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National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US

Related threads:
National Storytelling Festival 7-9 Oct 2011 TN-US (9)
2001 National Storytelling Festival (6)


Hollowfox 20 Sep 00 - 05:09 PM
Dave the Gnome 20 Sep 00 - 05:46 PM
GUEST 20 Sep 00 - 06:35 PM
GUEST,mag 20 Sep 00 - 10:10 PM
paddymac 20 Sep 00 - 10:47 PM
Les B 20 Sep 00 - 11:07 PM
Rich(bodhránai gan ciall) 20 Sep 00 - 11:29 PM
CamiSu 20 Sep 00 - 11:48 PM
rabbitrunning 21 Sep 00 - 01:09 AM
Tig 21 Sep 00 - 06:25 AM
GUEST,kendall 21 Sep 00 - 06:53 AM
Jock Morris 21 Sep 00 - 08:42 AM
paddymac 21 Sep 00 - 01:13 PM
Rich(bodhránai gan ciall) 21 Sep 00 - 01:40 PM
GUEST,Les B 21 Sep 00 - 03:57 PM
rabbitrunning 21 Sep 00 - 11:22 PM
CamiSu 21 Sep 00 - 11:46 PM
Rich(bodhránai gan ciall) 22 Sep 00 - 12:46 AM
Bev and Jerry 22 Sep 00 - 01:37 AM
Bettynh 17 Sep 10 - 02:36 PM
kendall 17 Sep 10 - 07:31 PM
Old Vermin 18 Sep 10 - 02:03 PM
Bettynh 18 Sep 10 - 03:00 PM
Bettynh 19 Sep 10 - 02:08 PM
Bettynh 20 Sep 10 - 10:57 AM
Tannywheeler 20 Sep 10 - 12:07 PM
Bettynh 20 Sep 10 - 12:41 PM
Bettynh 21 Sep 10 - 10:25 AM
Bettynh 22 Sep 10 - 09:47 AM
Bettynh 23 Sep 10 - 09:35 AM
Old Vermin 23 Sep 10 - 02:31 PM
Mark Ross 23 Sep 10 - 08:18 PM
Bettynh 24 Sep 10 - 11:38 AM
Bettynh 25 Sep 10 - 02:39 PM
Bettynh 26 Sep 10 - 01:42 PM
Bettynh 27 Sep 10 - 03:47 PM
Bettynh 28 Sep 10 - 02:04 PM
GUEST,Sue 01 Oct 10 - 12:59 PM
Bettynh 07 Oct 10 - 02:43 PM
Bettynh 08 Oct 10 - 12:35 PM
Bettynh 09 Oct 10 - 12:53 PM
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Subject: National Storytelling Festival
From: Hollowfox
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 05:09 PM

Any other 'Catters attending? It's in Jonesborough, Tennessee (the easternmost corner), and I know that some of you live nearby. I know I'll be there, and Dan Keding is performing. This festival is great; it's really more of an ongoing party that's held in annual weekend-long installments. I'm looking forward to meeting a bunch more 'Catters!


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 05:46 PM

Hmmmm - Love to be there but the big pond seems to get in the way! Any Brits interested in Storytelling may want to know that Taffy Thomas is on at Swinton on Oct 28 and, hopefuly, we have Tuup from Guyana as well. Good luck in Tennessee and Once upon a time there was a Cafe, a Gnome and a Thread....

Continue at your own pace:-)


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 06:35 PM

I performed at that festival 20 years ago, and, it was great. Go if you can, you wont regret it.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: GUEST,mag
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 10:10 PM

I'll be there; just bought the basic adult weekend pass, not the special evening stuff (tho' I have been to the "adult" cabaret, and it is certainly in good Mudcat style.)Now I know to wear my Mudcat T.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: paddymac
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 10:47 PM

Story telling is a fantastic folk art form enjoying a gradual expansion in exposure and popularity over the last 20 years or so, or so it seems to me on this side of the pond. It's always been around, of course, but like so many other kinds of entertainment that people made for themselves, is was over-shadowed by the idiot box. Although its primary use in today's world might be seen as entertainment, it has had more serious functions in other times. It was the mechanism by which most elements of culture were passed from one generation to the next, and from one community to the next.

