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Curious Expressions Three

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Bert 05 Oct 00 - 04:17 PM
SINSULL 05 Oct 00 - 04:18 PM
Bert 05 Oct 00 - 04:21 PM
Greyeyes 05 Oct 00 - 04:23 PM
Bert 05 Oct 00 - 05:06 PM
catspaw49 05 Oct 00 - 06:36 PM
GUEST,Medico Cosmico 05 Oct 00 - 07:00 PM
SINSULL 05 Oct 00 - 07:04 PM
catspaw49 05 Oct 00 - 07:24 PM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Oct 00 - 07:26 PM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Oct 00 - 07:29 PM
kendall 05 Oct 00 - 07:54 PM
catspaw49 05 Oct 00 - 07:57 PM
Wavestar 05 Oct 00 - 08:19 PM
Barbara 06 Oct 00 - 12:40 AM
katlaughing 06 Oct 00 - 01:04 AM
GUEST,Robina 06 Oct 00 - 03:04 AM
Steve Parkes 06 Oct 00 - 03:40 AM
Bugsy 06 Oct 00 - 05:10 AM
Naemanson 06 Oct 00 - 08:52 AM
Mrrzy 06 Oct 00 - 09:08 AM
kendall 06 Oct 00 - 09:21 AM
SINSULL 06 Oct 00 - 09:44 AM
Naemanson 06 Oct 00 - 12:50 PM
mousethief 06 Oct 00 - 12:51 PM
Mbo 06 Oct 00 - 12:52 PM
Ringer 06 Oct 00 - 12:56 PM
Ringer 06 Oct 00 - 12:58 PM
McGrath of Harlow 06 Oct 00 - 01:12 PM
Micca 06 Oct 00 - 01:34 PM
paddymac 06 Oct 00 - 01:39 PM
Greyeyes 06 Oct 00 - 02:00 PM
catspaw49 06 Oct 00 - 02:03 PM
Bert 06 Oct 00 - 02:10 PM
catspaw49 06 Oct 00 - 02:15 PM
Bert 06 Oct 00 - 02:21 PM
Greyeyes 06 Oct 00 - 02:22 PM
Bert 06 Oct 00 - 02:30 PM
Greyeyes 06 Oct 00 - 02:35 PM
McGrath of Harlow 06 Oct 00 - 03:28 PM
Greyeyes 06 Oct 00 - 03:42 PM
catspaw49 06 Oct 00 - 04:29 PM
sophocleese 06 Oct 00 - 04:36 PM
Naemanson 06 Oct 00 - 04:38 PM
Bert 06 Oct 00 - 05:31 PM
Geoff the Duck 07 Oct 00 - 10:51 AM
Geoff the Duck 07 Oct 00 - 10:51 AM
Liz the Squeak 07 Oct 00 - 02:23 PM
GUEST,Giac, not at home 07 Oct 00 - 04:14 PM
Bill D 07 Oct 00 - 07:02 PM
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Subject: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 04:17 PM

Well 'F**k my old boots' we need a new thread.
here's the old one


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: SINSULL
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 04:18 PM

Thank you, no Bert. I'll pass.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 04:21 PM

On the expresssions or the boots?


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Greyeyes
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 04:23 PM

I thought it was "bugger my old boots," not that it's important.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 05:06 PM

That must be the 'polite' version Greyeyes.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 06:36 PM

Okay.......I asked about this one before to no avail, so let's try again.

We had a young guy working for us at the station who didn't drive. He still lived at home so his Dad would often bring him to work. Since his Dad liked cars too, he would hang out a bit and after awhile we got used to him ragging some on his son for various "screw-ups" (in his eyes). One time Dan (the son) was doing something or another that his Dad didn't agree with and Dad turned to him and said,

"Jesus Dan. You act like a man with a rubber asshole."

Anybody ever heard that before? Exactly how does a man with a rubber asshole act?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: GUEST,Medico Cosmico
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:00 PM

Spaw:

A rubber one lacks tensional dynamics and stretches under any amount of egress pressure from within. Therefore it lets any product out regardless of external circumstances. Possibly the term includes ingress of external entities in unusual dimensions, as well, indicating a willingness to accomodate unusual practices without discrimination.

