landlady's inn.

          "Landlady! Have you any good beer and wine?
          And where are you keeping your little daughter?"

          "My beer and wine are fresh and clear,
          My little daughter lies dead upon her bier."

          And when they stepped into the cold little room,
          There she lay in a casket of black.

          The first lad dashed the veil aside,
          And with sorrowful look gazed upon her:


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Mar 04 - 10:30 PM

Sorry for the compuglitch. As I was saying,


          "Ah, if yet you lived, you lovely maid,
          I should have loved you from this moment on!"

          The second pulled the curtain to,
          And turned away and wept besides:

          "Alas, that you lie dead upon this bier,
          For I *have* loved you so many years!"

          The third rose up again at once,
          And kissed her on her lips so pale:

          "I've *always* loved you, I love you still today,
          And I *will* love you into Eternity!"

A literary English translation appeared by about 1856, but I have not yet dredged it up. The poem was eventually set to music, but I do not know what the music sounded like.

The suffix "-lein" is often translated as "little," but I believe it conveys strong overtones of "sweet" in this context.

What if anything the English bawdy song owes to Uhland's poem seems to be a matter of opinion only. The earliest recovered texts of the bawdy song, by the way, have only one German (or "Dutch") protagonist, not three.

Am open to comments and suggestions.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 21 Feb 05 - 06:22 PM

It's been a year. Any new 'Catters with uncollected verses? Anything with "hinky dinky" / "inky-pinky" / "taboo taboo," etc. will fill the bill. If you're out there, please tell me too where and when you learned 'em. Thanx.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armenti?res
From: GUEST,Joe_F
Date: 22 Feb 05 - 10:56 AM

W. H. Auden wrote a whole song on that pattern ("Passenger Shanty", 1938), but I'm afraid it is not in the spirit of the original:

The ship weighed twenty thousand ton

Parlez-vous

The ship weighed twenty thousand ton

Parlez-vous

She left Marseille at a quarter-to-one

For the China War and the tropical sun.

Inky-pinky parlez-vous.

(15 more stanzas)

--- Joe Fineman    joe_f@verizon.net

||: Tradition is a straitjacket; fashion is an iron maiden. :||


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Feb 05 - 11:36 AM

Thanks, Joe. A nice surprise.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter at work
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 09:12 AM

My search for traditionally learned versions is winding down, but I thought I'd refresh this one more time, just in case.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 12:10 PM

Just happened on this thread. In response to a question above:

"Skiboo," along with Skidoo, Skiball, Skibow, Skeubeugh and so on, come from the Irish "Usquebaugh," for "whiskey." The late Ben C. Moomaw, singer and song collector of Roanoke VA, and subsequently President of the VA Folklore Society, explained that to me when he sang this Civil War predecessor:

SKEBAUGH

In eighteen hundred and sixty-one,
Skebaugh, says I,
In eighteen hundred and sixty-one,
Skebaugh, says I,
In eighteen hundred and sixty-one
We beat the Yankees at Bull Run
And we'll all drink stone blind,
Johnny come fill up the bowl.

...sixty-two
We beat the Yankees through and through...

...sixty-three
Old Lincoln set the darkies free...

...sixty-four
I said I'd fight this war no more...

...sixty-five
We thanked the Lord we were alive...

Tune is more or less a major-key version of When Johnny Comes Marching Home.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 12:47 PM

Thanks so much, Bob. I've long suspected the connection between the refrains in some of the Civil War "Johnny" parodies and "skiboo, skiboo." The "Three German Officers" texts are very often sung to the "Johnny" tune, making me wonder whether that was the original, with the tune of "Hinky Dinky," in the major, coming as a later development. (Your own example suggests this is true!)

I had *not* imagined that "skeugaugh" could come from "usquebaugh," but, by cracky, that sounds to me like more than just a wild guess. Particularly when recalling that another refrain of "Johnny Fill up the Bowl" went "For bowls ! For bowls !" apparently a call for more to drink, which is presumably where "Usquebaugh !" (misheard as "skeebaw !" etc.) fits in. (The reported use of the refrain "For balls ! For balls !" (i.e., "For nothing !") in one "Johnny" parody, might well have encouraged the creation of new, thoroughly bawdy texts. Not that much encouragement was required.

So many Irish (and German)immigrants fought in the Civil War that these various cultural connections suggest a strong Civil War influence on what became the quintessential soldier song of the Great War.

All very interesting, IMO.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,sanng@skybest.com
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 01:54 PM

Attention O'Meara
re: NY 69th

My husband's father was in the 69th. Michael Gaffney--he rode a motorcycle. To think I know a verse that hasn't been posted here! Because of History Channel program about the Revolutionary War the subject of Washington came up which tickled my memory of Mademoiselle from Armentieres

Washington crossed the Delaware, parlez vous
Washington crossed the Delaware, parlez vous
Washington crossed the Delaware,
In his dirty underwear
Hinky-Dinky, parlez vous


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Clowance
Date: 13 Jun 06 - 01:30 PM

Clean version of the above taught to me at Brownies in the 1970s in England, went something like this:

The bomb went rolling down the street, parley vous;
The bomb went rolling down the street, parley vous;
The bomb went rolling down the street, parley vous;
Knocked a copper off his feet. Inky pinky parley vous

(more verses I dont remember)

Christopher Columbus drinking gin, parley vous;
Christopher Columbus drinking gin, parley vous;
Christopher Columbus drinking gin, parley vous;
Opened his mouth and the bomb went in. Inky pinky parley vous. BANG!

On reflection, probably not very suitable. Dont know its origin, sounds like a parody from WWII.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: Schantieman
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 08:48 AM

We used to sing after Rugby matches...

(a line I can't remember...)
Parlez Vous
(the same line I can't remember...)
Parlez Vous
(the same line I can't remember...)
Did a fart and out it flew
Inky Pinky Parlez Vous.

The fart went rolling down the street
Knocked a copper off his feet

The copper got out his rusty pistol
Shot the fart from here to Bristol

Bristol Rovers playing at home
Kicked the fart from here to Rome

...as well as three dirty Germans crossing the line (or was it Rhine?), f*cking the women and drinking the wine etc.