This is not an area of expertise for me, but I would dearly love to see this thread take on an informative examination and exploration of the function of story-telling in different societies.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Les B
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 11:07 PM

Paddymac - I too would like to hear more about the storytelling/folk process. I have only heard a few good "yarners" and always thought, "no I couldn't do that"! But that's what I also thought about folk music 25 years ago.

Who are some of the leading storytellers? Does everyone have their own individual repertoire, or are there basic tales that everyone must know to go the the next level? Does anyone mix music and stories ?


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Rich(bodhránai gan ciall)
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 11:29 PM

I unfortunately won't be at the Fest, but be aware that it is really the beginning of the storytelling season. It seems like storytelling concerts tend to swing through the school year (Fall to spring) Soon there will be evenings of ghost stories (often with the same teller performing a less scary child-oriented show and a more unnerving adult show) To me that's one of the real marks of a good teller: to take an audience who is prepared for a good scare, has their defenses up so to speak and still nail 'em! I'm not quite there yet.

Then the next big thing, Tellabration! For those unfamiliar it is a giant event that occurs on the same weekend all over the world at hundreds of locations. Originally it was on the same night (I believe it's the Saturday before Thanksgiving, but I have to be reminded every year.) Usually some of the best local tellers in a given area perform one story apiece for a concert of 8-10 stories. I've attended the Pittsburgh one for the last 4 or 5 years and it's always something special.

Slán,
Rich


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: CamiSu
Date: 20 Sep 00 - 11:48 PM

I have been the stage manager at the Storytelling stage at the Clearwater Hudson River Revival for 13 years, and after a few years the others at the stage stopped trying to get me to walk around the rest of the festival. I really wanted to stay there.

It is such a wonderful art form. Some people memorise their stories, word for word. Others (me included) get to know the story and then tell it, and sometimes we forget a bit, which usually means we won't forget THAT part again! The former technique is best for working with text by a contemporary author(copyright), and either works for traditional stuff.

One of the things I like best is the way it pulls people together. My kids grew up on Story Stage and they all love all manner of story, theater, and literature. They would, (and the youngest still does) demand stories they'd heard once, and by God, I'd better have heard it too! I see parents and kids together, and I'm not sure who is more rapt. Once I managed to get it JUST right on 'Come Again in the Spring' (which I learned orally, so don't have it the way it was written)and the whole audience gasped at the end line. The audience ranged from 6 to about 80.

The other kind of telling is the tellers own experience. Davis Bates does a number of wonderful tales about his grandad, meeting his wife, his son and now his daughter. Those of us who hear them year after year enjoy them as much as we do the trad tales.

I think we need stories. Most of us here probably read, but there is something special about listening. That's most likely why Garrison Keillor is so popular, not to mention books on tape. Also as one teller put it (Louise Kessel) 'People think storytelling they think cute and pigtails!(flipping her 3 foot long braids) They don't think ...subversive!' But it is such a great venue for passing on values. Much better than a lecture! (Gee, kinda like songs...)

Someday I'll get to Jonesborough, I keep promising myself. See you there then!

Cami Su


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: rabbitrunning
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:09 AM

I haven't been to Jonesboro, but I've been to storytelling conferences and it's amazing how willing everyone is to help you polish the stories you want to tell.

Margaret Read MacDonald has some excellent books for new storytellers, some stories aimed younger and some older. (And if you can get in workshop with her, do! You'll walk away with three or four stories ready to tell!)

Storytelling is special. I read to children sometimes (for things like "The Elephant's Child" where the author's language is an important element) but I usually tell stories. This can confuse some kids, who think that they have to have illustrations in order to "see" the story, but you can bring 'em around. One of my classes last year got a new girl just at the end of the year and I overheard her student "guide" explaining that "Miss Dye don't need no books. She reads to us from inside her head."

(okay, so I'm boasting... )

My "repertoire" includes authored stories, folktales, and even family stories -- anything that works well with my audiences (mostly elementary and preschool students, but occasionally families.)

I think everyone can tell stories. And well, too, if they make the effort. You might look for a book called "Old Man in a Baseball Cap" which is the war stories by a gentleman whose name escapes me, but who was encouraged to write down his tales by a class he took in storytelling.

