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Tell us about your town...and the music.

Jim Cheydi 17 Jul 01 - 12:10 PM
Mark Clark 16 Jul 01 - 11:54 AM
JohnInKansas 15 Jul 01 - 09:25 PM
RWilhelm 15 Jul 01 - 07:44 PM
RangerSteve 15 Jul 01 - 06:55 PM
Dorrie 15 Jul 01 - 06:48 PM
Jon Freeman 15 Jul 01 - 04:17 PM
GUEST,MP3-Welcome to project"Zu-Malta"(cooperation 15 Jul 01 - 03:43 PM
Mr Red 15 Jul 01 - 02:20 PM
Celtic Soul 15 Jul 01 - 01:31 AM
Rick Fielding 15 Jul 01 - 01:24 AM
Chip2447 15 Jul 01 - 01:10 AM
Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull 15 Jul 01 - 12:24 AM
Les from Hull 20 Dec 00 - 10:20 AM
Gypsy 19 Dec 00 - 10:06 PM
catspaw49 19 Dec 00 - 06:47 PM
Burke 19 Dec 00 - 05:29 PM
NightWing 19 Dec 00 - 05:16 PM
Jim Krause 19 Dec 00 - 04:23 PM
Jim Krause 19 Dec 00 - 04:15 PM
Jim Krause 19 Dec 00 - 04:09 PM
Peg 19 Dec 00 - 04:03 PM
GUEST,Mary in Kentucky 19 Dec 00 - 02:17 PM
Peg 19 Dec 00 - 11:30 AM
GUEST,Aldus 19 Dec 00 - 09:35 AM
Luke 19 Dec 00 - 09:17 AM
Sorcha 18 Dec 00 - 11:47 AM
Naemanson 18 Dec 00 - 11:05 AM
Bill D 18 Dec 00 - 10:55 AM
Naemanson 18 Dec 00 - 05:11 AM
Amergin 17 Dec 00 - 05:16 PM
MARINER 17 Dec 00 - 03:35 PM
Bill D 17 Dec 00 - 03:03 PM
sophocleese 17 Dec 00 - 02:38 PM
Mary in Kentucky 17 Dec 00 - 01:04 PM
catspaw49 17 Dec 00 - 12:59 PM
Jon Freeman 17 Dec 00 - 12:52 PM
Mary in Kentucky 17 Dec 00 - 12:28 PM
catspaw49 17 Dec 00 - 11:35 AM
Dave (the ancient mariner) 17 Dec 00 - 11:34 AM
Jon Freeman 17 Dec 00 - 11:20 AM
Mary in Kentucky 17 Dec 00 - 11:09 AM
Mary in Kentucky 17 Dec 00 - 11:04 AM
Naemanson 17 Dec 00 - 12:29 AM
Jon Freeman 16 Dec 00 - 11:00 PM
Rick Fielding 16 Dec 00 - 10:51 PM
Jon Freeman 16 Dec 00 - 10:34 PM
Hotspur 16 Dec 00 - 10:16 PM
Matt_R 16 Dec 00 - 09:49 PM
Caitrin 16 Dec 00 - 09:44 PM
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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jim Cheydi
Date: 17 Jul 01 - 12:10 PM

Luton, Bedfordshire.

Name comes from the Saxon for Lea Town (the river Lea runs through it). Population is a bit of a mix as immigrants have been arriving for hundreds of years. Scots and Irish initially as the town became the centre of the world's hat industry and then Vauxhall Motors too. After WWII more people arrived from Asia and the Carribean as well as large numbers from London as the town thrived.

We don't make hats anymore. We don't make cars anymore (thanks GM, you bastards).


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Mark Clark
Date: 16 Jul 01 - 11:54 AM

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Don't know how I missed this thread the first time around.)

Cedar Rapids is part of a cultural area that includes Iowa City (University of Iowa) and some of the surrounding communities. The area turns out to be a great music area. The area is home to many fine musicians including Catfish Keith, Greg Brown, Bob Black, Al Murphy, Craig Erickson, Big Wooden Radio, Several fine jazz musicians and ensembles, several working blues bands and a number of good venues that book nationally known performers.

The Mill in Iowa City hosts a permenent Celtic and bluegrass jam every Tuesday night. The Mill also books national acts ranging from country rock and blues to bluegrass, folk and even singer-songwriters. Iowa City is also home to other good music venues including The Sanctuary and Gabe's Oasis. Hancher Auditorium in Iowa City is where Broadway shows and acts like Stomp and River Dance perform but it has also hosted both Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie.

The whole area is dotted with quaint out-of-the-way places that feature music from time to time. Doc Watson has played at The General Store in Stone City—the subject of Grant Wood's famous painting of the same name—and many other well known folk acts have performed there as well.

I first saw Duke Robillard at an old stone pub in the tiny village of Waubeek called F & B Company. Waubeek is on the Wapsipinicon River near Stone City and was home to the Waubeek Trackers who I believe used to appear on A Prarie Home Companion. Duke now plays at 3rd Street Live, a larger venue, when he comes to to Cedar Raids—about once a year. Buddy Guy also plays at 3rd Street Live when he comes to town.

