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Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please

DigiTrad:
ROCKY BANKS OF THE BUFFALO


Related threads:
Rocks of Bawn - Meaning? (132)
Lyr Req: Identify this song?-Rocks of Bawn (17)
Lyr/Tune Add: Rocks of Baun (MacColl) (4)
Rocks of Bawn - any background info? (4) (closed)


mark gregory 29 Jul 97 - 06:50 AM
alison 29 Jul 97 - 09:09 AM
Martin Ryan 29 Jul 97 - 10:09 AM
Alice 29 Jul 97 - 10:43 AM
Bobby O'Brien 31 Jul 97 - 04:00 AM
Dave Brennen 12 Aug 97 - 09:03 PM
Billy Weeks 10 Aug 03 - 07:59 AM
Amos 10 Aug 03 - 11:01 AM
GUEST 13 Sep 06 - 12:33 AM
The Sandman 13 Sep 06 - 05:35 PM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 16 Sep 06 - 06:50 PM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 16 Sep 06 - 06:55 PM
MartinRyan 16 Sep 06 - 06:58 PM
GUEST,Maireid Sullivan's Never Drift Apart CD (200 11 Aug 07 - 11:48 PM
Mickey191 12 Aug 07 - 07:45 PM
GUEST,John 15 Aug 07 - 10:31 AM
Flash Company 15 Aug 07 - 10:58 AM
Rog Peek 15 Aug 07 - 12:49 PM
Goose Gander 21 Dec 09 - 03:36 PM
Goose Gander 21 Dec 09 - 04:25 PM
Goose Gander 02 Jan 10 - 05:23 PM
GUEST,mayomick 03 Jan 10 - 10:59 AM
GUEST 25 Feb 12 - 11:56 PM
Rog Peek 26 Feb 12 - 06:19 AM
Rog Peek 26 Feb 12 - 06:23 AM
GUEST,Unkemptquigley 27 Sep 16 - 07:17 PM
GUEST 11 Nov 17 - 06:45 PM
GUEST 14 Nov 17 - 02:42 PM
GUEST 17 Nov 17 - 12:54 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: ROCKS OF BAWN
From: mark gregory
Date: 29 Jul 97 - 06:50 AM

I have these verses but have heard one more at least and wonder if anyone knows it/them. Something about a glass of poteen I think

Come all you loyal heros and listen on to me.
Don't hire with any farmer till you know what your work will be.
You'll rise up early in the morn from clear day light till dawn.
But you never will be able to plough the rocks of Bawn.

Rise up now gallant Sweeney and give your horses hay
Give them a good feed of oats before they start away
Don't feed them on soft turnip sprigs that grow on your green lawn
Or you never will be able to plough the rocks of Bawn

My curse upon you Sweeney you have me nearly broke
Your sitting by your fireside now your feet upon the hob
Your sitting by your fireside now from clear day light till dawn.
But you never will be able to plough the rocks of Bawn.

I wish the Queen of England would send for me in time
And place me in some regiment all in my youth and prime
I'd fight for Irelands glory boys from clear day light till dawn
And I never will return again to plough the rocks of Bawn.


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: alison
Date: 29 Jul 97 - 09:09 AM

Hi,

In verse 3 "you have me nearly robbed" fits the rhyme better, and I have the next line as, "A sittin' by your fireside with your doudeen in your gob." (Don't ask me what a doudeen is - I haven't a clue!)

Verse 4

My shoes they are well worn out, my stockings they are thin
And my heart is always trembling for fear that they'll let in,
And my heart is always trembling from the clear daylight of dawn,
Afraid I'll never be able to plough the rocks of Bawn."

The title means "White Rocks".

Hope this helps.

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 29 Jul 97 - 10:09 AM

Alison

A "dudeen" is a clay pipe.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Alice
Date: 29 Jul 97 - 10:43 AM

Mark.... according to the version the Clancy Brothers sing, the second verse is,

And it's rise up lovely Sweeney,
And give your horse some hay,
And give him a good feed of oats,
Before you ride away.
Don't feed him on soft turnips,
Put him out on your green lawn,
And I know that he'll never be able,
To plow the rocks of Bawn.

