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Lammas

Related threads:
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Hollowfox 01 Aug 00 - 03:50 PM
katlaughing 01 Aug 00 - 04:04 PM
GUEST, Banjo Johnny 01 Aug 00 - 04:32 PM
MMario 01 Aug 00 - 04:38 PM
Mbo 01 Aug 00 - 04:50 PM
Liz the Squeak 01 Aug 00 - 05:41 PM
T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird) 01 Aug 00 - 05:42 PM
Uncle_DaveO 01 Aug 00 - 05:47 PM
Liz the Squeak 01 Aug 00 - 05:59 PM
GUEST, Banjo Johnny 01 Aug 00 - 07:36 PM
Bud Savoie 01 Aug 00 - 08:35 PM
Celtic-End Singer 01 Aug 00 - 08:50 PM
Jimmy C 01 Aug 00 - 10:40 PM
alison 01 Aug 00 - 10:52 PM
katlaughing 01 Aug 00 - 11:00 PM
Liz the Squeak 02 Aug 00 - 02:44 AM
Susan of DT 02 Aug 00 - 04:36 AM
Gervase 02 Aug 00 - 05:32 AM
SDShad 02 Aug 00 - 10:22 AM
Abby Sale 02 Aug 00 - 10:36 AM
Hollowfox 02 Aug 00 - 12:00 PM
Hollowfox 02 Aug 00 - 12:02 PM
Peg 02 Aug 00 - 12:21 PM
GUEST,JTT 02 Aug 00 - 05:13 PM
Mbo 02 Aug 00 - 05:18 PM
Hollowfox 02 Aug 00 - 05:48 PM
Liz the Squeak 03 Aug 00 - 01:12 AM
Penny S. 03 Aug 00 - 03:16 PM
paddymac 03 Aug 00 - 05:45 PM
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Subject: Lammas
From: Hollowfox
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 03:50 PM

A happy and blessed Lammas to all! May your weather be good, your crops bountiful, and your harvest easy. I know that this was a Christian holiday in medieval Europe, but I couldn't find anything to verify that it's still a part of the church calendar. Is it still on the official schedule, so to speak? (Me, I celebrate any holiday I can lay my little hands on.) Good Harvest to all, Mary


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: katlaughing
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 04:04 PM

Wow, Mary, thanks! Didn't even dawn on me that we've already reached August! I hope I have something to harvest...seems as though the whole season has drifted by in a haze of health challenges...mayhap this will signal the time to continue to reap improvements.

Merry and bountiful harvest to all.

Blessed be,

kat


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: GUEST, Banjo Johnny
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 04:32 PM

What's Lammas? Something like Harvest Home?


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: MMario
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 04:38 PM

Lammas derives from an Old English word meaning "Loaf Mass" - it was a celebration of the first fruits of the grain harvest.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Mbo
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 04:50 PM

Cool, just yesterday my Mom went outside and picked some beautiful gourds from a plant that had sprouted from old gourd seeds we had thrown out there. We had never noticed the plant before, and then one day BOOM there were these perfect bright yellow & green striped gourds. Really amazing.

--Matt


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 05:41 PM

Gourd mass doesn't have quite the same ring to it, but have a good one!

Lammas is not officially part of the church calendar any more, mind you, harvest is becoming less and less a part of it now, similarly, Rogationtide is more or less defunct as well. It seems that with more and more food being grown across the world and a kiwi fruit that grew on a vine in Rotorua yesterday can be in my fruit salad tomorrow, we no longer listen to the rythmn of the seasons, and those seasonal festivals celebrating and begging for a good harvest are being bypassed by things like Christian Aid week, World Aids day and the Americanised Mothers' day.

You will find lots of re-enactors celebrating it though, especially as it coincides with Petertide - St Peter's day was 29th July, and coupled with Lammas made a good weeks' holiday, lots of fairs and markets, and usually good weather, that's why it's traditional to have summer holidays in August.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird)
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 05:42 PM

I don't know whether the Lammas is still widely observed in English Christianity. Perhaps the deterioration of the climate in the northern hemisphere since circa 1200 A.D. has taken it out of phase with the agricultural work (though it remained listed on church calendars for many centuries). On the other hand, different varieties of grain may now be in use, with earlier harvest times than were used in the low middle ages. Sorting out these factors would be a fascinating interdisciplinary project.

The U.S. Episcopal Church calendar doesn't have Lammas day. Of course, the seasons aren't precisely the same in all parts of the U.S. as in England.

T.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 05:47 PM

"It fell about the Lammas-tide, when muirmen win their hay."