Another good Cedar Rapids venue is C.S.P.S, a combination art gallery and performance stage. Performers who have played there recently include Tom Paxton, Peggy Seeger and Mike Seeger. I'm guessing that C.S.P.S seats fewer than one hundred people but the audience is loyal and attentive.

Starlighters Theater in Anamosa, also near Stone City, has been presenting a series of concerts by well known singer-songwriters including David Olney and Steve Young.

My point is that real venues in the Cedar Rapids area actually pay well known performers to play. It's my hope that this news will provide encouragement to those of you who tour professionally (Rick, Frank, Jean (others?) are you paying attention?) to include the Cedar Rapids area on your next tour so I can come and hear you perform. If you would like to come but need some help making contact with local venues, feel free to PM me or use my email address in the Member Photos & Info section. I'll be happy to do some legwork to help get you here.

Cedar Rapids isn't really the end of the world. You can't even see it from here.

      - Mark


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 09:25 PM

Not a newcomer, exactly, but I just got my own name!
I've previously posted a few comments as John In Remote Kansas (JIRK) using my SO's cookie; but now I get to drop the "remote." An aside: I have shared the cookie pending our getting another email address. I went with hotmail – and it was traumatic. Approximately 60 SPAMs, mostly offering porn – we were almost ready to drop the account, but they have (apparently) exhausted themselves, and it appears safe to use the site. Patience (or inertia) is rewarded!

Okay. – this will be too long to inflict on my friends, but maybe some of the rest of you....

