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BS: British-American cultural differences 2

dwditty 18 Aug 00 - 06:12 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 18 Aug 00 - 06:21 AM
Gary T 18 Aug 00 - 07:26 AM
Rana 18 Aug 00 - 08:04 AM
GUEST,Fibula Mattock 18 Aug 00 - 08:55 AM
Burke 18 Aug 00 - 09:18 AM
GUEST, Banjo Johnny 19 Aug 00 - 02:45 AM
GUEST,Penny S.(minus cookie) 19 Aug 00 - 01:18 PM
catspaw49 19 Aug 00 - 01:32 PM
GUEST,Jim Dixon 19 Aug 00 - 03:13 PM
Brendy 19 Aug 00 - 05:04 PM
Roo 19 Aug 00 - 08:45 PM
Cobble 19 Aug 00 - 09:24 PM
catspaw49 19 Aug 00 - 09:36 PM
Gary T 19 Aug 00 - 10:32 PM
Rana 19 Aug 00 - 11:46 PM
rabbitrunning 19 Aug 00 - 11:57 PM
Penny S. 20 Aug 00 - 05:35 AM
GUEST,Crazy Eddie 20 Aug 00 - 06:00 AM
Roo 20 Aug 00 - 08:26 PM
Brendy 20 Aug 00 - 08:40 PM
rabbitrunning 21 Aug 00 - 08:52 AM
Quincy 21 Aug 00 - 09:34 AM
celticblues5 21 Aug 00 - 12:00 PM
GUEST 21 Aug 00 - 12:45 PM
Burke 21 Aug 00 - 12:58 PM
Whistle Stop 21 Aug 00 - 01:05 PM
Jim Dixon 21 Aug 00 - 06:36 PM
ol'troll 21 Aug 00 - 07:27 PM
GUEST,PatJoe 22 Aug 00 - 01:00 PM
Bert 22 Aug 00 - 01:06 PM
M.Ted 22 Aug 00 - 03:46 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Aug 00 - 04:00 PM
M.Ted 22 Aug 00 - 04:31 PM
Penny S. 02 Sep 00 - 05:39 AM
sledge 02 Sep 00 - 08:09 AM
JulieF 02 Sep 00 - 09:52 AM
Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull 18 Sep 01 - 01:47 AM
Ebbie 18 Sep 01 - 02:47 AM
Murray MacLeod 18 Sep 01 - 06:37 AM
Nemesis 18 Sep 01 - 08:18 AM
kendall 18 Sep 01 - 08:43 AM
GUEST,SarahC 18 Sep 01 - 08:43 AM
Mary in Kentucky 18 Sep 01 - 09:36 AM
Linda Kelly 18 Sep 01 - 10:09 AM
Jack the Sailor 18 Sep 01 - 10:58 AM
Jack the Sailor 18 Sep 01 - 10:58 AM
Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull 18 Sep 01 - 11:10 AM
Jim Dixon 18 Sep 01 - 11:46 AM
Ebbie 18 Sep 01 - 12:19 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: dwditty
Date: 18 Aug 00 - 06:12 AM

You talk funny. We don't. *BG*

dw


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 18 Aug 00 - 06:21 AM

...and,Lox,ower kid, a bison is a buffalo, except in Birmingham where we wash our face in it.
Tara, each
RtS


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Gary T
Date: 18 Aug 00 - 07:26 AM

Hey, Brendy, like those bits? Do you not care so much for the kibbles? (BG)

(Kibbles & Bits is brand/variety of cat food over here. If I remember right it's actually something like "Brand X cat food with kibbles and bits". The kibbles and bits are little morsels of whatever that are supposed to be very appealing to the cats. I had never heard the word "kibble" before, and suspect they made it up.)

Okay, I give up. What, in this context, is a bit?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Rana
Date: 18 Aug 00 - 08:04 AM

Lox,

Just a bi'a milk and a couple of bickies is fine with my kipper!

Rana


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,Fibula Mattock
Date: 18 Aug 00 - 08:55 AM

I'm with youse on the roundabout thing. Having spent 2 months working in Chicago earlier this year, we encountered only 1 roundabout near where we were living, cleverly named a "turning circle". No one seemed to know how to use it at all - they'd just fly on round it without giving way to other road users. In the end we gave up trying and just took the first chance to get onto the damn thing.
Also, sarcasm. Most people we met didn't get the Norn Ireland black and slagging sense of humour, or any of our "aye, yer ma" jokes.
Bacon. It's different.
Beer. What's going on there? You have to drink gallons of the stuff for it to have any effect. Thanks be that it's cheap!
I praise the coffee though!