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 05:59 PM

It celebrated the first cut of the harvest - the weather was settling down and the hay was ready. The earliest wheat was ready to be cut, none of this two crops in one season here, and it meant that there was about 6 weeks of hard work before everthing was gathered in, and you could sit down and do the winter jobs. That's why there are harvest moons in September - the extra light of a large full moon meant that you could carry on the farm work, at a time when the weather could break at any time, and time was of the essence.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: GUEST, Banjo Johnny
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 07:36 PM

Thanks, everyone. Sounds like a masters thesis in the works. == Johnny


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Bud Savoie
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 08:35 PM

Lammas is/was also called "Gule", from the Latin "Sanctus Petrus ad vincula" (admittedly, quite a stretch), or "St. Peter in Chains," the feast day on August 1 commemorating the release of the Prince of the Apostles from prison. This feast is still celebrated on traditional calendars. The feast, coming as it does as the corn is ripening, led to the "Lammas" idea. One of Robert Burns's incomparable love songs begins:

It was all on a Lammas nicht, when corn riggs are bonnie.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Celtic-End Singer
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 08:50 PM

The Scottish legal system still operates on the four old Christian terms: Candlemass, Whitsun, Lammas and Martinmass. The Ancient Scottish universities (Saint Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh) operate on the same system.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Jimmy C
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 10:40 PM

At the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle long ago
I met a little colleen and she set my heart aglow
She was smiling at her daddy buying lambs from Paddy Roe
At the Ould Lammas Fair In Ballcastle O

I took her home that night
when the moon was shining bright
From the Oukld Lammas fair in Ballycastle Oh.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: alison
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 10:52 PM

"would you treat your Mary Anne
to some dulce and yellow man
At the Ould Lammas Fair In Ballcastle O

this still goes on in a town in County Antrim every year

dulce is edible seaweed
yellow man
is a sweet, like a cross between toffee and honeycomb

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: katlaughing
Date: 01 Aug 00 - 11:00 PM

It is also known as LUGHNASADH. From WitchVox:

The First Harvest. Plants are 'setting their seed" already for the next year as the cycle of Nature continues. The Sun (Son) still burns brightly, but already the passing of the days begins to herald the coming of Autumn. The young animals are now almost full grown and our plans-planted with high expectations in the spring- are beginning to come to fruition.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 02:44 AM

Thanks for telling me what 'ad vincula' meant - it's puzzled me for years, as there is a pub in Dorset called St Peter ad vincula, although it's been 'countrified' and 'anglicised' to St Peter's finger.... (deja vu here, didn't we do this on a St Peter's shoon thread?). It's usually shortened to Pete's digit....

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Susan of DT
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 04:36 AM

Wasn't this one of the old Celtic quarter festivals: Beltain, Samhain, Lughnasa and I forget the winter one?


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Gervase
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 05:32 AM

First cut of the harvest? Blimey, the seasons are going crazy. The barley at home was in two weeks ago and the stubble has already been ploughed in, while the second hay cut has long been and gone on the meadow and the sweet smell of the sileage is everywhere at the moment, mixing with the flinty smell of the freshly broken soil. After a shower of rain I can close my eyes, fill my lungs and believe I was in heaven (or at least drinking a nice flinty white Burgundy)!
BTW, am I right in thinking that 'aftermath' is the second hay cut, or am I going mad?).


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Subject: Lyr Add: CORN RIGS AN' BARLEY RIGS (Robert Burns)
From: SDShad
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 10:22 AM

From Rabbie Burns, a song of Lammas of sorts:

Corn Rigs

It was upon a Lammas night
When the corn rigs were bonnie,
Beneath the moon's unclouded light
I held awa' to Annie.

The time flew by wi' tentless heed
'Til 'tween the late and early,
Wi' small persuasion she agreed
To see me thro' the barley.

Chorus:

Corn Rigs and barley rigs
Corn rigs are bonny
I'll ne'eer forget that Lammas night
Amang the rigs wi' Annie.

The sky was blue, the wind was still,
The moon was shining clearly.
I set her down wi' right good will
Amang the rigs o' barley.

I kept her heart, was a' my sin.
I loved her most sincerely.
I kissed her o'er and o'er again
Amang the rigs o' barley.

[Chorus]

I locked her in my fond embrace.
Her heart was beatin' rarely.
My blessing on that happy place
Amang the rigs o' barley.

But by the moon and stars so bright
That shone that hour so clearly,
She aye shall bless that happy night
Amang the rigs of barley.