I'm in Wichita, Kansas – not too far from the geographic center of the YEWNYNTED STAYTES.
I growed up here.
When I was a small pup, I spent quite a lot of time on my grandfathers farm, where the front pasture had never been plowed, and still had the native grass and the wagonwheel ruts from the old trail from Wichita to Hutchinson. I had a grandmother who "made her claim" by teaming rented mules along that trail to haul lumber for other people to build their homesteads. I spent some time, a couple of summmers, trying to kill the Russian Thistle that had invaded the four "buffalo wallers" in the pasture, cause grandpa said "they's furrin' weeds thet don't b'long there." They sold the farm when grandpa died, and when I saw that the new owners plowed the field, I cried for a while (I was about 30 then). Grandpa would'a made some noises that wouldn'a sounded like cryin'. (%^&@#!!)
My first recollection of any local music would have to be a group called "The Ark Valley Boys," who played in the area for forty years or more. I've recently seen a brand new bus with the name on it – but haven't heard of them having a job in the last twenty years. These guys played a "grand-ol' opry" style of music before any of us had a radio – complete with the comic, Cuzin Clarence, who greatly impressed an impressionable 5 year old at the Beech Aircraft Company Christmas Party in 1944 by taking his teeth out and wrapping his nose in his lower lip. His best song was "Barnacle Bill the Sailor." I got TWO candy canes from Santa Claus at the party. (My daddy bought a copy of the "Ark Valley Boys Songbook" – but I think mama burned it.)
For about the next 10 years, I thought that music was what you heard on our local AM radio – KFBI. Purely country. When the KFBI station was bought by "outa-towners," and the call letters were changed to KFDI, a lotta folks just quit listenin' for a year or two. That gives you an idea of the local "loyalties."
About 1954, my daddy paid $40 for an old tenor saxophone and said "Here – you're in the Junior High School Band." That was my formal music education.
In High School I hooked up with some "older guys" who were trying to put together a "Swing Band." Our drummer worked at a local mortuary, so he got to borrow the hearse to haul us to "gigs" at outlying small town Elks, Lions, VFW, dances. We sorta thought we were playing "Swing" type stuff – "Muskrat Ramble," "String of Pearls," etc. Never could teach the lead trumpet to play "In the Mood," though – he just couldn't get the rhythm. We finally got run out of business because the hearse driver was the only one old enough to join the Musicians' Union – if they hired us, nobody else could play for them.
About 1953 my mother said "Well, we've tried Methodist and Quaker, I think now we're gonna be Baptists." The church she took us to had a CHOIR. When the choir director noticed that I had no voice, he allowed as how "it ain't likely to change," and they let me into the "adult" choir.
Being too young to flirt with the altos, I immediately teamed up with a Friends University sophomore who was too short (4'6"?) to flirt with the altos, and the two of us sat around and talked about music theory, relativity, transcendental meditation, and such – while the baritones hit on the altos (and occasionally a soprano). I learned a lot of music theory from Jim. He later married a 6'2" blond Valkyrie, played "Snorky the Elephant" for a few years, and he and his wife were touring in "Christian Music" circles last I heard.
Which (FINALLY) brings me back to music in Wichita.
Our choir director had a voice that would break glass at forty paces, BUT he knew and loved classical choral music. He had managed to get the church to pay a postgraduate organist – and talked the church into buying her a "world class" organ. Two thirds of our choir members were also members of the Friends University "Singing Quakers," which is still – if you're into that sort of stuff – an internationally known and respected performing group. I was singing (croaking) with real pros. And since Jim couldn't get a girl either, I got private tutoring!
Formerly called the "University of Friends Church," but now known as just Friends University, the school offers "world class" education in classical (with emphasis, to a degree, on religious) music, and theology (of course), with a good liberal arts school. I understand that this is one of the oldest universities "west of the big muddy," and appears, still, to be going strong.
Our largest university, founded as "Fairmount College" back when rawhide britches were stylish, is now called "Wichita State University" (or "Hillside-High" by graduates of more prestigious technical schools). Although I don't know if it is still true, Wichita State University and Oklahoma State, for many years, claimed to graduate well over half of the engineers employed in "small aircraft" companies. Noted locally for their music and drama schools, Wichita State offers a comprehensive selection of courses – and highly successful athletic programs vastly overfunded by loyal alumni.
Our third major university is Kansas Newman, which is a much "younger" school, but appears to be thriving. A notable accomplishment is their annual sponsorship of the local "Renaissance Fair," which has its own peculiar flavor, and appears to be only loosely associated with the SCA.
Almost every "major" town (around here that's anything over about 8,000 pop.) has its own one (or two) Junior College(s). Some of them are really pretty good.
We do have a local symphony orchestra, an active civic choral group (with male and female divisions), and a number of people active in "barbershop" close harmony. There is a local "Theater Arts" group that has been excellent, although a recent change in directors has us waiting to see whether former standards will be maintained.
Perhaps presumptuously, some in Wichita consider us to be a "blues center," and there are a surprising number of local blues venues. A notable one, "The Artichoke," (seating for 7, average crowd 50, good food and relatively cheap booze) regularly schedules well known performers, along with a regular succession of locally known "names." Wichita State U has been sponsoring an annual Blues/Jazz "festival" that has begun to attract some attention.
There are a few local places that bill themselves a "jazz" venues," and I have heard that some of them have some pretty good performances, but we usually opt for places that don't charge admission.
We have 3 or 4 "large halls" that book "names" regularly. Willie Nelson and Ray Price are in town this week.
The local "Borders Books" schedules weekly performances of small groups – mostly local but occasionally reaching out to regionally notable bands.
The local "country" radio, KFDI cited above, has an FM station now that is VERY commercial, playing all of the latest loud commercial stuff. Fortunately their older AM station survives – and plays some really good oldies. We also have three area "public broadcast" FM stations that can be very good, or ...: - depending on whether the students or the faculty are rebelling at any given time.
For those who actually want to "make music," as opposed to just buying a ticket, one of our local coffee shops, the "Java Villa" sponsors a weekly "Irish jam," which is well attended.
We have a small active "Kansas Bluegrass Association," which has (approximately) monthly outings. There is a "Wichita Dulcimer Alliance," and a "Kansas Acoustic Arts Association," both of which offer a chance for people to play on a fairly regular basis. The Dulcimer Alliance emphasizes teaching and training in many of their sessions.
My SO (LiK) and I get together with a half-dozen friends weekly, to play (mostly) old-time country stuff. We know of several other similar groups, but although movement between these groups happens, it is rather sporadic.
The local kids still do the "our band" thing, like I did in High School, but now they need trucks to carry the amps. We don't listen to many of them – but they are pretty active on the local scene.
Almost all of our friends visit Mudcat and/or Cowpie on a regular basis, although I don't think many of them are heavy contributors.
Our BIG music scene here is the annual Winfield Acoustic Music Festival. We are trying to keep this a secret from the rest of the locals – but I'm afraid, after a quarter century, the news is leaking out. ("Outsiders," who might teach us something new are always welcome though.) Theoretically, it's a three day festival; but if you want a good camping spot, you need to set up a week in advance. If you REALLY want a good spot, you start camping a week before that – to get in line to get a good spot the week before the festival. If you're coming from far away, look up (or make when you get there) a buddy – we'll move somethin'. At my first festival, 8 of us went through 36 cases of beer (with a little help). It wasn't until my third year there that I found out that THEY HAVE PAID PERFORMERS in the grandstand. Then, once I started pretending I could play music, (and got too old to drink all that beer) I found out that the campground is so much MUSICAL fun, you don't really care what's going on in the grandstand. (LiK married me only after I had driven her there from Seattle three years in a row – she was afraid I'd quit bringing her. We finally decided it would be cheaper to move back here.) It still takes us 6 months to get well, and 8 months to get ready – go figure!


