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Lyr Req: Jawbone

Allan C. 19 Oct 00 - 12:55 PM
Sorcha 19 Oct 00 - 05:41 PM
Allan C. 19 Oct 00 - 05:54 PM
Quincy 19 Oct 00 - 06:03 PM
GUEST,John Leeder 19 Oct 00 - 06:13 PM
Allan C. 19 Oct 00 - 06:23 PM
Allan C. 28 Oct 00 - 12:19 PM
Jim Dixon 15 Aug 02 - 08:14 PM
Jim Dixon 15 Aug 02 - 08:22 PM
GUEST,The late, great Richard Manual 16 Aug 02 - 04:31 AM
GUEST,Ole Bull 16 Aug 02 - 02:39 PM
Stewie 16 Aug 02 - 10:40 PM
GUEST,lew 05 Nov 14 - 08:08 PM
GUEST 20 Nov 14 - 04:59 PM
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Subject: Jawbone
From: Allan C.
Date: 19 Oct 00 - 12:55 PM

Recently on the Independant Film Channel, (IFC) there has been a movie called, "Silent Tongue". To me this was one of those movies which began with a promise of being very good; but failed to keep the promise. The main redeeming feature of the film was the many trad songs which were sprinkled throughout. One song in particular sounded very familiar but I was unable to make out much in the way of lyrics. All I can recall was the chorus which was:

Jawbone. Jawbone. Something something something something...old jawbone.

I believe there was some reference to it hanging on the shed. Sorry I can't come up with more.

Does this ring any bells with anyone?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Sorcha
Date: 19 Oct 00 - 05:41 PM

Allan, is this it? Has the chords and an audio file, too. I know if I try to copy/paste it, the chords will come out all goobered up.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Allan C.
Date: 19 Oct 00 - 05:54 PM

That's an interesting song, Sorcha. Thanks. But that's not it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Quincy
Date: 19 Oct 00 - 06:03 PM

Allan, Was it sung by a band that were in the film as actors?
If so, it might be the Red Clay Ramblers as they were the acting band.......or so it says on a web-site about the film!!
Can't find it as a released track of theirs but they may have just done it especially for the film?
All this information and I still can't give you any lyrics!!!!!
Good luck with your search, best wishes, Yvonne


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: GUEST,John Leeder
Date: 19 Oct 00 - 06:13 PM

The New Lost City Ramblers recorded "Old Jaw Bone" (sometimes called "Old Joe Bone"), a song from the Carter Brothers and Sons, lots of raw energy but quite misogynisctic. One verse I can recall, without digging out the LP, is

A jawbone walking, a jawbone talking,

A jawbone eating with a knife and fork, and

I laid my jawbone on a fence,

And I ain't seen nothing of my jawbone since.

Chorus:

Old jawbone, couldn't get along,

Here comes Sally with a red dress on.

(Or maybe a blue dress.) Sound like it?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Allan C.
Date: 19 Oct 00 - 06:23 PM

Thanks for the lead, Quincy. Don't know why I didn't think to do a search on the movie title. I can't say for sure whether the actors were actually the singers. For the purposes of the story, they didn't need to be very good.

John, that seems as if it could be the one. I think it may have had some risque verses to it. I have sat through the show twice and am still trying to figure out the lyrics. (I think it may be time for some new batteries;-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Allan C.
Date: 28 Oct 00 - 12:19 PM

Okay, I put new batteries in the tape recorder and was able to capture the song. But I can still only make out the chorus and first verse. I will put it out here for anyone else to add to it or maybe recognize it.

(Chorus)
Old jawbone. Old jawbone on the almshouse wall
The old jawbone. Old jawbone on the almshouse wall

The old jawbone on the almshouse wall
Hung 50 years on that whitewashed wall
It was slimy and gray and covered with gore
Like the souls of the sinners who'd passed before

Chorus

At twelve o'clock...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Aug 02 - 08:14 PM

Found these quotes here: http://www.johnhartford.com/discog/goforth.htm

    "Jawbone walk and jawbone talk and
    Jawbone eat with a knife and fork."

    It seems to be a blackface minstrel tune. Hans Nathan in his Dan Emmett book has it sung at a Tennessee frolie in the early 1830's.