Go for it, Les B.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Tig
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 06:25 AM

I'm jealous. There's no way I can get to the National Storytelling Festival 'cos I live in Yorkshire and can't afford the trip. Dan Kedding is one of my favourite storytellers since I saw him at my first Festival at the Edge and I have seen him as many times as I can since.

I went home from there 6 years ago determined to be a teller by the next one - and I am. My street cred in school went up no end, the kids ASK for their favourite stories and are disappointed when I refuse to tell them. As a supply teacher it's great!

Treat yourself to some of Dan's tapes then you can carry on listening at home and give him Chris (the Badge Lady's)love for me if you go.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 06:53 AM

someone stole old cookie and I wish they'd bring it back..


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Jock Morris
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 08:42 AM

If you ever find yourself in Grasmere (English Lake District) on a sunny afternoon, make a point of spending some time in Taffy Thomas's Storyteller's Garden. He isn't there every day, but what a treat if you manage to catch him.

Jock Morris


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: paddymac
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:13 PM

A long time ago, in a galaxy far away - ah, well, seemed like it anyway - I was subjected to the collegiate ritual of reading Beowoulf. A disgusting and brutal experience. More recently, the nobel laureate poet Seamus Heany published a translation, which I had no interest in reading until I just happened to hear an interview with him in which he made the startling statement: "Beowoulf was never meant to be read; it was meant to be heard!" (or words to that effect). That got me to thinking about the great sagas from many cultures which are mostly passed down today as classic literature. God, they would be incredible if delivered in an oral tradition. Think of teh "Tain Bo Cualigne" as a recitation! Or the Iliad! And then that got me to thinking about the views of earlier cultures on writing. The pre-christian Irish disdained writing, primarily because every time words were transferred from memory to paper, there was the almost certain probability that it would be changed (remember, this was a long time before printing and xerox). Mayans also disdained writing, but for a different reason. In a general way, spoken words had to be remembered as a form of prayer, and writing was thought to remove the necessity of memorizing, which was considered disrespectful to the gods. I've taken on a whole new perspective on the ancient form of communication we now call story-telling and story-tellers. I think of it, and especially them, more in the sense of "living libraries".


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Rich(bodhránai gan ciall)
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 01:40 PM

Paddymac, I've heard people tell stories from Beowulf, and it can be really great in the right tellers hands.

In reference to the thought on th pre-Christian Irish, I would have to disagree. Words become fixed on paper as opposed to in the head where they mutate to fit the situation. In storytelling, one doesn't use the same words as he or she heard the story told. The common term is stripping it down to "the bare bones". It sort of like taking a novel, writing a Cliff's Notes version, and them rebuilding from there. You may use some piece of language the way it was told, but by rebuilding it becomes your story. It's not to say that if you told a chapter of Beowulf, anyone would think you pulled it completly out of your head, but it would be your "Beowulf meets Grendel" at that point. I've heard people tell a story that I had already written off as boring, and draw mw to the edge of my seat with their telling of it.

Slán agat,
Rich


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: GUEST,Les B
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 03:57 PM

So, in general, who are the audiences for storytelling - school kids or adults ? (I realize that's a simplistic question, but I'm probing here!)


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: rabbitrunning
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 11:22 PM

Audiences for "storytelling" can be any ages at all, but I see adults in the audience mostly as an adjunct to children -- except at storytelling conventions, of course, where the audiences are older.

Adults do listen to storytellers, of course, but they think they're listening to comedians.

;D

Go Bill Cosby!


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: CamiSu
Date: 21 Sep 00 - 11:46 PM

Ya know, paddymac, we've had that discussion in Sunday School of all places, as in does the writing down profane (or at least make less spiritual) the word? I'm not sure, because I love to read, but I SURE do love listening to stories.

And I do not see adults as adjuncts to children when I tell. Even The Bad Baby gets a great response from adults. I do generally choose stories that I enjoy, so perhaps I go for the more complex, but even very young kids enjoy a complex story if it is clear. And Bill Cosby is great, but so are a host of others who are not household names. That's one of the most wonderful things about festivals is, discovering the ones you've never heard of. If anyone ever gets a chance to hear Wolf Song, he is quite wonderful.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Rich(bodhránai gan ciall)
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 12:46 AM

Often it seems like the kids are there to give the grownups an excuse to see the storyteller. "I'm here for my kids. Yeah, that's the ticket.
Rich


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 22 Sep 00 - 01:37 AM

We saw Dan Keding at a storytelling festival last weekend. The audience was mostly adults with some kids. He had to reprimand some kids from the stage to keep quiet and pay attention as did three other tellers during the weekend. We think that's because the material may have been aimed at the adults. We do some storytelling in schools and select stories strictly for kids (although most adults enjoy them, too). We never have a problem with discipline.