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: RWilhelm
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 07:44 PM

I'm from Essex, Massachusetts where good number of American schooners were built in the 19th Century. A handfuls are still afloat. We have a very healthy folk/tradional community on Cape Ann and the North Shore of MA. Anyone in the area on August 25 will want to check out the 8th Annual Essex Music Festival. We've got folk, maritime, bluegrass, blues, old-timey, jug band, celtic, and originals. It's all local, all volunteer, and the musicians donate their time. The money goes to help restore the park that hosts the festival. It's our eighth year and we are starting to get a little proud.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: RangerSteve
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 06:55 PM

Readington Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. People who pass through NJ on the turnpike only see a small and mostly unpleasane state. Most of NJ is really nice, including where I am. Farms and rolling hills and woods. My property is bordered by farms, one of which has a sizeable buffalo herd. They're really beautiful to look at from a distance. Up close, they have the stupidest expression of any animal. Music-wise, there isn't much. A local listener-supported radio station started a Saturday night live country show, all local performers mostly playing early C&W and bluegrass. I may be the only Old-time country musician to have played there. Definately the only clawhammer banjoist. Most of the old-time musicians in the area live across the Delaware River in Bucks County, PA, and there are plenty of musical gatherings going on.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Dorrie
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 06:48 PM

hull rules and the musics ok


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 04:17 PM

Oh well I've moved since I last saw this thread. I am now in Roughton, a small village about 2 miles from the seaside town of Cromer on the North Norfolk (UK) coast.

I have to travel a little to get to music events, my favourite being an Irish instrumental (no singing) session in Norwich - about 30-40 minutes from here. Norwich also has a regular folk club which I attend sometimes and I go to a few other events within a similar distance as and when they crop up and I am able to get there - I quite enjoy the monthly Sheringham singaround to name one.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: GUEST,MP3-Welcome to project"Zu-Malta"(cooperation
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 03:43 PM

Hello! We - the project "Zu-Malta" (Vocal and Composer)-----Helen Malta and George Zubov. We have the big desire to cooperate with other musicants. We offer you for listening small Demo-material:

http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/272/projectzu-malta.html

If you will have desire to make "Remixes", we can send you vocals (voice) tracks or cooperate in some other image, offer the variants. With impatience we shall wait from you for the answer, Excuse for anxiety, Yours faithfully the Project "Zu-Malta" (Helen and George) we from RUSSIA E-mail : zu2ma@rambler.ru zu2ma@yandex.ru http://zu_malta.tripod.com/zu-malta/


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Mr Red
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 02:20 PM

Stroud Gloucestershire UK
Sleepy little town on the Western foothills of the Cotswolds. Centre of the "Five Vallies" leading to the Wolds.
We have a singers session once a month, a trad English music session every Monday and a Village Hall do which covers allsorts - Jazz, poetry, music and song with a dance or two thrown in. No beer but take yer own. AND a once a month ceilidh with big names in the Sunscription Rooms
cresby.com lists local things.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Celtic Soul
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 01:31 AM

Well, being near such a major metropolitan town such as the USA nations Capital, there is a *hell* of a lot of everything within a stones throw. And I mean anything and everything, socially, musically, and geographically.

What I like best is that it is so central to so many other places. The drive to Frederick (for festivals, shops, antiques, and music), to Baltimore (ditto), Annapolis (same), is very do-able, as is the drive to the Mountains, the ocean, historic towns and a host of other things and places.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 01:24 AM

Thanks Chip. So long ago I'd forgotten it. Feel free to start a part two if this gets clogged up.

Rick


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Chip2447
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 01:10 AM

Columbia, Missouri.
The Twilight festivals every thursday night in June and September showcase a wide variety of local talent performing on streetcorners. The University concert series brings in to town everything from Itzahk Perliman to B.B. King.
We are home to the Number one University sponsered NPR station, which happens to be the 2nd most popular station in the country. We have another community radio station here also, which plays an eclectic mixture of non standard musical formats. Blue grass, Celtic, World Woman, Jazz and blues and gospel. Both stations sponser concerts that bring in a WIDE variety of music.
There are several Renaissance Faires within easy reach, close enough to be nice day trips. Just a few miles west The Big Muddy Folk Festival is scheduled every year. There are several house concerts yearly. If you Throw in the First Night celebration and Earth day you will find nearly anything to fill your heart with tunes. OH, there's the Chez coffee house and the Music Cafe open mic nights.
Find a list of the top ten towns to live in for the past ten years or so and you'll find Columbia Mo.

Chip2447.... P.S. Rick, this was a really cool idea for a Tread. Makes vacation dreams even easier to visualize...


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Rt Revd Sir jOhn from Hull
Date: 15 Jul 01 - 12:24 AM

refesh


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Les from Hull
Date: 20 Dec 00 - 10:20 AM

Hull, Yorkshire, England

Hull is properly Kingston upon Hull since the King at the time (Edward the First, in the year 1299) bought the land for a useful seaport to help in his wars against the Scots. It's still a seaport with daily ferry connections to Europort and Zeebrugge, and quite a lot of container and bulk cargo. We used to be the biggest whaling port in the world in the first part of the 19th century, but we've grown up now. We also used to be the biggest fishing port in the world, but disagreement with Iceland and agreements with the European Community put a stop to all that. We have about a quarter million people in Hull and quite a few more in the suburbs.