Steve


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: GUEST,Chicken Charlie
Date: 14 Jun 06 - 07:07 PM

Late to the party though I am, I scanned the page and did not find these two verses, which are American. Sorry if they repeat:

They say this is a mechanized war; parlez vous?
They say this is a mechanized war; parlez vous?
They say this is a mechanized war; what in the hell are we walking for? Inky dinky parlez vous?

And:

The second lieutenant carries a pack...
We hope to hell it breaks his back...

Chicken Charlie


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: GUEST,Laurent
Date: 26 Jun 06 - 04:32 PM

A French version :

Line Renaud
Mademoiselle from Armentières
        
Paroles: Louis Gasté. Musique: Louis Gasté, Pierre Guillermin   1952
© 1952 - Editions Louis Gasté

Un joli sourire de France
Des fossettes aux joues
Des cheveux tout fous
Des yeux bleus très doux
Sur son berceau dès sa naissance
Une bonne fée
D'un coup de baguette
Avait changé sa destinée

Mademoiselle from Armentières
Parlez-vous,
Mademoiselle from Armentières
Parlez-vous,
Elle n'avait pas encore parlé
Qu'elle savait déjà chanter
Mademoiselle from Armentières
Puis vint l'âge d'être écolière
D'apprendre à compter
D'apprendre à parler
Ça ça l'ennuyait
Mais faire l'école buissonnière
Ca, ça l'amusait
Toujours gaie comme un pinson
Elle chantait sa chanson
{au Refrain}

Mais un matin ce fut la guerre
Et tous les soldats
Qui passaient par-là
Se disaient tout bas
La voyant si belle et si fière
Ah ! Qu'on serait bien
Blottis dans ses bras
Douillettement jusqu'au matin
{au Refrain}

Quand on raconte cette histoire
Dans tous les pays
On ajoute aussi
Qu'elle eut un mari
Les gens qui ont bonne mémoire
Vont vous raconter
Qu'elle accepta d'épouser
Un colonel anglais

Mademoiselle from Armentières
Voulez-vous ?
Mademoiselle from Armentières
Voulez-vous
Comme elle lui répondit : "oui"
Elle eut un très gentil mari
Mademoiselle from Armentières.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: GUEST,Bjarki
Date: 29 Jul 06 - 10:11 AM

Got a couple more verses in a show i'm teching for tonight, will try to note them down and post them tomorrow!

I know it's a little late but I thought it worth mentioning...

Bjarki


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 02 Aug 06 - 08:52 PM

Thanks, Bjarki. I'm still interested in all aspects of "Mademoiselle" and related songs, especially in traditional versions.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Sep 06 - 09:27 PM

Ethel Mermen's version from the "Ford's 50th Anniversary Show" Looks like the lyrics were cleaned up for t.v. Aired June 15th, 1953

Mademoiselle from Armentieres
Parlez-vous
Mademoiselle from Armentieres
Parlez-vous
Mademoiselle from Armentieres
She hadn't been hugged for forty years
Hinky-Dinky Parlez-vous

First marine went over the top
Parlez-vous
Second marine went over the top
Parlez-vous
Third marine went over the top
Because he had no place to stop
Hinky-Dinky Parlez-vous

The eiffel tower is quite a view
Parlez-vous
The eiffel tower is quite a view
Parlez-vous
The eiffel tower is quite a view
But when she saw me she went "Woo woo"
Hinky-Dinky Parlez-vous

Colonel got the Croix-de-Guerre
Parlez-vous
Colonel got the Croix-de-Guerre
Parlez-vous
Colonel got the Croix-de-Guerre
The son of a gun was never there
Hinky-Dinky Parlez-vous

The day we sailed away from france
Parlez-vous
The day we sailed away from france
Parlez-vous
The day we sailed away from france
We said goodbye and thought the rest
Hinky-Dinky Parlez-vous

Mademoiselle from Armentieres
Parlez-vous
Mademoiselle from Armentieres
Parlez-vous
She brushed her tooth and put on her hair
Cut or we'll be off the air
Hinky-Dinky Parlez-vous


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: Lighter
Date: 13 Sep 06 - 01:08 PM

Thanks, GUEST, for a version that I'd heard of but not seen. Definitely laundered and revised for early TV, though several of the verses had already appeared in popular collections. ("Brushing her tooth" and "putting on her hair" are interesting novelties, though.)

Did some censor decide that "Brest," pronounced as though it were English, was risque' enough to be changed to "France"? That doesn't even rhyme!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Tom Hamilton frae Saltcoats Scotland
Date: 29 Dec 06 - 02:36 PM

Mademoiselle from Armentieres
Three German Officers crossed the Rhine

Melody - attr. to Glitz Rice, 1915; Seq. by Jim Sheldon

attr. to Edward Rowland, 1915

|: Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous, :|
Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hasn't been kissed for forty years,
Chorus:
Hinky-dinky parlez-vous.
2. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
She got the palm and the croix de guerre,
For washin' soldiers' underwear,
Chorus:

3. |: The Colonel got the Croix de Guerre,
Parlez-vous :|
The Colonel got the Croix de Guerre,
The son-of-a-gun was never there!
Chorus:

4. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
You didn't have to know her long,
To know the reason men go wrong!
Chorus:

5. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
She's the hardest working girl in town,
But she makes her living upside down!
Chorus:

6. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
The cooties rambled through her hair;
She whispered sweetly "C'est la guerre."
Chorus:
7. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
She'll do it for wine, she'll do it for rum,
And sometimes for chocolate or chewing gum!
Chorus:
8. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
You might forget the gas and shell
But you'll nev'r forget the Mademoiselle!
Chorus:

9. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
Parlez-vous :|
Where are the girls who used to swarm
About me in my uniform?
Chorus:

10. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from St. Nazaire,
Parlez-vous :|
The Mademoiselle from St. Nazaire,
She never washed her underwear.
Chorus:

