Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Oscar Wilde

Fiolar 30 Nov 00 - 01:14 PM
Mrrzy 30 Nov 00 - 01:16 PM
Ringer 30 Nov 00 - 01:18 PM
Ringer 30 Nov 00 - 01:19 PM
Matt Woodbury/Mimosa 30 Nov 00 - 01:33 PM
Doctor John 30 Nov 00 - 01:47 PM
okthen 30 Nov 00 - 01:54 PM
kendall 30 Nov 00 - 02:34 PM
Steve Latimer 30 Nov 00 - 02:48 PM
MARINER 30 Nov 00 - 04:56 PM
M. Ted (inactive) 30 Nov 00 - 05:10 PM
Liz the Squeak 30 Nov 00 - 05:37 PM
guinnesschik 30 Nov 00 - 05:49 PM
GUEST,JTT 30 Nov 00 - 06:02 PM
lamarca 30 Nov 00 - 06:12 PM
Liz the Squeak 30 Nov 00 - 06:20 PM
lamarca 30 Nov 00 - 06:29 PM
Jim Dixon 30 Nov 00 - 07:54 PM
Mickey191 30 Nov 00 - 11:35 PM
GUEST,D_hand 01 Dec 00 - 06:21 AM
LR Mole 01 Dec 00 - 08:29 AM
GUEST 01 Dec 00 - 09:15 AM
Liz the Squeak 01 Dec 00 - 09:20 AM
Peter K (Fionn) 01 Dec 00 - 11:32 AM
GUEST,Pete Peterson 01 Dec 00 - 11:51 AM
Roger in Sheffield 01 Dec 00 - 12:10 PM
Fiolar 01 Dec 00 - 01:22 PM
GUEST,Matt_R 01 Dec 00 - 01:33 PM
GeorgeH 01 Dec 00 - 01:37 PM
GUEST,JTT 01 Dec 00 - 02:50 PM
Amergin 01 Dec 00 - 03:57 PM
Jim Dixon 01 Dec 00 - 05:08 PM
GUEST,Sarah 01 Dec 00 - 08:28 PM
Lyrical Lady 01 Dec 00 - 09:06 PM
GUEST,Sarah 02 Dec 00 - 01:39 PM
Roger in Sheffield 02 Dec 00 - 02:21 PM
pict 02 Dec 00 - 07:31 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 02 Dec 00 - 07:50 PM
Peter K (Fionn) 02 Dec 00 - 07:55 PM
Den 02 Dec 00 - 09:17 PM
rube1 03 Dec 00 - 07:30 PM
Lonesome EJ 03 Dec 00 - 08:23 PM
Stewie 03 Dec 00 - 08:49 PM
pict 04 Dec 00 - 07:16 PM
Troll 04 Dec 00 - 08:37 PM
Rick Fielding 04 Dec 00 - 10:33 PM
Jim Dixon 05 Dec 00 - 01:39 PM
Rowana (at work) 05 Dec 00 - 03:52 PM
Uncle_DaveO 05 Dec 00 - 03:58 PM
John Nolan 05 Dec 00 - 10:17 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: Oscar Wilde
From: Fiolar
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:14 PM

Thought folks might like to be reminded that the great Oscar Wilde author of that magnificent poem "The Ballad of Reading Jail" passed away exactly one hundred ago today on November 30th 1900, thus keeping the promise he made - "either that wallpaper goes, or I do." He was always a man of his word. M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Mrrzy
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:16 PM

Thank you for this, I like him and didn't realize we had an anniversary here... What a genius!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Ringer
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:18 PM

"A handbag?"

Just testing really. The forum header page showed 1 message but there were 2. Does mine make 2 or 3?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Ringer
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:19 PM

3


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Matt Woodbury/Mimosa
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:33 PM

click here for A lovely site in his honor . "There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about."