[Chorus]

I hae been blythe wi' comrades dear
I hae been merry drinking.
I hae been joyful gath'rin' gear
I hae been happy thinking.

But a' the pleasures e'er I saw
Tho' three times doubled fairly,
That happy night was worth them a'
Amang the rigs wi' Annie.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Abby Sale
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 10:36 AM

There are a large number of songs that use as the time frame Lammastide. It's just the setting for the story. There are an equal number for 'The first day of the year' or Martinmas, etc. The event is also interesting since harvest time is one basic season to mark in many religions and countries. In Britain, the season is also marked as one of the basic 'Sabbats' for Wicca and almost certainly is solidly based on (and intended by the Church to replace) the old Lughnasadh (Lugh's Day) from the Gaels. Lugh was a big deal.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Hollowfox
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 12:00 PM

kat/katlaughing, you're surely right about the young animals. Tonight I'll have to set my trap for raccoon #4. I've gotten a mother, her kit, and one sort of between those two in size so far, so I wonder what I'll get tonight. They're perfectly healthy, so I use a live trap, put them in the back of my minivan, and drive them about fifteen miles away, with the radio speakers turned up in the back of the van. It's as far away from houses as I can find, with woods and a stream.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Hollowfox
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 12:02 PM

Liz, watch out for that pub's welfare. In this "digital" age, the name could shift to Saint Peter's Byte.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Peg
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 12:21 PM

from a song written with Burns' brilliant poem in mind: (used to sing this with a pagan choir):

Lammas Night

The grain was reaped, the bins were full
The country danced, I with the Harvest Queen
She took my hand and led me through the night
Among the rigs of barleycorn

Chorus:
'Neath the rigs of bareycorn,
Come my Harvest Queen and lay with me once more,
and let me taste the honey of your love
Among the rigs of barleycorn...

She came to me on Lammas Night I lay with her and nested in her down
The moon round and full caressed her swollen breasts
Among the rigs of barleycorn

(chorus)

The newly-turned earth became our summer bed
My heart cried deeply for this night to never end
As she took me down within her rounded thighs,
Among the rigs of barleycorn

chorus...


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 05:13 PM

Lammas is Lughnasa, or the feast of Lugh Lámh Fhada. Also known as Walpurgisnacht among our northern brethren.


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Mbo
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 05:18 PM

Whoa! Walpurgisnacht is the night when Satan comes out to stir up trouble! Dang I love Corn Riggs Are Bonnie! Great pipe tune!

--Matt


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Hollowfox
Date: 02 Aug 00 - 05:48 PM

Sorry, JTT, you've got the right church but the wrong pew. Walpurgisnacht is April 30, called May Eve or Beltaine by the more southern brethern (and sistern too, I should think). Its a whole different set of songs. ;)


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 03 Aug 00 - 01:12 AM

Gervase, barley is a foreign crop - wheat is the traditional one, and if you think about it, we've had some strange weather recently. April was boiling hot for a lot of it and in May it pissed down. Plus the seed we plant now has been treated to make it more resistant to damp enduced fungus and rot so it is plantable in winter/early spring making a much earlier crop. When there was no modified or treated seed, we had to do it natures' way, and thus we had the first crops at Petertide.

Sorry, but I'm sober now..... and it really is 6.15am, you were right yesterday, I am an insomniac. Now I'm going to work.

LTS


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: Penny S.
Date: 03 Aug 00 - 03:16 PM

I believe that the harvest was later because the sowing wasn't until the new year - nowadays the winter wheat is in a few weeks after harvest. However, the field across the way which used to be cut before the end of term is unharvested still.

At Petertide in Folkestone, there is a blessing of the fisheries in the harbour.

Penny


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Subject: RE: Lammas
From: paddymac
Date: 03 Aug 00 - 05:45 PM

Susan - you're right. The missing one is Imbolc, celebrated at the start of February. That's followed by Beltaine (aka Bal's Fire, and more latterly, May Day), then Lughnassa (sp?) and Samhain (aka Halloween (All Hallows Eve) or All Saints Eve. Most pre- or non-industrial societies had/have dates of similar significance on their cultural/spiritual/religious calendars.

Samhain was the Celtic New Year's celebration, when the fires of the old year were extinguished and the new one lit. Folk's had to stay up all night lest the evil spirits snatch them away, and usually did so in the context of heavy-duty feasting and partying - the forerunner of the western world's current approach to New Year's Eve (the current habit being a much enfeebled version of the original).

If a person is so inclined, you could likely have a "legitimate " New Year's "event" at least four times a year, and maybe more.


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