11 |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Aix-Les-Bains,
Parlez-vous :|
Mademoiselle from Aix-Les-Bains,
She gave the Yankees shooting pains!
Chorus:

12. |: Oh, Mademoiselle from Montparnasse,
Parlez-vous :|
As soon as she'd spy a Colonel's brass,
She'd take off her skirt and roll in the grass!
Chorus:




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|: Three German Officers crossed the Rhine,
Parlez-vous :|
Three German Officers crossed the Rhine
To fuck the women and drink the wine,
Chorus:
Hinky-dinky parlez-vous.
2. |: They came to the door of a wayside Inn,
Parlez-vous :|
They came to the door of a wayside Inn,
Pissed on the mat and walked right in,
Chorus:

3. |: Oh landlord have you a daughter fair?,
Parlez-vous :|
Oh landlord have you a daughter fair?
With lily-white tits and golden hair?,
Chorus:

4. |: My only daughter's far too young,
Parlez-vous :|
My only daughter's far too young,
To be fucked by you, you bastard Hun,
Chorus:

5. |: Oh father dear I'm not too young
Parlez-vous :|
Oh father dear I'm not too young
I've just been fucked by the blacksmith's son,
Chorus:

6. |: At last they got her on the bed,
Parlez-vous :|
At last they got her on the bed,
And shagged her 'til her cheeks were red,
Chorus:

7. |: They took her down a shady lane,
Parlez-vous :|
They took her down a shady lane,
And shagged her back to life again,
Chorus:
8. |: And then they took her to a bed,
Parlez-vous :|
And then they took her to a bed,
And shagged her til she was nearly dead,
Chorus:
9. |: They shagged her up they shagged her down,
Parlez-vous :|
They shagged her up they shagged her down,
They shagged her all around the town,
Chorus:

10. |: They shagged her in they shagged her out,
Parlez-vous :|
They shagged her in they shagged her out,
They shagged her up her water-spout,
Chorus:

11. |: Now seven months later all was well,
Parlez-vous :|
Now seven months later all was well,
Eight months later she began to swell,
Chorus:

12. |: Nine months later she gave a grunt,
Parlez-vous :|
Nine months later she gave a grunt,
And a little fat Prussian popped out her cunt,
Chorus:

13. |: The fat little Prussian he grew and grew,
Parlez-vous :|
The fat little Prussian he grew and grew,
He fucked the cat and the donkey too,
Chorus:

14. |: The fat little Prussian he went to hell,
Parlez-vous :|
The fat little Prussian he went to hell,
He fucked the devil and his wife as well,
Chorus:


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Unclear as to when this song was written, but many sources credit it to the British Army of India under the name "Skiboo". The WWI lyrics were probably written at Armentieres in 1915, which served as a R&R (rest and recreation) area for units coming out of the trench line.

not to be taken serously, remember this was written during the first world war 1915.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Genie (Wha hoppen ma cookie?)
Date: 30 Dec 06 - 12:16 AM

OT, but in response to this post from Bill in Alabama:
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 07:57 AM

"Indeed, this was, along with 'Smile, smile, smile' and 'Lili Marlene', one of the best-known songs of WWI."

"Lili Marlene" ("Lili Marleen") was a popular song in WW II, not WWI. It was based on a poem written by a soldier in WWI. (See the Lili Marlene/Lili Marleen threads for its history.)

The actual title to the song with the refrain "Smile, smile, smile" is "Pack Up Your Troubles (In Your Old Kit Bag"0.

---

Thanks for all the verses to "Mademoisell From Armentieres" that I did not know.

I only knew 2 or 3 (including the "... hasn't been kissed in 40 years," except that the doughboys rarely sang "kissed" ;-D ) so I made up this one:

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, ... etc.
I went to war to see Paree
But I'm stuck here in the infantry.
Hinky-dinky parlez-vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Kelvin Philpott, Yate Bristol
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 04:18 PM

The second of Tom Hamilton's versions had a verse 12 variation that went:-

Nine months later her belly went pop,
Out came a Chav with a cast iron cock.

At that time (late 40's) chav was a common expression for a man that seems to have now come back to fashion but now has a degrogatory connotation that it did not have then.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 03 Jan 07 - 05:37 PM

Guest Kelvin, were the other verses the same as Tom Hamilton's ?
The variant you give is unusual. And why "Chav" ? Is that short for something else ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Tom Hamilton frae Saltcoats Scotland
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:17 PM

these are to words that the soldiers sang during the first world war and we were at war with Germany, sorry German Mudcatters


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Tom Hamilton frae Saltcoats Scotland
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:18 PM

a CHAV is a young man or woman who is a bit of a arsehole.
we in Scotland call them NEDS and in England they are known as CHAVS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,von
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 08:47 PM

my dad sang it to me when i was little
the cheese went rolling down the street
knocked a copper right off his feet

the copper got up and blew his whistle
the cheese went rolling on to bristle
lol that all i can remember but let me know if you know this version id like to know the rest of it ha ha


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 09:07 PM

You might not think this is related, but take a look at the Sadie Damascus version of "Two Sisters" - it's a veritable masterpiece...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: The Walrus
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 05:10 AM

Lighter posted on 03 Jan 07 - 05:37 PM

"...And why "Chav" ? Is that short for something else ?..."

If I recall, 'Chav' is a slang term (from the Romany, I believe), for a child.

I've no idea why it suddenly reapeared as a term for those pillocks in assorted cheap bling and knock-off Burberry designs.