Mimosa


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Doctor John
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:47 PM

There's supposed to be a recording of Oscar Wilde reading something I forget which was broadcast in the sixties. His son - then an old man - thought it might be his father although he had not seen him since he was nine years old. This very crakly recording is the voice of what sounds like an old man and, as Oscar Wilde died young, it is now though highly unlikely to be him.
What a tragic story his life was. Dr John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: okthen
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 01:54 PM

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars"

Thanks Oscar, if only for being the first choice,when,(in a trivia quiz) asked "who said......."

cheers

bill


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: kendall
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 02:34 PM

the first time he heard the bagpipes he remarked "Thank God, there is no odor"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Steve Latimer
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 02:48 PM

"The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: MARINER
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 04:56 PM

Wilde's Mother came from my home town, in fact the last of his relatives here, died 2 years ago. For those interested the Irish national broadcaster R.T.E. are now broadcasting a season of Wilde's plays and readings. Details can be had about their net broadcasts from RTE.ie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: M. Ted (inactive)
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 05:10 PM

There is an Anniversary Exhibit at the British Library


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 05:37 PM

The recording was known to be a mistaken identity a few years ago, but only revealed today....

There was an excellent cartoon in Private Eye this month - obviously titled lady standing at bottom of stairs, eying up butler who is carrying something.... A sandbag???!

Very topical if you've been flooded out recently, and made me laugh hysterically on the tube....

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: guinnesschik
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 05:49 PM

"Work is the curse of the drinking class."

My personal favorite... ;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 06:02 PM

Sing a verse of "Taimse i mo choladh agus na gluaisigh me" in his honour; Wilde used to sing his sons to sleep with this savagely nationalistic lullaby with its charming and calm melody.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: lamarca
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 06:12 PM

Saw the absolutely fantastic Art Nouveau exhibit at the Smithsonian last weekend, complete with a vintage Aubrey Beardsley print from Wilde's "Salome"...

Just a digression, but it was kind of funny how many originals of the art that decorated my college dorm room were in this show - Beardsley, Klimt, Moreau, Redon...

"I took all those habits of yours
that in the beginning were hard to accept
Your fashion sense, your Beardsley prints
I put down to experience..."

I'm older now, but still like the edge of depravity the Symbolists and Secessionists skirted...

Rest you merry, Mr. Wilde.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 06:20 PM

Lamarca, howling with tears here, that's a verse from my all time weepy song.... first love and all that..... but I have a Beardsley print in the bathroom.... wentto an amazing exhibition in the Victoria & ALbert museum 2 years ago. He loved trying to get rude bits past the censors, and suceeded more times than they like to admit....!

Wilde has been a favorite for years. His statue by St Martin's in the Fields, London is bloody good too.

It's doubtful he's resting, but I suspect he's very merry indeed!

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: lamarca
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 06:29 PM

Liz, the Victoria and Albert put this exhibit together first, then shipped it over to us Yanks to give us a bit of culture! (If you consider Salome worshipping JtB's dripping head to be culture...)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 07:54 PM

In my former life as an amateur actor, I had a small role in "Salomé." I think my character was called "2nd soldier." Most of my lines were repetitions of "The tetrarch has a somber look." -- "Yes, he has a somber look."

Though the play was supposed to be serious, there where times when it was hard to keep from laughing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Mickey191
Date: 30 Nov 00 - 11:35 PM

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that somewhere, someone is having a good time."If they'd only let him alone.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,D_hand
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 06:21 AM

my favorite wilde quote is: 'When God wishes to punish us He answers our prayers' Meaning of course that we don't know what's good for us !!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: LR Mole
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 08:29 AM

From Dorothy Parker:" If, with the literate, I am/ Impelled to try an epigram,/ I never seek to take the credit;/We all assume that Oscar said it." (Our Dottie:now, there's a woman who should be sung!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 09:15 AM

Edith Evans' role as Lady Bracknell in the 1952 movie "The Importance of Being Earnest" and her marvellous "A Handbag" will never be bettered. Wilde, I think would have been most impressed. Incidentally, Michael MacLiamoir did a one man show some years ago called "The Importance of Being Oscar." I recall him talking about the show and other Wildean matters on television. Most funnny was the bit where he told of his father trying to explain to him of Wilde's homosexuality. M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 09:20 AM

Let's hear it for JtB's dripping head - I loved that picture as a child and still do! I must confess to a liking for 'How Arthur quested for the dragon' because a) it's a bloody fine drawing, b) there's a big dragon in it, and c) there's a big willy that got past the censors!!