On the other hand, when we're singing, we sometimes do have a problem with discipline. We think storytelling is similar to singing in that you have to carefully select material to suit the age of the audience. If it's all ages, your screwed.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Bettynh
Date: 17 Sep 10 - 02:36 PM

Since this is coming soon (Oct 1-3, I know it conflicts with the Getaway, what a bummer!) I thought I'd add to the above. The Jonesborough festival isn't aimed at kids, really. It's aimed at teachers, librarians and others who tell stories themselves. I think there's a certain amount of government/corporate money involved, as it can be counted as a "professional enrichment" and used for certification, etc.The crowd looks like this . That said, there are plenty of kids and familys. I've been bringing my own family for 20 years now, and my kids have always been entertained and never a problem. Since the venue is outside (tents with folding chairs), it's easy for kids to just walk away if they've had enough. Parents, of course, can follow (or not. Jonesborough is tiny and it's impossible for even a kid to get lost. Mine were free to roam from about age 10). Freight trains go within 50 feet of a couple tents, usually a couple times a day. The tellers just have to cope. And there's lots of music as well. This year features:

Bill Miller
John McCutcheon
Andy Offutt Irwin
Patrick Ball
Kim Weitkamp

and many other non-musical tellers.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: kendall
Date: 17 Sep 10 - 07:31 PM

I was a performer at this festival back in 1988 I think it was. It was great fun.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Old Vermin
Date: 18 Sep 10 - 02:03 PM

For those of us on the other side of the pond, any hope of putting some more of it on YouTube in due course, please?


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Bettynh
Date: 18 Sep 10 - 03:00 PM

Old Vermin, not everyone who tells will broadcast their performance, unfortunately, but there are many out there:

These folks are not featured at the festival this year, but will likely return:

Willie Claflin


Bill Harley
(Although Bill is doing a musical concert at midnight on Saturday as an extra)

Leeny Del Seamonds

Judith Black

Syd Lieberman

And Kathryn Tucker Windham will be featured every year for as long as possible (she's currently in her mid-90's).


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Bettynh
Date: 19 Sep 10 - 02:08 PM

How could I have neglected David Holt


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Bettynh
Date: 20 Sep 10 - 10:57 AM

No longer with us are:

Jackie Torrence

Brother Blue

Gamble Rogers


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Tannywheeler
Date: 20 Sep 10 - 12:07 PM

So, when IS this shindig in 10-OH-C?? How does one get how-to-attend info?? Would love to go, but after all the expenses incurred by my recent life-saving med.proced. it's not likely. Howsomever, I know a few folks who would love to go (& might even give me a seat in the car...) & I could tell them. Tw


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival
From: Bettynh
Date: 20 Sep 10 - 12:41 PM

Tammy, the first weekend in October. This year (2010) that's Oct 1-3. Friday night is a separate (and separately charged) ghost story telling - outside in the dark, it's fun and a big favorite for the locals. Jonesborough, TN is close to Bristol, VA/Tenn (one city, two states). Parking is free with shuttlebuses, or reasonable if you'd prefer closer in.
Festival website
If anyone is thinking of going and needs a place to stay, I know a great place for minimal $$ within an hour's drive.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 21 Sep 10 - 10:25 AM

Thank you, Joe (or clone) for combining threads here. What a treasure this site is! Some of the tellers come from within the church:

Barbara McBride Smith is a seminary professor


Bill Lepp is a clergyman who has won the West Virginia Liar's Contest several times.

I can't find a video of one of our favorites, Donald Davis, who is also a clergyman.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 22 Sep 10 - 09:47 AM

Odds Bodkin tells Beowulf in full concert, which keeps his audience riveted.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 23 Sep 10 - 09:35 AM

Rosalie Sorrels is an amazing teller. When we saw her my niece (12 years old) kept mumbling "she's talking about ME," and followed her from tent to tent for the whole weekend.