W


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Mart
Date: 30 Jan 07 - 04:31 PM

Dunno if this thread is still alive, but there was a version we used to sing in Primary School on the bus on the way to the Swimming Pool I stumbled across this site in searching for the gaps in the version I knew (my daughter thinks this is funny and keeps asking me to finish it);

There was an old lady of 72, Parlez Vous
There was an old lady of 72, Parlez Vous
There was an old lady of 72, Parlez Vous
Who did a fart and away it blew
Inky pinky parlez vous

The fart went rolling down the street, Parlez Vous
The fart went rolling down the street, Parlez Vous
The fart went rolling down the street, Parlez Vous
And knocked a copper off his feet
Inky pink parlez vous

The copper got out his rusty whistle, Parlez Vous
The copper got out his rusty whistle, Parlez Vous
The copper got out his rusty whistle, Parlez Vous
And blew the fart from here to Bristol
Inky pinky parlez vous

(it's here that my memory fades...)
Bristol Rovers playing at home, Parlez Vous
Bristol Rovers playing at home, Parlez Vous
Bristol Rovers playing at home, Parlez Vous
(Some Bristol Rovers player) kicked the fart from here to Rome
Inky pinky palez vous

Julius Caesar (something, something), Parlez Vous
Julius Caesar (something, something), Parlez Vous
Julius Caesar (something, something), Parlez Vous
(de dum de dum de dum de doo)
Inky pinky parlez vous

If anyone can fill in the blanks...that'd be great ;-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lisa
Date: 12 Apr 07 - 10:41 AM

Those are the full lyrics to the song you just wrote out. So you can now finish it for your daughter. I used to find in highly amusing when I was a child. =]

There was an old woman of 92 parlez vous.
There was an old woman of 92 parlez vous.
There was an old woman of 92,
Did a fart and off it flew,
Inky pinky parlez vous.

The fart went rolling down the street parlez vous.
The fart went rolling down the street parlez vous.
The fart went rolling down the street,
Knocked the copper of his feet,
Inky pinky parlez vous.

The copper got out his rusty pistol parlez vous.
The copper got out his rusty pistol parlez vous.
The copper got out his rusty pistol,
Shit the fart from here to Bristol,
Inky pinky parlez vous.

Bristol Rovers playing at home parlez vous.
Bristol Rovers playing at home parlez vous.
Bristol Rovers playing at home,
Kicked the fart from here to Rome,
Inky pinky parlez vous.

Julius Caeser drinking gin parlez vous.
Julius Caeser drinking gin parlez vous.
Julius ceaser drinking gin,
Opend his mouth and the fart flew in,
Inky pinky parlez vous.

The fart went rolling down his spine parlez vous.
The fart went rolling down his spine parlez vous.
The fart went rolling down his spine,
Knocked his bollocks* out of line,
Inky pinky parlez vous.

The fart went shooting off to Mars parlez vous.
The fart went shooting off to Mars parlez vous.
The fart went shooting off to Mars,
Knocked the Martian on his arse,
Inky pinky parlez vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Fred
Date: 13 May 07 - 06:04 AM

The song Mademoiselle from Armentieres, as known in WW1 was penned by Cecil H Winter in 1915 / 16, during his time in England and France fighting with the kiwis. He was Australian having been raised in the 'Riverina' region of NSW. He was to take Riverina for his writings of Australian Bush poetry culminating in the writing of a book of such poetry ("The Story of Bidgee Queen & Other Verses",Century Books. 1929). From a young age he wrote for the Australian Bulletin Magazine. He migrated to New Zealand prior to WW1, living in Bluff, Southland.
I have a copy of his original writings of this song. He was my grandfather.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 13 May 07 - 01:39 PM

Guest Fred, this is significant information, not least because there are several versions claimed to be the original. Can you post your grandfather's lyrics and any copyright info including date and place?

Do you know what unit your grandfather was serving in when he wrote the song?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 May 07 - 12:51 AM

Here's the catalog entry from The National Library of Australia:

Record ID: 1612472
Author: Winter, C. H.
Title: The story of 'Bidgee Queen and other verses / by C.H. Winter ("Riverina") ; with an introduction by O. N. Gillespie, cover design and frontpiece by Ken Alexander.
Publisher: Sydney : New Century Press, 1929.
Description: 181 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Notes: Most of the verses appeared originally in the Bulletin, Aussie, Smith's Weekly, Sydney Mail, Worker (N.S.W.), Southland Times, N.Z. Artists Annual, and the Highway (N.Z.).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Fred
Date: 16 May 07 - 07:25 AM

Lighter,

I will source some additional info on Cecil H Winter for you. My mum has two of his journals made up of years of writings. This weekend I will figure out how to post the copy of the song for you.
Other bits about my grandfather:
Articles in my possession talk of him being friends with Breaker Morant who also wrote for the Bulletin around 1998 on until his death. One article tells of his visit to the offices of the Sydney Bulletin in 1949 and after making himself known, was surrounded by staff and treated as a brother.
Another interesting thing is one article talks of his early life around Deniliquin, being first brought up on a station about 50 km from the meeting of the Billabong and Edwards Rivers in the Riverina. HThe article states that as a younger man his father William met up with Burke and Wills on the Victorian border as they rode north (article: Southland Daily News (NZ),Sat Dec 15 1951 (p11).
In terms of the song, there are several who claimed authorship at some time or other. This is disputed in an article as well that I have, stating that the claims of one ECH Rowlands (UK) and Lt Gritz-Rice are flase and that CH Winter was the author.
Grandad Winter gave or sold the rights to the song to one Pat Hanna of the Diggers Vaudeville show that toured Austraila after WW1.
I have no knowledge beyond that.
What I do have though, is a copy of his song (the music itself is far older). On it it clearly shows a verse, which is crossed out and presumably he deleted. It was verse two and started "Mademoiselle enjoyed the noise, parlez vous"
In another, be crosses out the words "You'll" and hand writes "Go"
I cannot date these changes.
Another well known poen he wrote is Maloneys Cockatoo.

I hope that helps those interested. I am happy to converse with anyone who is interested. If you write to me, use my dodgy Yahoo addy initially (Tom_nz01@yahoo.com)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Fred
Date: 16 May 07 - 07:35 AM

Sorry, you will have to excuse my typos. In fact in regard to Breaker Morant it was of course 1898.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 17 May 07 - 09:58 AM

Guest Fred, thanks ! I look forward to seeing Cecil's song.