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 11:32 AM

For me he's the author of The Soul of Man under Socialism and for my 8-yr-old daughter he's the writer of favourite stories such as The Happy Prince and The Canterville Ghost.

Fiolar, as the only person I know who can recite the Ballad of Reading Gaol (sic) from memory, I am sorry to say that it is just about the least impressive thing he ever wrote; not a patch on his early poems(eg Requiescat) and certainly not in the same league as the plays.

He wrote the ballad more or less to order. A leading prison reformer, aware that the educated people of those days had virtually no first-hand knowledge of life inside, had urged him to publish his impressions. Oscar left prison apparently intending to campaign for reform. But apart from the ballad, his only other initiative was a letter to the News Chronicle, written in defence of a warder dismissed for giving a biscuit to an ill child jailed for stealing a rabbit.

The ballad seems to have been influenced by Housman's wonderful epic, A Shropshire Lad, which also takes a swipe at capital puhishment, but with less sentimentality.

He had two chances to evade so-called British justice, and head for France. Brave decisions. Two yeas imprisonment with hard labour (no remission) was a travesty, but he did know that shagging rent-boys was a criminal offence in those unenlightened times. (The legislation, which dated from 1885, had been criticised from the outset as a blackmailer's charter. but in the end one of the rent boys refused a deal in which he would have been acquitted in echange for testifying against Wilde. So he also got the maximum sentence.)

Apparently that exhibition at the British Library is one of the best collections of Wilde material ever assembled. It runs until some time in February.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,Pete Peterson
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 11:51 AM

My very favorite Oscar was the very first one mentioned! I give second place to "The most useless of memories, in old age, are those of temptation successfully resisted." and many others along the same lines.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Roger in Sheffield
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 12:10 PM

To mark the date in the UK we had the enlightened Baroness Young protesting at the lowering of the gay age of consent to 16
Also a protest letter in the Daily Telegraph (about the same OUTRAGE) from religious leaders had 17 signatories, the season of goodwill is almost upon us - but not you queers???
What ever happened to Bowsey?
Roger


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Fiolar
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 01:22 PM

"The Ballad of Reading Jail" may not be his best work but it was and is a powerful piece of work especially the part where he describes the grave of the executed man - "For he has a pall, this wretched man, Such as few men can claim: Deep down below a prison-yard, Naked for greater shame, He lies, with fetters on each foot, Wrapt in a sheet of flame."

Also the verses dealing with the work the convicts did has never been so vividly described - "We tore the tarry rope to shreds With blunt and bleeding nails; We rubbed the doors, and scrubbed the floors, And cleaned the shining rails: And, rank by rank, we soaped the plank, And clattered with the pails."

Let's not forget that when that poem was published there was little if any such descriptions of prison life as most of the Victorian works dealt with nature and other nice subjects. There were of course exceptions such as "The Cry of the Children" and "The Ancient Mariner." Wilde was an exception to the rule and of course we all know who acted as prosecution lawyer, his former "friend" Edward Carson. M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,Matt_R
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 01:33 PM

The Importance of Being Earnest is one of my favorite plays ever! When my community college did a dramatic reading of it, I played Algy. What fun!

When at the customs counter at a train staion, the customs man asked him if he anything to declare. Oscar said "Only my genius."

--Matt (confirmed Bunburyist)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GeorgeH
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 01:37 PM

I've not seen this mentioned here (but my visits remain somewhat erratic) . .

Currently BBC 2 is running an excellent series on the development of the contemporary British (well, English might be more accurate!) theatre; "Changing Stages", Sundays.