As far as I know U. Utah Phillips never appeared at the festival, but should have.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Old Vermin
Date: 23 Sep 10 - 02:31 PM

Thank you, Bettynh. Just came back to look at this thread again.

Think I'll aim to hear Odds Bodkin's Beowulf before looking at the DVD with Ray Winstone I picked up the the other day!


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Mark Ross
Date: 23 Sep 10 - 08:18 PM

Utah did appear there and loved it!

Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 24 Sep 10 - 11:38 AM

Old Vermin, I don't think Odds Bodkin has recorded that story. And it seems his current concerts are tellings of Ulysses. It's more like theater, sometimes, in what gets recorded. And storytelling doesn't seem to get much respect. Of course there's no such category in Itunes. Amazon seems to think any spoken-word recording is originally from a book, so searching for storytellers has to include book search as well. Audible.com specializes in spoken word, but makes no distinction between reading a story and performing one. And everything gets even more confused when a storyteller creates a book from his or her original story.

There are some podcasts.
Talk Story Radio is one of the best, since it incorporates many first-rate tellers.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 25 Sep 10 - 02:39 PM

Mark, I'm not surprised at all. Utah would have fit perfectly there.

Some of the tellers are very theatrical:


Eth-noh-tec

and

Brenda Wong Aoki

embrace the Oriental theater.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 26 Sep 10 - 01:42 PM

An interesting development is the use of storytelling within the NASA
organization. They have conferences in which project managers tell their own stories to educate others. NASA has also commissioned stories from generalist storytellers Syd Lieberman and Jay O'Callahan


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 27 Sep 10 - 03:47 PM

The festival always tries to include Native American tellers:


Johnny Moses



Joe Brucac


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 28 Sep 10 - 02:04 PM

I'm packing to go, so this will be the last bump for this thread. Have fun at the Getaway, folks who are going, we'll wave as we go by.

Some more great tellers:


Diane Wolkestein

Suzi Whaples


Carmen Deedy


Diane Ferlatte


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: GUEST,Sue
Date: 01 Oct 10 - 12:59 PM

And we can't ever forget Ray Hicks!

I have to say I'm really disappointed because in the last few years the cost of the Jonesborough festival has gone up so much that a lot of folks with children who love storytelling can't afford it.
My first time was when my daughter's kindergarten class went in 1981 (?) and we went every year after that, up until about 3-4 years ago. The last time my husband and I went we took our small grandson and he was mesmerized by the stories and the colorful tellers. We enjoyed that tremendously.
People do come from all over, and I'm sure the town of Jonesborough makes a hefty profit, but is it worth denying local young families the opportunity because of the cost?


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 02:43 PM

Sue, you're right. There were too many gray heads and not enough youngsters. If they really want the art to continue, and the festival to remain vibrant, I'd like to see reduced prices (way reduced, to something like $10 a day) for kids under 12 and half-price for anyone under 25. I miss the roving bands of 10 and 12-year olds that we saw 20 years ago. Friday is the traditional school-group day, and the groups weren't there this year. If you've the nerve and you are local to the festival and center, there are still places at the festival (outside the tents) where you can hear the stories. That doesn't work, of course, in the rain. And if you are local, keep an eye out for individual concerts at the center. Saturday matinee tickets are only $5.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 12:35 PM

Sue, we saw Ray Hicks several times at the festival. I'm sorry to say that as true Yankees, we couldn't follow his stories for his very thick accent. But the festival clearly loved him. He tells a story in this film. He was one of 13 children in the family. The Hicks family was a source for many collectors of folklore, including Alan Lomax, the Foxfire publishers, and others. Frank Proffitt was related to them, as well.


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Subject: RE: National Storytelling Festival 1-3 Oct 2010 TN-US
From: Bettynh
Date: 09 Oct 10 - 12:53 PM

For anyone with access:

Tune in for Storytelling Radio on SIRIUS Ch. 113/ XM 118 Friday, October 8 at 6 pm ET through Monday, October 11 at 3 am ET and feature stories from world-renowned tellers including Donald Davis, Kevin Kling, John McCutcheon, Carmen Agra Deedy and Kathryn Tucker Windham.


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