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Burke
Date: 18 Aug 00 - 09:18 AM

An American might find dunking a hard cookie/biscuit in tea a strange idea, but every child knows about dunking them in milk. Studies show that milk is the best for such purposes./a>


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST, Banjo Johnny
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 02:45 AM

What does "Bob's your uncle" mean? Someone told me this before, but I forgot. == Johnny in OKC


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,Penny S.(minus cookie)
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 01:18 PM

On biscuits and bubble and squeak we have had discussion before - try a search.

I read that Rowling was told that American children would not understand the reference to the Philosopher's Stone - not many of my 8 yr old addicts would have done, either.

Can anyone tell me why Diana Wynne Jones' books, by a British author, set in Britain, often have not only US spelling but vocabulary - sidewalk, fender, tire, trunk etc, in British editions, while American authors such as Judy Blume and Betsy Byars are available in UK English? One even had the internationally accepted spelling aluminium, which is not used in science journals. We have to write sulfur and do, but aluminum still gets used the other way round.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: catspaw49
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 01:32 PM

Like Penny said, we have had a number of these discussions before and I remember getting in trouble for suggesting that I'd have a hard time seeing a 6'2" 250 pound redneck asking for a plates of scones and gravy. And if you give that ol' boy what you call a biscuit when he asks for biscuits and redeye, let me get outta' the way before the ass-kickin' begins.

Twisting wrenches for a living on a lot of English cars made me appreciate early on the ability to translate. I used to ride BSA's and Triumphs in the 60's and loved the manuals: "Turn on the main petrol cock and tickle the carbuerettors." Was this for real? The fuel shutoff didn't resemble a cock of any sort and the carbs never laughed.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 03:13 PM

celticblues5: Sure, you know who Guy Fawkes was, but do you know how they celebrate Guy Fawkes Day in Britain today?

An electric shower is an electric water heater that does not contain a storage tank. It is a plastic-covered box mounted on the wall above the bathtub. You turn it on when you start to take a shower. Cold water flows into it and is heated right before it flows out though the nozzle. You control the temperature with a dial. Some also contain a pump to increase pressure. It saves energy by heating only as much water as you need, right when and where you need it. As far as I know, every British home has one. Americans find it a little scary to be touching a device that carries 230 volts or so while standing in the shower, but apparently they are well insulated and quite safe. (American showers are always connected to the central water heater, which is always on.)

McGrath of Harlow: My reason for mentioning bank holidays was as follows: American holidays are always meant, in theory at least, to commemorate something, and they always have some sort of ritual or tradition associated with them. Maybe the average American doesn't give a rip whether the Italian-American Association places a wreath on a statue of Christopher Columbus on Columbus Day, or whether some high-school student won a prize for the best recitation of the "I Have a Dream" speech on Martin Luther King Day, but those things happen, and are duly reported in the news media. The British attitude seems to be different: we don't need to commemorate anything; we just want to have a day off; so let's close the banks and call it a bank holiday. Thus I think it is a real cultural difference (although you might think it a trivial one) and not just a difference in terminology.

Penny S.: I was told that Brits eat pancakes only on Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras). Is that right? And do they eat them for breakfast, or what? Americans have several things they sometimes eat for breakfast with syrup: pancakes, waffles, and French toast. Maple syrup is the best, made from the sap of real maple trees, but cheaper substitutes are more common.

Marymac90: Christmas number one, as I understand, is whatever record (or nowadays, CD) happens to be number one on the pop charts at Christmas. It's a big deal because apparently a lot of Brits buy records as gifts or to play at Christmas parties, so more records are sold right before Christmas than any other time. Bookies take bets on what song will be Christmas number one. And Christmas number one is frequently a "novelty" or comedy record. Benny Hill once made it with his recording of "Ernie."

MMario: While the majority of American bars don't offer free munchies, some do. I know two that always have fresh popcorn available, and there used to be some around here that had salted-in-the-shell peanuts (they encouraged customers to throw the shells on the floor), but I think they gave that up when peanuts became too expensive. Free munchies tend to be salty, so they encourage you to drink more.

Need I mention that, in America, popcorn is served with salt and sometimes butter (or fake butter) but not sugar?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Brendy
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 05:04 PM

Yo there Gary T.

I was hoping that one of our English Midlands contingent would have jumped in to clarify the 'bits' bit.