Regards,

Medico


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: SINSULL
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:04 PM

There was a vaudeville player who had the unique ability to inhale through his anus and expel through a rubber hose into various instruments. He performed "God Save the Queen" for Victoria at a Command Performance. Women were said to faint in shock. His stage name was Le Petomane (The Farter) hence the name of the mayor in "Blazing Saddles". Would this constitute a rubber anus, Spaw? If not, please don't ask Cletus. We all saw what happened with the boots and he is expected at Mbo's concert tonight.
Geez Louise! That's all we need. Cletus on a donut.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:24 PM

Well there's two anyway..........And I know well the "work" of LePetomaine....a true artiste. Or something............I always had this vision of Dan bouncing around uncontrollably from one thing to the next on his ass....I guess that might be a "Flubber Asshole" though.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:26 PM

I don't believe in the command performance for Queen Victoria, though I'd not be at all surprised if her son King Edward VII had one - here'a a page about the gentleman with the unusual musical instrument


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:29 PM

Sorry, here it is = me blue clicky thing went for a Burton.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: kendall
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:54 PM

I've heard ..man with a PAPER asshole.. The old timers back home used to say..That's a hell of a note..no, I dont know what it means. I know what Whale oil beef hooked, means though.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: catspaw49
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 07:57 PM

Geeziz....What would a paper asshole be like? would you make kazoo noises when you sent up an air biscuit?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Wavestar
Date: 05 Oct 00 - 08:19 PM

I've recently been amusing myself with the frequency that the British use the phrase "gone walkies" to describe something that's not where it ought to be. Not very unusual or inexlicable, it just makes me giggle. Simple things for simple minds, I suppose.

-J


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Barbara
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 12:40 AM

On this side of the pond, we say "it went for a walk" or "walked off", and sometimes the implication is, it had help.
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: katlaughing
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 01:04 AM

That's funny, walkies at my house means a rush of cats to get to the door, so that they can go out the catflap to their enclosure. It is really fun when I call out, "Walkeeeez" and they all come running.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: GUEST,Robina
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 03:04 AM

When something diappears with the supposition that it was taken it's "grown legs."


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 03:40 AM

"Walkies" is taking the dog for a walk. My grandmother used to say "it must have growed legs and walked" when she couldn't find anything. She also used to say "yo'm a pie-can" (i.e. a silly person), which I've never heard anywhere else, and I've no idea where she got it form.

Steve


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bugsy
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 05:10 AM

In Aussie, if something goes missing it's "Gone Walkabout". In the mob in UK, when something was of no use it was said to be "Gash". Any suggestions?

Cheers

Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Naemanson
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 08:52 AM

It occurs to me that the information about Le Petomane given above should be pasted into that thread where the guy was looking for a way to make money! *BG*


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Mrrzy
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 09:08 AM

What in the ever-loving blue-eyed world is... was something my Dad used to ask. I've never figured that one out either.

Also, Petomane is closer to Fart Freak than Farter - the -mane ending is cognate to Maniac in English.

At work I hear that things have "grown legs and walked away" when something goes missing.

Also, from my X2B's side of the family: when someone is taking too long in the bathroom, the person waiting outside will eventually holler Don't forget to write your weight on the wall! I finally asked what that's about. I'll let you guys guess.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: kendall
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 09:21 AM

how about "What the hell are you trying to do? Hatch it?


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: SINSULL
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 09:44 AM

"It fell off a truck" - stolen.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Naemanson
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 12:50 PM

How about "Make sure to write your name and weight on the wall so we'll know how much to dip out if you fall in!"


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: mousethief
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 12:51 PM

"gash" is orc for "fire."

Alex
O..O
=o=


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Mbo
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 12:52 PM

"People are STUPID." --my personal motto


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Ringer
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 12:56 PM

From an old Nottinghamshire farm-hand (male). In di "You're like the man I'm aunt to." and conversely "You'll make a man before your mother."


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Ringer
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 12:58 PM

Sorry, please ignore "In di"


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 01:12 PM

"Fell off the back of a lorry" is how we'd put it - and it doesn't necessarily mean stolen, it means, don't ask where it came from... "Ask no questions and you'll hear no lies."

"It's gone walkabout" is now pretty current in England as a variant on "it's gone walkies", "it's grown legs" for something that went missing. (Possibly it fell of the back of a lorry.) That is thanks probably to Neigbours and Paul Hiogan and Rolf Harris and so forth.

Have we had "whatever you say, say nothing" - that's Northern Irish, but it's caught on over in England.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Micca
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 01:34 PM

Somewhere ,I have a newspaper report of a court case in which the defendant was being "done" for receiving and trading in stolen property, the defendant failed to appear and his very embarrassed lawyer had to tell the court he had had an accident and was in hospital , and therefore could not attend, when asked by the judge to explain further, the lawyer, told the court" He fell off the back of a lorry" the court erupted in laughter, including the judge


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: paddymac
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 01:39 PM

My compliments to Medico on his elegant discourse on the rubber assholes question - truly the epitome of techno-delicacy.

A question for 'catters on the morning-side of the pond. Does "gone missing" mean simply that a thing can't be found, for what-ever reason, or does it also imply something a bit more furtive or nefarious?