You can listen to a post-war recording of the version copyrighted by Carlton and Tunbridge here:

http://www.firstworldwar.com/audio/mademoisellefromarmentieres.htm

The site dates the recording to "1915," but those lyrics were not published till 1918-19.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Jul 07 - 08:01 AM

It brownies i was taught:

The bomb went rolling down the street, parley vous;
The bomb went rolling down the street, parley vous;
The bomb went rolling down the street, parley vous;
Knocked a copper off his feet. Inky pinky parley vous

The Copper got out his trusty pistol, parley vous;
The Copper got out his trusty pistol, parley vous;
The Copper got out his trusty pistol, parley vous;
the bomb went rolling on to bristol. Inky pinky parley vous

The people of bristol were out to dance, parley vous;
The people of bristol were out to dance, parley vous;
The people of bristol were out to dance, parley vous;
the bomb went rolling on to france. Inky pinky parley vous


The people of France were not at home, parley vous;
The people of France were not at home, parley vous;
The people of France were not at home, parley vous;
The bomb went rolling on to rome. Inky pinky parley vous

Julius Ceasar was drinking gin, parley vous;
Julius Ceasar wasdrinking gin, parley vous;
Julius Ceasar was drinking gin, parley vous;
He opened his mouth and the bomb went in. Inky pinky parley vous. BANG!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Leadfingers
Date: 28 Jul 07 - 09:22 AM

SO many variations ! Ceilidh band I gig with now and then even has a Singing call using the tune !


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Seppo
Date: 07 Dec 07 - 11:41 PM

The first marine went over the hill, parley vous;
The second marine went over the hill, parley vous;
The third marine went over the hill, as far as I know, they are there still...
Hinky dinky parlez vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,jay
Date: 26 Nov 08 - 09:22 AM

as a boy of about 7 circa 1959/60 we kids sang a version. first marine went over the wall parley vou.....pooped all over the magazine, also anti-nazi ditties. i guess a lot of old vets in the neighborhood...cramer hill, camden nj
jay


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Dec 08 - 04:47 PM

the queen went down the submarine parley vous
the queen went down the submarine parley vous
the queen went down the submarine parley vous
washed her tits in margarine
hinky pinky parley vous


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Sherry
Date: 23 May 09 - 06:35 AM

Here are some of the lyrics I learned as a child.

The Wacs and Ways are winning the war in parlez vous
The Wacs and Ways are winning the war in parlez vous
The Wacs and Ways are winning the war, so what the heck we fightin for. Inky Dinky Parlez Vous

The 2nd lieutenant went over the top in parlez vous
The 2nd lieutenant went over the top in parlez vous
The 2nd leiutenant went over the top, he thought he heard a nickel drop. Inky Dinky Parlez vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,John: Northern Ireland
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 05:51 PM

Does anyone know what or who skiboo actually is? it was used a lot in Belfast years ago when addressing young fellas. Thankyou


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 09:47 PM

Guest John, could you give a little more information about how skiboo was applied?

Here is some background.
M. B. Carey, writing in Jour. American Folklore, 1934, vol. 47, p. 369, said that it was used by the British Army in the 1890s. Major Charles Ffoulkes, late Secretary of the Imperial War Museum, London, and others, recalled singing it c. 1891. It was mentioned as "Snippo" in Jour. American Folklore, vol. 36, with regard to a parody-translation of Uhland's "Der Wirtin Tochterlein," and included in "Tommy's Tunes," 1917, a collection of British Army tunes. Some trace it to the British Army in India, some to an English drinking song (not found).

Above somewhere, the version of "Mademoiselle..." in "Tommy's Tunes" with the line:
"Two German officers crossed the Rhine, skiboo, skiboo,...."

No one seems to know the meaning, if any- it could be one of those nonsense words found in choruses of many songs.

Coming to present times, the online Urban Dictionary (not always reliable, and American usages only), has an entry:
"Any punk ass wannabe. A male between 16-25, pants so low as to show his underwear; crotch halfway to knees. Wears false gold over a sports jersey. Goatee common. ..."

In England there are the 'Farmer Skiboo' stories. Oxford Press recently (2007) published a bundle of them. I am not familiar with them.

Can't answer your question, Guest John.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 10:47 PM

There was a craze in Belfast, apparently beginning in 1945, to chalk the word (or name) "Skiboo" on walls, often under a stylized line drawing of a man peering over a wall.   Something similar happened in America beginning about 1941-42. That message was "Kilroy Was Here."

Allegedly "skiboo" was applied some years earlier to minor gangsters in Chicago, so maybe there was an earlier Irish connection.

The origin of "Skiboo" is not known; it may or may not have anything to do with the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Callie
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 02:03 AM

Have loved this thread!

Have just found a field recording of Carrie Milliner (Australian, 1926 - ) singing a version of this song she learnt from her dad who sang it in the army.

Madamoiselle she bought a cow parly-boo
Madamoiselle she bought a cow parly-boo
Madamoiselle she bought a cow
And how to milk it she didn't know how
Inky ponky parly-boo

She pulled its tail instead of its tits parly-boo etc
And all she got was a bucket of shit

cheers!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Joe_F
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 08:01 PM

Callie: That was current among naughty boys in Vermont, ca. 1950:

The maid went out to milk the cow, parley-voo...
She pulled the tail instead of the tit,
And all she got, etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 12:15 AM

One of my pedantic posts —

Don't think anyone has corrected statement made on about the 3rd or 4th post on this long long thread, 25 Jul 97, that LILI MARLENE was a popular *WWi* song. Although written as a poem in 1915, it was not set to music till the 30s, with some additional verses. And it was in **WWii**, not WWi, that a chance broadcast in 1941, as a programme filler on Radio Belgrade, the German forces radio programme, of a record made in 1939 by Lale Andersen, caught on, first with German, and then with Allied, troops. It was never a First World War Song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Old Vermin
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 09:47 AM

Thought the correction on Lilli Marlene's timing was made earlier, but well worth repeating. There is of course the D-Day Dodgers version....

At a boys grammar school in Surrey in the early 60s, I remember an older boy saying - with a 14-year old world-weariness - that he was *so* glad 'Parlez-vous' was going out [of fashion].

As then sung

Three German officers crossed the Rhine, Parlez-Vous x 2
Three German officers crossed the Rhine
Fuck the women and drink the wine
Inky-pinky, parlez vous

Much as elsewhere quoted, with the minor variation of them kicking the fucking door right in.