I used to share a house on the west of Ireland with a lad from close to Coventry; that place where all the BBC's World Service transmitters are (The name escapes me at the minute).
I was making chicken soup one evening, after we had killed one of the cocks, and had added chopped onion, pieces of chicken, carrots, etc.
As I served up my culinary masterpiece, yer man says to me, "Oh, it's got bits in.....I like bits."

He was referring to the pieces of chicken, onion, etc, and was using 'bits' as the collective noun.
'Bits', as far as I know, can be used to describe the contents of any liquid that has pieces of something floating, or submerged in it - recognisable or not.

I hope this helps.

B.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Roo
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 08:45 PM

What a mixed up lot we Aussies are! I have been following this thread with fascination. It seems we are more British than American but "Americanisms" have a strong hold here too. Then of course we do have our own Strine words which surface when you least expect them to! eg. ocher - arvo - chook - mozzie - barbie - yobbo - ute - bludger etc etc (how embarassing! - if you need a translation of Aussie English, let me know)


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Cobble
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 09:24 PM

Who was it who said " we are divided by a common language"?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: catspaw49
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 09:36 PM

Shaw

Spaw

rhymes huh?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Gary T
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 10:32 PM

Thanks, Brendy, that does help. Over here one more commonly hears "chunks", meaning essentially the same as bits. In particular, soups or sauces might be called chunky, especially so if the pieces are rather large.

Okay, Roo, I'll take you up on some translations. I've heard of barbie=barbecue. I only know ocher as a color or perhaps type of earth of that color (pronounced OH-cur). I bet that's not it, huh? Can't say I've heard of any of your other examples.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Rana
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 11:46 PM

Jim,

The pancakes we had on pancake day (or Shrove Tuesday) are not like N. American pancakes but more like a crepe. Instead of a filling we had sugar and lemon coated and then they were rolled up.

Rana


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: rabbitrunning
Date: 19 Aug 00 - 11:57 PM

I'm a children's librarian (in Boston, Massachusetts), so I have seen a lot of the UK/US variations in children's books. Mostly they are dependent on who published first, and whether or not the other publisher is interested in taking the time and effort to change the words or spelling for the "home" edition. With Harry Potter, the concern _was_ that US children wouldn't know what a philosopher's stone was, and also that they wouldn't touch the book without something more recognizable in the title. Foolish mortals.

I've been reading British mysteries and books, and watching Dr. Who, and various sitcoms for years, so very little of the vocabulary baffles me. And the children I know who have heard about the controversy think it's nonsense. As one of my young patrons said. "If I can figure out what Quidditch is, I can figure out what a lorry is too."

One of the differences I noticed is that the UK TV-movie tie-ins are better than the US versions. I still have a lovely fat book called "The Further Adventures of Oliver Twist" from one trip across the pond. And I have both the US and UK editions of a Six Million Dollar Man book. (The one with Bigfoot.) There are twice as many words in the first chapter of the UK edition. Longer ones too.

Yikes!


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Penny S.
Date: 20 Aug 00 - 05:35 AM

We do eat pancakes at other times as well, but Shrove Tuesday is essential. Try a search on Pancake Day or Olney, where they have races tossing pancakes - I don't know if anything is there.

On the other hand, I do know there are a number of Bonfire sites, or try fireworks for links to all that is left of a fine old tradition of sending up authority rotten. My feeling is that to allow a tradition of rebellious behaviour while appearing to condemn it and trying to ban it is a very good way of keeping dissent under control.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,Crazy Eddie
Date: 20 Aug 00 - 06:00 AM

I've been told that John Cleese [of Fawlty Toweres & Monty Python fame] was once asked on American radio, what he saw as the main differences between English &Americans His reply (so the story goes) was: #1 We speak English, you don't #2 When we hold a world series, we invite other countries to actually take part. & #3 When you meet our Head of State, you are expected to go down on ONE knee!

Has anyone mentioned that chips are really crisps, whereas fries are chips?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Roo
Date: 20 Aug 00 - 08:26 PM

Here you go Gary T - Strine at it's best. (Strine is how Australians are supposed to pronounce the word, "Australian" and so it means our distinct Australian language) You are right that ochre is an earthy colour, but an "ocher" (sometimes written okker; pron: okka) = an uncultivated Australian male arvo = afternoon footie = football chook = chicken (chook raffles are popular in footie clubs) mozzie = mosquito barbie = bar-b-que yobbo = similar to ocker ute = open backed van bludger = someone who bludges to bludge = do no work or borrow without the intention of paying back bubbler = drinking fountain

There are thousands of others. If you are interested there's a very good site which has a lot of Australian slang definitions: http://www.apex.net.au/~me/indexas.html

Bob's your uncle: Here in Oz we use it to mean "and that's that" or "hey presto" at the end of an explanation as to why or how something works or happens.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Brendy
Date: 20 Aug 00 - 08:40 PM

Bob's your uncle. The Definition.