The second programme dealt with the Irish influence at the start of the century and Wilde featured strongly. (It was a pity the "Wilde Heritage" tour of Dublin(?) they showed managed totally the wrong emphasis on ". . the Brighton side" - clearly THEY hadn't done their homework, and I'm surprised Richard Eyre let it pass.)

Incidently, the same programme used the first AfroCelt Sound System CD for almost all its soundtrack - and a wonderful soundtrack it was, too . . Of course this was NOT acknowledged in the programme credits!

G.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 02:50 PM

I couldn't disagree more; I find Reading Gaol deeply moving. Just shows you, tastes differ.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Amergin
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 03:57 PM

Personally, I always loved that beautiful tale, The Selfish Giant....everytime I read it tears come to my eyes.

Amergin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 05:08 PM

Roger in Sheffield: Sad to say, "Bosie," Lord Alfred Douglas, came to believe his father was right after all. He married (and was later separated), denounced Wilde, converted to Roman Catholicism, and apparently never afterward practiced The Love That Dared Not Speak Its Name.

Here is a New York Times book review of "BOSIE: A Biography of Lord Alfred Douglas," by Douglas Murray.

Here are a couple more sites that contain some interesting information: The Bosie Web-Site and The Unofficial Lord Alfred Douglas Page.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,Sarah
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 08:28 PM

My favorite Wilde quotes still remain:

"No good deed goes unpunished."

..and his reply to U.S. immigration upon being asked if he had anything to declare:

"Nothing but my genius."

Much used, but, both so true...

Sarah


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Lyrical Lady
Date: 01 Dec 00 - 09:06 PM

I played Miss Prism in The Importance of being Ernest. It was the most fun I've ever had being in a play! LL


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: GUEST,Sarah
Date: 02 Dec 00 - 01:39 PM

Didn't he also say, about his prison term, "If this is the way the Queen treats her prisoners, she doesn't deserve to have any"?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Roger in Sheffield
Date: 02 Dec 00 - 02:21 PM

Thanks Jim now I know more of both sides of the story

Roger


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: pict
Date: 02 Dec 00 - 07:31 PM

I asked my pal Pat a Dubliner what he thought of Oscar Wilde he said"He was a professional smartarse".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 02 Dec 00 - 07:50 PM

The ballad is certainly moving JTT - the first time I recited it in public a woman was in tears at the end. (But another shouted out: "So domestic violence is OK - is that what you're saying?") But as poetry it's a bit laboured. The imagery is often crude or trite: "the Governor all in shiny black /With the yellow face of Doom" and as with De Profundis the effect is sometimes undermined by self-pity that sometimes creeps in. Housman is much less sentimental, and probably more effective for that reason: "There sleeps in Shrewsbury jail tonight/Or wakes as may betide, A better lad if things went right/Than most that sleep outside." Incidentally, Bosie, who was himself an accomplished poet, wrote a sonnet about Wilde ("Dead Poet"?) - intensely moving, and also fine verse, see Bosie's sonnet about Wilde ("Dead Poet"?)

I don't think you've been entirely fair to Bosie, Jim. Though De Profundis was a private letter from Wilde to Bosie, Bosie never received it and learnt of its bitterness towards him only when extracts appeared in a book, many years after Wilde's death. He himself was then embittered for some years, but he got that out of his system long before he died (1945). Through Wilde's trials and afterwards, Bosie was almost recklessly disregarding of his own reputation in his support, though there is evidence that some in Wilde's (diminishing) circle wanted Wilde to break with him. They met in Italy after Wilde's release from prison, and Bosie was chief mourner at Wilde's funeral. Bosie did convert to catholicism, but I was not aware that he ever had anything but contempt for his father.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Peter K (Fionn)
Date: 02 Dec 00 - 07:55 PM

Sorry - you will have realised I should have deleted some words at the end of the penultimate paragraph in my last post.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Den
Date: 02 Dec 00 - 09:17 PM