(source, The Irish Songbook, Clancy Bros. & Tommy Makem)


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Bobby O'Brien
Date: 31 Jul 97 - 04:00 AM

The word is doogeen, and it is a clay pipe. The Rocks of Bawn was recorded by Dermot O'Brien twice, and appears on the following lps "Dermot O'Brien Sings" on Hawk Records, and on "Songs of Ireland" on the Release label.


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Dave Brennen
Date: 12 Aug 97 - 09:03 PM

I have one more verse...
    And if I get no answer, I'll sail across the sea
    To the green fields of America or yet some silent place
    Where I'll learn to rise up early, from the clear daylight 'til the dawn
    And I never will return again to plough the Rocks of Bawn.


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Billy Weeks
Date: 10 Aug 03 - 07:59 AM

Colm O Lochlainn in Irish Street Ballads, Dublin 1939, gives five verses under the title 'A New Song on the Rocks of Baun'


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Subject: RE: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Amos
Date: 10 Aug 03 - 11:01 AM

As I learne dit the first verse is "listen unto" and "Don't hire on to any master" rather than farmer. The third line is "Don't hire onto any master, or from the cool daylight til dawn". These are minor things, of course.

A


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Sep 06 - 12:33 AM

The rocks of Bawn are in the very south of County Cavan,
right on the border with County Longford.
They are at the top of a small hill.

While conversing with a couple of local farmers
one of them pointed out the rocks and told me,
"Those are the rocks of Bawn. There's a song about them."

I began asking about the song among the locals.
Everyone seemed to know where the Rocks of Bawn were
and I found two fellows who sang the song for me.

I should explain that I spent four months in a cottage
where I could look out the window and see the Rocks of Bawn.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: The Sandman
Date: 13 Sep 06 - 05:35 PM

well you have all the verses, now,. I sing durgeen[ its a pipe].


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 16 Sep 06 - 06:50 PM

The word is dúidín (without the accents duidin). In Southern dialects it's pronounced doodeen (the "d" being pronounced with the tip of the tongue between the teeth as in most US pronunciations of the "th" in "the"). In Western and Northern dialects, the second "d", affected by the "i" following it, is pronounced "dj".

It means a clay pipe with most of the stem broken off. Lots of poorer people would continue to smoke a clay pipe when the stem broke, as long as there was enough of it left to stick in their gob. But here, there's probably an implication that the farmer could afford to buy a replacement but is too tight-fisted to do so.

Bawn (bán) is a plain or even a small flat piece of land. It's the sort of topographical term that crops up in lots of place names, so it could be just about anywhere in the country.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 16 Sep 06 - 06:55 PM

Oops. Just saw guest's post. What he heard from the people in Cavan might have been true, though if he came across as a tourist they might have just wanted to impress!

If the rocks are indeed in Cavan, then the "doodjeen" pronunciation would probably be appropriate.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: MartinRyan
Date: 16 Sep 06 - 06:58 PM

"There's a Blarney Stone in Kerry, there's a Blarney Stone in Clare
There's a Blarney Stone in Dublin and there's dozens in Kildare....
...
... Sure there's divil a spot in Ireland but you'll find a BS"!

Regards


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROCKS OF BAWN (from Maireid Sullivan)
From: GUEST,Maireid Sullivan's Never Drift Apart CD (200
Date: 11 Aug 07 - 11:48 PM

According to notes on the CD Never Drift Apart (2003 Lyrebird Media) by Maireid Sullivan (maireid.com) In her version the third verse has not been recorded before. It was collected by Saul Roche in his hometown area in Co. Waterford. Maireid sings it instead of the usual third verse about feeding the horse.

ROCKS OF BAWN

Come all ye loyal heroes wherever that you be
Don't work for any master till you know what your work will be
For you must rise up early from the clear daylight of dawn
And I know that you'll never be a to plough the Rocks of Bawn

My shoes they are all worn now, my stockings they are thin
My heart is always trembling, afraid that I'll give in
My heart is nearly broken from the clear daylight till dawn
For I know I'll never be able to plough the Rocks of Bawn

O' hear me gallant Sweeny for your fate I do bemoan
O' the rain is pelting on your face amongst the rocks and stones
Your work is hard and troublesome, though your step is like the fawn
but I know that you won't be able to plough the Rocks of Bawn