We used to have a very famous folk club (Folk Union One at the Blubell), started originally by the Watersons and no doubt known to many 'catters. But that closed through lack of interest. Still, there are a couple of good clubs nearby, Nellie's in Beverley and Cottingham Folk Club. There are a few reasonable sessions and open mikes. Friday night in Hull to many of us means the Kingston, in Cumberland Street for a good general session of songs, tunes, poems and jokes.

Every year we have the Hull Shanty Festival - the UK's premier shanty festival.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Gypsy
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 10:06 PM

Ah, being in paradise. Lark in the morning just down from work, luthiers in abundance, and Luthiers Mercantile just over an hour away. Life is good in the northwest no where!


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: catspaw49
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 06:47 PM

LUKE: Sorry my Buckeye bud, but that's NEW Bremen as opposed to Bremen. I'm over in the southeast about 45 miles SE of Columbus....but I do get your way occasionally and I used to go to Indian Lake a good bit as a kid. Also used to go up to Mad Mountain before I began to value my bones.(:<))

NIGHTWING: There are quite a few 'Catters in your area including Rex Rideout, the racy kacy wild woman named WyoWoman, and the very popular and somewhat insane Lonesome EJ (Leej), who lives out in Evergreen and runs the Radio Shack store there. You're in great company, believe me.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Burke
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 05:29 PM

Clinton, NY. Named for a govenor, then president, now our senator.

Village population 2300, town: 10,000. Ten miles from Utica, NY. Oneida county population 250,000. Just a couple of miles from the river/Indian trail/canal/railroad/thruway that cuts right across the middle of the state. The foothills of the Adirondacks are just to the north. Serious Oneida Indian land claims area just to the west.

Clinton is a small college town. It still has it's town center with green, shops, churches, and firehouse. The college has a performing arts series that provides a concert @once a month. Utica has renovated old theater with a series as well and Broadway Theater League bringing in touring shows. The college has an oratorio society open to all that performs twice a year. The Young Mozart this spring.

The Methodists outgrew their church & moved to the edge of town in the 60's. Their former church on the green is an arts center providing classes, displays and a really good folk/bluegrass series. Sept.-May there are usually 2 concerts per month. For other concerts it's a trip to Syracuse & occasionally Albany or even Saratoga.

There's not a lot from the participatory point of view. We have a really small Sacred Harp group. I'd love to have the dozen from the Lawrence picture. 4-5 statewide Sacred Harp gatherings each year. I understand there are some Irish sessions in Syracuse (50 miles). The contra dance seems to have folded, but I rarely went so I can't complain.

During the summer there are lots of opportunities within a couple hours drive. Old Songs (Altamont), Falcon Ridge, Whiterhawk, Gray Fox, Pickin' in the Pasture (Lodi), Fox Family Bluegrass (Old Forge).

Bluegrass Ramble Sunday nights on the otherwise all classical all the time public radio is it.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: NightWing
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 05:16 PM

Denver, the Queen City of the Plains, sits (like Sorcha's town of Torrington, Wyoming) at the foot of the Rockies. Centered at the junction of several important rivers (okay, streams for those of you from places where you have "real" rivers *G*), the site was a main wintering camp for the Arapaho and Cheyenne Indians before the coming of the Europeans. Gold was found in Clear Creek in 1859 and that was the beginning of Denver's roller-coaster ride through history since then. As a center for mining through much of the US Rockies, it has had a serious problem with boom-and-bust economics.

The "Denver Metro Area" consists of (parts of) six counties and two dozen cities of one size or another, ranging from the City of Denver (population approximately 3/4 million) to Lakeside (population 8, at last count). The whole area has a population of around 2 million and stretches 50 miles north-to-south and, with the construction of Denver International Airport (of late infamy due to an automated baggage system that had a tendency to shred the baggages it was supposed to be carrying), about 75 miles east-to-west. The city is mostly on the rolling hills of the high plains but reaches tendrils into each of the canyons where streams run down from the mountains.

The music scene has never been what a body could call "great" though it is improving.

Swallow Hill Music Association: Denver's home for Folk and Acoustic Music. In south Denver, Swallow Hill has a great music school and sponsors lots of concerts, both at their venue and elsewhere around the city.

Brendan's: live blues every night of the week. Monday is Open Mike night.

El Chapultapec: With a name like that in this city with more Hispanics than Anglos, you'd expect Mexican music, wouldn't you? Nope, fine jazz (mostly Dixieland stuff) at least three nights a week.

Denver Symphony Orchestra: Recently did an excellent version of Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, heard on our local public radio station: KCFR, 90.1

Boulder (30 minutes to the northwest) is a long-time home for several bands beginning to be known on a wider scale than locally: Big Head Todd, Leftover Salmon, and the String Cheese Incident.

In addition, Colorado Springs (an hour south) has a growing music scene and further from the city in the mountains are several big annual jazz and bluegrass festivals.