This was in the days when 'fuck' was only used in all-male company, and out of earshot of authority. There was of course a CCF unit at the school....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 01:22 PM

Lighter,

You mentioned in an earlier post how you'd been collecting related songs on this theme. Have you published anything on it by chance? Would make an interesting read.

I'm sure you have the chantey "Oh Aye Rio", which Cray seems to connect with "Bollochy Bill" but seems to share more with "Madamoiselle" IMO. But I was wondering if you (or anyone else who'd care to) might also include the pseudo-Dutch chantey "Ja, Ja, Ja" in this category." I sense a resemblance.

Gibb


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 12:43 PM

Thanks for your interest, Gibb. I'm trying to "make sense" of about 400 texts (not different stanzas) of these songs. The three most important facts:

1."German Officer"-type versions were known in America and elsewhere from before 1850.

2. The "Mademoiselle/ Parlez-Vous" offshoot was sung in the British Army in France by 1915 or '16.

3. Most versions that were actually sung (rather than printed in folksong books) were only a few stanzas long.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 12:49 PM

Gibb, "Ja, Ja, Ja!" has a similar stanzaic shape, which leads to a similar insistent rhythm, but I don't see much resemblance otherwise.

"Mlle." has the pseudo-French "hinky dinky Parlez-vous" refrain, but I've never heard of any verses that were actually sung in a mock "Anglo-French" like the imitation Plattdeutsch of the shanty.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 01:14 PM

OK thanks, Lighter, for that breakdown.

You know, what I was thinking of with regards to "Ja Ja" (just brainstorming) was, like you said, the "similar stanzaic shape" but also in terms of the overall "gesture" of paradigm of the song. "Mlle" has "hinky dinky" ("hinky stinky" from the version I remember hearing when I was younger) and "Ja" has "inkum stinkum."

But beyond those specifics, I was thinking maybe many of these "pseudo-" refrains (never mind the verses), no matter what language they are supposed to reference, all amount to the same thing. That includes "snapoo" and the "pseudo-Spanish" words (that sound absolutely nothing like Spanish IMO) in the "Hero Bangidero" songs.

So yeah, probably not much there, but I was just wondering if, after looking at such a large body of texts that reflect transformations in different directions, any sort of big picture like that might have emerged.

Gibb


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 01:28 PM

Gibb, I believe that Hugill erred when he suggested that the refrains (in "Gals o' Chile" and "Saltpetre Shanty") were conscious imitations of Spanish. I strongly suspect that the pattern of the shanty came from "Snappoo," which is the ancestor of "Three German Officers."

Robinson's text of "Hero Bangidero" (rptd. by Colcord) is the only other one I know of. He may have altered it just a little for publication - or a lot. From what he says (vaguely) in "The Bellman" (where it first appeared) a few words in the refrain(s) had to be altered.   

BTW: most future shanty-singers will be getting a lot of their material from your YouTube videos. Keep up the good work!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Brian L
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 04:54 PM

My grandfather used to sing a version that i haven't seen anywhere on this forum. It went:

Nathan Hale went to jail, parlez vous
Nathan Hale went to jail, parlez vous
Nathan Hale went to jail, 'cause he sat on a horse's tail
Inky Dinky Parlez Vouz

I also remember him singing:

The scotch marines went over the top, parlez vous
The scotch marines went over the top, parlez vous
The scotch marines went over the top, because they heard a nickel drop
Inky Dinky Parlez Vous


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Paul Burke
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 06:35 PM

Wee wee masheree, parleyvoo, ally coochee coochee? Napoo? san fairy ann.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Helen Jocys
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 03:20 AM

My father, who served in the Cheshire Yeomanry in the 14/18 war, said they used to sing 'Mlle. from Armentieres,
                  Picaninni for souvenir.' etc. etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,maggie may
Date: 13 Nov 09 - 09:27 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,maggie may
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM

Sorry. I am still new at this computer stuff.

As a child in Manitoba in the late forties or v. early fifties, I learned this verse, which I have not seen on this delightful thread:

We saw the train come down the track, parlez-vous
We saw the train come down the track, parlez-vous
We saw the train come down the track
And hit the station a helluva whack
Hinkey-dinkey parlez-vous

I hadn't thought of this song in many years and then this morning it was running through my head. There were other verses... Maybe they will come back to me later.

Of course we always sang the 'helluva whack' part really loud. Mum told us not to sing it around polite company.

Thanks for the wonderful discussion and the fun. Now, if I can just make the message go...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 10:23 AM

My dad taught me this. He learned it from his grandfather, WWII vet.

The first marine he found a bean, parley-vou,
The second marine he cooked the bean, parley-vou,
the third marine he ate the bean and PBBBBTH(rasberry noise) all over the submarine,
Inky dinky parley vou.

We sing it to "when johnny comes marching home again"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 04:49 PM

At some point, I suppose many years after World War One, some people changed the tune to that of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again."

Which is essentially a minor-key version of the "Mademoiselle" song.

Interesting that nobody here who learned "Mademoiselle" via tradition (instead of from a folksong book) seems to have heard more than one or two stanzas.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Joe_F
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 05:47 PM

There were bits of it floating around my highschool (1950-1954), or else I wouldn't have known the tune. But IIRC I got most of my words out of John Dos Passos's _U.S.A._


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Dorsi Diaz
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 09:14 PM

What an interesting thread! I am actually going to write an article about my version of this song, which my mother sang to me growing up. My dad was a WW2 vet, and this is the way they sang it ( I am now singing it to my grandson, age 1) My mom was originally from Canada and my dad from New Jersey.

The scotch marines went over the top
Parlez Vous
The scotch marines went over the top
Parlez Vous
The scotch marines went over the top,
Because they heard a penny drop
Inky Pinky Parlez Vous.

Doo-doo-Doo-doo (I think my mom ad-libbed that last line..lol)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 11 May 10 - 01:20 PM

Several cleaned-up/ rewritten music-hall versions of "Mlle. from Armentieres" were copyrighted by different composers after the Great War. They're not a much like what the soldiers sang.