Can you imagine what it was like to sit down to dinner with him? "Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast," one of my favourites and also, "Alas I am dying beyond my means." And this one always cracks me up, "Whenever cannibals are on the brink of starvation, Heaven in its infinite mercy sends them a nice plump missionary." Den


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: rube1
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 07:30 PM

I recently slogged through De Profundis, a long angry letter with moments of high brilliance interspersed with the most painstakingly tedious delineations of his ill treatment at the hands young Douglas and his father. With obviously way too much time on his hands, he left precious few grievances unuttered. How painful it is, as a reader, to witness the exhaustion of his massive creative spirit as it pours into this seemingly endless diatribe. Never seen anything like it. Glad I read it. Can't picture the circumstances in which I might ever want to read it again. But something about it is magnetic and someday I probably will.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 08:23 PM

While on a tour of America,Wilde visited Central City,a rough-and-tumble mining town in Colorado.He insisted on having a drink at the local worker's tavern,where he attracted a lot of attention with his foppish attire and outlandish manner.The miners had never seen anything quite like Oscar before,and one of them made a comment about the bar being "for men only". Wilde responded by buying a whiskey for the man,who then bought Wilde a double-whiskey,and so on. The drinking bout continued into the night,the sullen miner downing his drinks while Wilde entertained the crowd with his humorous stories.At last,the miner passed out,and as he was being carried out,Wilde climbed atop a table and lifted his glass in the man's honor saying "though he has acquired the ability to drink much,he has not yet learned to drink well to the remedy of which,gentleman,I shall be available on tomorrow night for further lessons."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Stewie
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 08:49 PM

'Don't shoot the piano player - he's doing his best'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: pict
Date: 04 Dec 00 - 07:16 PM

I like the one where he was at a ball when he was a boy,he went up to a woman and asked her if she would give him the pleasure of the next dance to which she exclaimed"You expect me to dance with a child?" Oscar replied"Madame if I'd known you were in that condition I would never have asked".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Troll
Date: 04 Dec 00 - 08:37 PM

I've always liked,"Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same."
And, "Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes."

troll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 04 Dec 00 - 10:33 PM

Ahh, good ol' Oscar. I love the designation "Professional Smartass". If the pay were better, I'd like to give it a try myself.

Did anyone see the bio-pic with Stephen Fry? Nobody alive today really knows, but my guess is that Fry really nailed the character. My guess is also, that surrounding the witty remarks was a personality with a VERY short shelf-life.

As many here know, my great philosophical hero was Quentin Crisp, but short of seeing him in concert once and laughing at his writing, I don't think I would have wanted to spend much time around him. His theories on enjoying being an "outsider" still strike me as being spot on, but (I guess) that like Oscar, when the spotlight was off he could be very trying.

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 05 Dec 00 - 01:39 PM

Rick: If you like Wilde and Crisp, you might like the writings of Stephen Fry. I recommend his autobiography, "Moab Is My Washpot," and his collection of columns from (I think) the Telegraph, called "Paperweight." He also writes novels. One that I liked was "Making History."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Rowana (at work)
Date: 05 Dec 00 - 03:52 PM

A girlfriend and I saw the film earlier this year. S Fry was great in it. I see that the Express has given grandson Merlin Holland's new book _The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde_ a lukewarm review. Regarding Stephen Fry: _Hippopotomus_ was a very funny book.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 05 Dec 00 - 03:58 PM

For Wilde aficianados, I recommend a fairly recent movie made from his "An Ideal Husband". Wonderful! Get the VCR and see it!

Dave Oesterreich


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Oscar Wilde
From: John Nolan
Date: 05 Dec 00 - 10:17 PM

If this nostalgic thread is going to splutter on forever, I'll post a picture of Oscar's tombstone (a sphinx-like thing) which I took in Pere Lachaise Cemetery last summer, and give the link - ignore the skinny tomato plant temporarily irritating the sphinx's nostrils though. It's there for a long and complex reason that you don't want to know about.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 12 April 8:46 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.