B.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: rabbitrunning
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 08:52 AM

But surely Bjorn Stronginthearm is my uncle.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Quincy
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 09:34 AM

No Rabbit!!!! Bob's your uncle and Fanny's your aunt!!!!!!

Yvonne


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: celticblues5
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 12:00 PM

Jim

OK, I'll go for it - what DO they to for GF day these days? - Different from the classic literary scenes of bonfires & effigies?

The electric shower thing was interesting - lately there have been little blurbs about this great new product - a heating coil that heats water just before using, as an alternative to big ol' water heaters - touted as an energy-saving device! lol - as they say, nothing new under the sun.....


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 12:45 PM

Sorry Quincy, I was having a Pratchett moment there.
Although you did remind me of the difference in definitions between the US and UK of "Fanny." It's MUCH ruder in England.

Then there are the things that you just don't expect. The first time I went to England I wanted to try a crumpet. So I went to a bakery (near Boscombe Downs) and was told that they were out of season!

Crumpets got seasons???


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Burke
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 12:58 PM

Australian: bubbler = drinking fountain

Someone from around Milwaukee, Wisconsin must have been the importer or exporter of the first of these to Australia :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Whistle Stop
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 01:05 PM

Just jumped onto this thread, after avoiding it for some time. Regarding "roundabouts," I think they are the same thing we in the northeastern United States (the half-dozen states collectively known as "New England") call "rotaries". It's basically a traffic circle to handle cars coming from several different intersecting roads. They are common in my part of the country, but people from other parts of the U.S. hate them. It doesn't help that the rules seem to change periodically -- so there is no common understanding about whether you're supposed to yield to the oncoming traffic, or to the traffic that was already in the rotary.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 06:36 PM

OK, here's what I know about Guy Fawkes Day: Kids start preparing for it a week or so before the actual day. Usually a few preteen kids working together will first build a "guy" - a dummy made from old clothes stuffed with rags or crumpled newspaper. They usually put him in a wheelbarrow, or nowadays tie him to a plastic lawn chair, to make him easily portable. Usually on the Saturday before GF Day, they will set him up in a public place, anywhere there is a lot of foot traffic, and accost passersby with the words "A penny for the guy." (They don't go door to door, like American trick-or-treaters.) People are expected to give them a little money. (More than a penny, nowadays, I suspect.) The kids are supposed to use the money to buy fireworks, which they then stuff into the guy.

You will see signs posted around the neighborhood announcing that there will be a bonfire at such-and-such a place, sponsored by such-and-such an organization. That's because, in the interest of safety, it's a good idea to have this part supervised by adults. On the night of November 5, the kids bring their guys and throw them on the fire.

I haven't actually witnessed such a bonfire, but when I visited England shortly before Nov. 5, 1985, I saw several "guys."

I'm interested in hearing from Brits about their own experiences. Is Guy Fawkes Day, like American Halloween, also a time for pranks and minor vandalism? Americans often have fond memories of Halloween, because it is often their first experience of being outdoors at night in groups with no adults.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: ol'troll
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 07:27 PM

This is to give notice that the finest kippers in the world come from the Isle of Man and preferably from Peel on the Islands west coast. This is simple truth and I will brook no argument to the contrary.

The best are to be had in July when the herring are running so the kippers are fresh. There are Manxmen who only eat kippers at that time.

A couple of pairs with eggs and whole-meal bread and fresh-brewed tea is a breakfast that a king would envy.

But don't take my word for it. Go there and try them yourself.

troll


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,PatJoe
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 01:00 PM

Has anyone in the US ever seen a tin of HP's All Day Breakfast?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Bert
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 01:06 PM

troll, you'll have to send me a pair to see if I agree with you.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: M.Ted
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 03:46 PM

I am late again, but have a question, and this may be the place for it-- Just spent a few days in London, and, saw on the telly(what we would call a TV) a commercial for what appeared to be nappies for adults, however, they were not being promoted to persons with bladder control problems, the message was targetted at a younger audience, and promoted the idea that it was no longer necessary for healthy, normal people, to get out of bed when you needed to relieve themselves, thanks to this new product, they could simply let loose, then roll over and go back to sleep--

Did I hear right? Or did I misunderstand? Is there a general feeling over there that it is just too darn much trouble to get up at night and make a trip down the hall?