My curse upon you Sweeney, for you have me nearly robbed
You're sitting by your fireside with your dudgeen in your gob
You're sitting by your fireside from the clear daylight till dawn
And I know you will never be able to plough the Rocks of Bawn

I wish the Queen of England would send for me in time
And place me in some regiment all in my youth and prime
I'd fight for Ireland's glory, from the clear daylight till dawn
And I never would return again to plough the Rocks of Bawn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Mickey191
Date: 12 Aug 07 - 07:45 PM

Guest,
This is one of my all time favorites. It was my understanding that the Rocks of Baun (Bawn) was a reference to the _white_ limestone rocks, in the west of Ireland. The tennant farmers were turned out of their homes & sent to the west-where the land was not tillable because of the rocky grounds. So he'd _never_ be able to earn a living trying to plough the rocks.

Viewed in that context, the song is damn sad.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST,John
Date: 15 Aug 07 - 10:31 AM

Hello, all ROCKS OF BAWN fans. It was great to find this forum.

I think there might be two or more voices in the song.
The Clancy Brothers version I can make best sense of by imagining that the labourer (Sweeney) sings the verses bewailing the way he's treated, whereas the master's voice is trying to get him up (Come rise up, lovely Sweeney), and then cursing him when he won't (My curse attend you, Sweeney). At the end the young ploughman goes back to his dreams of soldiership.

What do you think?

John


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Flash Company
Date: 15 Aug 07 - 10:58 AM

This was the first song I ever sang in public, at Linotype Folk Club in (about) 1973.
From there on, I always tried to sing it first in any new venue I got up in. It helped to get the pitch of the room.

Brian Q


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Rog Peek
Date: 15 Aug 07 - 12:49 PM

I understand that 'gob' is an irish word that had been inducted into the english language, I believe the literal meaning is 'beak'. Martin Ryan may be able to confirm, or otherwise.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROCKS O' BAWN / ROCKS OF BAWN
From: Goose Gander
Date: 21 Dec 09 - 03:36 PM

I just came across a fascinating site detailing what appears to be the original version of Rocks of Bawn and a later revision. A rather different story then the one with which most of us are familiar . . .

THE ROCKS O' BAWN
written by Mr. Patrick Kelly, 1879-1940, of Cashel-in-Connemara, Ireland

"Oh, rise up, gallant Sweeney--"
The woman's voice was sweet;
The piper took his pipes and stick
And follow'd thro' the street.
As he was first so he was last
From clear daylight till dawn--
He said: "We won't be able
To plough the Rocks o' Bawn."

All weary walk'd young Sweeney:
The woman went before.
At high-noon sun he stopp'd to play
Before her father's door.
Her father came the youth to curse
And drive him from his lawn.
She said: "I go with Sweeney
To plough the Rocks o' Bawn."

"Now rest you, loyal comrade,
Beside this clear spring well;
And look you there and what you see
To me I bid you tell."
Young Sweeney look'd thro' Life and Death
And saw a golden dawn--
He said: "I know we're able
To plough the Rocks o' Bawn."

"Why sit you, Piper Sweeney,
So idle thro' the day,
And where is she you follow'd far
As cuckoo follows May?"
Young Sweeney said: "She weeps alone
Beside her father's lawn,
And so I sit me idle
All on the Rocks o' Bawn."

"Oh, rouse you, handsome Sweeney
And rouse the woman too;
Why sigh you here, why weeps she there
While work is still to do?"
But Sweeney said: "Tho' we may toil
From clear daylight till dawn,
I fear we won't be able
To plough the Rocks o' Bawn."

"Where go you now, Boy Sweeney,
Or roving in the May?"
"I go to her I'd follow still
Thro' dark and stormy day.
I look'd into the well she knew,
A Queen she walk'd her lawn--
And so I know we're able
To plough the Rocks o' Bawn."

Printed for the author, in Dublin 1922
Dollard Printinghouse, Dublin Limited



THE ROCKS OF BAWN (revised)
written by Mr. Patrick Kelly, 1879-1940, of Cashel-in-Connemara, Ireland

Published 1941, in "THE SALLEY RING"
Published 1977, in "POEMS FROM CONNEMARA"

"Oh, rise up, Piper Sweeney--"
The woman's voice was sweet;
The piper took his pipes and stick
And followed thro' the street.
As he was first so he was last
From clear daylight till dawn--
He said: "We won't be able
To plough the rocks of Bawn."