    "I left my jawbone sittin' on a fence.
    I ain't seen nothin' of my jawbone since.
    Walked on home and didn't get along.
    In come Sally with her big boots on."

    -Ragged but right - Kuntz, p. 306

    "A jawbone played with a stick so the teeth would rattle was a minstrel percussion instrument - probably borrowed from blacks." P. 19 - Leadbelly, Chas. Wolfe, Kip Lornel.

And I found this quote at http://listproc.ucdavis.edu/archives/banjo-l/log0005/0109.html

    Now the ol' jawbone, that is a humble instrument. It does help BTW, if the jawbone is removed from the head, stripped and cleaned and dried. Some people keep the lower jaw intact so it has a U shape suitable for carrying. But only one side works too, should you want to share.

    A refrain to "Give the Fiddler a Dram" goes: "Walk jawbone, Jinny git along, in come Sally with the blue boots on." Does this refer to playing the jawbone, or is it a dance call? The preceding verse is not enlightening: "Jawbone walk and jawbone talk, jawbone eat with a knife and fork. Laid my jawbone on the fence and ain't seen nothin' of my jawbone since."

    The fiddle tune "Jordan is a Hard Road to Travel" is also known as "Old Jawbone." Maybe that argues a minstrel show origin?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Aug 02 - 08:22 PM

The Internet Move Database gives this as the soundtrack listing for Silent Tongue (1993).

"Little Acrobat's Song"
Music and Lyrics by Tommy Thompson and Jack Herrick.

"Man of the House"
"The Saratoga Hornpipe"
"Hell Almongst the Yearlings"
"Old Jawbone"
"The Musical Priest"
"The Earl's Chair"
"White Blanket"
"Star of Donegal"
"Flying Cloud Cotillion"
"The Man at the Plough"
"Oh, Death"
"Haul Away, Joe"
Traditional music arranged by the Red Clay Ramblers.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: GUEST,The late, great Richard Manual
Date: 16 Aug 02 - 04:31 AM

I'm a thief, and I dig it!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: GUEST,Ole Bull
Date: 16 Aug 02 - 02:39 PM

The JawBone was a Plantation music/Minstrel Show icon where it was often used as a rhythem instrument in place of, or along side of, bones. Hence there are a lot of mid 19th century songs, some parodies of each other, with Jawbone titles or references. "De Old Jawbone" chorus goes:

"Walk Jawbone with the Turkey too, Never mind that Boogerboo."

And first verse is "Jawbone hung on the kitchen wall...

I think that it was Hans Nathan (mentioned above) who suggested that Walking JawBone was a dance which may be the prototype of Tapdance as it imitates the sound it makes.

Steven Foster sang of how Angelina Baker left him to weep a tear and beat on the old Jawbone.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: Stewie
Date: 16 Aug 02 - 10:40 PM

Pope's Arkansas Mountaineers recorded a version of 'Jaw Bone' in June 1928. The refrain goes:

Walk jaw bone and walk away
Walk jaw bone both night and day

It has silly verses like the first (as far as I can decipher it):

? old man comes riding by
Hey old man your horse will die
If he dies I'll tan his skin
If he lives, I'll ride (him) again

It also includes the 'jaw bone walks and jaw bone talks/jaw bone eats with a knife and fork' stanza mentioned above. The recording has been reissued on Various Artists 'Echoes of the Ozarks Vol I' County CO-CD-3506.

The spirited version by the Carter Brothers and Son, 'Old Joe Bone' (February 1929), which is mentioned above, has also been reissued by County - Various Artists 'Mississippi String Bands Vol I' CO-CD-3513.

The earliest reference given in the Meade, Spottswood, Meade biblio-discography is to 'S.S. Steele pre-1865'. They also reference 'Minstrel Songs Old and New' (1882), Talley 'Negro Folk Rhymes'(1922), Tennessess Folklore Society Publications (1935), Randolph 'Ozark Folksongs II' (1950) and Browne 'Alabama Folk Lyric' (1979).

--Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: GUEST,lew
Date: 05 Nov 14 - 08:08 PM

something about keeping the spooks away hang an old jaw bone on the outhouse door


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Jawbone
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Nov 14 - 04:59 PM


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