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jim Krause
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 04:23 PM

Still didn't get one of 'em right

Lawrence Barn Dance Association

There!
Jim


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jim Krause
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 04:15 PM

Aw nuts! A couple of the blue clicky things didn't work. Lawrence Barn Dance Association

Westside Folk

Now I think they should work.
Jim


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jim Krause
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 04:09 PM

I've lived in Lawrence, Kansas for oh, I guess about sixteen years. It is the home of the University of Kansas, and so as you might guess there is quite a bit of culture connected with the University; chamber music, art galeries and museums, theater both community and University, etc. Permanent population is about 50.000 nearabouts, and student population adds maybe another 20,000. Lawrence is located right on Interstate Highway 70 between Kansas City, Missouri, and Topeka, Kansas, the state capital.

One of the attractions for me about Lawrence is that we have managed to retain a vital down town area, that is we really don't have a Mall. So, along with all the restaurants, and stores, downtown serves as the main entertainment center. On the edges of town we have the usual Wal-Mart, K-Mart sorts of stores, but downtown seems to keep going right along, anyway.

As far as music goes, you can just about find anything you want. There are college hangouts that cater to the head-banger crowd, and then there is also a well established contra dance venue, the Lawrence Barn Dance Association. The LBDA keeps Old-time music in the Kansas City-Topeka metro area alive, and helps nurture local musicianship. There is also a Sacred Harp Society chapter, the Kaw Valley Shape Note Singing Association. We are also fortunate in that the local NPR affiliate, KANU has a weekly folk/celtic/old-time/bluegrass show on Sunday afternoons, from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM hosted by Bob McWilliams. Bob also is the guiding light behind Westside Folk a venue which attracting national touring folk musicians and singer/songwriters.

All in all, I think it's a pretty good place to live.
Jim


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Peg
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 04:03 PM

Mary: what a lovely way to put it! LOL!

I am 37; so, let's see, in 1989, he would only have been in his mid-twenties I believe...

He did have a brother but I don't recall his name. His younger sister was Misty Jo, and she was around 12 in 1986...

Maybe they are all related?


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: GUEST,Mary in Kentucky
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 02:17 PM

Hi Peg,

How do I ask this tactfully...hmmmm....oh well...HOW OLD ARE YOU?

I taught HS for five years and there were three girls by that last name. (youngest, 18 years old in 1989) Would you be referring to their father? Don't know of any brothers.

I didn't live here until I was grown (or at least older), but one of my friends now was "Jeannie" in the 60's.

Mary


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Peg
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 11:30 AM

Mary:

I spent a bit of time in Bardstown and saw the Stephen Foster Story which several of my college friends appeared in...my dear college friend Ronnie "Swat" Higdon is from there; do you know him?

Jon:

Conwy is indeed lovely too, I spent two whole days there walking around, hiked out to the ruins at Deganwy, and took MANY photos of the area! I loved that castle...

Boston is not so very far from New Hampshire and you'd be most welcome for a visit! I come back to the UK in June and maybe we will meet then...

peg


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: GUEST,Aldus
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 09:35 AM

Cornwall..a celtic place just south of England..great scenery, grand music but hell in summer due to overcrowding....


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Luke
Date: 19 Dec 00 - 09:17 AM

Hey Spaw,

If you look at the map,state road 274 runs right from your town to mine. Just look to the east and you might find Rushsylvania. Thats my town. Logan Co. just past Indian lake.

Luke


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Sorcha
Date: 18 Dec 00 - 11:47 AM

THEN: Grew up in Winfield, KS, USA. Home of the Walnut Valley Bluegrass Festival. Small town of about 10,000 set in the rolling wheat country of eastern Kansas. Hot, humid and Bible Belt. Has school orchestra, Civic orchestra, Civic band, Community Theatre, Sothwestern College (Methodist Synod), Community Choir which perfoms both Elijah and Messiah every year. Was home to Mossman Guitars until Stu sold it. Sometime in (1954?) Reader's Digest did a feature on Winfield, calling it "Music Town USA"

NOW: Torrington, Wyoming. Town of 5,000 on the eastern High Plains of Wyoming, just under the foothills of the Rockies. Warm to hot in summer, COLD in winter. Low humidity. Lots of Kuntry, and lots of "kid" bands--wannabe Rockers. For Trad, there is my bunch.......and that is about it. There is a Christmas Community Choir, and a Barbershop group about 30 miles away. Town next door also used to have Civic Orchestra, but I think it went under. We have a 2 year junior college--rodeo and vet tech are the biggies.........


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Naemanson
Date: 18 Dec 00 - 11:05 AM

Trying out wines reminds me of a story from my youth if you don't mind a little thread creep here.

The ship stopped in Rhodes, Greece and our dive buddy was all excited. It seems there was a beautiful cove near a set of ancient hot springs where he wnated to dive. He organized the trip and next day we were all up and out after a hasty breakfast. We had a great time (a story all by itself) and returned to the ship too late to get any supper. We'd had no lunch. After cleaning up we were back in the liberty boat and headed ashore. We found a Greek wine garden where we bought a glass and wandered from place to place sampling the wines. Bear in mind this is on an empty stomach. But it was such a little glass.