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 04:00 PM

If this had happened in the US, I would ask, were you watching "Saturday Night Live"? (A show that often does brilliant parodies of commercials.) This certainly sounds like the kind of thing they have done.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: M.Ted
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 04:31 PM

No, it was London, alright, I know, because there was a tea kettle in my room.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Penny S.
Date: 02 Sep 00 - 05:39 AM

There are traditions of mischief around GF night, in some areas it's called Mischief Night, but until the US Halloween customs came back over the pond a few years this had fallen into abeyance, encouraged by the police. I haven't seen many guys lately. There is less readiness to accept children off by themselves, interacting with unknown people. I'll try and find my book on seasonal customs, but I haven't seen it for some time, and last time the perfect binding had unbound.

I heard a program last year about an incident in East Anglia, when, unnoticed because of the detonations in the street, someone blew up the new organ in the church, a crime never solved. The vicar, young scion of the local big house, had installed it to expel the choir and band (see Hardy) with their right of choosing the psalm, through which they could comment on local issues. The program pointed out that in this particular village there was a conflict between the villagers who believed the village to be open (not controlled by the big house) and the local dominant family, who didn't.

There was a widespread tradition of using GF as a time to express opinion which at other times would be risky - jobs could be lost. The attitude of authority to this has been negative, and there are continued attempts to end or control the survivals in such a way that they lose all resemblance to the original. In Sussex, those who do this are liable to end up in effigy as enemies of Bonfire. Bridgewater in Somerset, has a similar situation as the town no longer approves of bonfires on the main, now tarmac'd street.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~bonboy/bfl.htm

Bonfire


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: sledge
Date: 02 Sep 00 - 08:09 AM

From my visits to the US:

Catfish is great, cornbread is very good with beans and rice, Wisconsin bratwurst is fabulous especialy if preboiled in beer before grilling. Down side has been most US cheese I have found to be feeble tasting, the exception was Monterey Jack with Jalapeno peppers in it. My exposure to grits left a very unpleasant tatste.

As for UK food, I consider steak and Kidney pudding to be the food of the Gods.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: JulieF
Date: 02 Sep 00 - 09:52 AM

Going back to roundabouts - has anyone else seen the one in the south of England - near Hemel Hemstead that is really 6 or 8 little roundabouts joined together. Sign for it looks like a molecule ( a bit like Benzene) and cars go in evry direction imaginable.

Julie


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 01:47 AM

A question for our US friends, What is Thanksgiving, who are you thanking & for what, Do you send cards/presents to friends? When is it? Cheers.john


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Ebbie
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 02:47 AM

Thanksgiving Day, the third Thursday of each November, is a national holiday in America; a holiday officially pronounced by the President each year.

The thanks (originally thanks for a bountiful harvest) go to whomever each person perceives as being the giver of all things good. Traditionally God, but I see no reason why one could not give thanks to the universe or Goddess, whatever.

Presents are not normally given but Hallmark, et al, has seized this day as another marketing opportunity and you will now find in the stores a wide array of Thanksgiving cards. (Stay tuned. Another ten years and it will have become another 6 week extravaganza.)

Over the years a certain sort of decoration has come to denote Thanksgiving. For instance, a turkey, whether live or on paper or a ceramic figure, is a symbol of Thanksgiving. So are cornucopias overflowing with harvested vegetables and fruits, as are paper tablecloths decorated with autumn colors.

I know Canada has a Thanksgiving Day too. How does it differ from the US version? Anybody?

Ebbie


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 06:37 AM

Uhhh, not really correct Ebbie. Click here for The Origin of Thanksgiving Day

Murray


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Nemesis
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 08:18 AM

Someone may have posted this already - We do have baton-twirling in UK (My Uncle was President of the European Baton Twirling Asssociation) - altho it's more of a personal sport choice than a cultural one.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: kendall
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 08:43 AM

Just for the record, Plymouth Rock is a myth. Oh, there is a rock alright, but it is nowhere near the waters edge.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: GUEST,SarahC
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 08:43 AM

Mischief Night is November 4 - the day before Bonfire Night. It is a particular Yorkshire custom as far as I understand, because that was the night that the Gunpowder plotters were in Parliament laying the explosives. Fawkes and many of the crew were from Yorkshire.