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:00 PM

Both my parents use the expression "seeing a man about a dog" When asked where they have been. It effectively means "it's none of your business", anyone else use it, or know the origin?

Also when a lady's petticoat is showing below the hem of her dress I have heard people say "it's snowing in Paris" as a polite way of allerting her to the faux pas.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: catspaw49
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:03 PM

On being missing......I alwyas liked the Great Lakes term for a boat that fails to arrive or goes missing.....They sailed through a crack in the lake.

Stolen/Hot auto parts are referred to as coming from "Midnight Auto Supply" or "Five Finger Auto Parts."

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:10 PM

Greyeyes, "seeing a man about a dog" is rhyming slang for "Bog" or as they would say in America "going to the bathroom"


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: catspaw49
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:15 PM

That's how I always used it Bert. Along with, "Shake the dew off my lily."

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:21 PM

And the Cockney version of that is "going for a Jimmy"


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:22 PM

I'm pretty sure my Mum doesn't realise that, I'd better warn her.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:30 PM

There are other rhyming slang expressions that are in common use but not always recognized.

Use your loaf: from loaf of bread - head
Number two: poo
a raspberry: from raspberry tart - fart
Berk: from Berkshire (or Berkley) Hunt - c**t


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 02:35 PM

Having a butchers, (butchers hook - look)


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 03:28 PM

"Seeing a man about a dog" doesn't really follow the rhyming slang conventions. I doubt if that's the origin. Especially since it can mean any number of other things as well - I see it as just meaning it just means there's something I've got to do, and it's my business what it is.

I think it's more likely that it's got its roots in some music-hall routine, maybe about whippets and dog racing or something like that, with that being some character's catch phrase as he dashes off-stage to avoid some embarrassment, such as a creditor or a mother-in-law.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Greyeyes
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 03:42 PM

That's closer to my understanding, sounds more in keeping with my little white-haired old mother as well.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: catspaw49
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 04:29 PM

Maybe it depends on where you live. Around here, your little, white haired, old, mother would be going out for a whizz.

So let's try interpreting this one:

"He really cut a fat hog in the ass that time."

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: sophocleese
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 04:36 PM

My brother used to say he was "going to hang a dead rat". I have no idea where he picked that one up from.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Naemanson
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 04:38 PM

In my family going to "take a whizz" outdoors is called "kicking a bush". We too use "Seeing a man about a dog" to mean the same thing.

As long as we are at this level how about "trouser trout".


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bert
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 05:31 PM

I'm sorry you disagree with that definition, McGrath. I come from a long line of Cockneys and grew of with the knowledge.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 07 Oct 00 - 10:51 AM

I can't help with an explanation of the expression "you'm a pie can", but if used within my vicinity I would have understood it implicitly. I would group it with calling someone a "pie face" or "pie crust".
I assume the origin has something in common with such good Northern English expressions as "he's as daft as a brush" or "as thick as two short planks" - likening stupid behaviour to that of an inanimate nonthinking object.
Any comments?
Quack!!!


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 07 Oct 00 - 10:51 AM

I can't help with an explanation of the expression "you'm a pie can", but if used within my vicinity I would have understood it implicitly. I would group it with calling someone a "pie face" or "pie crust".
I assume the origin has something in common with such good Northern English expressions as "he's as daft as a brush" or "as thick as two short planks" - likening stupid behaviour to that of an inanimate nonthinking object.
Any comments?
Quack!!!


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 07 Oct 00 - 02:23 PM

My dad always said he was going for a run out.... or a quick jimmy. Never actually ever heard him say he wanted to go to the toilet.

In bellringing circles the boys used to go and 'measure the buttresses' - girls had to go and look for a headstone.... Of course, now I'm churchwarden I don't do that sort of thing.... besides we have no headstones in our church garden......

LTS


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: GUEST,Giac, not at home
Date: 07 Oct 00 - 04:14 PM

When my uncle returned from a walk uptown, and was asked where he had been, would respond, "To see a man about a dog." I'm quite sure he meant "not your business" and not that he had been to the facility.

My mother didn't use "ugly" words and her only colorful expression was an exasperated "great gobs of blue mud!"

My favorite expressions from the area where I now live are:

That stinks like c'yarn (carrion) in the road.

and

He's actin' plumb black guardish. This is from people whose ancestors arrived generations ago, and they have no clue about the "black guard" reference.


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Subject: RE: Curious Expressions Three
From: Bill D
Date: 07 Oct 00 - 07:02 PM

Mrrzy asked about.."What in the ever-loving blue-eyed world is"

this was a commopn expression in the Pogo comic strip by Walt Kelly...I don't know that he 'invented' it, but that's sure where I got it 40 years ago


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