I keep finding references to one in which the Mademoiselle slaps a general's face. The slap seems to be an important part of the action. But there's no trace of the lyrics.

Does anybody know them?

I've checked the 'Net: no luck.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 05:41 AM

The Farmer came out to milk the cow, parley-vou...
The Farmer came out to milk the cow, parley-vou...
He pulled the tail instead of the tit,
And all she got, was a bucket of shit.
Inky dinky parley vou.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Noah
Date: 25 Dec 10 - 10:12 PM

This is a version my grandmother's been singing for 50-plus years

The first marine he ate the bean
Parlez-vous
The second marine he ate the bean
Parlez-vous
The third marine he ate the bean
He pissed [or alternately farted]all over the submarine
Inky-pinky parlez-vous

This is probably a children's satire from WWII


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: fox4zero
Date: 26 Dec 10 - 01:10 PM

Lighter pm
In reference to your '04 post about soldiers being charged by the "Y"
for edibles. Some years ago had a VA patient who had served in the Spanish-American War, Boxer Rebellion, and WWI. In 1919, when he was in Russia with the Siberian Expeditionary Force he told me bitterly that the Red Cross charged them for coffee and doughnuts.
A little off the subject, but I thought interesting.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 12:24 PM

Noah, my estimation is that the "bean" stanza is one of the top two known today.

I concur that it's probably a post-1918 kids' creation, if only because marines don't have much to do with submarines.

Fox4zero, there's not much that's off-topic here. But did your patient know any songs?

Thanks for the two posts.

And for refreshing the thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,DevilDog
Date: 13 Jan 11 - 06:04 PM

This is the way my Dad taough me this song:

The first Marine found a bean Parley-vous...

The second Marine cooked the bean parley-vous...

The third Marine ate the bean and blew a hole in the submarine...

Hinky-dinky-parley-vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 13 Jan 11 - 06:17 PM

Guest Devil Dog, that's exactly how I first heard it, in 1977.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: mayomick
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 09:26 AM

It's the "Inky Pinky" part of the chorus that I always liked most. I don't know what inky pinky is supposed to mean but it comes across like it's mocking the sound of some French words that the composer of the song doesn't understand .George Orwell said that the history of English poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks rhymes , but don't English language poets make up for it whenever they come across a bit of a foreign language to throw in ? Orleans rhyming with Liberty bonds and Croix-de-Guerre with underwear . Very funny


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 09:46 AM

"Inky pinky" appears in children's rhymes in the 19th century.

At least one pre-1914 version of "The Derby Ram" contains "hinky dinky" in the chorus.

In the U.S. for many years before the war, "hinky-dinky" meant contemptably small or inconsequential.

So I don't think these words stand for any particular French words in the song (though "Dis-donc!" "Hey, you!" might have called "hinky-dinky" to somebody's mind).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,celticbhoyliam
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 01:00 PM

celtic fc inky pinky parle vous lyrics !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

the rangers dont know what to do parle vous
the rangers dont know what to do parle vous
the rangers dont know what to do they havent got a fucking clue inky pinky parle vous

the rangers are looking for miracle cures parle vous
the rangers are looking for miracle cures parle vous
the rangers are looking for miracle cures i think they better go to lourds inky pinky parle vous

rangers futures looking grim parle vous
rangers futures looking grim parle vous
rangers futures looking grim i think they better sign a TIM inky pinky parle vous



hail hail , celtic fc champions 2012


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Subject: Lyr Add: MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES
From: Lighter
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 05:02 PM

It is often claimed that "Mademoiselle" was the result of a team effort in the spring of 1915 by Canadian Sgt. Gitz Rice (who contributed the tune)and British Sgt. Edward C. H. "Red" Rowland (who claimed the words).

Little evidence was ever adduced to support this assertion, so I was extremely skeptical of it for many years. Extensive research, however, has unearthed some detailed testimony from Rice and corroboration from Rowland which makes their claim to combining *one* seemingly early set of the words and an adaptation of the melody all but proven.

There's no space to go into detail here, or into the song's earlier history in other guises, but what follows is probably as close to Rowland & Rice's composition as we are ever likely to find.

Nova Scotian Gitz Rice, a graduate of McGill University in Toronto, was a successful songwriter and a vaudevillian. He copyrighted "Keep Your Head Down, Fritzie-Boy!" "I Want to Go Home!" and "Dear Old Pal of Mine." Rowland had been a music hall comedian; he told a journalist in 1939 that he and Rice had produced "Mademoiselle" in "about fifteen minutes" - which is entirely believable.

The following text (no tune) appeared in "The McGill University Song Book" in 1921. It is possibly the earliest printing of the song with "mademoiselle" and "forty years" in it, and it seems to me to be just naughty enough for presentation by enlisted men at a British Army concert party in Armentieres in 1915 without risking any disciplinary measures from the brass hats.

But it is clear, in any case, that this "Mademoiselle" was inspired by earlier bawdy songs of the "Three German Officers" type.

                MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, Parlez vous,
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, Parlez vous,
Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hasn't been kissed for forty years,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

The "Forty Thieves" they have a good time, Parlez vous,
The "Forty Thieves" they have a good time, Parlez vous,
The "Forty Thieves" they have a good time,
They steal our rations behind the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh Landlord have you any good wine, Parlez vous,
Oh Landlord have you any good wine, Parlez vous,
Oh Landlord have you any good wine,
Fit for a soldier of the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh yes, I have some very good wine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes, I have some very good wine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes, I have some very good wine,
To cheer the soldiers of the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh Landlord have you a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh Landlord have you a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh Landlord have you a daughter fine,
She breaks our hearts while up the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh yes I have a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes I have a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes I have a daughter fine,
But not to waste upon the line.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

But dear father I love them all, Parlez vous.
But dear father I love them all, Parlez vous.
But dear father I love them all,
Thin and fat and short and tall.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

They come to save our country fair, Parlez vous.
They come to save our country fair, Parlez vous.
They come to save our country fair,
Et a la guerre comme a la guerre.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Go to your room, oh daughter mine, Parlez vous.
Go to your room, oh daughter mine, Parlez vous.
Go to your room, oh daughter mine,
And leave the soldiers to their wine.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.