I don't remember anything about the rest of that evening. I know I ate something that night because I had to clean it up from the floor next morning. I was barely able to stand for morning muster and spent the rest of the day on the lower level of the engine room with the dry heaves. That was when the package from home arrived with the moldy banana bread. It was a memorable experience.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Bill D
Date: 18 Dec 00 - 10:55 AM

...I am totally aware that decent wines can be had 'relatively' cheaply, but there are so many! And my proclivity is to try the variations, like I do beer. And once you are hooked on the process, it is no longer cheap! "Oh, here's an interesting little Australian wine..only $8, lets try it"..and if $8 is GOOD, what could I get for $17?? Like I said, I am fascinated by the 'best'. I tend to learn about wine at parties where I can taste the choices of others....and if I find one which is just WRONG for me, it is only an ounce or two wasted.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Naemanson
Date: 18 Dec 00 - 05:11 AM

BillD, Consumer Reports recently did an article on wines and had a list of the best. The best that they tested all went for under $10 a bottle! Enjoy!


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Amergin
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 05:16 PM

BillD, there are some good wines out there that are rather affordable. My girlfriend usually buys (except for special occasions) these tasty Californian wines for about 7 or eight dollars American....On the special occasions she buys these more expensive brands....She also is in a wine of the month club, where she gets two bottles of wine (worth altogether about 65 or more bucks) for about 40 bucks a month. For more information for anyone interested click here I learned what little I know about wine from her....

Amergin


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: MARINER
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 03:35 PM

Wexford in the south east of Ireland. We've been inhabited by the Vikings, the Normans,the English and just about anybody else who fancied their chances. As a result we're a fair mix of races here. The fact that we were also a seaport helped in the mix.Little of ancient Wexford is left , thanks to unbridled "development" over the years, but it's still a nice place to live. There is music in all of the 60+ pubs in town, organised and impromptu . The Wexford Arts Centre is the H.Q.of music in town, mainly trad and folk. Every musician prominent in that field has played Wexford some time in their career.One of the main music pubs is called "The Sky and the Ground" after a song title by local man Pierce Turner. Just last night another local man Larry Kirwan, of New York based Celtic Rockers "Black 47" gave his first solo concert in the Arts Centre, a mighty night was had by all. For further info on Wexford visit southeastradio.ie and browse through the links.(sorry I can't do blue clickys)


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Bill D
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 03:03 PM

Like chocolate, beer, oatmeal, wine, coffee or rice, there are local favorites, fancier products and more expensive production methods for whiskey......I never liked ANY whiskey till I discovered the better Irish & Scotch, but since then I have learned that super quality Bourbons do exist...like wise with Rums, Gins...etc...my problem is that I almost always prefer the best!...So I never even tried learning much about wine, as I could NEVER afford to do it right!

I can barely stand cheap canned grocery store coffee, will NOT drink Budweiser beer (or almost any beer of that type) can't stomach 98% of blended Scotch, and will ignore cheap chocolate if I something good is available. I think that in my case, being a gourmet snob actually saves me money, as I sip, nibble and hoard rather than guzzle and gobble.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: sophocleese
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 02:38 PM

Hey catspaw and Jon I ain't offended. When I drink whisky I usually have single malt. I don't like any Canadian whisky that I've tried and the day after I had my first taste, a little out of my father's glass, of Jack Daniels I ended up in hospital having my appendix removed. Scotch seems safer to me.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 01:04 PM

On summer nights here in Bardstown you can actually smell the mash from the local distilleries making bourbon. We call it the "Bardstown Smell." If anyone is interested in a special label on their bottle of Maker's Mark, it can be obtained here. (This bottle made especially for...) I have tons of stories about the local whiskey-making, etc., but we really should keep this thread about music!


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: catspaw49
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 12:59 PM

At the risk of insulting my Canajun brethren, I gotta' agree with you Jon!

I have always had a strong preference for bourbon and corn whiskey.....which probably explains why I also have generally found most 'Shine pretty drinkable.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 12:52 PM

Mary, I can think of 4 countries that are well known for producing whiskey (or whisky - there is no "e" in the scotch spelling).

I am not well up on definitions but a Scottish malt is made from barley as it the Irish (who I believe distil twice). I have just read that Bourbon must contain 51% corn,the rest of the grain being made up of wheat, barley and rye. This probably explains the different flavour and why someone could have strong preferences towards Bourbons or Scotch/ Irish. The 4th country I can think of is Canada. I don't know what grain they use but I was very dissapointed with the only Canadian Whiskey (Canadian Club) that Ihave tried.

I have heard it said that there is a Welsh Wiskey but I have yet to come accross it.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 12:28 PM

I thought there was just ONE whiskey, BOURBON!