All weary walked young Sweeney,
The woman went before:
At high-noon sun he stopped to play
Beside her father's door.
Her father came in anger loud
And drove him from his lawn--
Said she: "I go with Sweeney
To plough the rocks of Bawn."

She stayed her steps when day was nigh,
She loosed her golden hair--
"I bid you look in yonder well
And say what dream is there."
Young Sweeney looked and he was pale:
He saw a splendid dawn--
"Oh, lady, are we able
To plough the rocks of Bawn?"

She bound her hair, she took his hand--
"Now turn you home," said she,
"And rest and wait - 'tis my command--
For Ireland will be free."
She kissed his hand, she drew her cloak
Against the chilling dawn--
"I'll meet you, boy, and by and by,
All on the rocks of Bawn."

"What seek you, Piper Sweeney?
King William rides this way."
"I seek a woman fair and young
That I to her may play.
I looked at noon into a well,
A Queen she walked her lawn:
And I shall meet her by and by,
All on the rocks of Bawn

Printed by Ennistymon Printing Works


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Goose Gander
Date: 21 Dec 09 - 04:25 PM

I should read my own sources more carefully - as the scan of the text reads "From a street ballad" it would seem that the 1922 lyrics were likely (or at least possibly) recomposed from an existing song. The more familiar version may indeed be the earlier song, despite the earlier print date for Patrick Kelly's song/poem.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Goose Gander
Date: 02 Jan 10 - 05:23 PM

This looks like the only North American version from tradition . . .
Rocks O'Bawn sung by Eileen Curran, recorded by Herbert Halpert in New York City in 1939. Can't find it on American Memory, so I guess this one is sitting in the archives along with thousands of others.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST,mayomick
Date: 03 Jan 10 - 10:59 AM

There's an Irish language version ,but I'm not sure which came first. I once thought that Rocks of Bawn might have been an Orange song originally because of the references to loyal heroes and serving the Queen of England ,but people on another thread thought it unlikely . Now the King William verse makes it sound orange again.

GG's version has some good verses , but it sounds like a bit of a reconstruction.Wouldn't a Connemara song have been in Irish? There is a nationalist version you hear sang sometimes with the Queen of England replaced by a sergeant major.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Feb 12 - 11:56 PM

a Dudeen is basicalorty the bowl + a short piece of stem.
Often referred to as a "jaw warmer"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Rog Peek
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 06:19 AM

It's 'sergeant major' I sing, can't remember where my version came from.

I understand the word gob is Irish for beak, hence mouth.

Rog


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: Rog Peek
Date: 26 Feb 12 - 06:23 AM

Struth! I just spotted I posted the gob bit back in '07, sorry to repeat myself!

Rog


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST,Unkemptquigley
Date: 27 Sep 16 - 07:17 PM

This is one of my favorite songs as my father used to sing it a lot and I never knew the name. I chanced across his record collection and found the Donal Donnely album and it's on there. I really like his version. It's actually on YouTube, in the name of Donnely is the album.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Nov 17 - 06:45 PM

The rocks of Bawn is in co.cavan near the Longford border.i was born and reared near there.Someof the rubbish I read here is unbelievable. there are twenty six verses to this song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Nov 17 - 02:42 PM

OK lets have these 26 verses- the place may well be in Cavan- there is a village called Bawnboy but for a great version, listen to Joe Heaney!! I think Seamus Ennis identifies the 'Rocks' as being on the cOrk/Kerry border?

Some people object to the lines

'I wish the queen of England would send for me in time'

but to me this reference identifies it , in translation maybe?? as in much of Irish song, as of the Victorian era, but thankfully with no reference to Grecian goddesses!!
Lets face reality, Victoria was the QUEEN in question and Irishmen fought for her and her empire- too late to change history now, however much Sinn Fein might like to, so don't go for the PC option


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rocks of Bawn/ more verses please
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Nov 17 - 12:54 PM

OK Guest of 11 Nov- where are these 26 verses- that's what th thread is about!


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