(I believe that the "Forty Thieves" was a nickname for the British Army Service Corps.)

Claims of authorship by other writers turn out, upon investigation, to refer to quite different sets of words, most or all of them written for the London stage at the very end of the Great War.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Nov 13 - 06:45 AM

I wonder if skiboo is an acronym like SNAFU or BUMPF that meant something to those at the time but has become obscure. Lots of military slang was based on the everyday bureaucracy they endured.

(Situation Normal All F'ed Up / Brakes Undercarriage etc. - essential pre-flight pilot checks)

Back in the east of London in the 50s and 60s it was amazing how many young kids knew these songs. probably because older relatives would sing them when drunk.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 07 Nov 13 - 08:12 AM

Acronyms (initial letters strung together and pronounced not as letters but as a word) hardly existed before the Second World War. (The first one appears to be DORA - the British Defense of the Realm Act of 1914).
"SNAFU" dates from 1941.

"Skiboo" is probably just nonsense. Early versions of the "German Officer" song sometimes have "snapoo" instead. More recently there's "Yo ho!" and under the influence of "Mademoiselle from Armentieres," "Hinky dinky parlez-vous."

And at some point, for some singers, the "German Officers" got mixed up with the tune of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jun 15 - 08:42 PM

My dad used to sing:

The YMCA went over the top
To pick up the nickels the doughboys dropped
Hinky-dinky parley-voo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,False Lankum
Date: 14 Sep 15 - 05:07 AM

Stumbled onto this very interesting and informative thread while looking for information re: 'The Fart Song/The Old Woman of 92' which I learned in Dublin as a child in the 80s. Two years ago I heard the following verse being sung in a pub;

11 soldiers in a tank, Parley vu,
11 soldiers in a tank, parley vu,
11 soldiers in a tank,
Reading the Beano and having a wank,
Inky, pinky, parley vu.

Also, Máire Johnston, in her book 'Around the Banks of Pimlico' mentions the following verse, which she dates to a visit of the Prince of Wales to the Liberties in Dublin on Thursday, 9 April, 1885 (although in light of the above, this seems unlikely);

The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, parley vu,
The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, parley vu,
The Prince of Wales is gone to jail,
For riding an ass without a tail,
With your inkey, stinkey, parley vu.

Have you ever published your findings on this Lighter? I would be very interested to get a copy if so.

Regards,

Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Sep 15 - 02:51 PM

Thanks, Guest. I have collected three other, independent examples of the "Prince of Wales" verses, though one involves the "King of France" and one a "horse." That's enough to show that the words were once fairly well known.

All are sung to the "Hinky Dinky" tune, though yours is the only one with "stinky" in the refrain.

The later George V was Prince of Wales in 1885. (He was 20 years old.) The future Edward VIII, in his early 20s, was Prince during World War I.

If the alleged 1885 reference is correct, the verses (without "Inky...") must antedate WW1. If so, they could easily have been set later to the soldiers' tune, which, esp. in the American army, tended to attract couplets from all over.

I can only guess at the meaning of the verses. "Put in jail/ For riding an ass [or even 'horse'] without a tail" suggests, however, a fairly obvious sexual metaphor.

The "tank" stanza usually has "Three German soldiers" in it. Your version may be the earliest one noted, which suggests an origin in WW2 or even later.

My problem with "Mlle. from Armentieres" is *too much information.* However, I am making progress in assembling it. There's so much good stuff it's difficult to leave so much of it out!

Thanks for asking.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: False Lankum
Date: 05 Nov 15 - 06:22 AM

I meant to get back on here to say thanks for your reply Lighter!

I should have explained more clearly - Máire Johnston didn't claim to have heard the verse in 1885 - indeed she was not born at this stage and only wrote the book in 1985! I get the feeling that she heard the verse at some stage growing up (the book contains many snippets of such verses) and being unaware of the various precedents, presumed that it stemmed from the said visit.

Hope that clears things up a bit and sorry if my original post was misleading!

Regards,

Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 05 Nov 15 - 07:24 AM

Not at all, Ian. Thanks for the clarification.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: EBarnacle
Date: 05 Nov 15 - 12:09 PM

I am surprised that nobody has commented on the verses about hearing a nickel drop are almost certainly of either American or Canadian origin.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: False Lankum
Date: 31 Jan 17 - 03:05 PM

Just came across the following in the book 'Your Dinner's Poured Out' (Dublin, 1981), which documents the Dublin based childhood of Paddy Crosbie (p.57);

'Towards the end of the war, in 1918, we were singing songs that came over from the trenches:

        'Madamoiselle from Armentieres, Parley Voo,
        'Madamoiselle from Armentieres, Parley Voo,
        'Madamoiselle from Armentieres,
         Hasn't been kissed for forty years,
         Inky Pinky Parley Voo.

         The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, Parley Voo,
         The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, Parley Voo,
         The Prince of Wales is gone to jail,
         For ridin' an ass without a tail,
         Inky Pinky Parley Voo.

         Up the stairs and into bed, Parley Voo,
         Up the stairs and into bed, Parley Voo,
         Up the stairs and into bed,
         Throw your oul' wan over your head,
         Inky Pinky Parley Voo.

There was another song which came back from the Front, but which is best left out. It certainly could not be mingled with children's rhymes.'

All the best,

Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 31 Jan 17 - 06:01 PM

Thanks for that, Ian.

The song takes two forms: a straight narrative lifted directly from "The Three German Officers" and random collections of a few topical, satirical verses each.

The satirical versions collected after 1918 are rarely more than three or four stanzas long. It would seem that "Parlez-Vous" was sometimes sung in limerick fashion, with the participants contributing ad-libbed stanzas.

While the song unquestionably began in the British army, most of the random stanzas that have been noted seem to be of American origin.

Am hoping I can finish my pedantic study of the whole song family some time in the next few months.


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