Spaw, various airlines have learned that when they have flights in or through Kentucky, all they need to stock is beer and bourbon!

Jon, I think the official claim is that of making the finest bourbon in the world...but like I said above, I thought there was just ONE whiskey!


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: catspaw49
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 11:35 AM

As you say Jon, a matter of taste.........But the finest BOURBONS come from Mary's stomping grounds. No doubt about it!!!

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Dave (the ancient mariner)
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 11:34 AM

I live in Bedford Nova Scotia. Three principal towns make up our community. Dartmouth, Halifax and Bedford. For those of you who may wish to see click here


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 11:20 AM

Mary I'd be very careful with the claim to making the finest whiskey in the world! IMO, the finest whiskys are single malts from Scotland (I like the peaty Islay malts best of all) then the Irish come in second place... Personal taste of course.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 11:09 AM

...oops, I left out the most important link. Bardstown


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 11:04 AM

I live in Bardstown, Kentucky, population ~7,0000, pretty much in the center of Kentucky. The town is most famous for "My Old Kentucky Home" or Federal Hill, the home which is one of the primary symbols of Kentucky, along with race horses and bourbon whiskey. We're also known as the "Bourbon Capitol of the World" and have a long history of making the finest whiskey in the world. This small town lost more men (per capita) in the Vietnam War than any other town in the US. We still get a lot of national attention on every anniversary. Bardstown was recently listed in Norman Crampton's book as one of the 100 Best Small Towns in America.

We're considered part of the Bluegrass Region, with gently rolling hills and yes, blue grass. The Knobs Area (funny-shaped tall hills) starts just to the west of us. For those that don't know Kentucky geography, Eastern Kentucky has the Appalachian Mountains, and Western Kentucky has flat farming land with deep coal fields.

Because of our central location and proximity to Louisville, the largest city in the state (we're actually a commonwealth), we have about any kind of music you'd like to hear. JamesJim is involved in some plans for performances and radio programs in Louisville, so I'll try to get him to tell us all about it. Bardstown is the home of Kentucky Music Week. You can read all about it and Kentucky Music Weekend here. (I heard Bill Staines and Jean Ritchie at the Weekend last August.) I go to Louisville to attend performances by Kentucky Opera, one of the finest companies in the US. I also travel to Lexington to visit my sons and go to events at the University of Kentucky, and listen to a full day of Bluegrass music on the radio. There's also a big country music scene in Lexington. Of course, you can hear Stephen Foster songs at The Stephen Foster Story here in Bardstown, an outdoor musical designed to get tourist's to spend their time and money here!


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Naemanson
Date: 17 Dec 00 - 12:29 AM

October 2001 I guess we have to have a rematch at Barry's house. Or Bat Goddess' House. Or Jeri's house. Or...

Someone will be hosting Jon and we will have to be there.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 16 Dec 00 - 11:00 PM

Thanks Rick - I just hope Bonnie is playing her clear headed banjo if I get to Toronto!!!

Rowana, I hope I do meet you here some day.

Caitrin, good to see you back.

Jon


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 16 Dec 00 - 10:51 PM

Jon, yer welcome anytime.

Thanks Paw, I was hoping you'd give a description of your turf.

Rick


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 16 Dec 00 - 10:34 PM

Well Rick, it could work out the other way round and I end up in Toronto! My parents have promised to help me fund a short holiday in North America which I am hoping to take September or October next year.

My first and most important aim is to finaly get to meet a very good friend from New Hampshire but I am not sure what I do from there. Heading North and meeting some of the Toronto people is certainly one of my desires but maybe I go to the Getaway or something and hope to meet more Mudcatters in one event.

Anyway, at the moment, this is mostly a dream but I will have so little time and so many people I would love to have the chance to meet...

Jon


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Hotspur
Date: 16 Dec 00 - 10:16 PM

Albany, NY. The capital of New York State, Halfway between Montreal and New York City. It's on the Hudson River, and was founded by the Dutch East India Company. It is the oldest chartered city in the U.S. Population is about 100,000. It's a fairly green and friendly city, I think. It is home to four colleges, State University at Albany being the largest.

The music scene is variable. There are a couple of "traditional pubs." The biggest folk event actually happens in a little town called Altamont, a few miles west of the city. This would be the Old Songs Festival of which many of you are already aware. Altamont is also home to Andy's Front Hall, which is a fabulously fabulous traditional music, recording and instrument store. There is also an organization called the Eighth Step, which brings in good concerts. They recently moved out of the city into a suburb though.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Matt_R
Date: 16 Dec 00 - 09:49 PM

Cool, that's him alright. He lives at the Catholic Newman Center, where I hang out more and more these days. He's now subjected to me and buddy Ryan singing in the house---loudly.


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Subject: RE: Tell us about your town...and the music.
From: Caitrin
Date: 16 Dec 00 - 09:44 PM

I missed y'all being in Boone? Argh! Thanks for all the welcomes back. And yes, Matt, I know Chrisschnur! Tell him Katie says Hi.


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