Mischief Night means the kids go round wreaking havoc (lard on the doorsteps, eggs broken on the upstairs windows etc). At least on Halloween you are given the chance to buy the little blighters off).

Cheers


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 09:36 AM

RE: cheerleaders and dance teams.

After watching a dance team perform at halftime in a local basketball game, Lars, the Swedish exchange student at our school said, "What is the purpose of this?"

Mary (NEVER a cheerleader, but the mother of one)


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Linda Kelly
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 10:09 AM

Whilst we are on the subject -can you get a decent trifle in the U.S.? also, can you explain why you need a blood test before you get a marraige license - this isn't required in the U.K.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Jack the Sailor
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 10:58 AM

Being from Canada, Living in the Georgia USA, having many English friend. I can Favor the Colourful expressions on theis thread, S'all goood...Y'all

Canada's Thanksgiving is the second Monday in October. Celebrated in much the same way as In the USA. It is not as big a deal in Canada for a number of reasons. We don't go in for the whole Pilgrim/Indian thing. So we have fewer traditions. In the US, because the holiday is a Thursday closer to Christmas you tend to get 4 day weekends and family reunions. In Canada there is no holiday between Halloween and Christmas so the Christmas decorations go up in the malls very early in November.

Bon Fire night (Guy Fawlkes We didn't have an effigy or collect for Guy I think we were celebrating that he almost got away with it.) was a very big holiday in Newfoundland when I was growing up and for generations before. Most of the pranks occured on Nov.5 same as the fires except for the tradition of "Bucking" materials to burn. Bucking basically means stealing. But not stealing something of great value. One would buck apples from someone's tree or buck worn out tires or old barrels from a backyard or shed.

There would be great rivalries between the boys from different parts of town to see who made the greatest fire. Most of the bucking was from each other.

Here is Georgia I have a number of English friend's who miss "proper biscuits". I would not dare pat them on the fanny. Another froend regularly had Popadoms and curry powder flown in so that he couls have a "proper English Curry"


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Jack the Sailor
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 10:58 AM

Being from Canada, Living in the Georgia USA, having many English friend. I can Favor the Colourful expressions on theis thread, S'all goood...Y'all

Canada's Thanksgiving is the second Monday in October. Celebrated in much the same way as In the USA. It is not as big a deal in Canada for a number of reasons. We don't go in for the whole Pilgrim/Indian thing. So we have fewer traditions. In the US, because the holiday is a Thursday closer to Christmas you tend to get 4 day weekends and family reunions. In Canada there is no holiday between Halloween and Christmas so the Christmas decorations go up in the malls very early in November.

Bon Fire night (Guy Fawlkes We didn't have an effigy or collect for Guy I think we were celebrating that he almost got away with it.) was a very big holiday in Newfoundland when I was growing up and for generations before. Most of the pranks occured on Nov.5 same as the fires except for the tradition of "Bucking" materials to burn. Bucking basically means stealing. But not stealing something of great value. One would buck apples from someone's tree or buck worn out tires or old barrels from a backyard or shed.

There would be great rivalries between the boys from different parts of town to see who made the greatest fire. Most of the bucking was from each other.

Here is Georgia I have a number of English friend's who miss "proper biscuits". I would not dare pat them on the fanny. Another froend regularly had Popadoms and curry powder flown in so that he could have a "proper English Curry"


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 11:10 AM

Thanks Ebbie & Murray.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 11:46 AM

For those who aren't familiar with American Thanksgiving: There are certain foods traditionally associated with it: roast whole turkey stuffed with a bread-based stuffing (recipes vary), cranberry sauce, sweet potatoes (yams), and pumpkin pie. Any of these things might be eaten at other times, too, especially at Christmas, though some people favor ham at Christmas. There would probably other dishes, too.


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Subject: RE: BS: British-American cultural differences 2
From: Ebbie
Date: 18 Sep 01 - 12:19 PM

Murray, which part of what I said is incorrect?

Incidentally, some of the information given on that link is incorrect. It says: "Over the next seventy-five years, Presidents followed Lincoln's precedent, annually declaring a national Thanksgiving Day. Then, in 1941, Congress permanently established the last Thursday of each November as a national holiday."

In 1941, under President Roosevelt, Congress established the last Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day. I think it lasted two years, before they (we) went back to celebrating it the fourth Thursday of the month.

Check out this year.

Ebbie


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